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UNDERGRADUATE & GRADUATE
COURSE CHANGE PROPOSALS

LIST #3 - 2003/2004

If there are no objections reported to Academic Affairs by September 23, 2003, the course change proposals listed below are approved as submitted.

 List #3 Program Change Proposals are located at http://www.csus.edu/acaf/policies/03-04prgmlst3.stm for your review

Course Change Proposals:
Past Course Change Proposal Lists:

College of Arts & Letters
College of Education
College of Engineering & Computer Sci
College of Health and Human Services
College of Social Sciences and Interdisciplinary Studies

Course Change List #1
Course Change List #2


COLLEGE OF ARTS & LETTERS

Department of Art

NEW COURSES

ART 3 Art in the Asian World. Introduction to the art and architecture of Asia (India, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Thailand, Burma, Cambodia, Tibet, China, Japan and Korea). The styles, subjects and significance of Asian art will be presented in a broader context that includes consideration of the history, geography, ethnic populations, languages, and religions of these countries (i.e., Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, Islam, Daoism, and Shinto).
Justification: The Art Department offers a 2-semester introductory survey of Western art history that includes coverage of ancient Egyptian, Middle Eastern and Islamic art, but omits Asian art almost entirely. A comparable broad survey of Asian art is needed for our foundation program to provide students with appropriate preparation for the upper division classes, Art 117A and 117B. This course fits generally within the spirit of the University’s strategic plan to view the relationships between cultures; in particular it supports goals within the Academic Program and Pluralism area.

ART 114 Visual Form and the African Diaspora. A survey of traditional African visual aesthetics prior to European involvement and after their transmutations through the Diaspora. An investigation of social, political, and spiritual circumstances provide insight into the various aesthetic manifestations. Sources of influence and inspiration such as music are explored.
Justification: The art history area wishes to expand its offerings beyond a western lens. This course considers globally the unfolding of the African Diaspora. As such, it provides students the opportunity to sample cultures in partnership and conflict. This course fits generally within the spirit of the University's strategic plan to view the relationships between cultures, and in particular supports goals within the Academic Program and Pluralism themes.

ART 192B Senior Seminar in Art History. This culminating course for the Art History concentration focuses on the research, writing, and oral presentation of a 25-35-page thesis in the student’s area of interest. Seminar readings, discussions, and weekly workshops support the thesis project and develop basic career skills. The seminar explores how to employ traditional and new research technologies and develops writing skills. Career topics include how to locate appropriate jobs, professional schools, and graduate programs; how to write professional resumes, correspondence, including graduate school and grant applications.
Prerequisite: Senior status, completion of all lower-division major requirements, History 100, and demonstration of writing proficiency as prescribed by California State University, Sacramento.
Justification: This culminating course for the Art History concentration focuses on the research, writing, and oral presentation of a 25-35-page thesis in the student’s area of interest. Seminar readings, discussions, and weekly workshops support the thesis project and develop basic career skills. The seminar explores how to employ traditional and new research technologies and develops writing skills. Career topics include how to locate appropriate jobs, professional schools, and graduate programs; how to write professional resumes, correspondence, including graduate school and grant applications.


COURSE CHANGES

ART 113B Oriental Art and Mythology.
Change to:
ART 113B Asian Art and Mythology.
No change to course description.
Justification: The word "oriental" is outdated and has fallen out of general use when referring to Asian art and culture. We would like to make this slight modification in the title for the next catalogue, class schedule and SIS+ entries.

ART 192 BA Seminar/Culminating Experience.
Change to:
ART 192A Senior Seminar in Studio Art.
No change to course description.
Justification: The creation of a concentration in Art History requires the development of a BA Seminar/Culminating Experience for students selecting this concentration. At the recommendation of the Budget and Curriculum Committee of the College of Arts and Letters, we will use ART 192A for students in the Studio Art concentration and ART 192B (Senior Seminar in Art History) for students in the Art History concentration. Also, to have comparable titles for the two courses, we would like to change the title of the Studio Art seminar, as listed above.

COURSE DELETION

ART 132 Early Childhood Art.
Justification:
ART 132 entered the inactive inventory because it has not been offered for several years. The Art Education faculty members agree that the course is no longer an essential part of the curriculum, in part because its content duplicates some of the content of ART 133. They have asked that the course be deleted. Eventually its number may be reassigned to an entirely new course in Art Education. It has been removed from the Single Subject Program. The course with which it was paired in the outline of degree requirements, ART 137, has been moved from "Breadth and Perspective" to "Core" (see Form B.)


Department of Communication Studies

COURSE CHANGES

COMS 124 Advanced Writing for Video. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1A, ENGL 20
Justification: Adds writing prerequisite to this course to improve preparation of students for this course.

COMS 126 Capturing and Editing Digital Media.
Change to:
COMS 126 Advanced
Capturing and Editing Digital Media. Artistic and technical skills employed when capturing and editing photographic, audio, and video data files. Data files are prepared for export into multimedia authoring applications. Mastery of appropriate hardware and software.
Prerequisite: COMS 20A, 20B, 26, each with a grade of B- or better.
Justification: Add “Advanced” in front of current title, slight change in description, and change in prerequisites. Since we added an introductory course, the 126 becomes an advanced class.

COMS 130 Staging and Lighting Digital Video. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: COMS 20A, 20B, 27A, 27B, each with a grade of B- or better.
Justification: Adding a 20A and 20B as a prerequisite. In the current Digital Media program, it was hoped that students would take courses in sequence as part of the recommended cohorts. This didn’t work as students didn’t follow cohorts. This change will improve course sequencing and provide students with greater flexibility.

COMS 142A Film as Communication - Third World Emphasis.
Change to:
COMS 142 Film as Communication.
Explores the uses of film as a tool of communication.
Justification: We are folding COMS 142A and 142B together into one class - 142. This is a more efficient way to offer the film classes.

COMS 144 Multimedia Design for the World Wide Web. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: COMS 20A, COMS 20B, and COMS 26, each with a grade of B- or better.
Justification: Adding a ComS 20A, ComS 20B and ComS 26 as a prerequisite, deleting ComS 136 or CSC 80 and ComS 117 as a prerequisite. In the current Digital Media program, it was hoped that students would take courses in sequence as part of the recommended cohorts. This didn’t work as students didn’t follow cohorts. This change will improve course sequencing and provide students with greater flexibility.

COMS 149A Multimedia Authoring. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: COMS 126, each with a grade of B- or better.
Justification: Deleting ComS 106 as a prerequisite. In the current Digital Media program, it was hoped that students would take courses in sequence as part of the recommended cohorts. This didn’t work as students didn’t follow cohorts. This change will improve course sequencing and provide students with greater flexibility.

COMS 180 Senior Seminar in Organizational Communication. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: COMS 105; completion of 12 units of upper division COMS courses including COMS 100A.
Justification: Adding COMS 100A to prerequisites. This is a senior seminar and should follow the introductory survey course.

COMS 184A Multimedia Project Planning and Management. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: COMS 149A
Corequisite: COMS 184B
Justification: Deleting ComS 117 as a prerequisite and adding ComS 184B as a corequisite. In the current Digital Media program, it was hoped that students would take courses in sequence as part of the recommended cohorts. This didn’t work as students didn’t follow cohorts. This change will improve course sequencing and provide students with greater flexibility.

COMS 184B Multimedia Project Completion. No change to course description.
Corequisite: COMS 184A
Justification: Deleting COMS 184A as a prerequisite and adding COMS 184A as a corequisite. In the current Digital Media program, it was hoped that students would take courses in sequence as part of the recommended cohorts. This didn’t work as students didn’t follow cohorts. This change will improve course sequencing and provide students with greater flexibility.

COMS 185A Practicum in Video Production.
Change to:
COMS 185 Practicum in Video Production.
Assignments in various phases of video production including creative use of camera, sound and lighting, editing production design, production planning and management, and directing and producing. Students in first semester function as crew members for productions. May be repeated once for credit. Repeating students are expected to produce and direct a major student project.
Prerequisite: COMS 127 and COMS 128 each with a grade of B- or better.
Justification: We are folding ComS 185A and 185B together into one class—185, and changing prerequisites. This is a more efficient way to offer the video practicum. Fewer WTU’s are required while the same goals for the original courses are met.

COMS 285 Practicum for Teaching Associates in Communication Studies. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: COMS 200, COMS 201
Justification: Change classification from 05 to 36. This is a supervisory course that does not have a set time or place for meeting.

JOUR 30 Basic News Reporting.
Change to:
JOUR 30 News Writing.
Fundamentals of news gathering and news writing. Emphasis on language and style used in feature and news stories.
Prerequisite: JOUR 20
Justification: Title change, prerequisite addition. This changes the title to de-emphasize the reporting, as the class primarily focuses on how to write news stories. More emphasis on reporting skills will be taught in Jour 130A and Jour 130B. This change also reflects the new Jour 20 class as a prerequisite.

JOUR 130 Advanced News Writing.
Change to:
JOUR 130A News Reporting I.
Instruction and practice in jounalistic research, interviewing, and reporting skills.
Prerequisite: JOUR 20, JOUR 30
Corequisite: JOUR 130B
Justification: Number, title and description change. This change corresponds with a repositioning of the journalism curriculum and is a corequisite with Jour 130B, News Reporting 2. This format will allow for intensive instruction in news gathering and writing skills.

JOUR 133 Advanced Editing, Design and Production.
Change to:
JOUR 133 Advanced Editing and Design.
Hands-on instruction and practice in story instruction and practice in story selection, editing, page design and composition, as well as retooling content for online platforms.
Prerequisite: JOUR 128
Justification: Title, description and prerequisite change. This change realigns JOUR 133 with the new JOUR 128 class.

JOUR 135 Reporting Public Issues.
Change to:
JOUR 135 Public Affairs Reporting.
Preparation and practice for covering California public issues, with a focus on state government.
Prerequisite: JOUR 130A, JOUR 130B
Justification: Title and prerequisite change. These changes fit in with the realignment with JOUR 130A and JOUR 130B.

JOUR 195 Internship in Journalism. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: JOUR 130A, JOUR 130B
Justification: Add prerequisites of JOUR 130A and JOUR 130B. The previous prerequisite of JOUR 130 has been reconfigured as JOUR 130A and JOUR 130B.


NEW COURSES

COMS 26 Introduction to Capturing and Editing Digital Media. Developing skills in producing photographic, graphic and animated materials used for the World Wide Web and multimedia.
Justification: This course provides an introduction to this area and replaces two lab courses, 27A and 27B, as prerequisites to COMS 126. It also provides a digital media course that can be transferred from many community colleges.

COMS 141 Theory of Film and Video Editing. A study of history and theory of film and video editing. Many films will be viewed and discussed, examining how editing theory is put into practice.
Justification: We have no film analysis course which explores the relationship of editing (image and sound) to the content and art of the medium.

JOUR 20 Style for Media Writers. Intensive review of grammar, word use, spelling, and principles of clear, concise writing.
Justification: Journalism students are frequently deficient in the grammatical skills necessary for success in journalism courses and later in the field. This course would provide a rigorous review and would save time now spent on this problem in the core skills courses. This course would be designated as a prerequisite to the skills courses.

JOUR 128 Copy Editing and Ethics. Instruction and practice in editing, headline writing, caption writing, and journalism ethics.
Note: Computer familiarity (MAC OS) recommended.
Prerequisite: JOUR 20, JOUR 30
Justification: This adds an upper-division editing course as a requirement. It fits in with the overall realignment of the journalism curriculum and allows for continued instruction and practice in editing skills. It also adds formal instruction in ethics, which until now has been piecemeal.

JOUR 130B News Reporting II. Practice in covering a news beat, writing news and feature stories on a weekly basis. Instruction includes reporting on local government.
Note: Computer familiarity (MAC OS) recommended.
Prerequisite: JOUR 20, JOUR 30
Justification: This new course corresponds with a repositioning of the journalism curriculum and is a corequisite with Jour 130A, News Reporting 1. This format will allow for intensive instruction and practice of journalism skills.


COURSE DELETIONS

COMS 142B Film as Communication - Europe and USA.
Justification: We are folding COMS 142A and 142B together into one class - 142. This is a more efficient way to offer the film classes.

COMS 185B Practicum in Video Production.
Justification: We are folding ComS 185A and 185B together into one class—185, and changing prerequisites. This is a more efficient way to offer the video practicum. Fewer WTU’s are required while the same goals for the original courses are met.


Department of Design

COURSE CHANGES

GPHD 100A Visualization.
Change to:
GPHD 30 Visualization.
No change to course description.
Justification: This upper division to lower division change will better prepare lower division students for the newly proposed portfolio admission requirement. Generally speaking, students transferring from area community colleges have stronger portfolios than their CSUS counterparts (those who started at CSUS as freshmen), particularly in drawing, composition, and craft skills. This move is an effort to eliminate the performance disparity before Graphic Design Pre-Majors apply for official admission into the Graphic Design upper division course sequence.

GPHD 100B Design Production Management.
Change to:
GPHD 100 Design Production Management.
No change to course description.
Prerequisite: GPHD 101, GPHD 103A, COMS 136
Corequisite:
GPHD 102
Justification:
Name change: With the migration of GPHD 100B’s sister course (GPHD 100A) to lower division, the letter distinction between them is no longer necessary. Prereq change:
Change needs to be made to reflect the proposed cohort sequence.

GPHD 101 Visual Principles I. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: ART 20A, GPHD 10, GPHD 25, GPHD 30, PHOT 40, and acceptance into upper division coursework through the program's portfolio review.
Corequisite: GPHD 103A
Justification: The prerequisite/corequisite requirements to this course need to be adjusted to reflect the proposed entrance portfolio.

GPHD 102 Visual Principles II - Color and Symbol. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: GPHD 101, GPHD 103A
Corequisite: GPHD 100
Justification: One minor change to this course: The prerequisite/corequisite language for this course needs to be updated to reflect the proposed cohort sequence.

GPHD 103A Typography I: Theory. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: ART 20A, GPHD 10, GPHD 25, GPHD 30, PHOT 40, and acceptance into upper division coursework through the program's portfolio review.
Corequisite: GPHD 101
Justification: The prerequisite/corequisite requirements to this course need to be adjusted to reflect the proposed entrance.

GPHD 103B Typography II. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: GPHD 100, GPHD 102
Corequisite: GPHD 101
Justification: The prerequisites/corequisites of this course need to be adjusted to reflect the proposed cohort sequence.

GPHD 104 Corporate Identity and System Design. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: GPHD 103B, GPHD 113
Justification: The prerequisites/corequisites of this course need to be adjusted to reflect the proposed cohort sequence.

GPHD 113 Visual Principles of Publication Design. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: GPHD 100, GPHD 102
Corequisite: GPHD 103B
Justification: The prerequisites/corequisites of this course need to be adjusted to reflect the proposed cohort sequence.

INTD 129 Portfolio. No change to course description.
Justification: We need to change this class from its current seminar classification to an activity classification. The new classification better represents the work performed in the class and will provide students with two additional contact hours per week. Since changing the class two years ago from its original activity status to seminar, we have found that it has been difficult to give graduating seniors the amount of critique time they need to prepare their portfolios for the job market.


NEW COURSES

GPHD 05 Introduction to Graphic Design. This course is an introduction to the field of Graphic Design. Course subjects include career possibilities, current trends, issues and practices in the industry. The basic theory, techniques and practices involved in solving a visual communication problem will also be introduced.
Justification: The proposed course is needed to improve students’ body of knowledge before entering GPHD upper division. Currently there is no course that gives students an introduction to the profession of graphic design. Students need to know what their career options are, as well as have a basic knowledge of current trends, issues and practices in the industry. The course will help clarify the question most students have before deciding to be a major: “What does a graphic designer do?”

