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UNDERGRADUATE & GRADUATE
COURSE CHANGE PROPOSALS

LIST #1 - 2003/2004

If there are no objections reported to Academic Affairs by September 9, 2003, the course change proposals listed below are approved as submitted.

 List #1 Program Change Proposals are located at http://www.csus.edu/acaf/policies/03-04prgmlst1.stm for your review

Course Change Proposals:

College of Arts & Letters
College of Business Administration
College of Education
College of Engineering & Computer Sci
College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics
College of Social Sciences and Interdisciplinary Studies


COLLEGE OF ARTS & LETTERS

Department of Communication Studies

COURSE CHANGES

COMS 143 Theories of Interpersonal Communication. No change in course description.
Justification: Adding COMS 100A to prerequisites. This is an option core requirement and should follow the introductory survey course.
Prerequisite: COMS 8 or equivalent; and COMS 100A which may be taken concurrently.

COMS 145 Organizational Communication. No change in course description.
Justification: Adding COMS 100A as a prerequisite. This is a concentration core requirement and should follow the introductory survey course.
Prerequisite: COMS 100A.

COMS 150 Mass Communication Theories and Effects. No change in course description.
Justification: Adding COMS 100A to prerequisites. This is an option core requirement and should follow the introductory survey course.
Prerequisite: COMS 55 or JOUR 55 or equivalent; and COMS 100A which may be taken concurrently.

COMS 151 Visual Communication. Comprehensive overview of the theoretical concepts and communication methodologies appropriate for analysis of contemporary visual messages. Focuses on rhetorical analysis of visual messages. Significant research and critical writing required.
Justification: Change in description and prerequisities. This course has a new place in our department curriculum. It is now a required upper division writing course for Digital Media majors as well as an elective for others. The new description more accurately reflects the nature of the course. The prerequisites are standard now for our writing courses.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1A, ENGL 20, passing score of WPE, COMS 100A.

COMS 163 Communication, Self and Society. No change in course description.
Justification: Adding COMS 100A to prerequisites. This is an option core requirement and should follow the introductory survey course.
Prerequisite: COMS 8 or equivalent; and COMS 100A which may be taken concurrently.

COMS 174 International Communication. No change in course description.
Justification: Adding COMS 100A as a prerequisite. This is a concentration core requirement and should follow the introductory survey course.
Prerequisite: COMS 100A.

COMS 178 Telecommunications Management. No change in course description.
Justification: Adding COMS 100A as a prerequisite. This is a concentration core requirement and should follow the introductory survey course.
Prerequisite: COMS 100A.

COMS 181 Senior Seminar in Small Group Communication. No change in course description.
Justification: Adding COMS 100A to prerequisites. This is a senior seminar and should follow the introductory survey course.
Prerequisite: COMS 105; completion of 12 units of upper division COMS courses including COMS 100A.

COMS 182 Senior Seminar in Interpersonal Communication. No change in course description.
Justification: Adding COMS 100A to prerequisites. This is a senior seminar and should follow the introductory survey course.
Prerequisite: COMS 8; completion of 12 units of upper division COMS courses including COMS 100A.

COMS 183 Senior Seminar in Media Issues and Ethics. No change in course description.
Justification: Adding COMS 100A to prerequisites. This is a senior seminar and should follow the introductory survey course.
Prerequisite: COMS 55 or JOUR 55; completion of 12 units of upper division COMS courses including COMS 100A.

COMS 188 Senior Seminar in Intercultural Communication. No change in course description.
Justification: Adding COMS 100A to prerequisites. This is a senior seminar and should follow the introductory survey course.
Prerequisite: COMS 116; completion of 12 units of upper division COMS courses including COMS 100A.

COMS 190 Innovation in Telecommunication: Technologies and Issues. No change in course description.
Justification: Adding COMS 100A as a prerequisite. This is a concentration core requirement and should follow the introductory survey course.
Prerequisite: COMS 100A.

COMS 191 Senior Seminar in Telecommunication and Multimedia. No change in course description.
Justification: Adding COMS 100A as a prerequisite. This is a senior seminar and should follow the introductory survey course.
Prerequisite: Completion of 12 upper division units including COMS 100A.

