Ethnic Studies 114: 3 Units

ASIAN AMERICANS & GLOBALIZATION

 

SPRING 2012

Professor: James Sobredo, Ph.D.
Lecture/Discussion: ETHN_114_84467_Tues.Thr. 9 - 10:15 am, ARC 1008

Office Hours: Amador Hall 563A, Hours. Tues.12:00 – 1:20 pm & 3-4:30 pm
    *Every 2nd Fri. of MONTH = Friday, 10:00 am - 1 pm (no office hours on Tues.)
Telephone: (916) 278-7566 & Web Address: http://www.csus.edu/aas/sobredo

CATALOG DESCRIPTION

                                                                                                                                                           

ETHN 114. Asian Americans and Globalization. An examination of the Asian American immigration within the context of the larger Asian global migration. Emphasis will be placed on the period from the 16th century to contemporary Asian global migration. A critical examination of the perspectives on the Pacific region and how the economic, social, political and historical forces affected migration and the formation of Asian global communities. 3 units.

 

*Fulfills the GE Requirement for Area D1B: World Cultures (3 units).
No prerequisites.

 

 

*DROPPING Prof. Sobredo’s ETHN or any class at Sac State:
The Professor is NOT responsible for ADDING or DROPPING you
from this course or any other course. It is YOUR RESPONSIBILITY to file the appropriate paper work with the Registrar’s Office to add or drop Dr. Sobredo’s ETHN or any other class.
* For more INFO on dropping individual classes, see: http://www.csus.edu/acad/faq/drp.stm

 

Course Description

 

 

The General Education Area D1b World Cultures objectives of this course to:

 

1.                    Exposes students to an analysis of political, social, and economic institutions of societies other than the United States. [In the case of western or central Europe, this analysis should not be limited to a single country.]

2.                    May include a historical component. [The primary emphasis of the course is on the 20th century, with significant attention to the post-1945 period, thus emphasizing the "contemporary" nature of this category.]

3.                    Is broad in scope and not limited to one institution or social process.

4.                    Develops an understanding of and appreciation for the diversity of the human community.

5.                    Presents the contributions and perspectives of women; persons from various ethnic, socio-economic, and religious groups, gays and lesbians; and persons with disabilities. [At least two of these groups should be included in the course.]

6.                    Includes a writing component described on course syllabus.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

 

The objectives of this specific course are to:

 

1.                    Provide students with an understanding and analysis of Asian migration within a global context (GE objectives 2, 4 & 5).

2.                    Examine and analyze the social, economic, and political context within which Asian migration and community formation occurs (GE objectives 1-5).

3.                    Understand the similarities and differences of the migration experience of Asians globally (GE objectives 1-5).

4.                    Provide students with analytic and critical thinking skills and how to apply them in analyzing social, economic and political phenomenon (GE objectives 1-2, 4-6).

5.                    Provide students with skills to plan and conduct social science research ((GE objectives 4-6).

6.                    Improve writing skills so students can more effectively communicate their ideas and interpretations of scholarly literature (1-2, 4-6).

 

By the end of the class, students will be able to:

 

1.                    Understand how globalization causes Asian global migration.

2.                    Describe the social, economic and political institutions in Asian countries and how they cause Asian migration.

3.                    Describe the global migration patterns of Asian migrations—from their countries of origin to their countries of destination.

4.                    Compare and contrast the immigration experience and settlement of Asians globally with that of Asian American immigrants.

5.                    Compare and contrast the unique immigration experience and settlement of Asian women globally.

6.                    Utilize and apply social science theory through the research and writing of Asian American history.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

In order to pass the class, students must complete all the midterms, the majority of the essay writing assignments, and oral history projects. Students are also expected to attend all the class lectures, arrive to class on time, participate in the majority of the on-line class activities and discussions, and are responsible for all the readings and lectures. ETHN 114 students are required to have a CSUS e-mail account (free too all CSUS students) and participate in all the class activities and discussions.

 

No special materials needed other than the course textbook, notebook for notes, internet/computer access, your CSUS e-mail account, and your listening and thinking skills.