GPHD 25 Visual Basics. This course provides a basic understanding of how visual structures are created and interpreted. Students study the main components of visual structures, become familiar with basic laws of color, and learn the basics of the gestalt principles of visual organization.
Prerequisite: ART 20A, ART 20B or ART 60
Justification: The addition of this new studio course will better prepare our native students for the proposed portfolio admission requirement. Generally speaking, students transferring from area community colleges have stronger portfolios than their CSUS counterparts (those who started at CSUS as freshmen), particularly in drawing, composition, and craft skills. This move is an effort to eliminate the performance disparity before Graphic Design Pre-Majors apply for upper division admission into the Graphic Design Program.

GPHD 129 Graphic Design Digital Portfolio. This course is to introduce the concepts and tools used in a digital portfolio production for entry into the practice of design or the advanced study. Exploration and development of the graphic design portfolio and resume in digital and print form. Discussions will cover such topics as networking, interview tips, employment issues, and presentation skills.
Prerequisite: GPHD 113, GPHD 103B
Justification: This course addition would replace the current INTD-129 requirement. Graphic design majors need a more customized portfolio to enable students to exit the major with a digital portfolio (cd rom/web site). The new course would also be a one-unit increase to the major.

Department of English

COURSE CHANGES

ENGL 001A College Composition. An intensive writing course that provides students with practice in the kinds of challenging thinking, reading, and writing required in academic discourse. Concentrates on prewriting, drafting, and rewriting processes that address a variety of rhetorical and academic tasks. Special attention given to effective development and support of ideas. Writing requirement: a minimum of 5,000 words.
Prerequisite: EPT score of 151 or above, or credit in ENGL 001.
Justification: Updating course description to reflect current practice and research.

ENGL 002 English for Speakers of Other Languages IV.
Change to:
ENGL 002 College Composition for Multilingual Students.
An intensive writing course for multilingual students that provides practice in the kinds of challenging thinking, reading, and writing required in academic discourse. Concentrates on prewriting, drafting, and rewriting processes that address a variety of rhetorical and academic tasks. Special attention given to effective development and support of ideas. Writing requirement: a minimum of 5,000 words.
Prerequisite: EPT score of 151 or above, or credit in LS 087; EDT score of 2-5.
Justification: The name change reflects that the course is equivalent to English 1A: College Composition. “Multilingual Students” is a less stigmatizing term than “ESL” and reflects that many students in English 2 speak several languages including English. Update course name and description to reflect current practice and research.

ENGL 20 Expository Writing.
Change to:
ENGL 20 College Composition II.
An advanced expository writing course that emphasizes textual analysis and integration of multiple works, to include multicultural and cross disciplinary perspectives, with the goal of developing sophisticated reasoning processes, complex organizational strategies, as well as research strategies and editing that meet standards for academic writing. This course is developed through a central theme that includes a book-length work. Writing requirement: a minimum of 5,000 words.
Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in Engl 1A or equivalent.
Justification: Update course name and description to reflect current practice and research.

ENGL 20E Expository Writing for ESL Students.
Change to:
ENGL 20M College Composition II for Multilingual Students.
An advanced expository writing course for multilingual students that emphasizes textual analysis and integration of multiple works, to include multicultural and cross disciplinary perspectives, with the goal of developing sophisticated reasoning processes, complex organizational strategies, as well as research strategies and editing that meet standards for academic writing. This course is developed through a central theme that includes a book-length work. Writing requirement: a minimum of 5,000 words.
Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in ENGL 001A or equivalent; EDT scores of 2-5.
Justification: The name change reflects that the course is equivalent to English 20: Expository Writing. "Multilingual Students" is a less stigmatizing term than "ESL" and reflects that many students in English 20E speak several languages including English. Update course name and description to reflect current practice and research.

ENGL 20T Expository Writing - Technical Communication.
Change to:
ENGL 20T College Composition II - Technical Communication.
An advanced expository writing course focused on technical disciplines. Emphasizes textual analysis and integration of multiple works, to include multicultural and cross disciplinary perspectives, with the goal of developing sophisticated reasoning processes, complex organizational strategies, as well as research strategies and editing that meet standards for academic writing. This course is developed through a central theme that includes a book-length work. Writing requirement: a minimum of 5,000 words.
Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in English 001A or equivalent.
Justification: Update course name and description to reflect current practice and research.

ENGL 109E Writing for Proficiency for ESL.
Change to:
ENGL 109M Writing for Proficiency for Multilingual Students.
Designed to review and improve academic reading and writing skills for upper division multilingual students who have taken but not passed the Writing Proficiency Exam. Focuses on the writing process, text-based academic writing, revision and editing.
Note: Completion with a grade of C- or better (based on group-evaluated common final and portfolio) satisfies Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR). May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite: Junior level or; higher class standing; grade of C- or better in ENGL 001A or equivalent WPE score of 6 or lower; EDT score of 2-5 or credits in LS 086.

ENGL 109W Writing for Proficiency. Designed to review and improve academic reading and writing skills for upper division students who have taken but not passed the Writing Proficiency Exam. Focuses on the writing process, text-based academic writing, revisions, and editing.
Note: Completion with a grade of C- or better (based on group-evaluated common final and portfolio) satisfies Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR). May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite: Junior level or higher class standing; grade of C- or better in Engl 1A or equivalent; WPE score of 6 or lower.
Justification: Update course description to reflect current practice and research.


NEW COURSES

ENGL 65 Introduction to World Literatures in English. An introduction to world literature written in English that places writers and their works within colonial, post-colonial, and literary contexts. Texts may come from Africa, India, Southeast Asia, the Middle East, the Caribbean, Canada, and non-English Britain.
Justification: This course is designed to introduce students to the variety of world literatures written in English. Moving between the colonial and post-colonial eras, the course will investigate the impacts and residues to imperialism, nationalism, and modern globalism, giving students insight into the contexts and conditions of texts written in English but written outside England and the USA.

ENGL 125E Academic Reading and Writing for Second Language Students. Helps prospective teachers to better understand the unique needs of second language students. The course will cover second language acquisition theory with particular emphasis on the teaching of reading and writing for academic purposes. Practical skills covered with all focus on the particular needs of second language readers and writers, for instance, how to help them to read more efficiently and with greater comprehension, how to write more fluently and accurately in ways that meet the needs and expectations of the academic discourse community.
Justification: Over half of the students in California's public schools are linguistic minorities - non-native speakers of English. They are a culturally diverse population with a wide range of educational, literacy, and linguistic experiences. Second language students face a variety of challenges as they move through our school system and on into their college years, but one of the most complex is their acquisition of academic literacy (reading and writing) skills. Researchers and theorists in second language acquisition agree that the processes involved in learning to read and write in a second language, especially for academic purposes, are complex and more difficult than developing these skills in one's first language. Future English teachers - especially at the secondary level - need to be prepared to meet the needs of second language students. Existing courses, specifically English 125 (Literature and Film for Young Readers) and English 125B (Writing for the Young Writer), do an excellent job of preparing future teachers. But in neither course is adequate time available to discuss what we know about second language acquisition and especially the development of academic literacy skills in high school, what we have learned about the reading and writing processes and products (texts) of second language students, and specific techniques and materials that have been found helpful in working with second language students at secondary level. This course will not only be helpful to future English teachers pursuing single-subject credentials. It will also appeal to students from other departments (e.g., Foreign Language, Education, or Communication Studies) who may be required to complete a minor and who may wish to pursue a minor in English, a minor in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages), or a Certificate of Advanced Studies in TESOL. Further, this course may be attractive to M.A. candidates completing the Graduate Certificate in Composition or the TESOL Certificate option for graduate students.

ENGL 170A Fantasy. This course helps students develop their own working definition of fantasy by examining its central narrative and dramatic structures, image patterns, and thematic preoccupations. At the same time, the course encourages students to compare these motifs with those of so called "realist" fiction so that they may understand how blurred conventional distinctions between "fantasy" and "reality" actually are.
Justification: This course is designed to acquaint students with the open-ended conventions of the fantasy genre (and the related genres of children's literature and science fiction), its relationships to the more inclusive romance genre and thus also to the surprisingly related genre of realism. In this sense, the course allows students to understand the overall concept of genre more clearly and comparatively. As far as the specific conventions of fantasy are concerned, the course critically explores the "typical" fantasy reader-identification figure (and often narrator), the "there and back again" dream-quest or dramatic structure, the primary archetypes of vision, fire, balance, the garden, language, and home, and the topical themes of the self, love, death, and life. Based on these motifs, the course also encourages students, as the semester develops, to create a provisional, working definition of fantasy. Finally, then, the course prompts students to justify the genre itself; in doing so, they ultimately see that fantasy is anything but escapist.

ENGL 190B C.S. Lewis. This course helps students understand both the theological and literary underpinnings of the C.S. Lewis' imaginative work-his narrative, dramatic, and generic structures, image patters, and thematic preoccupations. It also allows students to see how myth, especially the wasteland myth, critically informs both The Narnia Tales and The Space Trilogy. Students will read selections from Lewis' sermons, theological works, and literary criticism besides The Narnia Tales, The Space Trilogy, and his ultimate mythic vision, Till We Have Faces.
Justification: This course is designed to acquaint students with C.S. Lewis' theological, critical, and especially, creative works. The class helps satisfy students' need (whetted by the biographical film Shadow Lands and by animated versions of the Narnia tales) to discuss and analyze Lewis' fiction and allows them to discover that his work transcends univocal cliches about Christian apologetics, children's literature, fantasy, and science fiction. In fact, his critical remarks on "myth" actually integrate these various genres: "My view would be that a good myth (i.e., a story out of which ever varying meanings will grow for different readers and in different ages) is a higher thing than an allegory (into which one meaning has been put). In an allegory a man can put only what he already knows; in a myth he puts what he does not yet know and could not come by in any other way." In this syncretistic sense, Lewis' fiction nurtures the kind of holistic critical and imaginative skills that help his various readers creatively self-develop and self-discover.

ENGL 190J Tolkien: Lord of the Rings. This course helps students understand the primary structures, images, and themes informing Tolkien's Middle Earth and the ways these link the medieval worldview with modern, and even postmodern, wish-and fear-fulfillments. Students will read Tolkien's criticism, poetry, short tales, The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings trilogy, and selections from The Silmarillion.
Justification: This course is designed to acquaint students with J.R.R. Tolkien's critical and imaginative worldview as a Beowulf and fantasy scholar as well as the more celebrated creator of Middle Earth. The class satisfies students' need (whetted by the recent film versions of Middle Earth) to discuss and analyze Tolkien's works and helps them understand that the "popular fantasy writer" is ultimately overshadowed by - or, better, lives side-by-side with - the profoundly universal artist who wrote The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings trilogy. In this latter sense, the course justifies speaking of Tolkien in the same breath as canonical Modern British novelists like Joyce, Woolf, and Lawrence because his romance narrative and dramatic structures, image patterns, thematics, and overall concern with language compares favorably with their more realist concerns, particularly their shared psychological, ethical, existential, environment, and cultural preoccupations with the wasteland myth.

ENGL 198T Senior Seminar in English. A senior seminar in English that features specialized topics taught by a variety of instructors depending upon the semester. Topics can include subject matter from literature, linguistics, English education, creative writing, composition/rhetoric, and film. Work in the course will tend to the production of a significant research paper, a paper which will emphasize the student's ability to: analyze and interpret multiple texts; integrate primary and secondary sources; construct a sustained, coherent, and rhetorically sophisticated piece of writing.
Prerequisite: ENGL 120A and a minimum of 90 units.
Justification: This course is designed as a culmination to the English major and will replace the supervenient senior seminar the department has at present. This course will require students to: analyze and interpret multiple texts; integrate primary and secondary sources; demonstrate the ability to construct a sustained, coherent, and rhetorically sophisticated piece of writing.

ENGL 240U Nineteenth-Century Texts and Sex. This course examines a range of sexual identities through which nineteenth-century Britons imagined their lives. Such identities were influenced by ideas about race, class, status, ethnicity, gender, and age that often differed markedly from our own. The course will move beyond the literary to look at texts from a variety of genres (medical, literary, erotic, and autobiographical) and cover both well-treated and more obscure texts.
Justification: Focusing on the differences between our contemporary moment and nineteenth-century Britain, this course examines the connection between sexuality and identity that existed in nineteenth-century British culture. Specifically, we will examine a moment history just prior to the emergence of a modern psychoanalytic understanding of sexuality that prevails today and explore how ideas about race, class, status, ethnicity, age, and gender all worked to shape an understanding desire different from our own. To get a fuller picture of this culture, the course will move well beyond the literary to look at texts from a variety of genres (medical, literary, erotic, and autobiographical) and cover both well-treated and more obscure texts.

Department of Foreign Languages

COURSE DELETION

AFRL 199 Special Problems. No change in course description.
Justification: This course belongs to Ethnic Studies and not Foreign Languages.


NEW COURSE

ARABIC 1B Elementary Arabic. Arabic 1B is a continuation of Arabic 1A.
Prerequisite: Arabic 1A or instructor's permission.
Justification: Demand for our new Arabic 1A course has been enormous, and we want students to be able to continue.


COURSE CHANGES

GERM 140 Love and Marriage in the Medieval Epic.
Change to:
GERM 140 Heroes, Dragons and Quests.
An exploration of the heroic adventures of the medieval knights in their quests for fame and love with special attention to the bridal quest and the roles of their "ladies": their social, political and economic position, and their impact on life in the Middle Ages. Discussions will be based on the reading of selected Middle High German works in English translation. Note: No German language requirement.
Justification: Male students have objected to the former title of GERM 140 and a representative number of male and female students contribute to more meaningful class discussions. There is no change in the course content or requirements.

GERM 143 Arthurian Romance.
Change to:
GERM 143 King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table in Germany.
No change to course description.
Justification: The new title is more comprehensible to students than the existing title because many students do not understand the "Romance" as a genre of medieval epic.

SPAN 007 Spanish Reading Proficiency. Spanish Reading Proficiency. Designed to improve reading proficiency, this course will give students the opportunity to develop high intermediate to advanced level competency in Spanish. They will acquire the ability to understand main ideas and facts in description and narration of news items, personal correspondence, technical material written for general readers, simple short stories; follow essential points in ideas of special interest or knowledge. Students will demonstrate general comprehension of a text and will be able to answer content questions in English.
Note: Students must take the Spanish 7 Diagnostic Exam the first day of class. This course meets the Foreign Language Proficiency Graduation Requirement.
Prerequisite: SPAN 001B or SPAN 001C or two years of high school Spanish.
Justification: To bring the description in line with the content, and to alert students to new requirements for admission.

SPAN 196A Seminar in Translation.
Change to:
SPAN 108 Seminar in Translation.
Students will receive practical training in the techniques and strategies best suited for the average translation job. Much of the material presented will be selected from the documents, pamphlets and books/booklets translated by the PROFESSIONAL TRANSLATORS BOARD, an organization with which the instructor is associated. Therefore, in addition to the theory of translation, students will have the opportunity to tackle “real translation jobs” and evaluate their results. All work will be performed under the supervision of the instructor. The optimum recommended number of students should not exceed 16.
Prerequisite: Spanish, upper division standing or SPAN 47
Justification: Course can no longer be a experimental course number. Requesting permanent number. There is a great need in the State, as well as in the country, for good translators from English to Spanish and vice versa. Many of our graduates are called upon to do this work without any formal training in translation. Firms, State government agencies and advertising/publishing enterprises often ask our graduates to render professional translations. This proposed course, therefore, is a partial response to the need for university trained translators.

