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UNDERGRADUATE & GRADUATE
COURSE PROPOSALS

LIST #1 - 2005/2006

If there are no objections reported to Academic Affairs by noon on September 13, 2005 the Course Change Proposals listed below are approved as submitted.
The Curriculum Subcommittee will meet on Tuesday, September 13, 2005, at 1:30 in SAC 275 to review the Course Change Proposals contained in this list.

 List #1 Program Proposals are located at
http://www.csus.edu/acaf/policies/prgmlst.stm
for your review.

List #1 of Program Proposals to be reviewed by CPSP
(Council on the Preparation of School Personnel) is
located at http://www.csus.edu/acaf/policies/cpsplst.stm

 List #1 CCE Program & Course Proposals are located at
http://www.csus.edu/acaf/Policies/ccelist.stm

IMPORTANT NOTICE

Friday, September 23, 2005

Deadline for Submission of Course and Program Proposals (new, changes or deletions) to Academic Affairs for Inclusion in the
2006/08 Catalog


Course Change Proposals:
Past Program Change Proposal Lists:



COLLEGE OF ARTS & LETTERS

Department of History

NEW COURSE

HISTORY 180 American Legal History. E xamines the interaction of law, society, and politics in America from the colonial period to the present, with special emphasis on law as an arena of social and cultural conflict. Major topics include the development of the common law in early America ; the law of slavery and its impact on constitutional development; the role of the law in defining controversies over race and gender; legal thought and education; and the role of the Supreme Court in 20 th century America. 3 units.

Justification: The study of the historical development of law and the American legal system is an important subfield in American history. It is important to note that history is a popular major among pre-law students, so we expect that a history of law in America will become a popular course particularly among students interested in pursuing a career in law. The history department does not at this time offer a course devoted to the origins and development of law within the context of social, cultural and economic history. Studying the development of the American legal system is necessary for understanding how the United States political and legal system operates today. By examining the various ways in which law has been applied in the past, this course will also add to (while complementing) other approaches to history presently taught at CSUS, including the History of American Capitalism and the History of American Labor.
Note: Cross listed with GOVT 121.

HISTORY 181 The South, Slavery and the American Nation, 1600-1890. Study of interactions between slaves, planters, free blacks, Native Americans, women, small farmers, and townspeople from colonial times through the Civil War. Examines the origins and effects of racism and slavery; the institutions created to sustain and extend slavery, especially in the U.S. South; and its destruction in the midst of the Civil War. Explores the way slavery shaped regional and national identities, developments, and events. 3 units.

Justification: The study of slavery has been one of the more vibrant subfields in American history. In southern North America during this time (1600-1890) slavery rose to preeminence and subsequently fell apart in the midst of the bloodiest war in American history. Yet, the history department does not at this time include a course devoted to slavery and its place within the South and the American nation. Studying the rise and fall of American slavery is necessary for understanding race in the United States, political developments, societal interaction between diverse people, and the evolution of American institutions generally. This course will also add to (while complementing) other regional and ethnic approaches to history presently taught at CSUS, including the American West and African-American history.

Department of Philosophy

COURSE CHANGE

PHIL 122 Political Philosophy.   A philosophical examination of the individual, the community, and rights; the conflict between individual rights and the common good; various conceptions of justice, equality, liberty and the public good; and the relationship of politics to ethics, economics, law; war and peace. 3 units.
Justification:

PHIL 125 Philosophy of Science.   Study of the philosophical problems that arise in the sciences: the nature of scientific reasoning, the limits and styles of explanation, identifying pseudoscience, values in science, unity and diversity of the sciences, and science's impact on our world view. 3 units.
Justification: To update course description and make more informative.

PHIL 131 Philosophy of Religion.   Introduction to philosophical theology, the philosophical study of religious assertions, arguments, and beliefs: the existence and nature of God; the rationality of religious belief; the relation of faith to reason; the problem of evil; immortality and resurrection; the possibility of miracles; the meaning of religious language. Course will include both traditional and contemporary approaches. 3 units.
Justification: To update course description and make more informative.

PHIL 154 Philosophy of Language.   Study of philosophical issues concerning language: theories of the nature of linguistic meaning, in particular those involving the concepts of sense, reference, truth conditions, intention, convention, speech act, and force. Topics include the relation between meaning and reference to objects, and between meaning and mental processes. Emphasis on contemporary views, including views on the promise of a theory of language to shed light on fundamental philosophical problems in metaphysics and the philosophy of mind. 3 units.
Justification: To update course description and make more informative.