 

 

 

ASSESSMENT & GRADING

2 Midterm Exams

200 pts

2 Midterms (100 pts each): T or F, multiple-choice, fill-in-the-blanks, and short essay (500 words).

Oral History Project

50 pts

Oral History interview, narrative, & photos.

(a)   Oral History Narrative [20 pts]: 1,200 words (minimum), single-spaces (do a word count on your computer and write down the number of words). *Due: Last day of class, IN CLASS at beginning of class time.

(b)   Transcript [20 pts]: 5 full pages of transcript, single-spaced, typed—see online example. *Due: Last day of class, IN CLASS at beginning of class time.

(c)    Photos [10 pts]: provide 5 photos (color photo copies) with appropriate captions & explanations (who, what, where, when, why/how). *Due: Last day of class, IN CLASS at beginning of class time.

NOTE: If the person you are interviewing cannot sign a consent form or provide photos, then choose another interviewee.

In-Class Discussion, Short Assignments & Participation

50 pts

50 pts. CLASS DISCUSSIONS & IN-CLASS WRITING ASSIGNMENTS. 50 pts. Students will be evaluated on their small group discussion sessions, in-class writing assignments & participation.

 

Total

300 pts

 

 

GRADING SCALE   300 pts Total

300-282 points.... A, 281-270...A-, 269-260... B+, 259-250...B, 249-240... 

B-, 239-230...C+, 229-220...C, 219-210...C-, 209-179...D, 178 and below... "E" [not passing] 

EXAMS. The Multiple-choice, T/F, Fill-in-the-blanks parts of the EXAM have only ONE answer and are graded accordingly as correct or incorrect.  For the ESSAY part of the exam, I assign a letter grade to your essay, which is then converted to the corresponding number grade.

 

*Note there is a 1,500-word GE writing component (graded formal writing) required for this upper-division GE class: Two exams (500 words x 2 = 1,000 words total), Oral History narrative (1,500 words) and Transcript (5 pages). Thus, the writing component of this class exceeds the GE writing requirements.

 

*Computer literacy & database research component: Use the Library database to find and download the assigned journal article and newspaper readings: http://db.lib.csus.edu/databases/. *See Reference Librarian if you need more assistance.



LETTER GRADE

What it means as applied to your work (definition).

A

 

Exemplary achievement of the course objectives. In addition to being clearly and significantly above the requirements, work exhibited is of an independent, creative, contributory nature.

B

Superior achievement of the course objectives. The performance is clearly and significantly above the satisfactory fulfillment of course requirements.

C

Satisfactory achievement of the course objectives. The student is now prepared for advanced work or study.

D

Unsatisfactory achievement of course objectives, yet achievement of a sufficient proportion of the objectives so that it is not necessary to repeat the course unless required to do so by the academic department.

F

Unsatisfactory achievement of course objectives to an extent that the student must repeat the course to receive credit.

 

Required Texts and Course Materials

1.       Sucheng Chan, Asian Americans: An Interpretive History (Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1991).

2.       Martha Nussbaum, The Clash Within: Democracy, Religious Violence, and India’s Future (Cambridge: Harvard/Belknap Press, 2007).

3.       Rhacel Salazar Parrenas, Servants of Globalization: Women, Migration, and Domestic Work (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2001).

4.       Articles on Library Database: Articles on the reading list are available for reading or downloadable as a PDF file at the Sac State Library database: http://db.lib.csus.edu/databases/. *See Reference Librarian for assistance.

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE
COURSE OUTLINE & READINGS: 15 weeks

ASIAN AMERICANS & GLOBALIZATION

Week 1

Introduction: Defining World Trade and Globalization

 

*Introduction to the Course
*Concepts of race, ethnicity, Ethnic Studies, Asian American Studies
*Concept of world trade, global economy, globalization, global migrations, & the creation of transnational families

 

*READINGS:

 

 

 

Week 2

Context of Chinese Migration

*Examines and analyzes social, political and economic institutions in China and how the changes in these institutions caused individuals, families and kinship members of a community to migrate from rural to urban areas and finally to emigrate from China

 

*Analysis of how migrations changed the structure of traditional families, community and society

* Analysis of the effects of emigration on political and economic institutions

 

 

*READINGS:

  • “Labor Migration in Asia,” Philip L. Martin, International Migration Review, Vol. 25:1 (Spring, 1991)—the article is downloadable through the CSUS Library database.