Department of History

NEW COURSES

HIST 008 History of Islamic Civilizations. Introductory survey of the history of Islamic societies of Asia, Africa, and the Middle East from the 6th century to the present. The focus will be on both continuities and the discontinuities that distinguish them from one anther. Topics to be discussed will include: religious, political, social, and cultural development in Islamic civilization during the premodern period, and on reform, western imperialism, nationalism, and religious politics in the modern period.
Justification: The History Department currently has several lower division course offerings in world civilizations including Africa, Asia and the West, and yet nothing in Islamic Civilizations. The study of the history of Islamic countries is of course highly topical these days. This course is proposed by a new tenure track faculty member just hired. It would be made available to the general student population at CSUS through listing it in the World Civilizations G.E. category.

HIST 21 Freshman Seminar: Becoming an Educated Person. Freshman seminar intended to provide an introduction to nature and possible meanings of higher education and the functions and resources of the University. Course is designed to help students develop academic success strategies and to improve learning skills. Students will interact with fellow students to build a community of academic and personal support. Course will introduce history as an academic discipline by requiring students to interpret historical information about issues, such as academic freedom and development of racism.
Justification: History 21 will permit prospective history students to participate in the Freshman Seminar Program and in an Area E General Education course. Students will be introduced to the university study of history within the context of a small class to assist them in succeeding during their first year. Students will learn the skills required to succeed in the university and the study of history. Prospective majors will have an introduction to the study of history as an academic discipline and as part of the process of developing into an educated person.

HIST 101 History of Modern Greece. Introduces the fundamental events and figures that shaped modern Greek history and politics. Topics will include: the Greek War of Independence, the Megali Idea, the Asia Minor Catastrophe, and Greece’s entry into the European Union. No prior knowledge of Greece or Greek language assumed.
Justification: Professor Katerina Lagos is a new full-time hire specializing in Greek and Mediterranean history. She will also be Director of the proposed Hellenic Studies Program at CSUS associated with the Angelo Tsakopoulos Collection in the CSUS Library. It is very important that she has new courses in the upcoming catalog so that the new program will acquire greater visibility in the university and in the broader community.

HIST 103 Mediterranean Europe: From the Renaissance to the European Union. Traces the development of Southern European countries from the Renaissance to European Union membership. These two ‘rebirths’ for Europe had a unique impact on Portugal, Spain, Italy and Greece. Focuses on the political, economic, and cultural aspects of these Mediterranean countries.
Justification: Professor Katerina Lagos is a new full-time hire specializing in Greek and Mediterranean history. She will also be Director of the proposed Hellenic Studies Program at CSUS associated with the Angelo Tsakopoulos Collection in the CSUS Library. It is very important that she has new courses in the upcoming catalog so that the new program will acquire greater visibility in the university and in the broader community.

HIST 109 Medieval England to 1485. The course will examine the political, religious, social, intellectual, and cultural developments of English history from the Celtic Bronze Age to the fifteenth century. Issues of race and ethnicity, gender, social classes, political ideology, religious toleration, economic developments, and artistic achievements will all be examined in particular detail.
Justification: The History Department has operated with two survey courses in medieval history since the arrival of Mary Jane Hamilton in the 1960s. Our new medievalist, Candace Gregory, is proposing this new course to diversify History’s offering in this period. This third course will give the considerable number of students interested in medieval history more choice in their course selections. It would be offered about every three semesters, alternating with the other two on the books.

HIST 121 Democracy and Human Rights in the Era of the French Revolution and Napolean. Explores the crucial social, cultural, intellectual, and political legacies of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic years (1789-1815) in France and across the globe. In particular, the course examines ideas and policies regarding religious toleration, democratic participation, slavery, gender, and nationalism.
Justification: This course is being proposed by a new faculty member. It represents the beginning of a reorganization and diversification of the European History curriculum in the History Department. The course will be offered every two years, and will not represent a net increase in faculty costs for the department.

HIST 125 Twentieth Century Germany. Twentieth Century Germany. The collapse of the German empire, rise and defeat of Nazi Germany, world wars and the Holocaust, and postwar division and unification of Germany. Emphasis on the major trends in modern Germany history with special focus on the search for modern German identity and its political and cultural expressions.
Justification: This course will be part of the History Department’s reorganization of upper division electives in European history in the 20th century. The sequence has not been changed since perhaps the 1950s. The department has two new full-time faculty members who would like to bring the department’s offerings up to date. Some courses will be deleted (e.g., probably History 118A). Some will be added.

HIST 157 History of International Relations in the 20th Century. Survey of the history of international relations (political, military, economic, cultural, and environmental) in the 20th century. Covers Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and the Americas, with emphasis on global events and issues from non-U.S. perspectives.
Justification: This course is being proposed by the new faculty hire in 20th century U.S. international relations. It would complement the two foreign policy courses now offered by the History Department: History 159, which focuses on the forces behind the development of U.S. foreign policy, and History 160, which focuses on the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. This course would offer a global perspective on the history of international relations in the 20th century.

HIST 174 Women in North America and Britain, 1600-1850. A transatlantic and cross-cultural approach to the study of women in North America and Britain between approximately 1600 and 1850. Focusing on the North Atlantic basin, particular attention is paid to social and cultural identity, gender roles, work, family, the law, slavery, religion, radicalism and reform.
Justification: This upper division elective in History will be a valuable addition to the department’s offerings in women’s history and social history. The department currently has only a single course in U.S. women’s history that covers the whole period of U.S. history from settlement to the present. The course corresponds to the research orientation of Professor Carr. It is anticipated that there will be enough student demand to offer this course every three or four semesters.

HIST 179 American Immigration History. A study of immigration in American life. Particular attention given to the shifting causes and patterns of immigration, similarities and differences among the experiences of immigrants in the United States, nativism, the development of immigration restrictions, and the effects of immigration on the economic, social, cultural, and political life of the nation over time.
Justification: This course will be an upper division elective appealing to History majors and other interested students. It corresponds to the chief research interest of Prof. Patrick Ettinger, a recently hired faculty member. The course topic is of course current in present-day California. It will be a valuable addition to the university’s offerings dealing with immigration and minority groups.


COURSE CHANGES

HIST 118B World War II: Causes, Conduct, Consequences. A critical examination of political, military, social, and cultural transformations in the era of the Second World War. Particular emphasis will be placed on diplomatic relations between the Great Powers, military conduct during the war, the experience of fascism, the causes and ramifications of the Holocaust, and the war's cultural and political legacy in Europe.
Justification: New catalog description only.

HIST 157 History of International Relations in the 20th Century. Survey of the history of international relations (political, military, economic, cultural, and environmental) in the 20th century. Covers Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and the Americas, with emphasis on global events and issues from non-U.S. perspectives.
Justification: This course is being proposed by the new faculty hire in 20th century U.S. international relations. It would complement the two foreign policy courses now offered by the History Department: History 159, which focuses on the forces behind the development of U.S. foreign policy, and History 160, which focuses on the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. This course would offer a global perspective on the history of international relations in the 20th century.

HIST 159 History of U.S. Foreign Relations. Diplomatic, military, economic, and cultural relations between the United States and the world from 1789 to the present, with emphasis on the 20th century; focus on transformation of United States into a global power.
Justifications: New catalog description only. The purpose of the change is to distinguish this course more clearly from the new course, History 157, that deals with 20th century international relations from a global perspective.

HIST 178 Chicano/a History: From the Spanish Colonial Era to the Present.
Change to:
HIST 178 Mexican-American History
. No change to course description.
Justification: This change is intended to clarify that the course covers more than the “Chicano Movement” of the 1960s and 1970s. The current course title, when shortened for the Schedule of Classes, has led some students to think this course only covered the more recent historical period. The title change will also help avoid confusion with the Chicano Studies course offered in Ethnic Studies.

COURSE DELETION

HIST 144 Emerging Third World, 1945-Present.
Justification:
Course deletion only. The faculty member who taught this course is now fully retired. The Department's new specialist in Islamic history would prefer to drop the course.


Department of Humanities and Religious Studies

NEW CHANGE

HRS 183 Religion and Film. An examination of the religious and spiritual dimensions of selected films from around the world. The cinematic arts are examined in relationship to religious and spiritual concerns, concepts, and values.
Justification: A course on Religion and Film would contribute to the HRS curriculum by providing a class that unites themes and approaches in both "tracks" of the program - the study of the arts and religious studies. Course could also serve Film Studies students and General Education.

COURSE CHANGE

HRS 134 Baroque and the Enlightenment. No change to course description.
Justification: Change course classification from C02 to C03. This is an advanced study/intensive writing course.


Department of Learning Skills

COURSE CHANGES

LS 6 Language Development - ESL.
Change to:
LS 6 Language Development - Multilingual Students.
No change to course description.
Justification: "Multilingual Students" is a less stigmatizing term than "ESL" and reflects that many students in LS 6 speak several languages including English.

LS 6A ESL Language Development - Oral Skills.
Change to:
LS 6A Oral Skills for Multilingual Students.
No change to course description.
Justification: "Multilingual Students" is a less stigmatizing term than "ESL" and reflects that many students in LS 6A speak several languages including English.

LS 6B ESL Language Development - Writing Skills.
Change to:
LS 6B Writing Skills for Multilingual Students.
No change to course description.
Justification: "Multilingual Students" is a less stigmatizing term than "ESL" and reflects that many students in LS 6B speak several languages including English.

LS 50E
Change to:
LS 50 Academic Strategies for College Study for Multilingual Students. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Enrollment in LS 86
Justification: "Multilingual Students" is a less stigmatizing term than "ESL" and reflects that many students in LS 50E speak several languages including English.

LS 60E Reading for Speed and Efficiency - ESL.
Change to:
LS 60M - Reading for Speed and Efficiency - Multilingual Students.
No change to course description.
Justification: "Multilingual Students" is a less stigmatizing term than "ESL" and reflects that many students in LS 60E speak several languages including English.

LS 85 Grammar for ESL Writers.
Change to:
LS 85 Grammar for Multilingual Writers. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Placement of LS 86 or LS 87 on the English Diagnostic Test.
Justification: "Multilingual Students" is a less stigmatizing term than "ESL" and reflects that many students in LS 85 speak several languages including English.

LS 86 English for Speakers of Other Languages II.
Change to:
LS 86 College Language Skills for Multilingual Students. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Score of 120-141 on the English Placement Test or score of 2 or 3 on the English Diagnostic Test.
Justification: The name change reflects that the course is equivalent to LS 15: College Language Skills. "Multilingual Students" is a less stigmatizing term than "ESL" and reflects that many students in LS 86 speak several languages including English.

LS 87 English for Speakers of Other Languages III.
Change to:
LS 87 Basic Writing Skills for Multilingual Students. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Score of 142-150 on the English Placement Test or score of 4 on the English Diagnostic Test, or credit in LS 86.
Justification: The name change reflects that the course is equivalent to ENGL 1: Basic Writing Skills. "Multilingual Students" is a less stigmatizing term than "ESL" and reflects that many students in LS 87 speak several languages including English.


Department of Music

COURSE CHANGES

MUSC 139 Jazz Improvisation.
Change to:
MUSC 139A Jazz Theory and Improvisation I.
A is part of a two-semester study of jazz improvisation required of all jazz majors. This course will provide the student with basic and intermediate skills of creative improvisation styles in the jazz idiom. In order to expand the skill level of improvisation of each particular jazz student, this class will focus on four main areas of concentration: 1) listening, 2) scale and chord, development, 3) repertory development, 4) Transcribing jazz solos.
Prerequisite: MUSC 006 or consent of instructor.
Justification: We are requesting a course title and prefix change for Music 139 to support our new BM in Jazz Studies degree program at CSUS. Music 139, Jazz Improvisation, will become a two-semester study within our jazz curriculum. The material presented in the course will also require an additional unit increase. The change of units was approved with the program changes last spring, but we failed to submit this course change proposal at that time.

MUSC 139 Jazz Improvisation.
Change to:
MUSC 139B Jazz Theory and Improvisation II.
Music 139 B is the second part of a two-semester study of jazz improvisation required of all jazz majors. This course will provide the student with intermediate and advanced skills of creative improvisation styles in the jazz idiom. In order to expand the skill levels of improvisation of each particular jazz student, this class will focus on four main areas of concentration: 1) listening, 2) scale and chord, development, 3) repertory development, 4) transcribing jazz solos.
Prerequisite: MUSC 139A or consent of instructor.
Justification: We are requesting a course title and prefix change for Music 139 to support our new BM in Jazz Studies degree program at CSUS. Music 139, Jazz Improvisation, will become a two-semester study within our jazz curriculum. The material presented in Music 139 B – Jazz Theory & Improvisation II, will also require an additional unit increase. The addition of this course was approved with the program changes last spring, but we failed to submit this course change proposal at that time.

MUSC 143J Jazz Ensemble.
Change to:
MUSC 143J Instrumental Jazz Ensemble.
Rehearsal and performance of literature written for instrumental jazz ensemble.
Justification: We are requesting a course title and prefix change for Music 143 to clarify the distinction between Instrumental Jazz Ensembles and Vocal Jazz Ensembles. The current schedule offers Music 143J with five separate sections. Section 1-2 are vocal ensembles; sections 3-5 are instrumental. Students are often confused as to what section they should enroll in and the department experiences many registration problems as a result. With the new BM in Jazz Studies degree program, it is imperative that we try to make things as easy as possible and to alleviate any potential problems for both current and future students.

MUSC 143J Jazz Ensemble.
Change to:
MUSC 143V Vocal Jazz Ensemble.
Rehearsal and performance of literature written for vocal jazz ensemble.
Justification: We are requesting a course title and prefix change for Music 143 to clarify the distinction between Instrumental Jazz Ensembles and Vocal Jazz Ensembles. The current schedule offers Music 143J with five separate sections. Section 1-2 are vocal ensembles; sections 3-5 are instrumental. Students are often confused as to what section they should enroll in and the department experiences many registration problems as a result. With the new BM in Jazz Studies degree program, it is imperative that we try to make things as easy as possible and to alleviate any potential problems for both current and future students.

MUSC 185 Senior Recital.
Change to:
MUSC 185J Senior Recital Jazz.
A formal recital demonstrating the performance abilities of the student in the Jazz Studies concentration. Permission to enroll by permission of the appropriate faculty committee. Contents of the program must be approved and supervised by instructor in the performance medium.
Justification:
We are requesting a course prefix /number, and title change for Music 185 to illustrate the distinction between the Senior Recital for the BM performance concentration and the Senior Recital for the BM Jazz Studies concentration. This change will support and our new BM in Jazz Studies degree and will help to clarify the courses required within the jazz concentration.

Department of Philosophy

COURSE CHANGES

PHIL 101 Ethics and Social Issues. Moral controversies that divide society today, such as abortion, the death penalty, affirmative action, sexism, war and peace. Emphasis is on identifying the relevant values and moral principles underlying competing views and subjecting them to rational assessment.
Prerequisite: Passing score on WPE.
Justification: Update topic list to reflect current social issues.

PHIL 103 Business and Computer Ethics. Analytical treatment of controversial moral issues which emerge in the business world, e.g., affirmative action, corporate responsibility, the global economy, industry and environmental damage, social effects of advertising, the computer threat to personal privacy, ownership of computer programs. Discussion will focus on basic moral principles and concepts relevant to these issues.
Justification: Update topic list to reflect current topics in business ethics. Match GE Area D topic set more closely.