PHIL 190K Seminar: Kant's Critical Philosophy.   Study of important works of Immanuel Kant. We will examine Kant's contributions to epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics and consider his analyses of the concepts of space, time, self, God, freedom, immortality, causation, reality, and knowledge. We will also consider Kant's reactions to his rationalist and empiricist predecessors, and his impact on contemporary philosophy. Prerequisite: 6 units in philosophy or instructor permission. 3 units.
Justification: To update course description and make more informative.
Prerequisite: 6 units in philosophy or instructor permission.

NEW COURSE

PHIL 192M Seminar on Mearning and Reference.  Advanced topics in the philosophy of language. Topics include: sense and reference, meaning and force, intentions vs conventions, conditions for sameness of sense, conditions for successful reference, propositional content, indexical and demonstrative reference, and the semantics of propositional attitude and perceptual reports. 3 units.

Justification: The Philosophy Department’s growth in majors, and a seminar requirement in the Applied Ethics and Law Concentration have increased the need to offer seminars on important philosophical themes. The philosophical issues involving meaning and reference include issues in the study of which would greatly enrich the major. This course would be offered as a seminar in Spring 2006.
Prerequisite: 6 units in philosophy or instructor permission.

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Current and New MBA Course Numbers

Current and New MBA Course Numbers

Foundation Courses

Current Course Number

New Course Number

ACCY 201

MBA 201

OBE 202

MBA 202

OBE 203

MBA 203

OBE 204

MBA 204

MIS 206

MBA 206

MGMT 207

MBA 207

MGMT 208

MBA 208

MGMT 209

MBA 209

Core Courses

Current Course Number

New Course Number

ACCY 240

MBA 210

MGMT 234

MBA 220

OBE 252

MBA 230

MGMT 223

MBA 240

MIS 271

MBA 260

MGMT 222

MBA 270

MGMT 280

MBA 280

Culminating Experience

Current Course Number

New Course Number

MGMT 290

MBA 290

MGMT 500A, OBE 500A

MBA 500A

MGMT 500B, OBE 500B

MBA 500B

MGMT 500C

MBA 500C

Finance Concentration

Current Course Number

New Course Number

MGMT 235

MBA 221

MGMT 236

MBA 222

MGMT 237

MBA 223

MGMT 239

MBA 224

MGMT 233

MBA 225

Human Resources Management Concentration

Current Course Number

New Course Number

OBE 253

MBA 231

OBE 255

MBA 232

OBE 257

MBA 233

OBE 258

MBA 234

Marketing Concentration

Current Course Number

New Course Number

MGMT 224

MBA 241

MGMT 225

MBA 242

MGMT 226

MBA 243

Urban Land Development Concentration

Current Course Number

New Course Number

OBE 243

MBA 251

OBE 244

MBA 252

OBE 248

MBA 253

Supervisory Courses

Current Course Number

New Course Number

MGMT 294

MBA 294

MGMT 295A

MBA 295A

MGMT 295B

MBA 295B

MGMT 295C

MBA 295C

OBE 295A

MBA 295D

OBE 295B

MBA 295E

MGMT 296, OBE 296

MBA 296

MGMT 299A

MBA 299A

MGMT 299B

MBA 299B

MGMT 299C

MBA 299C

OBE 299A

MBA 299D

OBE 299B

MBA 299E

Elective Courses

Current Course Number

New Course Number

MGMT 210

MBA 244

MGMT 260

MBA 281

MGMT 283

MBA 282

MGMT 284

MBA 235

OBE 259

MBA 236

 

Department of Organizational Behavior and Environment

COURSE CHANGE

OBE 151 Special Topics in Human Resource Management. Designed to provide an in-depth examination of a current human resource management topic(s), from both a theoretical and practitioner perspective. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, outsourcing and staffing trends, merit-based performance and compensation plans, technology-based recruiting and selection practices, and innovations in training and career development. Instructional method provides for case method, group discussion, industry guest speakers, and classroom exercises. 3 units.

Justification: While Diversity and Management is a special topic in HR the title and course description change allow for other topics to be taught as well on a rotating basis to better provide knowledge on HR topics.

OBE 154 Management Skills Seminar. Development of management awareness of the dynamics of organizational behavior. Emphasis on case discussions, small group action and role playing for the acquisition of knowledge and skills for effective managing and changing in an organization. 3 units.