 

Department of History

COURSE CHANGES

HIST 126 Evolution of Christianity to the Reformation.
Change to:
HIST 126 History of Christianity to the Reformation. No change in course description.
Justification: "Evolution" was intended to avoid conflict with the Department of History. As this course is now cross-listed with HIST 126, "History" seems more appropriate.

HIST 127 Evolution of Christianity since the Reformation.
Change to:
HIST 127 History of Christianity since the Reformation. No change in course description.
Justification: "Evolution" was intended to avoid conflict with the Department of History. As this course is now cross-listed with HIST 127, "History" seems more appropriate.

 

Department of Humanities and Religious Studies

COURSE CHANGES

HRS 126 Evolution of Christianity to the Reformation.
Change to:
HRS 126 History of Christianity to the Reformation. No change in course description.
Justification: "Evolution" was intended to avoid conflict with the Department of History. As this course is now cross-listed with HIST 126, "History" seems more appropriate.

HRS 127 Evolution of Christianity since the Reformation.
Change to:
HRS 127 History of Christianity since the Reformation. No change in course description.
Justification: "Evolution" was intended to avoid conflict with the Department of History. As this course is now cross-listed with HIST 127, "History" seems more appropriate.

 

Department of Philosophy

NEW COURSE

PHIL 192N Seminar: Naturalism. Examines the significance of naturalism for the history of philosophy and at least four of the following subject areas: ethics, epistemology, philosophy of religion, philosophy of mind, philosophy of science, philosophy of law, philosophy of history, social and political philosophy, metaphysics, and logic.
Justification: The Department's 192 series (each is a seminar on a philisophical theme) is designed for advanced majors. The topic of the seminar is determined by the faculty member offering it. Professor Randy Mayes wishes to offer a seminar focusing on the general topic of "naturalism." this is a current topic, since naturalism has been made plausible in new areas of philosophy by the apparent success of evolutionary biology and cognitive psychology. Majors preparing for graduate study are greatly benefitted by experience with an intensive seminar, including the writing of a seminar paper. Furthermore, a 190-level course is required in the Applied Ethics and Law Concentration.
Prerequisite: 6 units in philosophy or instructor permission.

 

 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Department of Management

NEW COURSE

MGMT 196 Organizational Entrepreneurship. Multidisciplinary framework for studying and developing organizational entrepreneurship. Covers the climate and culture of an entrepreneurial organization, strategies for developing new business ventures within an organization, and strategies for transforming firms toward a more entrepreneurially driven organization. Students will increase their understanding of environment, processes and strategies that will create value and build competencies through entrepreneurial activities within organizations.
Justification: As Sacramento is being recognized as one of the emerging high-tech centers in the country, companies located in this region will demand more employees with strong entrepreneurial spirit and skills. This course is designed to meet this demand, which supports the College of Business Administration’s pursuit for “offering a quality business education that is responsive to the changing regional, global, and technology-driven environment”, as stated in CBA Mission Statement. This course proposal has also gained support from local industrial leaders and government officials. For instance, Michael Ziegler, President/CEO of Pride Industries, and Karin Boller, Chief of Finance Division at U.S. Small Business Administration have both written letters expressing their support for this proposal. This course proposal has also received very positive response from current students enrolled in College of Business Administration. In March 2002, we conducted a survey on 139 students. The results show that the majority of respondents agreed that (1) a course on organizational entrepreneurship should be offered; (2) the course will enhance students’ short-term and long-term career development; (3) all majors will benefit from this course. (More detailed survey results are available upon request.)
Prerequisite: Upper-Division Standing

Department of Management Information Science

NEW COURSE

MIS 251 Strategic Applications of Information Resources. Discussion of the techniques and methodologies to utilize information resource to improve an organization’s strategic performance measures. Topics include data warehouse, data mining, online analytical transaction processing, and multidimensional database.
Justification: Provide students with an elective course in data warehousing and data mining to enhance their database knowledge.
Prerequisite: MSBA/MIS students: MIS 210 and 211, or their equivalents. MBA students: MIS 271 and instructor permission.