PHIL 104 Bioethics. Ethical dilemmas faced by professionals and patients in the field of medicine, e.g., patient self-determination and informed consent, discrimination in health care, euthanasia, abortion, surrogate motherhood, genetic modification, and rights to health care. Emphasis is on well-reasoned application of general moral principles to practical ethical decisions.
Justification: Update topic list to reflect current topics in bioethics. Match GE Area D topic set more closely.

PHIL 126 Philosophy of Biology.
Change to:
PHIL 126 The Meanings of Evolution.
No change to course description.
Justification: Indicate more accurately the scope of material covered in course. Attractive students seeking a dispassionate, academic treatment of the issues surrounding evolutionary theory.

PHIL 192D Space and Time: Plato to Einstein. Introduction to philosophical issues involving space, time, and matter. The historical development of the issues from Antiquity (Zeno, Plato, and Euclid) through the Early Modern Period (Newton, Leibniz, Berkeley, and Kant) to contemporary treatments (Einstein, Thorne, and Hawking). An investigation into the current state of these issues. No background or work in mathematics or physics is required.
Prerequisite: 6 units in philosophy or instructor permission.
Justification: Changed course description clarifies the level of preparation needed for the course.

PHIL 195 Philosophy Internship. Supervised work experience in an approved office or organization where significant philosophical issues are raised. The student must write regular reports on these issues. Supervision is provided by the faculty instructor and an managing official in the work situation. Open to majors only.
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Justification: To provide the “service learning option” provided for in the Applied Ethics and Law Concentration and recommended in the department’s last program review.


Department of Theatre and Dance

COURSE CHANGES

DNCE 001 Beginning Jazz. No change to course description.
Justification: The department is doing a clean-up of classifications, because when the Dance classes moved from the Department of Kinesiology, the codes were not addressed, and they are not appropriately classified. The classification has been 02, and is now being changed to 12.

DNCE 002 Beginning Modern Dance. No change to course description.
Justification: The department is doing a clean-up of classifications, because when the Dance classes moved from the Department of Kinesiology, the codes were not addressed, and they are not appropriately classified. The classification has been 02, and is now being changed to 12.

DNCE 003 Beginning Ballet. No change to course description.
Justification: The department is doing a clean-up of classifications, because when the Dance classes moved from the Department of Kinesiology, the codes were not addressed, and they are not appropriately classified. The classification has been 02, and is now being changed to 12.

DNCE 004 Beginning Tap. No change to course description.
Justification: The department is doing a clean-up of classifications, because when the Dance classes moved from the Department of Kinesiology, the codes were not addressed, and they are not appropriately classified. The classification has been 02, and is now being changed to 12.

DNCE 005 Mexican Folklorico. No change to course description.
Justification: The department is doing a clean-up of classifications, because when the Dance classes moved from the Department of Kinesiology, the codes were not addressed, and they are not appropriately classified. The classification has been 02, and is now being changed to 12.

DNCE 006 Popular Jazz Dance. No change to course description.
Justification: The department is doing a clean-up of classifications, because when the Dance classes moved from the Department of Kinesiology, the codes were not addressed, and they are not appropriately classified. The classification has been 02, and is now being changed to 12.

DNCE 011 Intermediate Jazz. No change to course description except to add “instructor permission.”
Justification: Instructor permission is necessary because the student needs to demonstrate knowledge of the beginning level jazz vocabulary in order to participate in the Intermediate Jazz class.

DNCE 012 Intermediate Modern Dance. No change to course description except to add “instructor permission.”
Justification: Instructor permission is necessary because the student needs to demonstrate knowledge of the beginning level modern dance vocabulary in order to participate in the Intermediate Modern Dance class.

DNCE 013 Intermediate Ballet. No change to course description except to add “instructor permission.”
Justification: Instructor permission is necessary because the student needs to demonstrate knowledge of the beginning level ballet vocabulary in order to participate in the Intermediate Ballet class.

DNCE 014 Intermediate Tap. No change to course description.
Justification: The department is doing a clean-up of classifications, because when the Dance classes moved from the Department of Kinesiology, the codes were not addressed, and they are not appropriately classified. The classification has been 02, and is now being changed to 12.

DNCE 040 . Basic Dance Production A. No change to course description.
Justification: The department is doing a clean-up of classifications, because when the Dance classes moved from the Department of Kinesiology, the codes were not addressed, and they are not appropriately classified. The classification has been 02, and is now being changed to 12.

DNCE 041 Basic Dance Production B. No change to course description.
Justification: The department is doing a clean-up of classifications, because when the Dance classes moved from the Department of Kinesiology, the codes were not addressed, and they are not appropriately classified. The classification has been 02, and is now being changed to 12.

DNCE 111 Advanced Jazz. No change to course description.
Justification: The department is doing a clean-up of classifications, because when the Dance classes moved from the Department of Kinesiology, the codes were not addressed, and they are not appropriately classified. The classification has been 02, and is now being changed to 12.

DNCE112 Advanced Modern Dance. No change to course description.
Justification: The department is doing a clean-up of classifications, because when the Dance classes moved from the Department of Kinesiology, the codes were not addressed, and they are not appropriately classified. The classification has been 02, and is now being changed to 12.

DNCE 113 Advanced Ballet. No change to course description.
Justification: The department is doing a clean-up of classifications, because when the Dance classes moved from the Department of Kinesiology, the codes were not addressed, and they are not appropriately classified. The classification has been 02, and is now being changed to 12.

DNCE 120 Principles of Choreography. No change to course description except to add prerequisite below.
Prerequisite: DNCE majors only and permission of instructor.
Justification: This class is a part of the Dance concentration, open to majors only.

DNCE 121 Choreographic Forms and Styles. No change to course description.
Change to:
DNCE 122 Choreographic Forms and Styles.
Prerequisite:
DNCE 120, 121 (new)
Justification: Pre-requisite changes: This is the last course the majors take in choreography. They need to have DANCE 120, and what is now 122. NUMBER CHANGE: To fit sequence taken and order of classes.

DNCE 122 Dance Improvisation. No change to course description.
Change to:
DNCE 121 Dance Improvisation.
Prerequisite:
DNCE 120
Justification: National Association of School’s of Dance requires 2 units in improvisation and choreographic courses. A report to justify this is available in the Department of Theatre and Dance. Number Change to fit sequence.

DNCE 142 Dance Performance Skills. Description remains the same, except delete last line, “Must be taken two times for the major.”
Note: Open only to majors in Dance concentration.
Justification: National Association of School’s of Dance assesses the need for this class at 1 unit. The original intent was to hire artists-in-residence to teach the class. Due to budget constraints, this was impossible.

DNCE 143 Performance Practicum. Under NOTE: needs to match Dance Concentration listing of courses on Page 605. Course description remains the same until you get to the “Note.”
Change it to NOTE: A total of two undergraduate units must be taken for the major. 1 unit.
Justification: Course description error in catalog, including unit number.

DNCE 150 Dance Theory. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: DNCE 122, 130, 131, instructor permission.
Justification: For changing prerequisites: Students must have prior knowledge in choreography and history prior to taking this culminating class in their major in which they also prepare their portfolios.

DNCE 150 Dance Theory. No change to course description.
Justification: The department is doing a clean-up of classifications, because when the Dance classes moved from the Department of Kinesiology, the codes were not addressed, and they are not appropriately classified. The classification has been 02, and is now being changed to 12.

DNCE 151 Dance Criticism. No change to course description.
Justification: The department is doing a clean-up of classifications, because when the Dance classes moved from the Department of Kinesiology, the codes were not addressed, and they are not appropriately classified. The classification has been 02, and is now being changed to 04.

DNCE 160 Creative Dance. No change to course description.
Justification: The department is doing a clean-up of classifications, because when the Dance classes moved from the Department of Kinesiology, the codes were not addressed, and they are not appropriately classified. The classification has been 02, and is now being changed to 04.

THEA 011 Acting Study I. The foundation course for the Actor Training Program, it provides a basic working knowledge of the craft of acting. This studio class focuses in the areas of physical awareness, relaxation, trust, discipline, and action/objective. This is accomplished through bodywork, theatre games, improvisation, and discussion.
Prerequisite: Theatre Major or Dance Concentration with THEA 009.
Justification: Present catalog copy is outdated and not specific in terms of “exactly” what is covered in a given semester. It does not stress that ACTING 011 is a foundation course. We have a Gen Ed acting class, THEA 09, for students interested in taking an acting course.

THEA 101 Acting Study II. Building from the skills developed in Acting I, the aim of the course is to provide a working knowledge of the craft of acting to include: The actor’s process in analyzing a text, developing a role, and working in collaboration with others. This will be accomplished through scene and monologue work. In addition, the course will develop skills, confidence, mental agility, and trust through physical work, theatre games and improvisation.
Prerequisite: THEA 011 and instructor's permission.
Justification: Present catalog copy is outdated and not specific in terms of “exactly” what is covered a given semester.

THEA 109 Acting Technique in Musical Theatre.
Change to:
THEA 109A Acting Technique in Musical Theatre.
No change to course description. This form is adding the suffix “A” and adding pre-requisites.
Prerequisites: MUSC025, THEA 009 or THEA 011, DANC 001, 002, 003, 004, 005, 006 or instructor permission/audition.
Justification: For changing pre-requisites: Students must have a basic knowledge of the voice for singing and a beginning level acting and dance class.

THEA 110 Acting III.
Change to:
THEA 110 Acting Styles: Classic Realism.
The course provides the student with a working knowledge of the analysis, rehearsal and performance techniques used in the acting of 20th Century classic realism. Using Chekhov and Ibsen’s major plays as the foundation, students will analyze the text to discover the “given circumstances” of the play and develop character using a basic Stanislavski technique. Students also become familiar with the historical and social background of Russia and Norway in the late 19th and early 20th Century.
Prerequisite: THEA 101, THEA 114A, THEA 114B and instructor's permission.
Justification: Present catalog copy is outdated and not specific in terms of “exactly” what is covered in a given semester. The course will not change from what it has been, only become more focused in its subject matter.

THEA 113 Acting Styles: Shakespeare. The course offers a de-mystifying approach to speaking Shakespeare’s text. Acting Shakespeare begins with an in-depth study of the structure and meter of the verse. The language is explored through sound, sense, and imagery exercises. Scene and monologue work is detailed and extensive.
Prerequisite: THEA 101, THEA 114A, THEA 114B and instructor's permission.
Justification: Present catalog copy is outdated and not specific in terms of “exactly” what is covered in a given semester. The course needs to focus on acting Shakespeare and not a catch all for all acting styles that are rarely, if ever, offered.


NEW COURSES

THEA 109B Acting Technique in Musical Theatre II. A practical study in singer-actor-dancer performance techniques. Major consideration is given to the coordination of dialogue, melody, lyric and the use of musical staging and choreography.
Prerequisite: THEA 109A, instructor permission or by audition.
Justification: This course will serve as an intermediate level of instruction required for the Theatre/Dance student who is choosing a concentration in musical theatre.

THEA 126 Audition Technique. An in-depth study of the techniques of auditioning for professional theatre, film, voice over and musical theatre. Students prepare an audition repertoire that is appropriate to their age and type.
Prerequisite: THEA 101, THEA 114B, THEA 114B, THEA 110, THEA 113 and instructor's permission.
Justification: The acting program in the Department of Theatre and Dance must include a class of this type of training to prepare students for graduate acting program entrance and the professional theatre world. Auditioning is a unique skill and it requires specific training.

THEA 175 Multicultural Perspectives in American Film. A study of the historical and artistic contributions of Native American, Chicano/Latino, African-Americans and Asian American to the American cinema. The course will concentrate on a range of films with an emphasis on multicultural theoretical and critical writings and will examine the cultural and socio-political climate in which these films were crafted.
Justification: As the Film Studies continues to expand, this particular course complements the existing course, THEA 174, Multicultural Perspectives in American Theatre. In addition, THEA 175 would enhance the curricular structures of Area C (C4-Further Studies in the Arts and Humanities) and Area E, Race and Ethnicity in American Society.


COURSE DELETION

THEA 112 Acting for the Camera. No change to course description.
Justification: The class is not offered.

 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Department of Bilingual/Multicultural Education

NEW COURSES

EDBM 200 Pro-seminar in Bilingual and Multicultural Education. The current undergraduate and graduate curricula in nursing recognizes and values development of cultural competence in the education of future leaders in nursing care. Current course offerings provide students with an opportunity to develop general knowledge regarding culture and health as well as experiences with the culturally diverse population in the local area. Building upon this foundation, further competence in transcultural nursing will be developed through focused study of one particular culture as well as the lived experience of immersion into another culture. This will provide students with an appreciation of international and transcultural issues in health care enhancing their clinical practice and preparing them for graduate study in this rapidly growing field of specialization. Immersion in another culture is further expected to enhance the student’s appreciation of cultural diversity and prepare them to engage in productive relationships in a pluralistic society.
Justification: Courses in the department’s graduate program have been revised in order to more appropriately meet the needs of our students. In some cases, the revisions have been substantial and reflect significant changes in the professional profile of our students and the academic interests that they have. In other cases, the changes have been more subtle. In an effort to make the program sequencing operate more efficiently and transparently, we have also renumbered our courses in order to follow the most logical sequence.

EDBM 220B Afrocentric Curriculum and Instruction. Expansion of mainstream curriculum theory and educational philosophy through the examination of alternatives to the Eurocentric education model imposed on U.S. schools. Exploration of effective materials and methods for target population. Emphasis on contemporary programs, practices, and policies addressing these issues at the elementary, secondary and university levels. Inquiry into issues of identity, power, equity and achievement from an Afrocentric perspective in these educational contexts.
Justification: Courses in the department’s graduate program have been revised in order to more appropriately meet the needs of our students. In some cases, the revisions have been substantial and reflect significant changes in the professional profile of our students and the academic interests that they have. In other cases, the changes have been more subtle. In an effort to make the program sequencing operate more efficiently and transparently, we have also renumbered our courses in order to follow the most logical sequence.

EDBM 240 Advanced Seminar in Teaching Strategies for Multicultural Schools. In-depth study of the most recent research on cooperative learning, arts education, and education in the content areas. Emphasis on methods that develop students’ critical thinking skills and their understanding of fundamental concepts in the content areas as well as prepare them to participate actively and critically in a democratic and pluralistic society. Additional focus on building teachers’ capacity in instructional technology.
Prerequisites: EDBM 210 and EDBM 220A or the equivalents or permission of instructor.
Justification: Courses in the department’s graduate program have been revised in order to more appropriately meet the needs of our students. In some cases, the revisions have been substantial and reflect significant changes in the professional profile of our students and the academic interests that they have. In other cases, the changes have been more subtle. In an effort to make the program sequencing operate more efficiently and transparently, we have also renumbered our courses in order to follow the most logical sequence.

EDBM 245A Advocacy, Change and Community. Focus on learning theories behind and the methods for creating social change. Development of skills needed to differentiate social problems from their symptoms, and to coalesce key community members and agencies toward effecting social change. Additional study of strategies needed to assess the success of change efforts, and how to learn from challenges
Justification: Courses in the department’s graduate program have been revised in order to more appropriately meet the needs of our students. In some cases, the revisions have been substantial and reflect significant changes in the professional profile of our students and the academic interests that they have. In other cases, the changes have been more subtle. In an effort to make the program sequencing operate more efficiently and transparently, we have also renumbered our courses in order to follow the most logical sequence.