Justification: The word “knowledge” is a better and more definitive choice to convey what is addressed in the course than the more ambiguious “attitudes”.

Prerequisite: OBE 150.

OBE 156 Current trends and Emerging Issues. Designed to provide an in-depth examination of current trends and emerging issues in human resources management and/or organizational behavior. Provides the opportunity to better understand the latest people-related challenges organizations face. Instructional method provides for case method, group discussion, industry guest speakers, and classroom exercises.
3 units.

Justification: While compensation is one area of issue and concern in HR the new title allows for other areas an issues to be addressed on a rotating schedule as well giving both faculty and students the opportunity to address a wider array of topics and issues.

OBE 157 Labor Relations. Employer-employee relations in historical and contemporary contexts, with emphasis on the development of labor and management institutions and philosophies, public policies, collective bargaining, and contract administration in the private and public sectors. 3 units.

Justification: The change in title was to reflect the more usual usage of the term “Labor Relations”.

OBE 158 Employment Law. An overview of the employment laws that impact and influence the workplace including laws regarding employment discrimination, disability discrimination and accommodation, employment leaves of absence, workplace harassment, employment torts and contracts, wage/hour regulations, employee privacy, intellectual property in the employment setting, and other emerging issues in employment law and personnel management. The impact of law on the management of human resources will be the focus of this class. 3 units.

Justification: The focus on labor and employment law was considered too broad and considering that the vast majority of our graduates find jobs locally the focus on giving students a good overview of employment law especially in California was considered more critical. Labor Law may be taught as a special topic elective.

OBE 160 Strategic Human Resources Management. Identifying contemporary strategies to improve individual and organizational performance. Utilizes a strategic human resource management perspective and incorporate Human Resource Management and Organizational Behavior theories for practical implementation in organizations. Linking such concepts as compensation, performance management, law, conflict management, communication, diversity, ethics, and managerial skill building towards preparing for the future of managing individuals in organizations. 3 units.

Justification: The title and focus of the course has changed to reflect the more strategic orientation of the HR function which in contemporary organizations is part of the organizational change and development process.

Prerequisites: OBE 153, OBE 154, OBE 158.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Department of Bilingual/Multicultural Education

COURSE CHANGE

EDBM 104 Multicultural Education for a Pluralistic Society. An introductory study of the social and cultural conditions that influence education. Examination of the pervasive influence of culture, the importance of understanding one’s own cultural background and experiences, as well as those of diverse groups. Specific sociocultural dimensions including race and ethnicity, language, social class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, age, and exceptionality will be examined. Examination of strategies to effectively promote intercultural interaction, intergroup communication, conflict resolution, and social justice in the university classroom, the campus community and the larger society. 3 units.

Justification: The Bilingual/Multicultural Education Department (BMED) has revised course content, course sequencing and course names as well as created new courses in order to better meet the needs of California’s diverse populations. As a result of the California’s demographic changes related to language, cultural, and ethnic diversity, we would like to offer this course as an upper division elective for undergraduate students interested in learning about the social and cultural conditions that influence human behavior and impact education. It is also intended to assist students with understanding diversity and how to interact and relate effectively in the university classroom and society to promote pluralism, equity and effective intergroup communication and interaction.

Note: Students enrolled in EDBM 104 will not be able to enroll and receive credit for EDBM 105.

EDBM 105 Multicultural Education for the Future (K-12) Educator. An introductory study of the social and cultural conditions that influence education, while supporting students in understanding diversity and strategies to use this knowledge effectively as future K-12 public school educators. Students will examine the pervasive influence of culture, the importance of understanding one’s own cultural background and experiences, as well as those of diverse groups. Specific sociocultural dimensions including race and ethnicity, language, social class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, age, and exceptionality will be examined. 3 units.

Justification: The Bilingual/Multicultural Education Department (BMED) has revised course content, course sequencing and course names as well as created new courses in order to better meet the needs of future educators. As a result of the growing demand for (K-12) public school teachers in the State of California, this course has been modified as an undergraduate, upper division elective for students interested in learning about the social and cultural conditions that influence education, to assist students with understanding diversity and how to use this knowledge effectively in the preparation for future careers as K-12 public school educators. This course is also designed to attract, recruit and prepare future educators who are themselves from diverse backgrounds and who desire to work in culturally and linguistically diverse educational environments.