Week 3

Chinese Migration & Settlement in Asia Pacific

*Examines and analyzes Chinese settlement patterns in the Philippines, Hawaii, and California

*Examines the social, political, economics institutions in the Philippines, Hawaii, and California and how they affected the family and community formation of Chinese

 

*READINGS

Š          Chan, pp. 3-8, 25-35, 45-51, 63-67, 81-83, 89-92, 94-98

Š          “A Comparative Study of the Assimilation of the Chinese in New York City and Lima, Peru” (Comparative Studies in Society and History, Vol. 20, No. 3, July 1978)—the article is downloadable through the CSUS Library database.

Week 4

Japanese Migration in Asia Pacific

 

*Examines and analyzes social, political and economic institutions in Japan and how the changes in these institutions caused individuals, families and kinship members of a community to migrate from Japan to Hawaii and the United States in the 20th century.

 

*READINGS: Chan, pp. 8-15, 35-38, 52-53, 68-73

 

*Review of Oral History Research Project

 

Week 5

Colonial Subjects: Korea, India, Philippines


*Examines and analyzes social, political and economic institutions in Korea, India and the Philippines and how the changes in these institutions caused individuals, families and kinship members of a community to migrate from their home countries and come to Hawaii, Canada, and the United States.

 

*READINGS:

Š          Chan, pp. 18-23, 41, 74-75, 94

Š          Chan, pp. 17-18, 25, 37, 39-41, 53, 55-57, 60

 

 

 

Week 6

Contemporary Patterns of Asian Global Migration

*Examines the major difference between pre-1965 and post-1965 Asian immigration and how these trends are also reflected globally

 

*Examines and analyzes the recent changes in global economics and politics, particularly changes that have occurred at the institutional level

 

*Examines how these changes affected individuals, families and communities in Asia and caused their out-migration

 

 

*READINGS:

Š          Timothy Fong & James Sobredo, “Asian Global Migration and Transnationalism Revisited, 16th  - 21st Century” in The Borders in Us All: Global Approaches to Three Diasporic Societies, edited by William A. Little, et al (Northridge, CA: New World African Press, 2005) *Library RESERVE

 

 

* * * Mid-term I (6th week): Tuesday, 2 October 2012 * * *

Week 7

Contemporary Transnational Chinese Diaspora (Part A)
*Examines and analyzes how globalization and recent changes in Chinese social, political and economic institutions caused the continuing migration of Chinese

 

*Examines and analyzes the social, political and economic context of the migration and community formation of Chinese entrepreneurs in the Philippines, Germany, and Italy—this section briefly examines Philippine, German and Italian societies and their social, political and economic institutions

 

 

*READINGS:

Š          "Conceptualizing Chinese Diasporas, 1842 to 1949," Adam McKeown, The Journal of Asian Studies, Vol. 58, No. 2. (May, 1999) —the article is downloadable through the CSUS Library database.

 

Week 8

Contemporary Transnational Chinese Diaspora (Part B)

*Analyzes and discusses the concept of Chinese “transnational” families, businesses and political institutions

*Examines Chinese restaurant business model, import-export industry, venture capital funding, and the new business of information technology in the Philippines, Germany and Italy

 

*Compares and contrasts the experience of Chinese entrepreneurs in the Philippines, Germany and Italy with the experience of Chinese American entrepreneurs in California. How are their social, political and economic institutions similar and/or different?

 

 

*READINGS:

Š          New Chinese Migrants in Italy,” Antonella Ceccagno, International Migration, Vol. 41:3 (2003) —the article is downloadable through the CSUS Library database.