EDBM 245B Cultural Dialogue, Advocacy and the Development of Community Based Educational Programs. Presentation and analysis of the historical and contemporary context of the cultural dialogue between members of diverse minority groups and the dominant educational institutions. Specific emphasis will be placed on the identification of community based educational initiatives and agendas that were successfully developed and implemented by diverse cultural groups.
Prerequisite: EDBM 170 or Ethnic Studies 195
Justification: Courses in the department’s graduate program have been revised in order to more appropriately meet the needs of our students. In some cases, the revisions have been substantial and reflect significant changes in the professional profile of our students and the academic interests that they have. In other cases, the changes have been more subtle. In an effort to make the program sequencing operate more efficiently and transparently, we have also renumbered our courses in order to follow the most logical sequence.

EDBM 260 Social and Psychological Foundations of Race and Gender among African Americans. In-depth exploration of the dynamic influences that form the subjective experience and personal agency of African American men and women. Focus on the social context and internal experience of African Americans to illustrate the impact of gender and racial socialization on identity development specifically and human behavior generally.
Justification:
Courses in the department’s graduate program have been revised in order to more appropriately meet the needs of our students. In some cases, the revisions have been substantial and reflect significant changes in the professional profile of our students and the academic interests that they have. In other cases, the changes have been more subtle. In an effort to make the program sequencing operate more efficiently and transparently, we have also renumbered our courses in order to follow the most logical sequence.

EDBM 265 Thesis/Project Writing. Seminar to focus on the process of completing the required culminating experience including refining the research problem, completing the literature review, finalizing and implementing the research design, and completing required university protocol (e.g., Human Subjects Review and format requirements).
Prerequisites: EDBM 250 or the equivalent, Advancement to Candidacy, completion of at least 20 units of coursework toward the master of arts.
Justification: Courses in the department’s graduate program have been revised in order to more appropriately meet the needs of our students. In some cases, the revisions have been substantial and reflect significant changes in the professional profile of our students and the academic interests that they have. In other cases, the changes have been more subtle. In an effort to make the program sequencing operate more efficiently and transparently, we have also renumbered our courses in order to follow the most logical sequence.

EDBM 280 Action Research for Critical Educators. Systematic investigation of a particular aspect of professional or community practice. These investigations can focus on, but are not limited to, curriculum and instruction, program design and delivery, student performance, assessment, school/organizational culture, restructuring or reform issues, or professional responsibilities. Participants will formulate a research question, create a research design, collect and analyze data, and organize and write a report of their findings.
Justification: Courses in the department’s graduate program have been revised in order to more appropriately meet the needs of our students. In some cases, the revisions have been substantial and reflect significant changes in the professional profile of our students and the academic interests that they have. In other cases, the changes have been more subtle. In an effort to make the program sequencing operate more efficiently and transparently, we have also renumbered our courses in order to follow the most logical sequence.

EDBM 285 Law and Education Policy. Introduction to legal and related policy concerns in education, particularly those addressing educational equity issues. Provides an historical perspective on the evolution of federal and state court decisions, federal and state statues, and mandates. In-depth study of the basic legal considerations focusing on affirmative action, the rights of student and parent groups based on language and language varieties, citizenship/residence status, social class, special needs and sexual orientation.
Justification: Courses in the department’s graduate program have been revised in order to more appropriately meet the needs of our students. In some cases, the revisions have been substantial and reflect significant changes in the professional profile of our students and the academic interests that they have. In other cases, the changes have been more subtle. In an effort to make the program sequencing operate more efficiently and transparently, we have also renumbered our courses in order to follow the most logical sequence.


COURSE CHANGES

EDBM 251 Education for a Democratic, Pluralistic Society.
Change to:
EDBM 205 Education for a Democratic, Pluralistic Society.
Advanced study of social, cultural, historical, philosophical and psychological issues related to the teaching and learning of culturally and linguistically diverse students. In-depth consideration of the implications of theories and research related to the history of educational reform, the history and culture of the teaching profession, the nature of learning for linguistically and culturally diverse students, the relationship between schooling and democratic society, and the barriers to all of the above.
Justification: Courses in the department’s graduate program have been revised in order to more appropriately meet the needs of our students. In some cases, the revisions have been substantial and reflect significant changes in the professional profile of our students and the academic interests that they have. In other cases, the changes have been more subtle. In an effort to make the program sequencing operate more efficiently and transparently, we have also renumbered our courses in order to follow the most logical sequence.

EDBM 273 Research Seminar on Bilingualism and Language Varieties in Education.
Change to:
EDBM 235 Research Seminar on Bilingualism and Language Varieties in Education.
No change to course description.
Justification: Courses in the department’s graduate program have been revised in order to more appropriately meet the needs of our students. In some cases, the revisions have been substantial and reflect significant changes in the professional profile of our students and the academic interests that they have. In other cases, the changes have been more subtle. In an effort to make the program sequencing operate more efficiently and transparently, we have also renumbered our courses in order to follow the most logical sequence.

EDBM 275 Assessment of Bilingual Learners.
Change to:
EDBM 230 Assessment in Multicultural Schools.
Covers the historical and contemporary issues surrounding the assessment of culturally/linguistically diverse learners in the areas of academic achievement, intelligence, language proficiency and diagnostic testing. Surveys the various instruments and procedures currently available for such testing and their application. Students will be prepared to apply their knowledge of assessment practices in order to promote rather than hinder school achievement and success of culturally/linguistically diverse learners. Lecture, student presentations, debates, research, group work, discussions.
Justification: Courses in the department’s graduate program have been revised in order to more appropriately meet the needs of our students. In some cases, the revisions have been substantial and reflect significant changes in the professional profile of our students and the academic interests that they have. In other cases, the changes have been more subtle. In an effort to make the program sequencing operate more efficiently and transparently, we have also renumbered our courses in order to follow the most logical sequence.

EDBM 277 Curriculum for Multicultural Schools.
Change to:
EDBM 220A Curriculum for Multicultural Schools.
No change to course description.
Justification: Courses in the department’s graduate program have been revised in order to more appropriately meet the needs of our students. In some cases, the revisions have been substantial and reflect significant changes in the professional profile of our students and the academic interests that they have. In other cases, the changes have been more subtle. In an effort to make the program sequencing operate more efficiently and transparently, we have also renumbered our courses in order to follow the most logical sequence.

EDBM 278 Theoretical Perspectives on Cross-Cultural Education.
Change to:
EDBM 210 Critical Race Theory and Critical Pedagogy: Concepts and Practice.
In-depth examination of the theory and practices of critical pedagogy and critical race theory, including historical and theoretical roots, related theoretical frameworks, and applications in various contexts. Consideration of issues related to power, agency, social reproduction, resistance, liberation, and social justice. Comparison of critical pedagogy with other teaching/learning and social change theories. Analysis of critical pedagogy as a tool for change within classroom, school and community contexts.
Justification: Courses in the department’s graduate program have been revised in order to more appropriately meet the needs of our students. In some cases, the revisions have been substantial and reflect significant changes in the professional profile of our students and the academic interests that they have. In other cases, the changes have been more subtle. In an effort to make the program sequencing operate more efficiently and transparently, we have also renumbered our courses in order to follow the most logical sequence.

EDBM 565 MA Thesis.
Change to:
EDBM 565 MA Thesis/Project.
Completion of a thesis or project approved for the Master’s degree. Prerequisite: Advanced to candidacy. EDBM 250 and Thesis/Project Petition and Advisor Reservation Forms approved by Department Graduate Coordinator one semester prior to registration
Prerequisite: EDBM 250, Advancement to Candidacy
Justification: Courses in the department’s graduate program have been revised in order to more appropriately meet the needs of our students. In some cases, the revisions have been substantial and reflect significant changes in the professional profile of our students and the academic interests that they have. In other cases, the changes have been more subtle. In an effort to make the program sequencing operate more efficiently and transparently, we have also renumbered our courses in order to follow the most logical sequence.

COURSE DELETION

EDBM 566 MA Project.
Justification:
Courses in the department’s graduate program have been revised in order to more appropriately meet the needs of our students. In some cases, the revisions have been substantial and reflect significant changes in the professional profile of our students and the academic interests that they have. In other cases, the changes have been more subtle. In an effort to make the program sequencing operate more efficiently and transparently, we have also renumbered our courses in order to follow the most logical sequence.


Department of Child Development

NEW COURSE

CHDV 242 Advanced Child Development. An in-depth examination of physical, cognitive, and social development from infancy through adolescence. Content includes current developmental theory and research and the application of this research to educational and community settings, with special emphasis on the cultural context of development. The development of critical thinking skills and scholarly writing will be emphasized.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.
Justification: Many students in the Early Childhood Education Master’s Program lack advanced content in developmental theory. The course is aimed at providing this content as well as a focus on critical thinking and writing necessary for the thesis or project.

COURSE CHANGES

CHDV 247 Theoretical and Applied Perspectives on Cultural Diversity.
Change to:
CHDV 247 Theoretical and Applied Perspectives on Cross Cultural Development.
The cultural basis of human development through an in-depth examination of the socio-emotional, cognitive, language and gender development of children from infancy through adolescence within and across different cultures and communities. Theory, methods, and research of cross-cultural investigations will be considered and applications of course material to educational and community settings will be explored and analyzed.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
Justification: This change focuses the content of this course to the study of socio-emotional, cognitive, language and gender development within and across different cultures and communities. As a part of overall changes in the M.A. program, content in the old CHDV 247 description related to socio-political and educational issues will now be incorporated into the CHDV 251 course where it is more appropriate. This change will also shift this important content from a course that students may select (CHDV 247) to a course that is a requirement in the M.A. foundations (CHDV 251).

CHDV 251 Education in a Democratic and Pluralistic Society.
Change to:
CHDV 251 Development and Education for a Democratic and Pluralistic Society.
Advanced study of cultural, social-political, and psychological influences on development and how they relate to educational and community settings serving children (prenatal to 18 years). Focus will be placed on demographic markers and categorical memberships related to equity.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
Justification: The proposed change maintains the current content of the CHDV 251 class but expands the course to incorporate a perspective that addresses the diversity of career interests and directions of students in the ECE M.A. program. These students come from a variety of community settings, including elementary, preschool, day care, mental health, social service and recreation. The content of the course will continue to reflect consideration of social, psychological, and political issues related to children and education but with a greater focus on issues related to development and to equity.

Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation and School Psychology

COURSE CHANGE

EDS 439 Early Fieldwork in School Psychology. No change to course description.
Justification: This is a non-substantive change. We would like to change the units from variable 3-10 to variable 1-10. This change will give students greater flexibility and more closely align it with school psychology program recommendations which suggest that students take Early Fieldwork in the 3rd and 4th semesters.


Department of Teacher Education

COURSE CHANGES

EDTE 201 Practicum in Comprehension: Assessment and Instruction. No change to course description.
Justification: Delete prerequisite: EDTE 200. Catalog cleanup.

EDTE 220 Seminar in Mathematics Education. Research of mathematical instruction trends, problems of teaching math, and successful mathematics program.
Justification: Deleting prerequisite: EDTE 304, or EDTE 386. Catalog cleanup. Adding word to description.

EDTE 227 Seminar in Curriculum and Instruction, K-12. No change to course description.
Prerequisite:
EDTE 250
Justification: Adding prerequisite EDTE 250. Catalog cleanup.

EDTE 230 Introduction to Computers in the Multiple Subject Classroom.
Change to:

EDTE 230 Introduction to Computers in the Classroom. Practical introduction to the use and applications of computer-based technologies in the Kindergarten-twelfth grade classroom. Major topics include basic computer terminology and functions, educational software evaluation and integration into instruction, using telecommunication, multimedia authoring and issues relating to the impact of computers in a democratic society. No prior experience with computers required.
Justification: Catalog cleanup. Correcting titles and changing one word.

EDTE 250 Education Research. Studies qualitative and quantitative methods in the development of reliable knowledge in the field of education. Includes identification and formulation of research problems, research designs and presentation of reports representative of different research strategies. Classified students are encouraged to take this course early in their graduate programs.
Justification: Changing prerequisite. Graduate standing is designated in the Catalog in Teacher Education under "Graduate Courses". "Graduate standing is required for 200-series courses enrollment."

EDTE 251 Education for a Democratic, Pluralistic Society. Advanced study of social and psychological issues which need to be considered in education relating to the client, the educator, the community and society. Addresses implications of theories of learning , assessment, individual differences and social/political influences.
Justification: Changing prerequisite. Graduate standing is designated in the Catalog in Teacher Education under "Graduate Courses". "Graduate standing is required for 200-series courses enrollment."

EDTE 260 The Gifted/Talented Pupil.
Change to:
EDBM 260 The Gifted/Talented Pupil.
No change to course description.
Justification: Program changed to the Department of Bilingual/Multicultural Education.

EDTE 261 Teaching the Gifted and Talented Learner.
Change to:
EDBM 261 Teaching the Gifted and Talented Learner.
No change to course description.
Justification: Program changed to the Department of Bilingual/Multicultural Education.

EDTE 262 Seminar in Gifted and Talented Education.
Change to:
EDBM 262 Seminar in Gifted and Talented Education.
No change to course description.
Justification: Program changed to the Department of Bilingual/Multicultural Education.

EDTE 290 Seminar in Culminating Experience. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Justification: Change from CR/NC to letter grading. The EDTE 290, Seminar in Culminating Experience, is proposed to be added to the required courses in all programs as it is not a part of the 3-unit culminating experience (project/thesis) requirement. This would simply change its placement from “Culminating Experience” to “Required Courses.” In Curriculum and Instruction, this would be adding the EDTE 290 to the program. A separate program change proposal has been submitted to make this change.

EDTE 505 Culminating Experience: Curriculum and Instruction. No change to course description.
Justification: Adding prerequisite: EDTE 290.

EDTE 506 Culminating Experience: Behavioral Sciences - Women's Studies. No change to course description.
Justification: Adding prerequisite: EDTE 290.


COURSE DELETIONS

EDTE 100 Observation-Participation in Schools.
Justification: Course no longer needed for the Single Subject Credential Program. Implementing SB 2042 beginning Fall 2004.

EDTE 106 Educational Psychology.
Justification:
Course no longer needed for the Single Subject Credential Program. Implementing SB 2042 beginning Fall 2004.

EDTE 107 Educational Foundation: Learning and Schooling.
Justification:
Course no longer needed for the Multiple Subject Credential Program. Implementing SB 2042 beginning Fall 2004.

EDTE 196G Parenting Skills-CH D.
Justification:
Course no longer offered.

EDTE 196T Creativity.
Justification:
Course no longer offered.

EDTE 231 Introduction to Computers in the Single Subject Classroom.
Justification: Requirement is now met in EDTE 230.

EDTE 296I Educational Apps and the Internet: Curr Dev.
Justification: Course no longer offered.

EDTE 296P Literature/Language Skills Young Child.
Justification: Course no longer offered.

EDTE 296W Tech II: Education and the Internet.
Justification: Course no longer offered.

EDTE 309A Language and Literacy A.
Justification: Course no longer needed for the Middle Level Credential Program. Implementing SB 2042 beginning Fall 2004.

EDTE 321 Departmental Methods Integrating Language Arts and Social Studies.
Justification: Course no longer needed for the Middle Level Credential Program. Implementing SB 2042 beginning Fall 2004.

EDTE 322 Departmental Methods Integrating Mathematics and Science.
Justification: Course no longer needed for the Middle Level Credential Program. Implementing SB 2042 beginning Fall 2004.