COURSE CHANGES

MIS 104 Business Programming for Small Computers. No change in course description.
Justification: Change the prerequisite to MIS 120 instead of MIS 15.
Prerequisite: MIS 120

MIS 120 Advanced Object-Oriented Business Programming. No change in course description.
Justification: Remove CSC 15 as a prerequisite because MIS 120 will require a different programming language.
Prerequisite: MIS 15

MIS 122 Object-Oriented Programming for Business.
Change to:
MIS 122 Object-Oriented Programming for Business in Java. No change in course description.
Justification: Make the title more descriptive of the course content.
Prerequisite: MIS 15 or CSC 15

MIS 140 Business Telecommunications. No change in course description.
Justification: Remove CSC 15 as a prerequisite.
Prerequisite: MIS 15

MIS 150 Database Systems for Business. No change in course description.
Justification: Add MIS 175 as a prerequisite to MIS 150 to familiarize students concentrating in MIS to an overview of the MIS profession.
Prerequisite: MIS 120 and MIS 175

MIS 160 Systems Development Life Cycle I. No change in course description.
Justification: Add MIS 175 as a prerequisite to MIS 160 to familiarize students concentrating in MIS to an overview of the MIS profession. Add OBE 130 as a prerequisite. Remove MIS 131 as a prerequisite.
Prerequisite: MIS 120, MIS 175, OBE 130

MIS 161 Systems Development Life Cycle II. No change in course description.
Justification: Add MIS 140 as a prerequisite to MIS 161 because students should have been exposed to fundamental telecommunications and networking concepts prior to undertaking a design and/or implementation project. Remove OBE 130 as a prerequisite.
Prerequisite: MIS 140, MIS 150, MIS 160

MIS 210 Information Systems I. Introduction to business information systems planning and systems development methodologies. Various methodologies are explored and information systems development project planning is emphasized.
Justification: Change the course content to reflect current practices in the discipline.

MIS 211 Information Systems II. Introduction to basic and object-oriented programming concepts, data structures for information representation, and database management systems.
Justification: Change the course content to reflect current practices in the discipline.

MIS 214 Fundamentals of Data Communications.
Change to:
MIS 240 Fundamentals to Telecommunications and E-Business Applications. Introduction to the concepts, technology, applications and management of data and voice communication with the emphasis on building, supporting and administering the requirements of network infrastructure and architecture to support an e-business.
Justification: Change the course content to reflect current practices in the discipline. Change the course number to be consistent with the numbering scheme adopted by the MIS department.
Prerequisite: MIS 211, or equivalent

MIS 216 Advanced Analysis and Design of Computer-based Information Systems.
Change to:
MIS 260 Advanced Information Systems Analysis and Design. An in-depth study of various methods that can be used to analyze and design a computer-based information system. Emphasizes the use object oriented systems development (OOSD) in information systems development.
Justification: Change the course content to reflect current practices in the discipline. Change the course number to be consistent with the numbering scheme adopted by the MIS department.
Prerequisite: MIS 210 and 211, or their equivalents

MIS 217 Database Design and Administration.
Change to:
MIS 250 Database Design and Administration. Covers database design techniques such as extended entity-relationship and unified modeling language; logical data models including object-relational database, object database, and advanced topics in relational database; as well as database implementation and administration topics, such as distributed database, web database, security issues, and physical database design.
Justification: Change the course content to reflect current practices in the discipline. Change the course number to be consistent with the numbering scheme adopted by the MIS department.
Prerequisite: MIS 211, or equivalent

MIS 218 Decision and Knowledge-based Systems.
Change to:
MIS 280 Decision and Knowledge-based Systems. This course covers the organizational use of information generated from transaction processing systems, management information systems, and decision support systems. The uses of information by managers for planning, control, and decision-making purposes will be discussed. The types of information systems implemented in various kinds of organizations will be covered.
Justification: Change the course content to reflect current practices in the discipline. Change the course number to be consistent with the numbering scheme adopted by the MIS department.
Prerequisite: MIS 211, or equivalent