Š          Chinese Migration to Germany: A Story Retold” (Chpt. 2) and “Chinese Restaurants: More than Just Chinese Culture” (Chpt. 6), Maggi Wai-Han Leung, in her book Chinese Migration in Germany: Making Home in Transnational Space (Frankfurt am Main: IKO-Verlag für Interkulturelle Kommunikation 2004). *Library RESERVE

Week 9

Contemporary Transnational Filipino Diaspora (Part A)

*Examines and analyzes how globalization and recent changes in Philippine social, political and economic institutions caused the continuing migration of Filipinos


*Examines and analyzes the social, political and economic context of the migration and community formation of Filipinos in Hong Kong and Italy (Rome)—this section also examines briefly Chinese (Hong Kong) and Italian societies and their social, political and economic institutions.

 

*Examines the social and economic institutions formed by Filipino women in the domestic service sector of Hong Kong and Italy (Rome)

 

*Compares and contrasts the experience of Filipino women in Italy and Hong Kong with that of Filipino women working in the domestic service industry in Los Angeles, California (Parrenas’s book). How are their social, political and economic institutions similar and/or different?

 

 

*Readings:

Š          Servants of Globalization: Women, Migration, and Domestic Work, Parrenas, “Introduction” and Chapters 1-3.

Š          “Home Cooking: Filipino Women and Geography of the Senses in Hong Kong,” Ecumene (2001, Vol. 8:3) —the article is downloadable through the CSUS Library database.

 

 

 

Week 10

Contemporary Transnational Filipino Diaspora (Part B)

*Examines and analyzes the social and economic institutions formed by Filipino women and men in Japan

 

*Examines Japan’s “underground” institution (commercial sex and “entertainment” industry and “undesirable”/hazardous labor market) and the social institutions formed by Filipino women and men in the illegal immigrant enclave of Kotobuki (Yokohama)


 

*Readings:

Š          Servants of Globalization: Women, Migration, and Domestic Work, Parrenas, Chapters 4-7.

Week 11

Indians in the Pacific (Fiji Island) (Part A)
*Examines and analyzes how globalization and recent changes in Indian social, political and economic institutions caused the continuing migration from India


*Analysis of the recent social, political and economic context of the migration and community formation of Asian Indians in the Pacific Island of Fiji—this section examines briefly Fijian society and their social, political and economic institutions.

 

*Examines and discusses the structure of the Indian caste system, the caste system’s “disintegration and reformation” in Fiji, Girmitayas, Punjabi plantation workers, and entrepreneurs from Gujarati

 

 

*READINGS:

Š          The Clash Within: Democracy, Religious Violence, and India’s Future, Nussbaum, Chapters 1-5.

Š          The Effects of Migration on the Establishment of Networks: Caste Disintegration and Reformation among the Indians of Fiji,” Elizabeth Grieco, International Migration Review, Vol. 32, No. 3 (Autumn, 1998) —the article is downloadable through the CSUS Library database.

Week 12

Indians in the Pacific (Fiji Island) (Part B)

*Examines and discusses Indo-Fijians’ secondary migration to California, New Zealand and Australia

 

*Compares and contrasts the experience of Indo-Fijians with that of Asian Indians in Northern California. How are their social, political and economic institutions similar and/or different?

 

*READINGS:

Š          The Clash Within: Democracy, Religious Violence, and India’s Future, Nussbaum, Chapters 6-10.

Š          “Migration and Transnational Families in Fiji: Comparing Two Ethnic Groups,” Carmen Voigt-Graf, International Migration, Vol. 46:4, (2008) —the article is downloadable through the CSUS Library database.

 

* * * Mid-term II (12th Week): Thursday, 15 November 2012 * * *

Week 13

Asian Immigrants in the Middle East

 (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait & Qatar) (Part A)


*Examines and analyzes the recent social, political and economic context of the migration and community formation of Indian and Filipino workers in the Middle East (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait & Qatar).

 

*Examines and analyzes Muslim society in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and Qatar and their social, political and economic institutions.

 

 

*READINGS:

Š          “Asian Women Workers in Kuwait,” Nasra M. Shah, Sulayman S. Al-Qudsi, Makhdoom A. Shah, International Migration Review, Vol. 25:3 (Autumn 1991) —the article is downloadable through the CSUS Library database.

Š          “East Asian Migration to the Middle East: Causes, Consequences and Considerations,” L. Huan-Ming Ling, International Migration Review, Vol 18:1 (Spring 1984) —the article is downloadable through the CSUS Library database.