EDTE 323 Middle Level Methods Integrating Language and Literacy.
Justification: Course no longer needed for the Middle Level Credential Program. Implementing SB 2042 beginning Fall 2004.

EDTE 325 Departmental Applications of Language Arts and Social Studies Methodologies.
Justification: Course no longer needed for the Middle Level Credential Program. Implementing SB 2042 beginning Fall 2004.

EDTE 326 Departmental Applications of Mathematics and Science Methodologies.
Justification: Course no longer needed for the Middle Level Credential Program. Implementing SB 2042 beginning Fall 2004.

EDTE 327 Middle Level Teacher-Advisor Seminar.
Justification: Course no longer needed for the Middle Level Credential Program. Implementing SB 2042 beginning Fall 2004.

EDTE 380 Secondary School Teaching.
Justification: Course no longer needed for the Single Subject Credential Program. Implementing SB 2042 beginning Fall 2004.

 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

Department of Civil Engineering

NEW COURSE

CE 194 Career Development in Civil Engineering. Designed for Civil Engineering students making career decisions. Instruction will include effective career planning strategies and techniques including skill assessments, employment search strategy, goal setting, time management, interview techniques and resume writing. Lecture one hour.
Note: Units earned cannot be used to satisfy major requirements.
Justification: We just want to cross reference this class in CE schedule for easy access for students.

COURSE CHANGES

CE 181 Geoenvironmental Engineering. Equilibrium distribution of contaminants among air, water and solid phases of soil systems; analysis and modeling of soil vapor extraction (SVE), pump and treat, and soil washing systems; movement of gasses in landfills; infiltration through landfill cover; geosynthetic liner systems; hazardous waste containment systems.
Prerequisite: CE 171A or instructor permission.
Justification: The course description was changed to reflect the material that is covered in the class.

CE 252A Environmental Quality Processes I. Theory and practice of chemical processes affecting water quality. Chemical equilibrium, stoichiometry and kinetics of aqueous chemistry. Acid-base, precipitation-dissolution, oxidation-reduction, and coordination chemistry. Adsorption.
Prerequisite: CE 170 or equivalent.
Justification: The course description was changed to reflect the material that is covered in the class.

CE 252B Environmental Quality Processes II. Theory and practice of biological processes affecting water quality. Stoichiometry and kinetics of microbial growth. Aerobic and anaerobic metabolism. Biological reactors. Engineered suspended and attached growth systems. Introduction to sludge treatment.
Prerequisite: CE 170 or equivalent, CE 252A recommended.
Justification: The course description was changed to reflect the material that is covered in the class.

CE 252C Environmental Quality Processes III. Theory and practice of physical and chemical processes used in engineered water and wastewater systems. Adsorption, ion exchange, gas transfer, membrane processes, coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, filtration, precipitation, disinfection, and stripping. Physical/chemical reactors.
Prerequisite: CE 170 or equivalent, CE 252A recommended.
Justification: The course description was changed to reflect the material that is covered in the class.

CE 254 Quality Management in Natural Water Bodies.
Change to:
CE 254 Water Quality Management.
Examination of pollution sources and effects on water bodies, and the management issues and tools used to protect environmental quality. Topics include point and nonpoint pollution sources, interactions in the environment, Federal and State laws, water quality objectives, beneficial uses, and regulatory mechanisms such as basin plans and total maximum daily loads (TMDLs). Emphasis is on surface water.
Prerequisite: CE 170 or equivalent, CE 252A recommended.
Justification: Edit for clarity and to reflect current content of course.

CE 274 Computer Hydraulics.
Change to:
CE 274 Hydrologic Modeling.
Theories and structure of hydraulic model components; application of HEC-RAS (River Analysis System) and HEC-HMS (Hydrologic Modeling System) computer programs; emphasis on flood routing methods; dam safety analysis methodology including dam break and dam overtopping cases; application of microcomputers in hydraulics computations.
Prerequisite: CE 272 or equivalent.
Justification: The course name and description was changed to reflect the material that is covered in the class.

ENGR 140 Engineering Economics. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: ENGR 30 or ENGR 17 or MET 30
Justification: Need to change prerequisites to meet multiple Departments' requirements. Also need to clarify text.

Department of Computer Engineering

COURSE CHANGE

CPE 190 Senior Design Project I. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: CPE 142, CPE 166, CPE 186, CPE 187, EEE 102, and passing score on WPE.
Justification: Prerequisite change; add EEE 102 to existing prerequisite list. Even though advising sheets strongly indicate otherwise, some students postpone taking their only electronic course until they begin their senior project course. This is too late to help them on their project.

Department of Computer Science

COURSE CHANGES

CSC 15 Programming Concepts and Methodology I. Programming concepts using an object-oriented programming language. Introduction to methodologies for program design, development, testing, and documentation. Topics include program design, algorithm design, number systems, classes and objects, methods (functions), control structures, arrays, and interactive input/output. Lecture two hours, technical activity and laboratory, two hours. Prerequisite: CSC 10 or equivalent programming experience in a high-level programming language.
Justification: Modify course description to reflect stronger emphasis on object-oriented paradigm.

CSC 20 Programming Concepts and Methodology II. Application of object-oriented techniques for systematic problem analysis and specification, design, coding, testing, and documentation. Semester-long project approach emphasizing larger programs. Managing program complexity using abstraction. Introduction to algorithm analysis and Big-O notation. Advanced language features. Basic sorting and searching algorithms. Recursion. Lecture two hours, technical activity and laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: CSC 15
Justification: Modify course description to reflect stronger emphasis on object-oriented paradigm and advanced programming concepts and methodology.

CSC 28 Discrete Structures for Computer Science. Introduction to the essential discrete structures used in computer science, with emphasis on their applications. Topics include: counting methods, elementary formal logic and set theory, recursive programming, digital logic and combinational circuits, real number representation, regular expressions, finite automata. Prerequisite: Math 29, CSC 20; CSC 20 may be taken concurrently.
Justification: The course has evolved over time and the description needs to be revised to reflect current topics.

CSC 35 Assembly Language Programming.
Change to:
CSC 35 Introduction to Computer Architecture.
Internal representation of numeric and non-numeric data, assembly level machine architecture, addressing modes, subroutine linkage, polled input/output, interrupts, high-level language interfacing, macros and pseudo operations. Lecture two hours, technical activity and laboratory two hours.
Prerequisite: CSC 15
Justification: The course has evolved over time and the description and title need to be updated.

CSC 133 Object-Oriented Computer Graphics Programming. Introduction to computer graphics and advanced topics in object-oriented (OO) programming. The OO paradigm is used throughout, utilizing computer graphics as the vehicle for solidifying basic OO concepts, studying the implementation of event-driven systems, and for developing a thorough understanding of advanced OO concepts such as inheritance and polymorphism. Topics include fundamental concepts of object-oriented programming, software design patterns, graphic devices, line and surface drawing, simple 2D and 3D representation, and use of User Interface components. Prerequisites: CSc 130 and CSc 131.
Justification: CSc 60 (Introduction to Systems Programming) is being dropped as a prerequisite. There is no substantial material in CSc 60 which is needed prior to taking CSc 133.
CSc 131 (Introduction to Software Engineering) is being added as a prerequisite. CSc 131 provides substantial coverage of the software development lifecycle and of formalisms (such as the Unified Modeling Language) for representing software structures. These concepts are important background which is needed for development of object-oriented programming concepts in CSc 133. Currently these topics have been covered in both courses, resulting in substantial overlap between the courses. With CSc 131 as a prerequisite, this overlap will be significantly reduced. Since CSc 131 is normally taken in the first semester of the junior year, and CSc 133 is normally taken in the second semester junior or first semester senior year, there is no problem with a lengthened prerequisite chain.

CSC 134 Database Management and File Organization. File systems, storage structures, and access methods; data modeling; Entity-Relationship analysis and data normalization; design of applications using database technology; elements of commercial database management systems; introduction to transaction processing; introduction to SQL; information interchange and XML; database processing on the Web.
Prerequisite: CSC 130
Justification: The course has evolved over time and the description and title need to be updated.

CSC 136 Programming Languages. Evolution and characteristics of programming languages. Scripting, procedural, object-oriented, functional and logic paradigms. Language specification; interpreters and compilers; virtual machines; parsing techniques. Design and implementation of selected features of programming languages. Programming languages used in the development of intelligent systems, with introduction to Artificial Intelligence. Trends in programming languages. Prerequisite: CSC 35, CSC 132
Justification: The course description has been updated to reflect the addition of material on Intelligent Systems, parsing techniques, and the major language paradigms. Also, topics which are no longer covered in this course, such as “string manipulation” and “structured programming” have been removed from the description. CSC 35 has been added as a prerequisite because students need exposure to assembly language before taking the course.

CSC 137 Computer Organization. An introduction to computer organization and architecture. Topics include combinational devices, sequential and synchronized circuits, memory, bus structures, input/output and interrupt structures, CPU organization, control unit design and organization, and an introduction to modern processor and memory features. Projects include construction of a complete simple system using a schematic simulator and HDL. Prerequisite: CSC 28, CSC 35, CSC 130.
Justification: Modify course description to reflect course content changes as a result of the addition of CSC 28 as a prerequisite (approved 4/26/99) which includes an introduction to digital logic. Add specific description of laboratory projects.

CSC 151 Compiler Construction. A practical approach to compiler design and implementation. Organization of a compiler, algorithms for lexical, syntactic and semantic analysis, recursive descent and/or LALR parsing, organization of symbol tables, error detection and recovery, object code generation. Modular design will be emphasized.
Prerequisite: CSC 136; CSC 136 may be taken concurrently.
Justification: Change in prerequisite: CSC 145 was removed since it is no longer a require course. CSC 136 related material is covered early in the course allowing the two courses to be taken concurrently. Change in description to reflect change in current content.

CSC 174 Database Management Systems. Topics in database analysis and design, and applications; Extended Entity-Relationship and UML modeling; SQL view, query processing, and query optimization; concurrency control, transaction performance and recovery algorithms; integrity constraints and triggers; functional dependencies and normalizations algorithms; application generator technologies; performance and security issues in Internet database processing; introduction to data mining; introduction to database administration.
Prerequisite: CSC 131; CSC 134
Justification: The course has evolved over time and the description and title need to be updated.

CSC 209 Graduate Seminar.
Change to:
CSC 209 Research Methodology.
Research methodology, problem formulation, and problem solving. Orientation to the requirements for Master's Thesis or Project. Presentations on various research topics. Prerequisite: Fully classified graduate standing in Computer Science or Software Engineering, passing score on the WPE, and completion of at least 12 units of 200-level courses in Computer Science. Graded Credit/No Credit.
Justification: The current catalog description is outdated. This course introduces graduate students to not only the research interests of the faculty but also the process of conducting scientific research.

CSC 230 Software System Engineering. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Fully classified graduate standing in Computer Science or Software Engineering.
Justification: Recent changes to the admission requirements of both programs as well as recent curricular development make it necessary for students to have the background provided by full classification.

CSC 231 Software Engineering Metrics. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Fully classified graduate standing in Computer Science or Software Engineering.
Justification: Recent changes to the admission requirements of both programs as well as recent curricular development make it necessary for students to have the background provided by full classification.

CSC 232 Software Requirements Analysis and Design. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Fully classified graduate standing in Computer Science or Software Engineering.
Justification: Recent changes to the admission requirements of both programs as well as recent curricular development make it necessary for students to have the background provided by full classification.

CSC 233 Advanced Software Engineering Project Management. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Fully classified graduate standing in Computer Science or Software Engineering.
Justification: Recent changes to the admission requirements of both programs as well as recent curricular development make it necessary for students to have the background provided by full classification.

CSC 234 Software Verification and Validation. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Fully classified graduate standing in Computer Science or Software Engineering.
Justification: Recent changes to the admission requirements of both programs as well as recent curricular development make it necessary for students to have the background provided by full classification.

CSC 236 Formal Methods in Software Engineering. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Fully classified graduate standing in Computer Science or Software Engineering.
Justification: Recent changes to the admission requirements of both programs as well as recent curricular development make it necessary for students to have the background provided by full classification.

CSC 280 Advanced Computer Architecture. No change to course description.
Justification: When the Computer Engineering Program submitted its proposal for an MS in Computer Engineering (which was recently approved), it submitted a course change proposal to rename CSC 280 as CPS 280 with the intention that Computer Science and Electrical and Electronic Engineering would eventually delete CSC 280 and its cross-listed course, EEE 280. However, CSC 280 is a required course for the Computer Science Graduate Certificate in Computer Architecture and an elective for the Computer Science Graduate Certificate in Computer Engineering. The Computer Science Department would like to retain the Computer Science designation of this course for purposes of the certificate programs. Therefore, the best solution appears to be cross-listing, to accommodate both Computer Science and Computer Engineering students.


Construction Management Program

COURSE CHANGES

CM 20 Construction Materials and Processes. No change to course description. Prerequisite: CM 010 and ENGL 001A.
Justification: No prerequisite in current catalog. Add prerequisites to increase successful completion rate of students in this required class.

CM 22 Construction Documents. No change to course description. Prerequisite: CM 010 and CM 021.
Justification: Delete one of the three prerequisites to meet change made by the College of Business Administration in their requirements for a Minor in Business Administration that substituted a new Upper Division course, OBE 118 Legal Environment of Business for a Lower Division course, OBE 018 Legal Environment of Business.

CM 110 Legal Aspects of Construction. No change to course description. Prerequisite: OBE 118, CM 022.
Justification: Change one of the two prerequisites to meet change made by the College of Business Administration in their requirements for a Minor in Business Administration that substituted a new Upper Division course, OBE 118 Legal Environment of Business for a Lower Division course, OBE 018 Legal Environment of Business.

 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Division of Criminal Justice

COURSE CHANGES

CRJ 205 Criminal Justice Policy Analysis. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in the "Required Courses" (CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 260), and completion of the WPE requirement; or permission of the instructor.
Corequisite: CRJ 200, 255 and 260
Justification: Courses listed are electives in the CRJ Graduate Program. This change conforms with Program change submitted that requires completion or concurrent registration in the core courses, or instructor approval, to register for Criminal Justice graduate electives in the Criminal Justice Masters Program.

CRJ 207 Criminal Justice Research and Program Evaluation. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in the "Required Courses" (CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 260), and completion of the WPE requirement; or permission of the instructor.
Corequisite: CRJ 200, 255 and 260
Justification: Courses listed are electives in the CRJ Graduate Program. This change conforms with Program change submitted that requires completion or concurrent registration in the core courses, or instructor approval, to register for Criminal Justice graduate electives in the Criminal Justice Masters Program.

CRJ 210 Critical Examination of Criminal Law. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in the "Required Courses" (CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 260), and completion of the WPE requirement; or permission of the instructor.
Corequisite: CRJ 200, 255 and 260
Justification: Courses listed are electives in the CRJ Graduate Program. This change conforms with Program change submitted that requires completion or concurrent registration in the core courses, or instructor approval, to register for Criminal Justice graduate electives in the Criminal Justice Masters Program.

CRJ 220 Politics of Crime Legislation. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in the "Required Courses" (CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 260), and completion of the WPE requirement; or permission of the instructor.
Corequisite: CRJ 200, 255 and 260
Justification: Courses listed are electives in the CRJ Graduate Program. This change conforms with Program change submitted that requires completion or concurrent registration in the core courses, or instructor approval, to register for Criminal Justice graduate electives in the Criminal Justice Masters Program.