Note: Students enrolled in EDBM 105 will not be able to enroll and receive credit for EDBM 104.

Department of Teacher Education

COURSE CHANGE

EDTE 433B InternTeaching II - Multiple Subject Credential: Intern Pathway. 6 units.
Justification: Changing title for clarity only.
Prerequisite: Successful Completion of EDTE 433A.

NEW COURSE

EDTE 470C Internship Teaching : Secondary Schools. Required for candidates in internship assignments in their final semester of the Single Subject Program while concurrently enrolled in program integrated coursework. Interns will be full-time teachers with district and university teaching and assessment responsibilities. The primary focus of the Intern will be the “cycle of teaching”: plan, teach, assess, reflect, and plan.17 units.

Justification: The University supervised internship course is established to meet the expanded expectations and assessments of the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) “Standards of Quality and Effectiveness for Professional Teacher Preparation Programs” and “Teaching Performance Expectations” per legislative action, SB 2042 for Intern Teachers. This final supervised teaching experience is four units more than the final student teaching course (ED TE 470B) for Phase III Single Subject student teachers to accommodate the increased responsibilities of a full-time teaching Intern.

Prerequisite: The successful completion of Student Teaching I (EDTE 470A) and program courses leading to the final semester of the Single Subject Credential Program and approval for an internship position.

Corequisite: Enrolled in final semester of Single Subject Teaching Credential Program

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING & COMPUTER SCIENCE

Department of Civil Engineering

COURSE CHANGE

CM 021 Construction Graphics.
Instruction and exercises in graphic techniques and procedures applicable to construction. The analysis of drawings in the civil, architectural, structural, mechanical and electrical field and how drawings affect construction planning. Freehand sketching. Isometric and oblique presentations. Quantity surveying. Laboratory nine hours. 2 units.

Justification: The delivery mode of the class is changed from three-lab format to two lectures and one lab (no unit change). This change will strike a better balance between the number of credits students receive and the number of classroom hours they are required to attend. Previously, students were required to attend 9 contact hours (3 lab sessions) for a two-unit class. Under the new format the contact time will be reduced to 5 hours. The course content will not change significantly, though some of the assignments will be adjusted. Students will be expected to do more work outside the class room. We think they are capable of doing that and that they will appreciate the increased flexibility in their schedules allowed by the fewer scheduled lab hours.

Prerequisite: CM 020, competence in mechanical drawing.

Department of Computer Science

COURSE CHANGE

CSC
131 Computer Software Engineering. Principles of Software Engineering covering the software development life cycle, including software requirements engineering (elicitation, modeling, analysis and specification), software design, software implementation and testing. Main topics include various software development process models, method and techniques for specifying requirements, architectural and detailed design specification, prototyping, top-down and bottom-up software implementation and testing. Topics also include project management, project documentation and the development of communication skills through written documentation and oral presentation. 3 units.

Justification: Course description has been changed primarily to include the development of communication skills. This change was made in response to a weakness identified in our curriculum by our accreditation agency.

Prerequisite: CSC 130; may be taken concurrently.

NEW COURSE

CSC
180 Intelligent Systems. Theory and implementation of a variety of techniques used to simulate intelligent behavior. Expert systems, fuzzy logic, neural networks, evolutionary computation, and two-player game-tree search will be covered in depth. Knowledge representation, pattern recognition, hybrid approaches, and handling uncertainty will also be discussed. 3 units.

Justification: Artificial Intelligence (AI) is an important facet of Computer Science, and examines methods used to simulate intelligent behavior using computers. There is currently no such undergraduate course at CSUS. The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) recommends 10 hours of AI within the CSC B.S. core; CSUS covers that material in non-AI courses. Many universities also include a 3-unit elective course for those students wishing to do further AI study, and many of the topics that such a course would cover are recommended elective material according to the ACM guidelines. CSUS has AI courses at the graduate level, but not at the undergraduate level. The proposed course in Intelligent Systems focuses on those areas of AI which have practical application for entry-level programmers, and can reasonably be implemented by undergraduates. There exist various textbooks appropriate for such a course, focusing on neural networks, expert systems, evolutionary computation, fuzzy logic, and adversarial search. The CSC department has for many years recognized the need for more AI coverage at the undergraduate level. As such, this course was offered experimentally as CSc-196L for the past two years. It proved not only popular, but was the highest-rated upper division undergraduate course in the department, according to student evaluations in Fall 2004.