 

 

* * * THANKSGIVING BREAK: 22-25 November 2012 * * *

Week 14

Asian Immigrants in the Middle East

 (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait & Qatar) (Part B)

 

*Analyzes and discusses social and economic institutions formed by Indian and Filipino construction workers in segregated labor camps

 

*Examines and analyzes social and economic institutions formed by Filipino and Indian women working in the domestic service sector

 

*Compares and contrasts the experience of Indians and Filipinos in the Middle East with those in California. How are their social, political and economic institutions similar and/or different?

 

 

*READINGS:

Š           “Asian Labor Migration to the Middle East,” Fred Arnold and Nasra M. Shah , International Migration Review, Vol. 18:2 (Summer, 1984) —the article is downloadable through the CSUS Library database.

Š           The Relative Economic Progress of Male Foreign Workers in Kuwait,” Sulayman S. Al-Qudsi and Nasra M. Shah, International Migration Review, Vol. 25:1 (Spring, 1991) —the article is downloadable through the CSUS Library database.

 

Week 15

Summary

 

*Compares and contrasts the experience of Asian American immigrants with those global Asian immigrants in the Asia Pacific region, Europe and the Middle East. How are their social, political and economic institutions similar and/or different?

 

*Discuss common themes and connections to globalization, global migrations and the Asian American experience

 

 

*READINGS: no readings

 


EXTRA CREDIT:

7 Oct. 2012 (11 am – 4 pm), Asian Art Museum (San Francisco): Filipino American History Celebration


20 Oct. 2012 (TBA), United Latinos political forum, CSUS University Union.


* * * CLASS ENDS: 7 December 2012 * * *

* * * ORAL HISTORY PROJECTS DUE in class * * *



 

 

CLASSROOM POLICIES

 

1.             Only medical and family emergencies will be considered as legitimate excuse by the instructor. Unless prior arrangement has been made with the class instructor, the professor does not accept late assignments.

2.             The professor does not tolerate disruptive class behavior. For example, it is disruptive to come in fashionably late, hold private conversations, let your cell phone ring or have a cell phone conversation in class (turn off your cell phone, beeper, or put it on silent).

3.             Inappropriate classroom behavior: It is disruptive to have a private conversation with other students, to walk in “fashionably” late to class (let me know ahead of time if you’re going to be late and go to the back of the class and quietly find a seat). It is disruptive to the instructor if you fall asleep in class (this particular instructor spends many long hours preparing for his class lessons)—let me know ahead of time if you work nights/evenings or have children and other pressing responsibilities.

4.             Professional Ethics. Students are expected to behave and conduct themselves in a polite and professional manner. The course instructor is to be addressed as “Dr. Sobredo” or “Professor Sobredo.”

5.             Plagiarism. The professor does not tolerate academic dishonesty--consult the CSUS Student Handbook (http://www.csus.edu/admbus/umanual/UMA00150.htm) for policies governing student conduct and responsibilities. It is the student’s responsibility to understand what plagiarism is and how to provide the appropriate and correct citation of ideas and sources that are not their own. An “F” grade will be given to any student who plagiarizes by (a) passing another person’s idea or work as theirs or (b) failing to provide to provide the appropriate citation for original theories/concepts, quotes or research data—I will also write a letter about the incident to the Dean of Student Affairs.

6.             Unless prior arrangements has been made with the professor, late work will be assessed a 20 percent reduction in grade.

7.             The instructor does not give "make-up" quizzes, exams or grade on a curve. 

9.             Do not call or email the instructor regarding homework assignments. All homework assignments are available online, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week (24/7). Should any mistakes occur regarding online postings of assignments, the instructor will make the appropriate changes and adjustments.

10.                EXTRA CREDIT: The professor will allow students no more than 1 (ONE) extra credit assignments (short paper, 2 pages minimum)—submit your work with your MIDTERM or on LAST DAY OF CLASS. [*Exceptions: no extra credit work is accepted during the shortened online and summer sessions.]

11.                Your final grade will reflect your ability to follow these classroom policies, to follow and complete class assignments, and to follow professional ethics.