CRJ 230 The Prison. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in the "Required Courses" (CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 260), and completion of the WPE requirement; or permission of the instructor.
Corequisite: CRJ 200, 255 and 260
Justification: Courses listed are electives in the CRJ Graduate Program. This change conforms with Program change submitted that requires completion or concurrent registration in the core courses, or instructor approval, to register for Criminal Justice graduate electives in the Criminal Justice Masters Program.

CRJ 231 Change in Penal Institutions. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in the "Required Courses" (CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 260), and completion of the WPE requirement; or permission of the instructor.
Corequisite: CRJ 200, 255 and 260
Justification: Courses listed are electives in the CRJ Graduate Program. This change conforms with Program change submitted that requires completion or concurrent registration in the core courses, or instructor approval, to register for Criminal Justice graduate electives in the Criminal Justice Masters Program.

CRJ 233 Psychodynamics of Confinement. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in the "Required Courses" (CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 260), and completion of the WPE requirement; or permission of the instructor.
Corequisite: CRJ 200, 255 and 260
Justification: Courses listed are electives in the CRJ Graduate Program. This change conforms with Program change submitted that requires completion or concurrent registration in the core courses, or instructor approval, to register for Criminal Justice graduate electives in the Criminal Justice Masters Program.

CRJ 250 Comparative Analysis of Criminal Justice Systems. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in the "Required Courses" (CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 260), and completion of the WPE requirement; or permission of the instructor.
Corequisite: CRJ 200, 255 and 260
Justification: Courses listed are electives in the CRJ Graduate Program. This change conforms with Program change submitted that requires completion or concurrent registration in the core courses, or instructor approval, to register for Criminal Justice graduate electives in the Criminal Justice Masters Program.

CRJ 251 Blue and White Collar Crime. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in the "Required Courses" (CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 260), and completion of the WPE requirement; or permission of the instructor.
Corequisite: CRJ 200, 255 and 260
Justification: Courses listed are electives in the CRJ Graduate Program. This change conforms with Program change submitted that requires completion or concurrent registration in the core courses, or instructor approval, to register for Criminal Justice graduate electives in the Criminal Justice Masters Program.

CRJ 252 Violence and Victims. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in the "Required Courses" (CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 260), and completion of the WPE requirement; or permission of the instructor.
Corequisite: CRJ 200, 255 and 260
Justification: Courses listed are electives in the CRJ Graduate Program. This change conforms with Program change submitted that requires completion or concurrent registration in the core courses, or instructor approval, to register for Criminal Justice graduate electives in the Criminal Justice Masters Program.

CRJ 256 Historical Analysis of the American Criminal Justice System. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in the "Required Courses" (CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 260), and completion of the WPE requirement; or permission of the instructor.
Corequisite: CRJ 200, 255 and 260
Justification: Courses listed are electives in the CRJ Graduate Program. This change conforms with Program change submitted that requires completion or concurrent registration in the core courses, or instructor approval, to register for Criminal Justice graduate electives in the Criminal Justice Masters Program.

CRJ 257 The Nature of Terrorism. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in the "Required Courses" (CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 260), and completion of the WPE requirement; or permission of the instructor.
Corequisite: CRJ 200, 255 and 260
Justification: Courses listed are electives in the CRJ Graduate Program. This change conforms with Program change submitted that requires completion or concurrent registration in the core courses, or instructor approval, to register for Criminal Justice graduate electives in the Criminal Justice Masters Program.

CRJ 261 The Courts. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in the "Required Courses" (CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 260), and completion of the WPE requirement; or permission of the instructor.
Corequisite: CRJ 200, 255 and 260
Justification: Courses listed are electives in the CRJ Graduate Program. This change conforms with Program change submitted that requires completion or concurrent registration in the core courses, or instructor approval, to register for Criminal Justice graduate electives in the Criminal Justice Masters Program.

CRJ 262 Administration of Juvenile Justice. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in the "Required Courses" (CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 260), and completion of the WPE requirement; or permission of the instructor.
Corequisite: CRJ 200, 255 and 260
Justification: Courses listed are electives in the CRJ Graduate Program. This change conforms with Program change submitted that requires completion or concurrent registration in the core courses, or instructor approval, to register for Criminal Justice graduate electives in the Criminal Justice Masters Program.

CRJ 267 Criminal JusticeIssues in Collective Bargaining and Arbitration. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in the "Required Courses" (CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 260), and completion of the WPE requirement; or permission of the instructor.
Corequisite: CRJ 200, 255 and 260
Justification: Courses listed are electives in the CRJ Graduate Program. This change conforms with Program change submitted that requires completion or concurrent registration in the core courses, or instructor approval, to register for Criminal Justice graduate electives in the Criminal Justice Masters Program.

CRJ 295 Internship. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in the "Required Courses" (CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 260), and completion of the WPE requirement; or permission of the instructor.
Corequisite: CRJ 200, 255 and 260
Justification: Courses listed are electives in the CRJ Graduate Program. This change conforms with Program change submitted that requires completion or concurrent registration in the core courses, or instructor approval, to register for Criminal Justice graduate electives in the Criminal Justice Masters Program.

CRJ 296 Experimental Offerings in Criminal Justice. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in the "Required Courses" (CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 260), and completion of the WPE requirement; or permission of the instructor.
Corequisite: CRJ 200, 255 and 260
Justification: Courses listed are electives in the CRJ Graduate Program. This change conforms with Program change submitted that requires completion or concurrent registration in the core courses, or instructor approval, to register for Criminal Justice graduate electives in the Criminal Justice Masters Program.

CRJ 299 Special Problems. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in the "Required Courses" (CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 260), and completion of the WPE requirement; or permission of the instructor.
Corequisite: CRJ 200, 255 and 260
Justification: Courses listed are electives in the CRJ Graduate Program. This change conforms with Program change submitted that requires completion or concurrent registration in the core courses, or instructor approval, to register for Criminal Justice graduate electives in the Criminal Justice Masters Program.


Division of Nursing

NEW COURSE

NURS 196C Cultural Competence in Healthcare-An International Exchange. The opportunity to explore personal cultural understanding of health and illness in another country. Readings, seminar discussion, reflective writing, and immersion will guide the student in the exploration of transcultural nursing and health. The course emphasizes the development of communication skills necessary to work effectively with diverse populations. International health issues will be explored in the context of collegial sharing as students are able to interact with healthcare providers in the host country.
Prerequisite: NURS 138, NURS 139; or Licensed RN
Justification: The current undergraduate and graduate curricula in nursing recognizes and values development of cultural competence in the education of future leaders in nursing care. Current course offerings provide students with an opportunity to develop general knowledge regarding culture and health as well as experiences with the culturally diverse population in the local area. Building upon this foundation, further competence in transcultural nursing will be developed through focused study of one particular culture as well as the lived experience of immersion into another culture. This will provide students with an appreciation of international and transcultural issues in health care enhancing their clinical practice and preparing them for graduate study in this rapidly growing field of specialization. Immersion in another culture is further expected to enhance the student’s appreciation of cultural diversity and prepare them to engage in productive relationships in a pluralistic society.

Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies

NEW COURSES

RLS 1 Orientation to Recreation and Leisure Studies. An introduction to the Recreation and Leisure Studies major, with an emphasis on degree options, advising, the internship process, and the portfolio requirement.
Note: RLS 1 should be taken in the student's first semester.
Justification: This course is being proposed in conjunction with RLS 101. Both serve as replacements for RLS 194 which is being cancelled. Since the recent introduction of a required graduation portfolio, a more formal advising and accountability sequence is necessary. There is currently no formal exit strategy for the requirement (see RLS 101). At the same time, the DFE preparation requirement (the role of RLS 194) has diminished as students are more familiar with such skills as resume preparation and placement searches. A reduced exposure to the DFE process will still be included in the RLS 1 class, along with an introduction to the major fields of study, advising processes, and the portfolio requirement.

RLS 101 Senior Portfolio Seminar. A seminar in which Recreation and Leisure Studies seniors present their individual graduation portfolios. The course requires both in-class presentations and consultations with the portfolio coordinator.
Note: RLS 101 should be taken in the student's final semester. RLS majors only. Seniors only.
Prerequisite: RLS 1
Justification: This course is being proposed in conjunction with RLS 1. Both serve as replacements for RLS 194 which is being cancelled. Since the recent introduction of a required graduation portfolio, a more formal advising and accountability sequence is necessary. There is currently no formal exit strategy for the requirement (hence RLS 101). At the same time, the DFE preparation requirement (the role of RLS 194) has diminished as students are more familiar with such skills as resume preparation and placement searches. A reduced exposure to the DFE process will still be included in the RLS 1 class, along with an introduction to the major fields of study, advising processes, and the portfolio requirement.

COURSE CHANGE

HHS 150 Nonprofit Leadership.
Change to:
RLS 164 Nonprofit Leadership.
Introduction to concepts and principles of nonprofit leadership with an emphasis on youth and human service agencies. Students will explore and develop an understanding of historical and philosophical foundations of nonprofit organizations, board/committee development and operation, and the various roles of human service professionals as they relate to the nonprofit field. Consists of lecture, readings, discussions, guest speakers, nonprofit agency visitations, direct internet research, active learning exercises, and a community service learning component.
Justification: This course is currently offered under the course prefix / number HHS 150. The course has always been taught by a member of the RLS faculty and the majority of students that take the class have been RLS majors. The class has proved popular but has had to be extensively promoted because few students look under the HHS prefix when selecting classes. In addition the prefix has meant that while the class is highly relevant to students in recreation and leisure studies (and has been treated by advisors as being substitutable for an RLS elective class) RLS advisors have had to write numerous substitutions to allow the class to be counted by majors as an RLS elective. The Description, Goals, Learning objectives, Assessment and Content of the class will not be affected by this change. This change is made with the knowledge and approval of the Dean of the College of Health and Human Services.

COURSE DELETION

RLS 194 Orientation to Directed Field Experience.
Justification: RLS 194 is being replaced by RLS 1 and RLS 101.

 

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Department of Anthropology

COURSE CHANGES

ANTH 015 Archaeology of Prehistoric Societies. Introduction to the broad sweep of world prehistory, from the emergence of human culture through the development of domestication of plants and animals and rise of state-level societies. Major cultural developments on every continent, emphasizing similarities and differences in the nature and timing of key technological and sociological changes. Major archaeological discoveries and important personalities are discussed in their historical context.
Justification: Update catalog description.

ANTH 107 Anthropology of Hunters and Gatherers. Survey of the rapidly disappearing life way which anthropologists call hunting and gathering, with economies based on the use of wild plant and animal resources. Using ethnographic examples from the Arctic, southern Africa, rainforests in South America, deserts of Australia, and western North America, explores variation in hunter-gatherer societies with respect to differences in environment, technology, social organization, and the historical effects of interaction with more complex cultural groups. Models that attempt to explain long-term changes in this life way are also explored.
Justification: Update catalog description.

ANTH 111 California Archaeology. Pre-contact California encompassed some of the most extensive environmental and cultural diversity ever to exist on the planet, containing widely divergent biota,many distinct languages and cultures, and among the densest hunter-gatherer populations ever recorded. At least 11,000-12,000 years of human occupation have been marked by multiple migrations and major shifts in technological and social organization. Explores long-term trends in cultural development across the state, and examines models used to explain why semi-permanent settlements, intensive subsistence strategies, and complex social institutions arose in some times/places and not others.
Justification: Update catalog description.

ANTH 112 Great Basin Archaeology. Explores the cultural and natural history of the Great Basin from the last glacial maximum into the historic era. Though largely arid, this region in fact manifests considerable environmental variability and has seen significant climatic alterations since the Pleistocene. Human occupation of the Great Basin witnessed major changes in demography, technology, subsistence practices, and sociopolitical organization over the last 10-12,000 years. The course looks to understand cultural and environmental variability across the region through examination of the long-term material record and consideration of anthropological and biological models.
Justification: Update catalog description.

ANTH 114 North American Prehistory. Familiarizes students with the archaeological record of North America, and provides an analytical framework through which it may be understood in anthropologically meaningful terms. This will be accomplished by considering some of the explanations that have been proposed to account for the prehistory of the continent, and by examining the archaeological remains and cultural sequences found in various areas, including the North and Southeast, Great Plains, Pacific Northwest, and arctic/subarctic regions.
Justification: Update catalog description.

ANTH 115 Origins of Agriculture. Surveys and evaluates worldwide anthropological perspectives of the origins of agriculture and the rise of complex society. Traces the development of major archaeological theories for the inception and spread of agriculture and civilization, acquainting students with groundbreaking archaeological research associated with each theoretical perspective. Current archaeological research is reviewed in depth, providing a context for critique of the theories. Examples from North America, Latin America, the Middle East, India and China are compared and contrasted using movies, readings, and lectures.
Justification: Update catalog description.

ANTH 116 Old World Prehistory: Paleolithic Archaeology. Surveys Old World Paleolithic archaeology from the emergence of hominids until the development of agriculture and civilization. Cultural developments in Africa, Asia, Europe and Australia will be examined with the aim of highlighting similarities and differences in the processes of technological, demographic, and sociopolitical change within each region. Explanatory models offered to account for cultural evolution in various parts of the Old World will be explored and assessed.
Justification: Update catalog description.

ANTH 124 Environmental Archaeology. All human societies depend on their natural surroundings, and so the reconstruction of prehistoric environments is an essential part of archaeological interpretation. Three interrelated aspects of environmental archaeology are considered:-- (1) examines general approaches to paleoenvironmental reconstruction, employing various biological and geological indicators; (2) looks more closely at the analysis of human plant and animal food remains; and (3) examines the geological and other processes that are responsible for the formation of archaeological deposits. Field trip. Fee course.
Justification: Update catalog description.

ANTH 125 Historical Archaeology. Written history only records a small portion of human activities that occurred in the recent past. Explores the numerous methods of investigation, analysis and interpretation that are available to aid the historical archaeologist in discovering missing information and in some cases correcting erroneous statements, assumptions and interpretations about the past.
Justification: Update catalog description.

ANTH 151 Human Paleontology. A survey of the field of human evolution from primate beginnings to modern humans groups. The course emphasizes the interpretation of the fossil evidence and the major trends in hominid evolution, including the origins and relationships of the extinct forms of humans.
Justification: Update catalog description.

ANTH 192A Laboratory Work in Archaeology. Introduces methods used in the basic laboratory preservation, cataloging, and initial analysis of various materials recovered through ANTH 195A survey and excavation projects; Always offered in conjunction with ANTH 195A. (May be repeated once for credit. Corequisite: ANTH 195A; may be waived with instructor permission.)
Justification: Update catalog description.

ANTH 196B Human Use of Caves. Unique character of caves and their deposits present many challenges that can not always be met with conventional archaeological, methodological and theoretical approaches. Students will be exposed to investigative techniques that facilitate the understanding of these unique archaeological resources. The investigation of the human use of caves through a worldwide perspective will provide students with a thorough introduction to the study of these significant resources.
Prerequisite: ANTH 003
Justification: Update catalog description.

COURSE DELETIONS

ANTH 116 Old World Prehistory: Paleolithic Archaeology.
Justification: The sole instructor of the course has retired and the focus of the Department's archaeology program is on Meso- and North America.

ANTH 118 Biblical Archaeology.
Justification: The sole instructor of the course has retired and the focus of the Department's archaeology program is on Meso- and North America.

ANTH 119 Egyptian Archaeology.
Justification: The sole instructor of the course has retired and the focus of the Department's archaeology program is on Meso- and North America.

 

Department of Economics

COURSE CHANGES

ECON 100A Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory. Analysis of the determinants of the aggregate level of output, income, employment and prices.
Prerequisite: ECON 001A, ECON 001B
Justification: Update course description and title to improve wording, and better reflect course content.