MIS 219 MIS Strategic Planning and Policy.
Change to:
MIS 270 Information Technology Strategic Analysis and Planning. Emphasizes the process of analyzing and planning for the optimal utilization of information systems and information technology to achieve the strategic goals or competitive advantages in relation to organization's competitors, customers, suppliers, services and products.
Justification: Change the course content to reflect current practices in the discipline. Change the course number to be consistent with the numbering scheme adopted by the MIS department.
Prerequisite: MIS 210, or equivalent

MIS 221 Management Information Systems.
Change to:
MIS 271 Management Information Systems. No change in course description.
Justification: Change the course number to be consistent with the other course number changes within the MIS department.
Prerequisite: Classified graduate status

MIS 223 Topics in Management Information Systems.
Change to:
MIS 281 Topics in Management Information Systems. No change in course description.
Justification: Change the course number to be consistent with the other course number changes within the MIS department.

MIS 229 Practicum in Strategic Information Technology Planning.
Change to:
MIS 279 Practicum in Strategic Information Technology Planning. A practical assessment of the planning, analysis, design and implementation of computer-based information systems. The course integrates information systems strategic planning and policy as well as systems development, data communications, and database design and administration.
Justification: Change the course content to reflect current practices in the discipline. Change the course number to be consistent with the numbering scheme adopted by the MIS department.
Prerequisite: MSBA/MIS students: MIS 240, 250, 260 and 270. MBA students: MIS 271 and instructor permission.

MIS 294 Cooperative Education Experience in Management Information Systems. No change in course description.
Justification: Change the course number of the prerequisites.
Prerequisite: Completion of two of the following: MIS 240, MIS 250, MIS 260 or MIS 270; minimum CSUS GPA of 3.0

MIS 295 Internship in Management Information Systems. No change in course description.
Justification: Change the course number of the prerequisites.
Prerequisite: Completion of two of the following: MIS 240, MIS 250, MIS 260 or MIS 270; minimum CSUS GPA of 3.0

Department of Organizational Behavior and Environment

COURSE CHANGES

OBE 19 Real Estate Principles. An examination of real estate principles and practices necessary for the acquisition, financing, management, and disposition of real estate. Incidents of ownership, the brokerage business, state regulation and transactional ethics are emphasized. Note: This course is required by the California Department of Real Estate prior to taking the real estate salesperson’s examination.
Justification: To clarify the “Note” about the relation of OBE 19 and the California Real Estate Salesperson’s exam.

OBE 142 Real Estate Finance. No change in course description.
Justification: Change of course prerequisite to add OBE 140 as an alternate prerequisite to increase flexibility without sacrifice of quality.
Prerequisite: OBE 19 or OBE 140 or ACCY 161A or MGMT 133 or ENGR 140

OBE 143 Market Analysis and Feasibility Studies.
Change to:
OBE 143 Real Estate Market Analysis and Feasibility Studies. No change in course description.
Justification: Name change of OBE 143 from “Market Analysis and Feasibility Studies” to “Real Estate Market Analysis and Feasibility Studies.” Name change clarifies the topic area.
Change of course prerequisite to add OBE 140 as an alternate prerequisite to increase flexibility without sacrifice of quality.
Prerequisite: OBE 19 or OBE 140 or ACCY 161A or MGMT 133 or ENGR 140

OBE 145 The Land Use Regulatory and Entitlement Process.
Change to:
OBE 145 The Land Use Regulatory Environment. No change in course description.
Justification: Change clarifies the course topic area with a less awkward name. Change of course prerequisite from OBE 19 to OBE 140 to reflect program changes.
Prerequisite: OBE 140

OBE 149 Current Topics in Real Estate and Land Use. No change in course description.
Justification: Change in prerequisites to include (Completion of 9 units of required real estate courses, including OBE 140). Reflect changes in major concentration and emphasize importance as capstone course.
Prerequisite: Completion of 9 units of required real estate courses, including OBE 140

OBE 152 Human Resources Management Information Systems. No change in course description.
Justification: A successful course (OBE 152) needs students to have both knowledge of Human Resource responsibilities and management systems before understanding the specific system design to Human Resources. Lack of the inclusion of these prerequisites was an oversight.
Prerequisite: OBE 153 and MIS 175