Prerequisite: CSC 130, 132, Math 31, Stat 50

Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

COURSE CHANGE

EEE 230 Analog and Mixed-Signal Integrated Circuit Design .
Covers core topics and circuits important for analog and mixed-signal integrated circuits. Topics include: device structures and models, single-stage and differential amplifiers, current mirrors and active loads, operational amplifier design, stability and compensation, fully-differential circuits and common-mode feedback, noise in integrated circuits and the impact of IC processes on analog performance. 3 units.

Justification: This is a change in course number & content for the existing EEE235 class, in order to align it with the new EEE graduate program core area designations. Adjustments in course content are being made to better serve as the core course for the Microelectronics Design area.

Prerequisite: EEE 109 or consent of the instructor.

COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Department of Criminal Justice

COURSE CHANGES

CR J 021 Freshman Seminar.
3 units.
Justification.
These courses have already been taught for the past three years as HHS 021 classes in the College of Health and Human Services. At a recent meeting of the Administrative Council for HHS, it was decided that the HHS 021 classes will be changed to the departments/divisions.

NEW COURSE

CR J 161B Contemporary Issues in Policing .
3 units.
Justification.
This change reflects the course description better than the previous course title. This is not an administration course but an examination of critical issues in contemporary policing.

Prerequisite: CrJ 110 and 167.

Department of Kinesiology and Health Science

COURSE CHANGE

KINS 044 Intermediate Tae Kwon Do.
An emphasis will be placed on Tae Kwon Do intermediate skills including transition to dynamic movement through patterns, forms, and drills, including training intensity and conditioning. Instruction in a variety of intermediate kicks and blocks commonly used in competitive training. An extended knowledge of the philosophical aspects of Tae Kwon Do including the influence of the Asian culture will be explored. Instruction includes mental and physical exercises geared toward self defense. 1 unit.

Justification. Catalog description change is to reflect the content of the course (unsubstantial).
Prerequisites are being removed to follow the format of other intermediate activity classes.

Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies

NEW COURSE

RLS 021 Freshman Seminar.
3 units.

Justification. This course has already been taught as HHS 021 in the College of Health and Human Services. At a recent meeting of the Administrative Council for HHS, it was decided that the HHS 021 classes will be changed to the departments/divisions.

Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology

NEW COURSE

SPHP 021 Freshman Seminar.
3 units.

Justification. These courses have already been taught for the past three years as HHS 021 classes in the College of Health and Human Services. At a recent meeting of the Administrative Council for HHS, it was decided that the HHS 021 classes will be changed to the departments/divisions.

Nursing Division

NEW COURSE

NURS 021 Freshman Seminar.
3 units.
Justification.
These courses have already been taught for the past three years as HHS 021 classes in the College of Health and Human Services. At a recent meeting of the Administrative Council for HHS, it was decided that the HHS 021 classes will be changed to the departments/divisions.

 

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
AND INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Department of Family and Consumer Sciences

COURSE DELETION

FACS 60 Professional Development in Family and Consumer Sciences . 1 unit.
Justification: Delete FACS 60 from the FACS curriculum. The information presented in FACS 60 will be integrated into a proposed revised version of FACS 168 (Senior Seminar). The proposed revision will increase the number of units given for FACS 168 from 2 units to 3 units. Due to this revision, FACS 60 will no longer be needed.

NEW COURSE

FACS 130 History of Fashion. A study of dress in Western civilization from ancient times through the present. An interdisciplinary approach is used to examine how clothing communicates values displayed by the individual and functions as a reflection of trends in technology, political events, social ideals, and cultural developments such as art and music. Emphasis on the contributions and perspectives of women as well as differing roles in the production, dissemination, and consumption of clothing in relation to socioeconomic groups. Lecture discussion. 3 units.

Justification: The new course FACS 130 will combine content from two courses currently offered, FACS 130A -History of Costume and FACS 130B-Contemporary Costume. There is some overlap between the two courses and FACS 130 is designed to strengthen the connections from early periods to our post-modern era. The integration of the content of these two courses will be more effective in achieving the course outcomes and is consistent with the curriculum approach of the majority of academic programs related to textiles and clothing across the United States.

COURSE DELETIONS

FACS130A History of Western Costume. 3 units.