ECON 100B Intermediate Microeconomic Theory. Analysis of household and firm behavior as the foundations of supply and demand.
Prerequisite: ECON 001B
Justification: Update course description and title to improve wording, and better reflect course content.

ECON 101 History of Economic Thought. Analysis of the development of economic theory from the predecessors of Adam Smith through John Maynard Keynes. The contributions made to the discipline by its principal figures are compared and evaluated.
Prerequisite: ECON 001A, ECON 001B
Justification: Update course description to improve wording, and better reflect course content.

ECON 104 Introduction to the United States Economy. One semester survey of the principles of economics, basic methods of economic analysis, and their application to public policy and current events.
Note: Not open to students who have had ECON 001A or ECON 001B or those majoring in economics.
Justification: Update course description to improve wording, and better reflect course content.

ECON 110 Introduction to Public Economics. Examines the rationale for government provision of goods and services and presents cost-benefit analysis as a method to evaluate public participation in a market economy.
Prerequisite: ECON 001B
Justification: Update course description to improve wording, and better reflect course content.

ECON 130 Government Finance.
Change to:
ECON 130 Public Finance.
Economic analysis of the public sector and its impact on the allocation of resources and the distribution of income. Emphasis given to the economics of government expenditure and taxation.
Prerequisite: ECON 001A, ECON 001B; ECON 100B recommended.
Justification: Update course description to improve wording, and better reflect course content.

ECON 140 Introduction to Quantitative Economic Analysis.
Change to:
ECON 140 Quantitative Economic Analysis.
Examination of the basics of conducting quantitative economic analysis. Included are basic concepts and methods of data analysis and research. Students will examine economic data using spreadsheets, will develop presentation skills, and be introduced to career opportunities.
Prerequisite: ECON 001A, ECON 001B, STAT 001
Justification: Update course description and title to improve wording, and better reflect course content.

ECON 141 Application of Statistical Analysis to Economic Data.
Change to:
ECON 141 Introduction to Econometrics.
Covers the basics of regression analysis, estimation, and forecasting.
Prerequisite: ECON 001A, ECON 001B, ECON 140; ECON 100A or ECON 100 recommended.
Justification: Update course description and title to improve wording, and better reflect course content.

ECON 150 Labor and Manpower Economics.
Change to:
ECON 150 Labor Economics.
Economic analysis of labor markets, with special reference to employment, wage determination, and the role of government.
Prerequisite: ECON 001A, ECON 001B
Justification: Update course description and title to improve wording, and better reflect course content.

ECON 190 International Economic Relations.
Change to:
ECON 190 International Trade.
Analysis of the causes and results of trade among nations. Introduction to modern trade theory is combined with examination of trade instruments and policy analysis.
Prerequisite: ECON 001A, ECON 001B
Justification: Update course description and title to improve wording, and better reflect course content.

ECON 192 International Finance: Theory and Practice.
Change to:
ECON 192 International Finance.
A critical examination of the theories and practices of financing trade among nations. International financial and monetary theories focus on how the world and financial system works, given globalization and international economic integration.
Prerequisite: ECON 001A, ECON 001B
Justification: Update course description and title to improve wording, and better reflect course content.

ECON 193 Economics of Underdeveloped Countries.
Change to:
ECON 193 Development Economics.
An analysis of the factors involved in the growth of economies. The focus is on the application of development economics and growth theory to the process of economic growth in developing countries. Particular attention is given to variables that explain growth, namely, technological progress, population growth, saving, trade, human capital and education, and the role of institutions.
Prerequisite: ECON 001A, ECON 001B
Justification: Update course description and title to improve wording, and better reflect course content.

ECON 200A Economic Theory-Macro.
Change to:
ECON 200A Advanced Macroeconomic Theory.
Theories of the determinants of aggregate income, employment and prices. May be taken independently of ECON 200B.
Justification: Update course description and title to improve wording, and better reflect course content.

ECON 200B Economic Theory-Micro.
Change to:
ECON 200B Advanced Microeconomic Theory.
Theories of the consumer, producer, and market structure. May be taken independently of ECON 200A.
Justification: Update course description and title to improve wording, and better reflect course content.

ECON 230 Economics of Government Finance.
Change to:
ECON 230 Public Finance.
Examination of the theories, foundations, and philosophies of economic welfare. Specifically, the basic techniques of cost benefit analysis will be presented and applied to various policy issues.
Justification: Update course description and title to improve wording, and better reflect course content.

ECON 265 Applied Economic Analysis.
Change to:
ECON 265 Cost Benefit Analysis.
Examination of the theories, foundations, and philosophies of economic welfare. Specifically, the basic techniques of cost benefit analysis will be presented and applied to various policy issues.
Justification: Update course description and title to improve wording, and better reflect course content.

COURSE DELETIONS

ECON 107 Applied Problems in Public Policy.
Justification:
This course has not been offered in many years, and it is not a requirement in our program or any other program.

ECON 109 Applied Problems in Macroeconomics.
Justification:
This course has not been offered in many years, and it is not a requirement in our program or any other program.

ECON 151 International and Comparative Industrial Relations.
Justification:
This course has not been offered in many years, and it is not a requirement in our program or any other program.

ECON 196E Diversity Issues in Economics.
Justification:
This course will not be offered again.

ECON 196J Sports Economics.
Justification:
This course is becoming a regular course offering, ECON 186.


Department of Environmental Studies


COURSE CHANGES

ENVS 010 Environmental Science. This survey course looks at the earth as an ecosystem composed of biological, chemical, and physical systems. The focus is on the interaction of these systems with each other and with human population, technology, and production. The student should acquire the fundamentals of a scientific understanding of the ecological implications of human activities. Specific topics treated within the context of ecosystem analysis include energy flows, nutrient cycles, pollution, resource use, climate changes, species diversity, and population dynamics. Meets GE requirement Area B2: Life Forms.
Justification: Add language to the course description: Meets GE requirement Area B2: Life Forms.

ENVS 011 Environmental Issues and Critical Thinking. Examines Western cultural values and personal beliefs toward the environment. Teaches critical thinking skills to analyze issues to make informed choices that may impact the earth, its resources and their management as consumers, leaders, professionals and moral agents. Meet GE Requirement Area A3: Critical Thinking Requirement.
Justification: Add text to course description: Meets GE requirement Area A3: Critical Thinking Requirement.

ENVS 128 Environment and the Law.
Environmental law offers students an opportunity to explore the legal process in an especially appealing and relevant substantive context. Although environmental law is in large measure the adaptation of traditional legal concepts and doctrines, the recent infusion of extensive litigation and innovative legislation represents an opportunity for meaningful public participation. The student is expected to become sufficiently familiar with the legal process to understand both its possibilities and limitations. Course also substitutes for ENVS 171. Note: Cross listed as GOVT 128; only one may be counted for credit.
Prerequisite: ENVS 111 or instructor permission.
Justification: Alternate course for ENVS 171

ENVS 171 Environmental Politics and Policy. Politics of human interaction with land, air and water. Political analysis of agenda setting, policy formation and administration (national, state and local) of environmental programs. Focus on contemporary issues such as energy alternatives, management of toxics, land development, and pollution control. Course also substitutes for ENVS 128.
Pre requisite: ENVS 111 or instructor permission.
Justification: Alternate course for ENVS 128

ENVS 198 Senior Thesis and Research.
Change to:
ENVS 198 Independent Senior Thesis Research.
Selection, design and implementation, and reporting of an approved environmental research project. For students in special circumstances. Written progress and final reports generally required.
Prerequisite: Senior status and prior consent of a faculty member who will supervise the work. Note: Generally students complete a senior thesis by enrolling in ENVS 190 A, B, or C.
Justification: This class was created for seniors who cannot attend the regular senior thesis courses due to work restraints or because their thesis topic did not fit will with the topics of ENVS 190A-Environmental Policy Thesis, ENVS 190B-Environmental Quality and Social Justice Thesis, or ENVS 190C-Environmental Science Thesis. This change is to clarify when this class is to be used. Requesting only a name and course description change.

COURSE DELETION

ENVS 296G Environmental Policy Seminar.
Justification:
This class was cross listed with Public Policy and Administration Department. They are now teaching this class on their own.

NEW COURSE

ENVS 175 Aquatic Pollution Assessment. Examines both the negative and positive impacts that anthropogenic activities have on groundwater, streams and lakes. Course provides the student with an introduction to the interrelationships among plants, animals, and environmental factors with in polluted aquatic ecosystems. Emphasizes laboratory and field procedures used in strategies take to assess and manage these impacts. Concentrates on the application of field sampling techniques and laboratory analysis currently used to assess the pollution impacts on biotic and abiotic components of groundwater, streams and lakes.
Prerequisite: BIO 160, CHEM 006A
Justification: This course will examine the negative impacts anthropogenic activities have on aquatic ecosystems .Techniques and strategies that are currently being used to assess and manage these systems in an effort to understand and minimize these impacts will be studied. The course will focus on hands on experience through laboratory exercises developed to take the student from beginning to end of a particular protocol currently being used by government agencies and/or industry. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of environmental issues students pursuing a career in the environmental field must have the ability to communicate with scientific, policy and engineering personnel. This course will provide students, no only in environmental studies, but students in other disciplines such as biology, natural, resource sciences, and ecology the opportunity to learn applications of stream and lake management currently in practice.


Department of Family and Consumer Sciences

COURSE CHANGES

FACS 110 Food Management. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: FACS 10, FACS 11 and 109 or concurrent enrollment or instructor permission.
Justification: Addition of two new prerequisites, FACS 10, Nutrition and Wellness, and FACS 109, Food Safety and Sanitation. To strengthen student's knowledge and ability to apply nutrition principles to menu planning, recipe modification, and nutrition analysis assignments and to practice proper food safety and sanitation techniques.

FACS 116 Foodservice Management. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: FACS 11, FACS 110 or instructor permission.
Justification: Addition of prerequisite, FACS 110, Food Management. To strengthen student's ability to apply concepts and practices of meal planning, menu planning, standardized recipes, and quantity food production management acquired in FACS 110 to cost control, labor control, kitchen layout, equipment selection, and the quality assurance in FACS 116.

FACS 117 Community Nutrition. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: FACS 113, FACS 115
Justification: Addition of prerequisite, FACS 115, Nutrition in the Lifespan. Students must have an understanding of the nutritional needs and issues of human from infancy through adulthood to aging prior to learning about the community resources and national policy issues taught in FACS 117.

FACS 118A Medical Nutrition Therapy I. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: FACS 113, BIO 131 or instructor permission.
Justification: Change prerequisite to delete ability to take prerequisite course BIO 131 concurrently, as it has hindered some students' ability to excel in the course, and add "or instructor permission" instead.

FACS 170 Advance Nutrition and Metabolism. Study of the physiologic function of carbohydrates, lipids, protein and micronutrients including integrated metabolism, transport, regulation and relation to inborn errors/chronic disease. Introduction to gene-nutrient interaction.
Prerequisite: CHEM 161, FACS 113, or instructor permission.
Justification: Modification of course content including : 1) Addition of gene-nutrient interactions to ensure content in accordance with Commission on Accreditation of Dietetics Education for Didactic Program in Dietetics. 2) Increased content of applied nutritional metabolism related to human disease and metabolic syndromes.


Department of Psychology

COURSE CHANGE

PSYC 135 Psychology of Multicultural Groups. Examines the role of culture, race, ethnicity, gender, and social class in human development and behavior within diverse cultural groups. Presents sociocultural and ecological perspectives on human development, i.e., that individuals must be understood in the context of his or her culturally patterned social relations, practices, institutions, and ideas. Explores psychological issues that pertain to the major ethnic minority groups in the United States.
Justification: The course description for PSYC 135 is modified to better distinguish it from a newly added course, PSYC 100 Cross Cultural Psychology. Specifically, the course description for PSYC 135 emphasizes cultural variables (as well as gender and social class) within multicultural societies in the U.S., whereas PSYC 100 examines psychological similarities and differences between disparate global cultures.

Social Science Program

COURSE CHANGE

SSCI 193 Integrating History and Social Science. A capstone seminar that serves as a bridge between academic preparation and entry into a professional teacher credential program. Students will examine social science-history in the State curriculum framework, reflect on subject matter preparation, focus on middle and high school social science teaching and learning, investigate and evaluate resources pertinent to instruction, and explore current issues in education.
Justification: Need to change catalog description to better reflect changes in the course and new California Commission on Teacher Credentialing standards.


Department of Sociology

NEW COURSE

SOC 123 Black Studies in Sociology. An introduction to the sociological analysis of Black American life in the United States. This course will focus upon the original contributions of social scientists to Black Studies in Sociology. In this course students will be introduced to the complex phenomena of Black issues, emerging theories of race, and the cumulative scholarship on black identity, experience, socio-economic status, and social organization.
Justification: Black Americans have been central to the larger American experience from the colonial period to the present. The discipline of sociology has held a long tradition in examining this group throughout their history in the United States. This course will also serve as an alternative to our offerings of the general race and ethnic relations sections.

COURSE CHANGES

SOC 169 Changing American Family. Analysis of the American family, past, present, and future, focusing on explanation and consequences of changes in child-bearing, courtship, marriage, and the interrelationships between the individual and the family and society. Focus on connecting course material to real world organizations and programs in the community that are associated with or linked to families. Per week: lecture two hours; field work in the community two- three hours.
Note: Course to be offered only in the Fall.
Justification: We are changing the class from a standard lecture class to a service learning class, while still introducing and discussing the same material from the previous course. The change to a service learning class is to give students a chance to connect the material being discussed in class with real world experience. As well, it offers students an opportunity to interact and work in an environment that may lead to potential careers. As for the connection to the department, there is, at this time, no service learning courses being offered, which can be seen as limiting the experience of students. Having already one Family course, and acknowledging that family issues touch a range of programs and organizations in the community, we felt changing the Changing American Family course to a service learning course would be beneficial to both students and the department, not to mention the benefit gained by the community.

SOC 196A Sociology of Film.
Change to:
SOC 134 Sociology of Film.
Introduces the "Sociological Imagination" by linking the personal histories found in films to larger social structures. The evolution of important contemporary global and domestic social issues is discussed by analyzing the sociological content of major motion pictures. The socio-historical development of the American film industry is also examined to explore its ideological role in challenging and perpetuating various forms of class, race, and gender discrimination.
Justification: The cinema is a major source of social and cultural information for young people. There is presently no class on campus that explores the sociological functions of the cinema. This course is designed to respond to an identified curriculum need to improve our students’ “media literacy” by critically examining how films re-enforce prejudice and discrimination. It is also designed to introduce and reinforce fundamental sociological concepts that have been identified in our assessment process.

SOC 196B Sociology of Health and Illness.
Change to:
SOC 144 Sociology of Health and Illness.
Examines the social contexts of health, illness, and medical care. Emphasizes the debates and contrasting perspectives that characterize the sociological study of health and illness. Topics include the social, global, environmental, and occupational factors influencing health and illness; the politics surrounding physical and mental illness; the patient’s perspective on illness; ethical issues in medicine as they relate to medical technology; and health care reform. The influence of health status on identity and interaction will also be addressed.
Prerequisite: SOC 001 or instructor approval.
Justification: (Course number is changed) Health is a socially defined and distributed good that shapes human identity, group membership, and life chances both in the United States and globally. Medical Sociology is taught in many sociology departments and is recognized by the American Sociological Association. The international focus of this course serves the department and university-wide goals of globalizing the curriculum.