 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Department of Bilingual Multicultural Education

NEW COURSE

EDBM 172 Introduction to Hmong Literacy. Introduction to Hmong Literacy is a Hmong course. This course covers the fundamental literacy components: phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics. It also examines Hmong history, culture, and the historical development of the Hmong oral and written language. The major emphasis of the course is on Hmong literacy through learning how to read and write Hmong, oral discussions in Hmong, and written assignments.
Justification: Provided that there are over 400 Hmong students attending CSUS and some of them are pursuing a California teaching credential, it is necessary to provide this course for Hmong students. By taking this course, they will be more proficient in Hmong and at the same time learn more about Hmong history, language, and culture.
Prerequisite: Fluent in Hmong.

Department of Counselor Education

COURSE CHANGE

EDC 480 Field Study in Counseling. Directed field study for counselors. Supervised experiences in the field are arranged in counseling. One hundred clock hours of experience required for each unit of credit. A supervision seminar is part of the field experience.
Justification: In order to meet the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) mandates for the Master of Science degree in Counseling it is necessary to increase the number of clock hours from 65 hours per one unit to 100 hours per one unit.

Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation, and School Psychology

NEW COURSES

EDS 160 Deaf History and Education. An overview of the education of the deaf from prehistoric times to the present will be provided. Roots of current trends and events in Deaf education will be explored, with projections for the future. Current issues such as mainstreaming, cochlear implants, communication modalities for instruction and others will be discussed in both a historical context and from a Deaf perspective. Note: Course to be taught in American Sign Language with voice interpretation.
Justification:
Course will be a foundation of an ASL/Deaf Studies minor and needs to be added as a permanent listing rather than as an “experimental” course.

EDS 161 Deaf Culture and Community. Course introduces students to the Deaf as a cultural and linguistic minority in America through coverage of sociolinguistic, anthropological, and historic issues in the development of Deaf culture and community in America and worldwide. Utilizing readings, lectures and group discussion, topics will include: theories of culture; language use; cross-cultural interaction and intercultural processes, and Deaf Literature and Art. Upon course completion, students will understand current and past educational, legal and medical policies and their impact on deaf and hard-of-hearing people. Note: Course to be taught in American Sign Language with voice interpretation.
Justification:
Course will be a foundation of an ASL/Deaf Studies Minor and needs to be added as a permanent listing rather than as an “experimental”course.

EDS 246B Preventive Mental Health Interventions. Study and application of various primary, secondary, and tertiary psychological interventions designed to prevent school failure and/or emotional challenges. Examines techniques of identifying pupils who are experiencing mental health difficulties that interfere with school functioning, and intervention techniques designed to address these problems [Spring only].
Justification:
This change is part of the proposal to offer a new degree (M.A. in Education, School Psychology Option) for students within the School Psychology Program. In addition, it will address new California Commission on Teacher Credentialing training requirements. Attempts to meet these new requirements within EDS 246 (as it currently exists) have resulted in important course content not being covered in sufficient depth. By making this into a year-long sequence (vs. a one semester course) it is anticipated that all course material will be given the attention it deserves.
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

COURSE CHANGES

EDS 150 Beginning American Sign Language.
Change to:
EDS 150 Beginning American Sign Language 1A. Students will learn basic vocabulary and grammar of American Sign Language. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to exchange basic information about themselves and their families such as their names, where they live, and their interests. Through out-of-class readings, in-class discussions and demonstrations, and experiences within the Deaf community, students will be exposed to elements of the Deaf culture and community. Course will be conducted in ASL without voice.
Justification:
This change reflects a change in instructional curriculum and will more accurately reflect students’ actual communicative competence upon completion of this course.