Justification: Contingent on the acceptance of FACS 130-History of Fashion as a new course, FACS 130A will no longer be needed in the Apparel Marketing and Design curriculum. The new course FACS 130 will combine content from two courses currently offered, FACS 130A -History of Costume and FACS 130B-Contemporary Costume. There is some overlap between the two courses and FACS 130 is designed to strengthen the connections from early periods to our post-modern era. The integration of the content of these two courses will be more effective in achieving the course outcomes and is consistent with the curriculum approach of the majority of academic programs related to textiles and clothing across the United States.

FACS130B Contemporary Costume. 3 units.

Justification: Contingent on the acceptance of FACS 130-History of Fashion as a new course, FACS 130B will no longer be needed in the Apparel Marketing and Design curriculum. The new course FACS 130 will combine content from two courses currently offered, FACS 130A -History of Costume and FACS 130B-Contemporary Costume. There is some overlap between the two courses and FACS 130 is designed to strengthen the connections from early periods to our post-modern era. The integration of the content of these two courses will be more effective in achieving the course outcomes and is consistent with the curriculum approach of the majority of academic programs related to textiles and clothing across the United States.

COURSE CHANGE

FACS 168 Advanced Clinical Nutrition. Designed to synthesize knowledge in Family and Consumer Sciences. Examination of the concentration in the major and career exploration. Analysis of public policy and ethical issues, professionalism and leadership strategies. Includes personal and professional competency assessment, and development of an academic and professional portfolio. 3 units.

Justification: FACS 168, Senior Seminar will be increased to a 3-unit course to integrate the contents of FACS 60, Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences, a 1-unit course that is recommended for deletion. Senior Seminar will thus incorporate the career exploration, personal and professional competency assessment components from FACS 60. The course description has also been amended to reflect this change. Increasing the units will provide students with additional time for career exploration and preparation at a more appropriate time during their senior year. The prerequisites will change from 21 FACS units, including FACS 160, to Senior Standing because the electronic portfolio requires samples from upper division courses that the seniors would have completed.

Prerequisite: Senior Standing.

Department of Government

COURSE CHANGE

GOVT 249A Middle East Politics and the United States. A graduate introduction to politics and governments of the Middle East and the impact of the United States foreign policy in the region. Relying on a comparative frame to tease out the causes of intrastate and interstate conflicts in the region, as well as the effects of the American foreign policy on the contemporary political trends in the Middle East, including those relating to the Arab-Israeli conflict, Islamic political resurgence, and terrorism. 3 units.

Justification: During the past two years since this course was approved, the graduate seminars have increasingly focused on the impact of the United States’ foreign policy on the political trends and developments in the Middle East. The shift in emphasis reflects the fact that, since the “9/11” terrorist attack, the United States has been attempting to reshape the political environment of the region. Therefore, the proposed title more accurately reflects the overall topic covered in the four 2-hour seminars scheduled for graduate students during the semester. In addition, the emphasis on the US foreign policy would permit the inclusion of this course under the “American Foreign and Domestic Policy Track” of the International Affairs program. If approved, an additional textbook and journal articles focusing on the US Foreign policy toward the Middle East shall be assigned. The proposed changes represent additions to the existing undergraduate course (GOVT 148) and, therefore, would comply with the paired course policy currently under consideration by the university Curriculum Committee.

NEW COURSE

GOVT 121 American Legal History.
Examines the interaction of law, society, and politics in America from the colonial period to the present, with special emphasis on law as an arena of social and cultural conflict. Major topics include the development of the common law in early America; the law of slavery and its impact on constitutional development; the role of the law in defining controversies over race and gender; legal thought and education; and the role of the Supreme Court in 20th century America. 3 units.

Justification. The study of the historical development of law and the American legal system is an important subfield in Public Law. We expect that a history of law in America will become a popular course particularly among students interested in pursuing a career in law. The Government Department does not at this time offer a course devoted to the origins and development of law within the context of social, cultural and economic history. Studying the development of the American legal system is necessary for understanding how the United States political and legal system operates today. By examining the various ways in which law has been applied in the past, this course will also add to (while complementing) other approaches to Public Law presently taught at CSUS, including constitutional law and jurisprudence.

Department of Interdisciplinary Studies

NEW COURSE

ID 124 Social Justice in Interdisciplinary Perspective. Social Justice is a collaborative effort to examine the nature and forms of social justice and injustice. We first address key philosophical and theoretical models and debates over the meaning of social justice, using historical and contemporary examples to highlight important concepts and controversies. During the remainder of the course, faculty from different departments within SSIS, and occasionally from other colleges, will address how their discipline understands and analyzes issues of social justice. Students will be encouraged to critically assess the assumptions of various perspectives on social justice, and to address the relationship of academe and social activism in achieving social justice. 3 units.

Justification: This offering is the outcome of a multi-departmental effort over the past two years to design a course that will complement the Harold Gladstone Fund for Social Justice that is based in The College of Social Sciences and Interdisciplinary Studies. The course will prepare students for future research sponsored by the Gladstone Fund (when it becomes available) by focusing on the theoretical and conceptual dimensions of social justice, and the empirical research that has been done in this important area. Though issues of social justice and injustice are discussed in many existing courses, there is no single course devoted specifically to this topic from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or instructor permission.

Labor Studies Program

COURSE CHANGE

LBRS 100 Labor and the American Social Structure. Introduction to the study of labor in the U.S., including the nature of work, characteristics of the work force, and an overview of contemporary labor and industrial relations systems within the framework of current U.S. economic and political developments. Cross-listed with SOC 176. Prerequisite: Passing score on the WPE. 3 units.

Justification: The department of sociology would like to cross-list with LBRS 100 as a means of providing this course a department base. As the only course with an LBRS designation in the Labor Studies Program, this course does not receive as much visibility as it will being listed in the sociology curriculum. Finally, the content of this course is consistent with the discipline of sociology and with our learning goals.

Prerequisite: Passing score on the WPE

Department of Psychology

COURSE CHANGES

PSYCH 111 Introduction to Biological Psychology. 3 units.

Justification: Title change only. “Physiological” Psychology is an older term that no longer accurately reflects the catalog course description for Psychology 111.

PSYCH 115 Introduction to Neuroscience . An introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system including neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and systems neuroscience. Lectures and readings emphasize the empirical questions, techniques, and methods used in neuroscience research. Laboratory activities focus on nervous system structure and some of the specialized techniques used within the fields of cellular, systems, and behavioral neuroscience. Lecture-discussion three hours; laboratory three hours. 4 units.

Justification: I am requesting a slight change in the course description and also a change in the recommended [not required] prerequisites. The updated description is more relevant to current issues within the field (e.g., “systems neuroscience” instead of “sensorimotor integration”, as the former term is more contemporary and also includes the latter term). The prerequisites in the catalog state that a “background in physiology and chemistry [are] strongly recommended.” I am requesting the elimination of this recommendation from the catalog, as I have found that such a background is not necessary for successful performance.

Prerequisites: PSYC 001, PSYC 008, PSYC 101.
Note: Cross-listed as BIO 115; only one may be counted for credit.

PSYCH 117 Drugs and Behavior. 3 units.

Justification: This change only affects the course title. Our department has recently added a graduate course in psychopharmacology (Psyc 220 – Psychopharmacology), which is required of our MFT students. To avoid any confusion we are changing the name of Psyc 117 to “Drugs and Behavior”, a commonly used title for this undergraduate course.

NEW COURSE

PSYCH 118 Cognitive Neuroscience. Examines how the nervous system accomplishes cognitive functioning. Brain mechanisms of higher functions such as memory, attention, sensorimotor integration, decision making, and language will be covered. 3 units.

Justification: Due to the wide range of topics within the field of neuroscience and the necessity of covering fundamental processes before advanced topics, our current neuroscience course offerings (Psyc 111 and Psyc 115) are unable to devote sufficient course time to this rapidly developing topic area. Cognitive neuroscience is the subfield of neuroscience that has been most influenced and is most relevant to the field of psychology.

Prerequisite: Psyc 111, Psyc 115, Bio 115, or Bio 132

COURSE CHANGE

PSYCH 410 Fieldwork in Clinical and Counseling Psychology. (Previously PSYCH 295F) 1 - 4 units.

Justification: The proposed change in course number better reflects the culminating nature of this course requirement and brings the numbering in line with other departments’ fieldwork courses (e.g., Counselor Education, Social Work).

Department of Sociology

COURSE CHANGES

SOC 106 Births, Deaths and Borders. 3 units.

Justification: The present title is a formal reference within the discipline that students are unfamiliar with until having taken the course. The new title reflects the material addressed in the course in a more familiar fashion without changing any component of the course.

SOC 122 Immigration Studies. 3 units.

Justification: The present title is too complex and lengthy. The new title, while still reflecting the course material, reduces the problems of the original title.

NEW COURSE

SOC 124 Social Justice in Interdisciplinary Perspective. Social Justice is a collaborative effort to examine the nature and forms of social justice and injustice. We first address key philosophical and theoretical models and debates over the meaning of social justice, using historical and contemporary examples to highlight important concepts and controversies. During the remainder of the course, faculty from different departments within SSIS, and occasionally from other colleges, will address how their discipline understands and analyzes issues of social justice. Students will be encouraged to critically assess the assumptions of various perspectives on social justice, and to address the relationship of academe and social activism in achieving social justice. 3 units.

Justification: This offering is the outcome of a multi-departmental effort over the past two years to design a course that will complement the Harold Gladstone Fund for Social Justice that is based in The College of Social Sciences and Interdisciplinary Studies. The course will prepare students for future research sponsored by the Gladstone Fund (when it becomes available) by focusing on the theoretical and conceptual dimensions of social justice, and the empirical research that has been done in this important area. Though issues of social justice and injustice are discussed in many existing courses, there is no single course devoted specifically to this topic from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or instructor permission.

COURSE CHANGES

SOC 125 Social Inequalities. Examination of the ways race, class and gender, as well as the intersection of all three, affect the distribution of valued resources in a society. Other social inequalities such as age, sexual orientation, or nationality, etc. may also be examined. Attention is given to struggles to change or preserve economic and political inequalities. Prerequisite: SOC 001 or equivalent. 3 units.

Justification: The new title change better reflects the content of the course which covers a broader range social inequalities other than class.

Prerequisite: SOC 001

SOC 133 Sport in a Global Perspective. 3 units.

Justification: With the present title, in SSIS format in catalog and class listings, the course focus of Sport in a global context is lost. The new title, which merely reorganizes the words in the title while still reflecting the course material, reduces the problems of the original title.

SOC 138 Sport in a Global Perspective. 3 units.

Justification: The identification in the present title as an introductory course is misleading, as no advanced course in environmental Sociology exists, or is intended to be implemented in the future. The new title simplifies and correctly identifies the course without changing any of the course material.

NEW COURSE

SOC 170 Sociology of Children and Adolescents. Introduces students to the sociology of childhood and adolescence, focusing on theoretical foundations, methodological challenges, and empirical examination of youth from preschool through high school. Focuses on peer relations within wider contexts shaped by gender, race, and social class. 3 units.

Justification: This course compliments current departmental course offerings in the areas of socialization and family. It meets the department learning goals focused on diversity, social change, and understanding relationships between individuals and society.

COURSE CHANGE

SOC 175 Work and Occupations. 3 units.

Justification: The present title is too complex and lengthy. The new title, while still reflecting the course material, reduces the problems of the original title.

NEW COURSES

SOC 176 Labor and the American Social Structure. Introduction to the study of labor in the U.S., including the nature of work, characteristics of the work force, and an overview of contemporary labor and industrial relations systems within the framework of current U.S. economic and political developments. 3 units.

Justification: The department of sociology would like to cross-list with LBRS 100 as a means of providing this course a department base. As the only course with an LBRS designation in the Labor Studies Program, this course does not receive as much visibility as it will being listed in the sociology curriculum. Finally, the content of this course is consistent with the discipline of sociology and with our learning goals.

Note: Cross-listed with LBRS 100.

Prerequisite: Passing score on the WPE.

SOC 194 Special Topics in Sociology. Examines contemporary issues and social developments within the research specialization of department faculty. Provides a forum to discuss and evaluate controversies and advancements in the discipline of sociology, including theory and methodology. 3 units.

Justification: This course would allow faculty with research specializations or ongoing research an opportunity to address topics that are timely and relevant to students’ lives and interests. Likewise, this course provides a forum that our curriculum currently lacks to discuss controversies and advancements in the discipline of sociology, including theory and methodologies.

Prerequisite: Sociology 1 or instructor permission.

COURSE CHANGES

SOC 214 Research Methods. .3 units.

Justification: Change SOC 216 to SOC 214. A review of our assessment data suggested that our master's students might benefit if we reversed our graduate methods sequence. After reviewing this proposal, our graduate committee has agreed that student learning goals would be enhanced if we required our students to first take the research methods design course, followed by the data analysis course. Consequently, we are proposing that the course numbers be swapped to facilitate this change.

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