EDS 151 Intermediate American Sign Language.
Change to:
EDS 151 Beginning American Sign Language 1B. Students will continue and expand vocabulary and concepts acquired in EDS 150. Expansion of conversational range will include talking about other people and activities, giving directions, and making requests. Students will also develop discourse skills appropriate for establishing connections with Deaf acquaintances and handling a variety of interruptions. Through in-class discussions/demonstrations, course readings, and out-of-class field experience, students will be exposed to elements of the Deaf culture and community. Course will be taught in American Sign Language, without voice.
Justification:
This change reflects a change in instructional curriculum and will more accurately reflect students’ communicative competence upon completion of this course.
Prerequisite: EDS 150 or equivalent

EDS 152 Advanced American Sign Language.
Change to:
EDS 152 Intermediate American Sign Language. Students will expand their communicative repertoire developed in EDS 151 to talk about people and places in a contextually-reduced framework. Students will learn how to describe places, objects, and events. Students will also develop basic narrative skills to tell about past events. Through in-class discussions/demonstrations, course readings, and out-of-class field experience, students will be exposed to elements of the Deaf community and culture.
Justification:
This change reflects a change in instructional curriculum and the title will more accurately reflect students’ actual communicative competence upon completion of this course.
Prerequisite: EDS 150, EDS 151 or equivalent

EDS 153 Advanced II American Sign Language.
Change to:
EDS 153 Advanced ASL: Instructing and Informing. Principles, methods and techniques of manual communication with Deaf people using American Sign Language. Emphasis on the continuation of developing advanced manual communication skills for students who will work or interact with adult Deaf persons. Continuation of the analysis of the culture of deafness with emphasis on participation in the community.
Justification:
This change reflects new curricular content, the level of communicative competence students are expected to achieve upon completion of the course, and the focus of topics covered in the course.
Prerequisite: EDS 150, EDS 151, EDS 152 or equivalent

EDS 240 Observing, Recording, and Evaluating Behavior.
Change to:
EDS 240 Functional Assessment of Behavior. Assessment of behaviors using the techniques of applied behavior analysis. Students will learn how to do functional assessments of behavior. Methods appropriate for assessment of children in the school setting will be emphasized.
Justification:
The course title change and new course description make use of language that is more consistent with current practice in the field of school psychology.
Prerequisite: Instructor permission

EDS 246 Seminar in Preventive Interventions.
Change to:
EDS 246A Preventive Academic Interventions. Study and application of various primary, secondary, and tertiary academic interventions designed to prevent school failure and/or learning challenges. Examines techniques of identifying pupils who are experiencing academic difficulties that interfere with school functioning, and intervention techniques designed to remediate or ameliorate these problems. Note: Fall only
Justification:
This change is part of the proposal to offer a new degree (Master of Arts in Education, School Psychology Option) for students within the School Psychology Program. In addition, it will address new California Commission on Teacher Credentialing training requirements. Attempts to meet these new requirements within EDS 246 (as it currently exists) have resulted in important course content not being covered in sufficient depth. By making this into a year-long sequence (vs. a one semester course) it is anticipated that all course material will be given the attention it deserves.
Prerequisite: Approval as a candidate in the School Psychology Program and instructor permission.

EDS 249 Special Seminar: Counseling/School Psychology.
Change to:
EDS 249 Special Seminar: School Psychology. No change in course description.
Justification:
The M.S. Degree for which this course was provided is being replaced with an M.A. in Education (School Psychology) option. This course will become part of that M.A. Program.

EDS 540 Master's Thesis: Counseling/School Psychology (Plan A).
Change to:
EDS 540 Master's Thesis: Education/School Psychology (Plan A). Credit given upon successful completion of a thesis approved for the Master of Arts in Education/School Psychology.
Justification:
The M.S. degree for which this course was provided is being replaced with a Master’s of Art in Education Program. This course will become part of that program.

EDS 541 Master's Project: Counseling/School Psychology (Plan B).
Change to:
EDS 150 Master's Project: Education/School Psychology (Plan B). Credit given upon successful completion of a project approved for the master’s degree. M.A. in Education/School Psychology option.
Justification:
The M.S. degree for which this course was provided is being replaced with a Master of Arts in Education, School Psychology option. this course is part of the new program.

 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

Department of Computer Science

COURSE CHANGE

CSC 196L Intelligent Systems. No change in course description.
Justification: When the original Form A was prepared, this phrase was inadvertently left out of the prerequisite section: "and two additional upper-division courses selected from CSC 131-189, 196X."
Prerequisite: CSC 130 and two additional upper-division courses selected from CSC 131-189, 196X.

 

COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS

Department of Chemistry

COURSE CHANGE

CHEM 6B Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry. No change in course description.
Justification: Nursing programs are moving toward requiring only organic/biochemistry, which is taught in this course. This change permits a well-qualified student to take Chem 6B without taking Chem 6A.
Prerequisite: Chem 001A or Chem 006A, or a high school chemistry course and passing a qualifying exam given in first laboratory period.

Department of Geology

NEW COURSES

GEOL 7 Natural Disasters. An examination of earth materials and earth processes through the study of natural disasters. Topics include earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, tsunamis, hurricanes, tornadoes and meteorite impacts. Examination of causes, effects and mitigation of natural disasters.
Justification: This course is proposed for the GE offerings from the Geology Department. The study of natural disasters receives a tremendous amount of attention around the world but especially here in the Western US where earthquakes, floods, volcanic eruptions, landslides and other natural hazards directly impact an ever-growing population. The course is designed to stimulate interest in science and use extreme events to examine how the scientific process is used to understand and evaluate natural phenomena. The course will include the study of earth materials, plate tectonics, the hydrologic cycle, mantle processes and surface processes. We are proposing that this course be added to GE science offerings at CSUS. Natural disasters have historically been the events that spawn scientific inquiry into their causes and recurrence. Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, hurricanes, tsunamis, and other natural disasters have all led to scientific study that has developed modern theories about Earth processes. By studying the materials and processes responsible for natural catastrophes, students will obtain a general education that also provides an appreciation-of and interest-in learning more about earth sciences. Natural Disasters is a new course offering in Geology. If approved, we will eliminate Geology 1, General Geology, one of our other B1 – GE offerings. Like General Geology, this new course will serve as an introduction to the science but will achieve this goal through a different approach.

GEOL 240C Advanced Volcanology. Analysis of volcanic eruption processes. Interpretation of volcanic deposits in the evaluation of volcanic hazards, risk, eruption processes, and geologic history.
Justification: Geology 240 is already approved and in the University catalog as “Special Topics” course. Several courses including 240C, Advanced Volcanology, are listed as special topic courses. This proposal expands on the description of the special topic. Advanced Volcanology is proposed for the Geology Department’s Masters Degree program, which concentrates on hydrogeology and natural hazards. The study of volcanic activity is a critical element of this goal. The course will focus on three subjects:
-Understanding of styles of volcanic activity and physical controls
-Understanding of volcanic hazard and methods of monitoring volcanoes
-Analysis and interpretation of volcanic deposits
Volcanic studies receive a tremendous amount of attention around the world but especially here in the Western US where volcanic eruptions and other natural hazards directly impact an ever-growing population.

GEOL 240D Field Volcanology. Field trip to classic volcanic settings to observe, record and analyses volcanic deposits in the evaluation of volcanic hazards, risk, eruption processes, and geologic history.
Justification: Geology 240 is already approved and in the University catalog as “Special Topics” course. Several courses including 240D, Field Volcanology, are listed as special topic courses. This proposal expands on the description of the special topic. Field Volcanology is proposed for the Geology Department’s Masters Degree program, which concentrates on hydrogeology and natural hazards. The study of volcanic activity is a critical element of this goal. This course is the field component to a lecture/seminar course called Advanced Volcanology, Geology 240C. Geology 240D will visit and study on one (or two) volcanic field areas for a total of 7-10 days. Volcanic studies receive a tremendous amount of attention around the world but especially here in the Western US where volcanic eruptions and other natural hazards directly impact an ever-growing population. This course will help to train specialists to help understand and mitigate volcanic hazards in our modern society.
Prerequisite: GEOL 114 or 240C; or either concurrently; or permission of instructor

 

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Department of Environmental Studies

NEW COURSE

ENVS 138 Introduction to Environmental Sociology. Introduction to environmental sociology; the study of human society, the natural environment, and their mutual interactions. Examines environmental sociology at several levels, from the micro level of individual communities to the meso level of government policies to macro theoretical considerations. Analysis of environmental issues in a global context also included.
Justification: Environmental Sociology provides an essential perspective on the definition and resolution of environmental problems. That is, how various human groups define, approach, and evaluate environmental conditions as problematic, unsatisfactory, or unacceptable establishes the content in which environmental decision-making takes place.

Department of Family and Consumer Sciences

COURSE CHANGE

FACS 295 Field Study. No change in course description.
Justification: This course will continue to serve its originally approved purpose in addition to the newly approved Dietetic Internship Program. The new Dietetic Internship Program includes field study using the already existing course FACS 295; however it requires students to get more than the current approved number of units of FACS 295, as it is primarily a work experience/ field placement program. The dietetic internship program requires a minimum of 900 hours of field placement/ work experience in three areas of advanced and specialized study (clinical/ food service & administration/ community nutrition) to meet the American Dietetic Association Commission on Dietetic Education Competencies during this one year program. This requires enrollment of 6 to 7 units of supervised field study (FACS 295) per semester, which exceeds the current approved units for this course. Therefore, we are requesting an increase of these units for the post-baccalaureate dietetic internship program being offered through CCE to begin in Fall 2003 to vary from one to seven units per semester. This would allow any post-baccalaureate FACS student to take a variable number of units in FACS 295.enrollment of 6 to 7 units of supervised field study (FACS 295) per semester, which exceeds the current approved units for this course. Therefore, we are requesting an increase of these units for the post-baccalaureate dietetic internship program being offered through CCE to begin in Fall 2003 to vary from one to seven units per semester. This would allow any post-baccalaureate FACS student to take a variable number of units in FACS 295.
Prerequisite: Undergraduate major or minor in Family and Consumer Sciences or equivalent; individual arrangement with instructor.

Department of Government

NEW COURSE

GOVT 249A Politics of Contemporary Middle East. Designed as a graduate introduction to politics and governments of the Middle East to meet the needs of a limited number of graduate students who wish to study the Middle East politics at graduate level, but who presently lack such an option. Relies on a comparative analytical frame to tease out the causes of intrastate and interstate conflicts in the region and their interaction with contemporary political trends, including those relating to the Arab-Israeli conflict and the peace process, Islamic political resurgence, terrorism, and a growing US interventionism.
Justification: Middle East has been a critical region in world politics and, since the end of the Cold War, its importance has been further enhanced due to both the continuation of conflicts in the region that threatens the world peace and the regions strategically significant energy resources. There is a strong demand from graduate students, particularly those in the International Affairs Program, for a graduate level course on the Middle East politics. Currently there are no graduate level courses that focuses primarily on the governments and politics of contemporary Middle East. SOC 260, Contemporary Issues of the Middle East and North Africa, only partially deals with the political issues and it may not be offered on a regulars basis. The proposed course will fill this lacuna in the short run, since it is designed for a very limited number of graduate students, almost all from the IA/ Government master programs.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and intsructor's permission.

Department of Sociology

NEW COURSES

SOC 138 Introduction to Environmental Sociology. An introduction to environmental sociology; the study of human society, the natural environment, and their mutual interactions. Examines environmental sociology at several levels, from the micro level of individual communities to the meso level of government policies to macro theoretical considerations. Analysis of environmental issues in a global context also included.
Justification: Environmental sociology is a growing field of study within the discipline of sociology and this course fills an important gap in our department’s curriculum. Students have expressed interest in this area, and sociology departments nationwide teach courses in this area. This course also meets our department learning goals and it relates course materials to regional issues. The global dimension of this course also contributes to the university-wide focus on globalization of the curriculum.

SOC 238 Environmental Sociology. Examines the complex relationship between human society and its surrounding environment. Theoretical perspectives are complemented by empirical research on environmental issues. Special attention is given to issues relating to the local and regional California environment. Analysis of environmental issues in a global context also included.
Justification: Environmental sociology is a growing field of study within the discipline of sociology and this course fills an important gap in our graduate curriculum. Students have expressed interest in this area, and many graduate students desire to move into government or public policy related fields in which environmental concerns predominate. This course also meets our department learning goals and it relates course materials to regional issues. The global dimension of this course also contributes to the university-wide focus on globalization of the curriculum.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing