Error processing SSI file


UNDERGRADUATE & GRADUATE
COURSE CHANGE PROPOSALS

LIST #4 - 2003/2004

If there are no objections reported to Academic Affairs by October 28, 2003, the course change proposals listed below are approved as submitted.

 List #4 Program Change Proposals are located at http://www.csus.edupolicies/03-04prgmlst4.stm for your review.

Course Change Proposals:
Past Course Change Proposal Lists:

College of Arts & Letters
College of Education
College of Engineering and Computer Science
College of Health & Human Services
College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics

College of Social Sciences and Interdisciplinary Studies


Course Change List #1
Course Change List #2
Course Change List #3


COLLEGE OF ARTS & LETTERS

Department of Art

NEW COURSE

ART 118B. A survey of the history of California architecture and its impact on the urban environment from Native Americans to the 20th century. Particular attention will be given to architecture as a symbol or statement of social, economic, and political empowerment. Cross-listed as HIST 184; only one may be counted for credit. 3 units.
Justification: This course will fill an important curricular need in the university. It will expand the courses in architectural history offered in the Art Department. It will also be a valuable resource for students in History, particularly Public History students specializing in historic preservation. The course will be taught on a rotating basis by faculty in History and Art.
Prerequisite: none.

COURSE CHANGES

ART 007 Art Appreciation. For the general education student who wants to explore the world of art and visual culture. A wide range of multicultural, historical, and contemporary art works, art media, art history, art ideas, and art practices are presented through illustrated lectures, discussions, field trips, guest lectures, studio visits, and beginning-level art projects. Note: Not open to majors in art and students who have received credit for ART 001A or Art 001B.
Justification: The course description for ART 7 had not been updated to reflect its re-affirmed status as a General Education course in Area C-2. The old description also did not fully convey what takes place in the class. The revised version is an accurate summary of the core coverage and activities that will be shared by the multiple sections of this course.

ART 118 Modern Architecture.
Change to:
ART 118A Modern Architecture
Justification: The course number will change with the approval of ART 118B and HIST 184.

ART 130 Aesthetics and Art Criticism. No change in course description.
Justification: The catalogue entry for ART 130 is out of date. It does not indicate that there are any prerequisites, even though students need to be upper division Art majors in order to be prepared to take the course. Accordingly, a "prerequisite line" has been added to the description, which otherwise is un changed..
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate status; declared major in Art.

ART 133 Understanding and Creating Art. No change in course description.
Justification: The demand for ART 133 is such that priority needs to be given to students majoring or minoring in the subjects that require this course(Art, Child Development, and Liberal Studies). Accordingly, the "prerequisite line" has been extended to include these areas. The course description is unchanged.
Prerequisite: Upper division status; declared major in Art, Child Development or Liberal Studies, or a minor in Art Education.

Department of History

NEW COURSE

HIST 184 California Architecture and Urban History. A survey of the history of California architecture and its impact on the urban environment from Native Americans of the 20th century. Particular attention will be given to architecture as a symbol or statement of social, economic, and political empowerment. 3 units.
Justification: This course will fill an important curricular need in the university. It will expand the courses in architectural history offered in the Art Department. It will also be a valuable resource for students in History, particularly Public History students specializing in historic preservation. The course will be taught on a rotating basis by faculty in History and Art.
Prerequisite: none.


COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation and School Psychology

NEW COURSE

EDS 234 Directed Fieldwork Seminar: Early Childhood Special Education. The seminar for student teachers is designed to allow the ECSE teacher candidate to focus on two overall issues: Problems and resolutions particular and general to their teaching assignment, and the development and/or refining of a preliminary Level I Performance Portfolio. Co-requisites: EDS 474 and EDS 475 or EDS 476 and EDS 477. Graded Credit/No Credit.
Justification: The EDS 234 course change proposal which specifies the student teaching seminar as early childhood special education is a change in course number (from EDS 233) for purposes of more effective student advising.

COURSE CHANGES

EDS 233 Student Teaching Seminar: Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe. Designed to allow the special education candidate teacher/intern to focus upon two overall issues pertaining to their specific needs: problems and resolutions particular and general to their teaching assignment. And the development and/or refining of a preliminary Level II Induction Plan. Note May be taken twice for credit. A Student Teaching/Field Experience course. This course must be taken twice for credit. First, it must be taken within the first two semesters of program or concurrently with initial student teaching. It must also be taken during the final phase of student teaching. Graded Credit/No Credit.

EDS 474 Directed Field Experience: Infants with Special Educational Needs. No change to course description.
Justification: The EDS 234 course change proposal to specify the student teaching seminar as Early Childhood Special Education requires a change in the co-requisite student teaching courses. These changes will assist in effective advising of credential candidates.
Corequisite: EDS 234

EDS 475 Directed Field Experience: Preschoolers with Special Educational Needs. No change to course description.
Justification: The EDS 234 course change proposal to specify the student teaching seminar as Early Childhood Special Education requires a change in the co-requisite student teaching courses. These changes will assist in effective advising of credential candidates.
Corequisite: EDS 234

EDS 476 Internship: Infants with Special Educational Needs. No change to course description.
Justification: The EDS 234 course change proposal to specify the student teaching seminar as Early Childhood Special Education requires a change in the co-requisite student teaching courses. These changes will assist in effective advising of credential candidates.
Corequisite: EDS 234

EDS 477 Internship: Preschoolers with Special Educational Needs. No change to course description.
Justification: The EDS 234 course change proposal to specify the student teaching seminar as Early Childhood Special Education requires a change in the co-requisite student teaching courses. These changes will assist in effective advising of credential candidates.
Corequisite: EDS 234

Department of Teacher Education

COURSE CHANGES

EDTE 232 Educational Applications of Computers. No change to course description.
Justification: Changing prerequisite only.
Prerequisite: EDTE 230 or EDTE 231; or EDTE 330 and EDTE 330B; EDS 271A/B; or equivalent.

EDTE 233 Teaching Problem-Solving Skills with Microcomputers.
Change to:
EDTE 233 Teaching Problem-Solving Skills with Educational Technology. Examines the theoretic presuppositions underlying the use of educational technology to teach problem-solving, conditions under with problem-solving opportunities are likely to arise, computer programming as a problem-solving medium and the potential of software programs designed to teach problem-solving skills. Includes Internet-based problem-solving and principles of distributed learning.
Justification: Changing prerequisites and title to update. Adding sentence to update content.
Prerequisite: EDTE 230 or EDTE 231; or EDTE 330 and EDTE 330B; or equivalent.

EDTE 234 Curriculum Development with Microcomputers.
Change to:
EDTE 234 Curriculum and Staff Development with Educational Technology. Provides the student with an in-depth understanding of the principles and processes of analyzing curriculum for the purpose of integrating educational technology at the classroom, school and district levels. Students will analyze curricula, identify appropriate technology applications, and create plans for establishing, monitoring and evaluating technology-based programs. Special emphasis will be placed on professional development. Prerequisite: EDTE 232 or equivalent.
Justification: Changing prerequisites and title to update. Adding sentence to update content.

EDTE 235 Multimedia in the Classroom.
Change to:
EDTE 235 Enhancing Curriculum with Multimedia and the Web. Provides the student with an in-depth understanding of the principles of multimedia and web-based design. Students will apply these principles to developing curriculum for the technology-infused classroom. Intensive hands-on experience in the development of web and multimedia including video based on principles of human information processing and aesthetics.
Justification: Changing prerequisites and title to update. Adding sentence to update content.
Prerequisite: EDTE 232 or equivalent.

 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

Department of Computer Science

COURSE CHANGE

CSC 280 Advanced Computer Architecture. No change in course description.
Justification: CSC 205 was a prerequisite for many years. It was inadvertently left off when a Course Change Proposal was done in 1999 to revise the catalog description and add "fully classified standing" as a prerequisite. The focus of CSC 280 is on parallel architectures and students need to have a complete understanding of single processor architecture, which is covered in CSC 205, before taking CSC 280.
Prerequisite: CSC 205 and fully classified graduate standing in Computer Science or Software Engineering. 3 units



COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Department of Kinesiology and Health Science

NEW COURSE

KINS 261 Exercise Psychology. This course was designed for graduate students in Kinesiology. Currently, exercise psychology is taught within the sport psychology course. There is a significant amount of new research and programming in exercise psychology. The purpose of the proposed course is to expose students to various psychological issues evident in the exercise setting. The theoretical and applied knowledge from this course will provide students with the necessary skills to incorporate psychological skills into their profession as a fitness directors, coaches, physical educators, sport psychologists, or athletic trainers.
Justification: This course is designed for graduate students in Kinesiology. The content of exercise psychology topics is minimal in the current course and will be omitted. The course will focus exclusively on sport psychology. The purpose of the proposed course is to expose students to various psychological issues evident in the exercise setting. The theoretical and applied knowledge from this course will provide students with the necessary skills to incorporate psychological skills into their profession as fitness directors, coaches, physical educators, sport psychologists, or athletic trainers.
Prerequisite: none.

COURSE CHANGE

KINS 260 Psychology of Sport and Exercise.
Change to:
KINS 260 Psychology of Sport. The in-depth study of parameters of human behavior as specifically related to sport including personality factors, motivational techniques, expectancy effects, group dynamics, leadership issues, aggression, arousal, concentration, and goal setting.
Justification: This course is designed for graduate students in kinesiology. The content of exercise psychology topics is minimal in the current course and will be omitted. The course will focus exclusively on sport psychology.
Prerequisite: none.

Division of Nursing

NEW COURSES

NURS 213F Adult Mental Health Nursing. An introduction to the advanced practice content in adult psychiatric/mental health nursing. Theoretical frameworks for practice, case studies, narrative clinical presentation, practice roles, legal and ethical issues, practice standards, treatment modalities, psychopathology, nursing process, and psycho-pharmacology will be covered.
Note:
Web-based. Requires Internet access
Prerequisite:
NURS 210A, NURS 212, NURS 213A, NURS 293A and instructor permission
Corequisite:
NURS 293F
Justification:
The current graduate curriculum in nursing includes preparation for titling as a Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS). MS in Nursing students who desire national certification as an adult mental health clinical nurse specialist are required to have a course in adult mental health nursing, in addition to the NURS 213A/NURS293A clinical role courses. This course is web-based and would be required for those students who select the CNS functional role in adult mental health. Students who wish to prepare for this role currently have enrolled in an independent study course (NURS 299) to meet the theory requirement and in NURS 292 a practicum course which already exists to be eligible for titling and national certification. The Division currently has NURS 213E which is a web-based course required for national certification emphasizing children and adolescents. Clinical Nurse Specialists choose from either children/adolescents or adults for national certification. There actually is no additional cost for this course as the small number of students who have focused on adult mental health have enrolled in NURS 299 and NURS 292, and the workload is a per student assignment. This course would only be available every other year.

NURS 293E Practicum in Child-Adolescent Mental Health. Supervised field experience to allow in-depth exploration of the advanced practice role with children and adolescents in a psychiatric/mental health or school-based setting.
Justification: The current graduate curriculum in nursing includes preparation for titling as a Clinical Nurse Specialist(CNS) in child-adolescent mental health or for a functional roles in school-based mental health services. Students who wish to prepare for either of these roles must complete NURS 213E (an existing web-based course) and NURS 292 which is a practicum course(3 units) focusing on the consultant role in the area of specialization. Other courses in the clinical role preparations of Family-Community-Mental Health, Adult Nursing, and School Nursing(the 213A or B or C or D series) have a companion practicum numbered NURS 293A or B or D. For consistency the Division would like to have NURS 293E to avoid confusion. There is no additional cost for this course as the workload is a per student assignment whether it would be NURS 292 or the new NURS 293E.
Prerequisite: NURS 210A, NURS 212, and NURS 213A or NURS 213C and instructor permission.

NURS 293F Practicum in Adult Mental Health Nursing. Supervised field experience to allow in-depth exploration of the advanced practice role with adults in a psychiatric/mental health setting.
Prerequisite: NURS 210A, NURS 212, NURS 213A and instructor permission
Corequisite: NURS 213F
Justification: The current graduate curriculum in nursing includes preparation for titling as a Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) in adult mental health. Students who wish to prepare for this role must complete NURS 213F (a new web-based course) and NURS 292 which is a practicum course (3 units) focusing on the consultant role in the area of specialization. Other courses in the clinical role preparations of Family-Community-Mental Health, Adult Nursing, and School Nursing (the 213A or B or C or D series) have a companion practicum numbered NURS 293A or B or D. For consistency the Division would like to have NURS 293F to avoid confusion. There is no additional cost for this course as the workload is a per student assignment whether it would be NURS 292 or the new NURS 293F. This course would be offered every other year.

 

 

COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS

Department of Biology

NEW COURSES

BIO 111 Land Plants: Evolution, Life & Times. A study of the evolution of land plants including transition to the land environment and the first land plants. Emphasis will be placed on three stages of plant diversification: initial, gymnosperm, and angiosperm. Lecture 3 hours.
Justification: Biological sciences BA and BS No Concentration require an upper division plant course. Only three such courses are offered, two are offered only in Spring. The number of students requiring an upper division plant course cannot be accommodated in the existing courses. Additionally, for employment in State or Federal biological conservation agencies, applicants are required to take more plant biology courses than Biological Sciences offers.
Prerequisite: BIO 012.

BIO 175 Aquatic Pollution Assessment. Examines negative/positive anthropogenic activity impacts on groundwater, streams and lakes. Introduction to interrelationships of plants, animals, and environmental factors within polluted aquatic ecosystems. Emphasis on laboratory/field procedures used in strategies to assess and manage impacts. Concentration on field sampling techniques and laboratory analyses assessing pollution impacts on biotic and abiotic components of groundwater, streams, and lakes. Lecture 2hours; Laboratory 3 hours. Spring Only.
Justification: This cross listed course examines both the negative and positive impacts that anthropogenic activities have on ground water, streams and lakes. This course provides the student with an introduction to the interrelationships among plants, animals, and environmental factors within polluted aquatic ecosystems. The course emphasizes laboratory and field procedures used in strategies taken to assess and manage these impacts. Thereby, concentrating on the application of field sampling techniques and laboratory analysis currently used to assess the pollution impacts on biotic and abiotic components of groundwater, streams, lakes.
Prerequisite: CHEM 006A, BIO 160, and instructor's permission. 3 units.

BIO 183 Cancer Biology. A study of cancer from the molecular level to the effect on whole tissue and organ. Topics to be covered include the classification and nomenclature of cancers, the process leading up to the formation of a cancer, the possible causes of cancer, and possible treatment. Lecture two hours.
Justification: Additional elective course for Biology majors and minors. Career-related course for pre-health students. Add diversity to courses offered by the Department of Biological Sciences.
Prerequisite: BIO 010, BIO 011, BIO 012, and CHEM 006B or CHEM 020. 2 units.


COURSE CHANGES

BIO 169 Ethology: The Behavior of Animals
Change to:
BIO 169 Animal Behavior.
Introduction to the fascinating world of why animals do the things that they do. The focus is on the evolution and function of animal behavior through understanding the costs and benefits of different behavior including foraging, fighting and reproduction. Lecture two hours; laboratory three hours.
Justification: Change in title and description to clarify course content. Content will stay the same.
Prerequisite: BIO 011 or instructor permission.

BIO 170 Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism. Study of the physiologic function of carbohydrates, lipids, protein and micronutrients including integrated metabolism, transport, regulation and relation to inborn errors/chronic disease. Introduction to gene-nutrient interaction.
Justification: Change in course description to incorporate changes in course. Modification of course content including: 1) Addition of gene-nutrient interactions to course content in accordance with Commission on Accreditation of Dietetics Education for Didactic Program in Dietetics. 2) Increased content of applied nutritional metabolism related to human disease and metabolic syndromes.
Prerequisite: CHEM 161, FACS 113; or instructor permission.

BIO 198A Honors Pro-Seminar and Research. Contemporary topics in biology selected by students in the course will form the basis for an introduction to scientific journals, the scientific method, and research as a professional pursuit. Each student will develop a refined research proposal and prepare a seminar summarizing the proposal and the current state of knowledge in the topic area. Students will develop and refine their methodology under the direction of a faculty sponsor.
Justification: Change in prerequisites. Because of the number of transfer students coming in to the Biological Sciences program, the department wishes to be less restrictive in the basic requirements to the Honors Program. Students had been required to complete BIO 010, BIO 011, and BIO 012 with a GPA of 3.0 Our experience has been that students with 15 units of biology and at least 6 upper division units of Biology that adhere to the GPA requirements do well in the honors program.
Prerequisite: Open only to honors students in Biological Sciences who have an overall GPA of 3.25 and a minimum of 3.0 GPA in biology courses (at least six units of upper division biology excluding BIO 106, 108, 194, 195, 197 and 199) 2 units.


Department of Chemistry

COURSE CHANGES

CHEM 1A General Chemistry.
Change to:
CHEM 1A General Chemistry I. No change in course description.
Justification: Changing course title because it clarifies sequencing of course by adding "I" to the title.
Prerequisite: High school algebra (two years) and high school chemistry, or equivalent.

CHEM 1B General Chemistry.
Change to:
CHEM 1B General Chemistry II. No change in course description.
Justification: Changing course title because it clarifies sequencing of course by adding "II" to the title.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1A.

CHEM 24 Organic Chemistry Lecture I. Introduction to the basic principals of organic chemistry, including nomenclature, properties, and reactions of various classes of organic compounds. Reaction mechanisms will be emphasized. Note: Required for chemistry majors and recommended for pre-professional students.
Justification: Changing course description. An improved and clearer description of the course content compared to the previous one. Syllabi has not changed in terms of general content.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1B. 3 units.

CHEM 31 Inorganic Quantitative Analysis.
Change to:
CHEM 31 Quantitative Analysis.
Chemical measurements including associated statistics, chemical equilibrium in aqueous solutions, volumetric analysis, and an introduction to spectrophotometry and chromatography.
Prerequisite: CHEM 001B
Justification: Revised course title reflects better the nature of the course and its syllabus. It covers more than just inorganic examples. It is not a major change.

CHEM 124 Organic Chemistry Lecture II. Introduction to the basic principals of organic chemistry, including nomenclature, properties, and reactions of various classes of organic compounds and spectroscopic analysis. Reaction mechanisms will be emphasized.
Justification: Changing course description. Changes to course description clarifies the content and how the course is different from CHEM 24. There is no change in course design or content.
Prerequisite: CHEM 24 or instruction permission; concurrent enrollment in CHEM 25 recommended. 3 units.

CHEM 140A Physical Chemistry Lecture.
Change to:
CHEM 140A Physical Chemistry Lecture I. Introduction to chemical thermodynamics and kinetics.
Justification: Changing course title and course description. Improves accuracy of course description. Additional clarification of sequencing of courses by adding "I" to title. No change in course design.
Prerequisite: CHEM 31, MATH 32, PHYS 5A, PHYS 5B, PHYS 11A, PHYS 11B, PHYS 11C; PHYS 11C may be taken concurrently. 3 units.

CHEM 140B Physical Chemistry Lecture.
Change to:
CHEM 140B Physical Chemistry Lecture II. Introduction to molecular quantum chemistry, structure of matter, molecular spectroscopy, and statistical thermodynamics.
Justification: Changing course title and course description. Improve accuracy of existing course content and difference from CHEM 140A. No change in course design or content. Also adds "II" to title to clarify sequencing of courses.
Prerequisite: CHEM 140A. 3 units.

CHEM 160A Structure and Function of Biological Molecules. Describes the chemistry and biochemistry of amino acids, proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and carbohydrates. Also includes enzyme kinetics, the structure and function of membranes and discussion of some common laboratory methods.
Justification: Changing course description. More accurately reflects course content. Course design remains the same.
Prerequisite: CHEM 124; MATH 26A or MATH 30 is recommended. Fall only. 3 units.

CHEM 160B Metabolism and Regulation of Biological Systems. Describes the bioenergetics and regulation of anaerobic and aerobic metabolic pathways. Major topics include glycolysis, Kreb's cycle, fatty acid and amino acid oxidation, lipid biosynthesis and photosynthesis. Particular emphasis is given to pathway regulation and integration.
Justification: Changing course description. More accurately reflects course content. Course design remains the same.
Prerequisite: CHEM 160A; Spring only. 3 units.

CHEM 164 Macromolecular Laboratory Techniques. Capstone course which emphasizes biochemical laboratory experimental design and trouble-shooting skills. Common biochemistry techniques are applied in semester-long individual student projects.
Justification: Changing course description. Course is offered every semester.
Prerequisite: CHEM 162 or equivalent; ENGL 020 or an equivalent second semester composition course. 3 units.

CHEM 240 Advanced Instrumentation Laboratory. The synthesis of compounds and application of modern separation techniques to determine structure and reactivity will be emphasized. Organic, inorganic, and/or biological chemicals may be synthesized. Instrumental methods that may be used include: HPLC, FT-IR, nuclear magnetic resonance, UV-VIS, flourescence, atomic absorption, and mass spectrometry and cyclic voltammetry.
Prerequisite: CHEM 24, 25, 124 or permission of instructor.
Justification: Prerequisites have been changed to one year of organic lecture and one semester of organic lab. This better represents the entering skills and knowledge needed by students enrolled in course.

CHEM 250 Selected Topics in Chemistry. Intensive coverage of one or more advanced topics in chemistry. A variety of learning/teaching methodologies may be employed including lecture, team projects, computer modeling, oral presentations and poster projects. May be team-taught. May be repeated once for credit if topics are different.
Justification: Changing course description. The phrase "and taught by a different instructor" is not needed.
Prerequisite: Enrollment in MS Chemistry graduate program or instructor permission. 3 units

CHEM 260 Protein Biochemistry. Provides a comprehensive review of proteins, with emphasis on protein structure and structure/function relationships. Topics include methods for structure determination, stability and folding, catalysis and denovo protein design. Topical examples from the literature, particularly those related to disease states, are used to illustrate fundamental principles of protein structure and function.
Justification: Changing course description. More accurately reflects course content. Course design remains the same.
Prerequisite: One semester of biochemistry. 3 units


Department of Geography

COURSE CHANGES

GEOG 115 Geography of Plants and Soils.
Change to:
GEOG 115 Geography of Plants and Animals. Introduction to the geographic distribution of life. Communities and biomes, changing continents and climates, dispersal, colonization, extinction, life on islands, and past and present human impacts are examined. Field trip required.
Justification: Course modification reflects change in course content as a result of new faculty teaching the course. The proposed course changes should be more attractive and relevant to students.
Prerequisite: GEOG 001. 3 units

GEOG 163 Applied Resource Planning.
Change to:
GEOG 163 Applied GIS. Introduction to developing a GIS project, including planning, database research, proposal writing, analysis and evaluation. Lecture 2 hours; Laboratory 3 hours. 3 units.
Justification: As a result of a new faculty member assuming responsibility for the course, its nature has changed from somewhat from that described in the original course proposal. As a result, the old course title and catalog description (i.e. the current catalog copy) are now somewhat misleading; the proposed changes more accurately reflect the current focus of the course.
Prerequisite: GEOG 109.


Department of Physics & Astronomy

NEW COURSES

PHSC 075 Intro to Machine Shop Practices. Safe machine operation techniques on common fabrication equipment. Study of materials and methods used to build testing and measuring equipment. Reading and calibrating measuring devices, gauging and optical gauging. Study of measuring conventions and understanding of precision. Interpretation of drawings, tolerances and tactics for maintaining tolerances. Jigs and mounts for dynamic data collection equipment. Prototype manufacturing. Students completing this course qualify to perform work in the shop with minimum supervision. Lecture one hour; Laboratory three hours. 2 units.
Justification: This new course will be part of the requirement for the certificate program in scientific instrument development and strongly recommended to all BA/BS students. The course is intended to prepare students for either the business/industrial environment or graduate students in Experimental Physics, Chemistry or Engineering.


PHYS 136 Electrodynamics of Waves, Radiation, and Materials.
Electromagnetic waves, wave propagation in material media, reflection and refraction, polarization, cavities and waveguides, optical fibers, simple radiating systems, radiation from an accelerated charge and special relativity. Introduction to plasma physics and electromagnetic properties of superconductors.
Justification: The current coverage of electricity and magnetism, an important core subject for a BS Physics program, is simply inadequate. The proposed change remedies this inadequacy by adding a 3-unit course for a 6-unit total, which is the norm in most undergraduate Physics programs. This course will emphasize critical topics currently ignored by our previous curriculum: exploring the development of Maxwell's Equations with application to optics, radiative systems, and relativisitic phenomena.
Prerequisite: PHYS 135. Fall only. 3 units.

PHYS 191 Senior Project. Research Project under faculty supervision. Project may consist of laboratory or theoretical research project, instrumentation/demonstration development, or literature research project. Projects require written and oral reports.
Justification: Physics 191, Senior Project, is the capstone course for physics majors pursuing both BA and BS degrees. The goal of this course is to provide an opportunity for students to demonstrate the scientific skills that they have learned in the process of obtaining their degree.

Physics 191 will provide physics majors with the opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of the discipline b performing an independent project (research paper, laboratory project, apparatus development) under the guidance of a faculty member. A student is expected to spend a minimum of 75 hours (5 hours per week based on a normal semester) working on the projected for a passing grade in the course. Acceptable uses of time are: preliminary/background research, planning, development, construction, implementation, programming, analysis, and report preparation. Not included in the above are regular meetings between student and advisor. If the student is using off campus work to satisfy the time requirements of this course, the student must get the permission of the Department Chair and the Senior Project Coordinator.

The nature of this course provides a broad range of opportunities of projects for students. Students may perform an experimental research project on-campus, under the guidance of a faculty member, or off-campus as a guest researcher or summer fellow at another facility (i.e. national laboratories, state laboratories, or another university). Additionally, theoretical/computational projects may also be performed on- or off-campus. Work done off-campus must meet minimum time guidelines listed below in the course requirements section. Students interested in physics education may select a project to construct a demonstration apparatus or develop and test a new laboratory experiment. Another option for the project may be a library research project. Possible topics for a library project may be of historical/philosophical nature o the review of a specific topic in physics. Additional special project topics may be possible with the approval of the PHYS 191 coordinator.

All students will give a presentation (normally 15 minutes followed by a 5 minute Q/A period) of their work to the department near the end of the semester in which they complete their project. A final written report is due at the end of finals week of the same semester.
Prerequisite: Department chair permission.


COURSE CHANGES

PHYS 110 Intermediate Mechanics.
Change to:
PHYS 110 Classical Mechanics.
Fundamental principles of statics and dynamics, including Newton's equations and conservation laws, damped and forced oscillations, central force motion, accelerated coordinate systems, coupled oscillations, normal modes, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods, introduction to nonlinear systems and chaos theory.
Prerequisite: MATH 045, PHYS 11C, PHYS 105.
Justification: This is a nonsubstantive change in course title and catalog description only.

PHYS 115A Introduction to Electric & Electronic Measurements.
Change to:
PHYS 115 Electronics & Instrumentation. Linear and non-linear circuits, operational amplifiers, transducers, basics of digital circuitry, and an introduction to computerized data acquisition. Lecture two hours; laboratory six hours
Justification: Change in title and course description better represents material covered in course. Gradual changes in material occur due to changes in technology (advances in electronics/computers).
Prerequisite: PHYS 011C or PHYS 005B with instructor permission. Fall only. 4 units

PHYS 115B Electronic Systems & Instrumentation.
Change to:
PHYS 116 Advanced Electronics & Instrumentation. Noise reduction techniques, signal recovery, frequency analysis, computerized instrument control, and instrument development. Lecture one hour; laboratory six hours
Justification: This change is not substantial. Title and course description changes merely reflect a gradual change in material covered due to developments in the field.
Prerequisite: PHYS 115. Fall only. 4 units

PHYS 135 Electricity and Magnetism. Development of electromagnetic theory from basic experimental laws; electrostatics, electric currents, magnetostatics, electric and magnetic properties of matter, induction, Maxwell's equations, conservation laws, electromagnetic waves.
Justification: This change is not substantial and is intended to make the catalog description consistent with that of its proposed sequel, PHYS 136.
Prerequisite: MATH 045, PHYS 011C, PHYS 105. Spring only. 3 units.

PHYS 151 Modern Physics.
Change to:
PHYS 151 Advanced Modern Physics.
Structure of matter including basic elements of atomics, molecular, solid state, nuclear and particle physics. Topics will also include photon and electron gases, lasers, superconductivity, Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluidity.
Prerequisite: PHYS 150
Justification: This is a nonsubstantive change in course title and catalog description only.


COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES & INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Department of Anthropology

NEW COURSES

ANTH 004 Language, Culture, and Critical Thinking. Introduction to the abstract and formal structures of language and cultural dimensions of human communication via major linguistic anthropological concepts, theoretical assumptions, and methodologies. Addresses the logical, formal relationship between underlying rules of natural languages while critically analyzing how speakers from different cultures use language to convey complex social and cultural information. Course illuminates how language is used to create and reinforce relationships of power (race, class, gender); develops ability to recognize linguistic fallacies; instructs in basic critical thinking skills. 3 units (CAN ANTH 8).
Justification: This course is being offered to expand lower division electives available to both majors and non-majors in Anthropology. The Department of Anthropology has upper division course offerings in all four fields of Anthropology (Cultural, Linguistic, Physical, and Archaeology); however, it currently lacks a lower division linguistic anthropology course. This offering provides introductory training in the fundamentals of linguistic anthropology, which would in turn provide the ability to go beyond mere introductory principles and theories in the upper division course offering.
Prerequisite: none.

ANTH 120 Introductory Statistics for Anthropologists. Covers the conceptual framework involved in quantitative methods of data analysis commonly employed in anthropology. The emphasis is primarily on understanding concepts and secondarily on learning techniques of data analysis. Topics to be considered include data description and distributions, estimation procedures, hypothesis testing, and model fitting. Illustration of concepts in lecture will be made with data from archaeology, physical anthropology, and social/cultural anthropology. 3 units.
Justification: The usage of statistics by anthropologists differs from the usage in other behavioral sciences. Often anthropological research is historical or otherwise non-experimental. Also, anthropologists borrow research methods from the natural sciences. An anthropology-focused statistics course is justified for two reasons: (1) Other statistics courses are unlikely to reflect the range of methods employed in anthropology; and (2) students learn mathematical concepts with greater proficiency when they are illustrated in familiar problem contexts.
Prerequisite: none.

ANTH 122 The Evolution of Early Mesoamerican States. Traces the emergence of prehispanic state societies in Mesoamerica from the growth of the earliest settlements to the collapse of the Aztec empire. Analyzes how complex societies evolved in Mesoamerica, focusing on such evidence as household and village social organization, craft specialization and interregional exchange, religion and ideology, and the logistics of state management and imperial expansion. 3 units.
Justification: Dr. Biskowski is a Mesoamerican archaeologist whose specialties contribute to the archaeological program as well as complement those of the Latin Americanists in the Department. With the recent departure of Dr. Goldfried, we no longer had the faculty to teach a number of his (Goldfried's) courses on state-level societies (e.g., Egyptian Archaeology and Biblical Archaeology). Dr. Bisokowski, however, could take over Goldfried's GE Mexican Archaeology class as well as develop other courses on state-level societies. This is the first such course on more complex societies that will contribute to our students' understanding of the range of social systems (from mobile hunger-gathers to sedentary agriculturists).
Prerequisite: none.

ANTH 142 Political Anthropology. Explores political anthropology as a specialized field of anthropological inquiry . Analyzes the articulation of power, authority, and legitimacy in non-state and state based societies. Contributes to an understanding of the transforming powers of modernity and resistance to it and develops a critical appreciation of how age, status, class, ethnicity, race, gender and religious ideologies shape political order within various societies around the world. 3 units.
Justification: The Department of Anthropology continues to develop an integrated curriculum that applies anthropological theories and methods to explore political, economic and cultural transformations around the world. This course represents a vital step in the development of topical studies within the Department of Anthropology. This course, keeping in mind the need to inform students and preparing them to interact with the world, will significantly contribute to broadening the focus of topical studies offered by the Department.
Prerequisite: ANTH 002 or ANTH 101.

ANTH 195D Fieldwork in Linguistic Anthropology. Consideration of language in its social context: language and power, language and gender, interethnic communication, language and race, pidgins and creoles, multilingualism, standardization, language ideology. Instruction in ethnographic and linguistic methods of data collection and analysis; identification of socially significant linguistic variables. Contributions of the study of contextualized speech to linguistic theory. 3 units.
Justification: This course is being offered to expand the fieldwork opportunities available to both majors and non-majors in Anthropology. The offering is in response to the introduction of a new faculty member hired to reinforce the four-field approach of the Anthropology department through the development of at least one course on contemporary issues in linguistic anthropology such as language and society. The course will provide: 1) a linguistic anthropological offering that will satisfy the fieldwork requirement in the Department for undergraduates, and 2) student exposure to recent trends and developments in fieldwork and analytic methodologies that simply cannot be covered sufficiently in the single course the Department is currently able to offer (ANTH 004).
Prerequisite: ANTH 004 or instructor permission.

ANTH 276 Museum Anthropology. Surveys the practical, theoretical, and historical dimensions of museum anthropology and material culture studies, with particular emphasis on California and the U.S. Situates contemporary issues related to the collection, exhibition, and repatriation of ethnographic and archaeological materials within the sociopolitical context of the globally based indigenous rights movement.
Justification: This course prepares graduate students to work as museum anthropologists and interpretive specialists in a variety of contexts (ranging from private museums to federal, state, or tribal cultural centers) that require knowledge of the basic principles and practices related to collecting, researching, preserving and exhibiting material culture.
Prerequisite: Graduate status in Anthropology or instructor permission.

COURSE CHANGES

ANTH 001 Introduction to Physical Anthropology. Covers the concepts, methods of inquiry, and theory of biological evolution and their application to the human species. There is a specific focus on molecular, Mendelian and population genetics, mechanisms of evolution, primatology, paleoanthropology, biocultural adaptations, and human variation. The scientific method serves as the foundation to the course. 3 units (CAN ANTH 2).
Justification: This language is taken from the 2002-2003 IMPAC* Annual Report's recommendation for CAN descriptions. Therefore it conforms to the language used at the UCs and the CCs and is more up to date. There is absolutely no substantive change to the course content.
*Intersegmental Major Preparation Articulated Curriculum project.

ANTH 002 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. An introduction to anthropological approaches in the study of people and cultures. Using ethnographic case studies, the course contributes to a critical understanding of continuity and diversity in peoples' lifestyles, social institutions and cultural practices in different societies around the world. The course also examines the impact of political, economic and social changes, such as colonization, decolonization, globalization, etc., on people and cultures over the last century. 3 units (CAN ANTH 4).
Justification: This language is more informative for students, adds greater clarity, and provides a more contemporary description of the course content. There is absolutely no substantive change to the course content.

ANTH 003 Introduction to Cultural Archaeology. Archaeology is the study of past societies based on the physical remains they left behind. This course introduces students to the methods and theories used by archaeologists to find, recover, and interpret such remains in an effort to reconstruct and understand the lives of earlier peoples. The class uses archaeological case studies, films, and hands-on examples of tools and other artifacts produced by simple stone age hunters and more complex civilizations that lived in California and other parts of the world. 3 units (CAN ANTH 6).
Justification: This description provides a simpler, clearer, more contemporary description of the course content. There is absolutely no substantive change to the course content.

ANTH 110 The Archaeological Method and Theory. This class traces the development of archaeology from its inception in the eighteenth century up to the present time. Readings, lectures, and class assignments follow the evolution of archaeological method and theory in relation to changing ideas about the role of culture, environment, and technology within the broader discipline of anthropology. 3 units.
Justification: This language is more informative for students, adds greater clarity, and provides a more contemporary description of the course content. There is absolutely no substantive change to the course content.
Prerequisite: ANTH 003.

ANTH 123 Ancient Technology. This course examines the importance of various preindustrial technologies, and the techniques and methods involved in their manufacture and use. Topics include stone, bone, wood, and hide working, ceramics, weaving, metallurgy, and other crafts essential to human survival in ancient and contemporary societies around the world. 3 units.
Justification: This language is more informative for students, adds greater clarity, and provides a more contemporary description of the course content. There is absolutely no substantive change to the course content.

ANTH 126 Ancient Technology. This seminar introduces students to various approaches to archaeological analysis, focusing on how different classes of data are collected, classified, and interpreted to resolve research issues. Includes such topics as the handling, treatment, and analysis of flaked and ground stone tools, plant and animal food remains, and other types of archaeological materials. Lecture one hour, laboratory six hours.
Justification: This language provides a more contemporary description of the course content. There is absolutely no substantive change to the course content.
Prerequisite: ANTH 003. (May be repeated once for credit). 3 units.

ANTH 128 Indians of California. Provides a survey of the traditional cultures of California Native American groups as they existed immediately after Western contact. Exploration of the ecological linguistic, economic, social, political, and religious diversity of California Native American groups provides a background for analysis of current anthropological theories of hunter-gatherer adaptations, subsistence intensification, political economy, cultural complexity, and California prehistory. 3 units.
Justification: This language provides a clarification of the course content. There is absolutely no substantive change to the course content. Change in course classification, as this upper division course does not follow a Lecture Composition/Case Study format, but rather it follows a Lecture/Recitation format, with student discussion as the primary instructional method.

ANTH 135 Indians of North America. This class provides a survey of traditional Native American societies and culture areas north of Mexico. Readings, lectures, and class discussions emphasize primary ethnographic and historic data that provide the richest accounts of Amerindian cultures at the time of European contact and shortly thereafter. 3 units.
Justification: This language provides a clarification of the course content. There is absolutely no substantive change to the course content. Change in course classification, as this upper division course does not follow a Lecture Composition/Case Study format, but rather it follows a Lecture/Recitation format, with student discussion as the primary instructional method.

ANTH 154 Primatology.
Change to:
ANTH 154 Primate Behavior. Survey of the genetic, ecological and social influences on non-human primate behavior from an evolutionary perspective; covers the major non-human primate groups, including their taxonomy, major adaptations, and their present geographic distribution. The history and development of primate behavior also will be considered, with an emphasis on various models for interpreting behavior.
Justification: The course title is a better descriptor, as Primatology per se includes skeletal and soft tissue analysis, paleontology, neurology etc. The course description reflects contemporary content better. There is absolutely no substantive change to course content.

ANTH 155 Physical Method and Theory.
Change to:
ANTH 155 Method and Theory in Physical Anthropology. Survey of the development of method and theory in physical anthropology, from its origins in zoology, anatomy, and medicine, to the various approaches currently used in the study of human biology and evolution. Concepts considered include the scientific method, modern genetics, evolutionary theory, the race concept and other approaches to explaining human variation, taxonomy & systematics, and macro-evolutionary models. Critical reading and analytical skills will be emphasized.
Justification: The course title is a better descriptor of the course. This language provides a more contemporary description of the course content. There is absolutely no substantive change to the course content. The course classification change (from C2 to C3) brings it into alignment with most of the other Method and Theory classes in our curriculum, allowing more contact with the students and better quality evaluation of their writing/performance.
prerequisite: ANTH 001 and ANTH 001A. 3 units.

ANTH 165 Applied Anthropology. Provides tools for exploring the application of an anthropological paradigm to various aspects of culture change and conflict. Content is organized into a series of critical topical areas such as modernization, economic development, and urbanization. 3 units.
Justification: Reflect contemporary content better.

ANTH 195A Fieldwork in Archaeology. Introduction to archaeological field methods, covering practical aspects of how to identify and investigate isolated artifact finds, particular sites and features, and entire landscapes. Covering survey and excavation techniques, basic approaches to sampling, mapping and navigation, stratigraphic excavation, artifact and feature recording, and recovery methods.
Justification: This language provides a more contemporary and informative description of the course content. There is absolutely no substantive change to the course content.
Co requisite: ANTH 192A. 2 units.

ANTH 203 Archaeology. Explores the intellectual development of archaeological method and theory; examines the history of archaeological thought from its advent to the present day, looking in detail at pre-scientific, culture-historical, processual, and post-processual approaches to the discipline; emphasis is placed on the role of archaeology as a branch of anthropology and as a historical, humanistic, and/or scientific enterprise. 3 units.
Justification: This language provides a contemporary description of the course content. There is absolutely no substantive change to the course content. Course classification change from C15 to C5, because the course is one of our core graduate seminars.

ANTH 204 Current Archaeological Methods and Theory.
Change to:
ANTH 204 Current Problems in Archaeological Method and Theory. Explores recent methodological and theoretical developments within archaeology; focus is on contemporary debates within the discipline; topical coverage varies; examines conceptual and practical concerns, highlighting possibilities and limitations of new approaches to archaeological problems. May be repeated for credit, providing the topic and/or instructor are not the same. 3 units.
Justification: The title change provides more clarity. The catalog language provides a more contemporary description of the course content. There is absolutely no substantive change to the course content. Course classification change from C15 to C5, because the course is one of our core graduate seminar.

ANTH 223 Areal Archaeological. Seminar provides an intensive examination of archaeological problems within a selected regional or topical area. Through general readings and case studies, students will critically assess how current perspectives regarding relevant issues have evolved and determine how contemporary viewpoints might be improved or expanded. May be repeated for credit provided topic and instructor are not repeated. 3 units.
Justification: This language provides a more contemporary description of the course content. There is absolutely no substantive change to the course content. Course classification change from C15 to C5, because the course is a graduate seminar.

ANTH 226 Techniques of Archaeological Analysis - Typologies and Syntheses.
Change to:
ANTH 226 Advanced Techniques of Archaeological Analysis. This seminar examines more refined approaches to archaeological analysis, focusing on how various classes of data are collected, classified, and interpreted to resolve directed research problems. Emphasis is on such topics as sampling procedures and statistical assessment of data rather than descriptive analysis and interpretation. Lecture one hour; laboratory six hours. May be repeated once for credit.
Justification: The description language is more informative for students and adds greater clarity. ANTH 126 is entitled Advanced Techniques of Archaeological Analysis; the addition of "Advanced" to the otherwise same title indicates the similarities and difference between the courses. There is absolutely no substantive change to the course content. Course classification change from C15 to C5, because the course is a graduate seminar.
Prerequisite: ANTH 126 or instructor permission. 3 units.


Department of Economics

NEW COURSES

ECON 152 Economics of Education. An introduction to the various aspects of the economics of education. Applies the tools of economic analysis to education policy and problem solving. Topics include cost-benefit analysis of education, the signaling vs. human capital debate, race and gender issues in education, education production functions, and financing education at the elementary, secondary, and post-secondary levels. Emphasis placed on individual and social choice in education.
Justification: This course would help pursue the Department's goal to increase upper division course offerings. Economics of Education would give majors an additional applied upper division elective and would also serve as a good follow up course for Liberal Studies and or Social Science majors looking to take an additional Economics course beyond those required for their respective majors.
Prerequisite: ECON 001B or ECON 104. 3 units.

ECON 161 Fundamentals of Game Theory. An analysis of strategic games with sequential or simultaneous moves under complete information and uncertainty. Discussion of theory and techniques is combined with examination of specific classes of games and their application to real-world examples such as markets, voting, auctions, and international relations.
Justification: The prevalence of Game Theory in the Social Sciences and the popularity of the subjects in Economics programs throughout the U.S., provide a solid Justification for inclusion of the course in the Economics Department curriculum. Economics majors will not only be able to elect this course as part of their upper division requirements, but will also benefit from its wide applicability to Economics, Government, Business, and International Relations, among others.
Prerequisite: ECON 001B, STAT 0001; Recommended ECON 100B. 3 units.

ECON 186 Sports Economics. Sports Economics introduces the essential economic concepts and develops them with examples and applications from the sports industry. The course covers basic economic concepts: economic principles, supply and demand, perfect competition, and monopoly behavior. It also applies these concepts to a variety of topics: the public finance of spots franchises, the cost/benefits of a spots franchise to a city, labor markets and labor relations, discrimination, and amateurism and college sports. There are no prerequisites for this course.
Justification: The department of economics would like to broaden its offerings with this course. Sports Economics provides an ideal environment for students to apply the skills and knowledge developed in economics courses.

ECON 189 Economics at the Movies. Analysis of the use and treatment of economic theory and history in popular American films. Emphasis is placed on the topics of game theory, industrial organization, entrepreneurship, law and economics, labor economics, the stock market, and American economic history. The entertainment industry will also be examined from an economic perspective. 3 units.
Justification: This course would continue in the mission to broaden the course offerings of the Economics Department. Economics at the Movies would serve as a new mechanism to attract non-majors to Economics and would provide current majors with an opportunity to apply their skills from other economics courses.

ECON 260 Industrial Organization and Performance. A modern analysis of industry structure, conduct, and performance. Emphasis i placed on the use of game theory to address firm behavior, including price and output decisions, entry and exit, horizontal mergers, technological change, and marketing issues. 3 units.
Justification: The field of Industrial Organization is growing in importance in Economics, particularly because of the use of game-theoretic tools to address firm behavior in a variety of market settings. Hence, by offering this graduate elective course, the Department of Economics will be better suited to meet the needs of students pursuing graduate work with the intent to specialize in industrial organization, or to apply the issues of industrial organization in their vocation. In addition, this course meets the goals of the Economics Department's plan to broaden the graduate-level course offerings.
Prerequisite: Classified graduate status in Economics or approval of the instructor.

ECON 290 International Trade. An analysis of modern trade theories, their empirical relevance, and the role of multinational firms in the evolution of international trade patterns. Discussion focuses on theoretical and empirical evaluation of trade policy instruments. Various trade agreements are also discussed in the context of economic integration and globalization. Attention is also given to foreign direct investment and as a vehicle of globalization and the challenges it poses to both multinational firms and host countries.
Justification: The challenges of globalization make the subject of International Trade an important and increasingly essential part of a graduate degree in economics. By offering this graduate elective course, the Department of Economics will be better suited to meet the needs of the students pursuing graduate work with the intent to specialize in International Economics or apply the issues of international economics in their vocation. In addition, this course meets the goals of Economics Department's plan to broaden the graduate-level course offerings.
Prerequisite: Classified graduate student status in Economics or approval of the instructor.

COURSE CHANGES

ECON 132 State and Local Government Finance. Analysis of the economics of state and local government finance, with an emphasis on California's fiscal system.
Justification: Update course description to improve wording, and better reflect course content.
Prerequisite: ECON 001A and ECON 001B, or ECON 104. 3 units.

ECON 135 Money and Banking. Examines the role of financial markets, the banking system, and the Federal Reserve System in the economy. Included are an introduction to present value and the behavior of interest rates, analysis of money creation, and evaluation of monetary policy.
Justification: Update course description to improve wording, and better reflect course content.
Prerequisite: ECON 001A. 3 units.

ECON 145 Economic Research Methods. Covers the basics of conducting applied economic research: the selection of topic, literature survey, choice of research method, formulation of hypothesis, testing of hypothesis using empirical analysis, and summary and conclusions. Designed to enhance the student's ability to integrate economic theory, quantitative research skills, and research.
Justification: Update course description to improve wording, and better reflect course content.
Prerequisite: ECON 100A, ECON 100B, ECON 140, and passing score on the WPE; the course is open to graduating seniors only. 3 units.

ECON 160 Industrial Organization Economics.
Change to:
ECON 160 Industrial Organization. Analysis of firm decision-making in a variety of market settings. Topics include pricing and output decision, entry and exit issues, marketing strategies, horizontal mergers, vertical integration, technological change, and U.S. antitrust policy.
Justification: Update course description to improve wording, and better reflect course content.
Prerequisite: ECON 001B. 3 units.

ECON 181 Economics of Racism. Economic analysis of the origins and development of racism, focusing mainly on its impact in the United States. Differing theoretical explanations surrounding racism will be compared and evaluated.
Justification: Update course description to improve wording, and better reflect course content.

ECON 194 Economics-Related Work Experience. Supervised employment in a company or agency working on economics-related work, arranged through the Department of Economics and the Cooperative Education Programs. Requires preparation of application packet, completion of a 3-6 month full-time or part-time work assignment, and a written report.
Note: Students may enroll for no more than 12 total units. Units may not be used to meet the economics major, minor or graduate course work requirements.
Justification: Update course description to improve wording, and better reflect course content.
Prerequisite: Open only to upper division or graduate students with appropriate course preparation. Consent of Economics Department faculty coordinator. Graded Credit/No Credit. 6 or 12 units.

ECON 195 Economic Internship. Supervised economic-related work experience, research, or teaching assistance to provide an opportunity for the student to apply principles and theories learned in the classroom to the "real world."
Justification: Update course description to improve wording, and better reflect course content.

ECON 295 Economic Internship. Supervised work experience or research on economic topics in government, financial, business, charitable or other kinds of institutions to provide an opportunity for the student to apply principles and theories learned in the classroom on the "real world." Partial supervision may be supplied by persons in the institution under study.
Justification: Update course description to improve wording, and better reflect course content.

ECON 298 Tutoring in Economics. Supervised tutorials at educational institutions including CSUS where and when appropriate arrangements can be made. Prior approval for tutoring must be obtained from the Economics Department. Emphasis is on the development of effectiveness in the teaching of economics.
Justification: Update course description to improve wording, and better reflect course content.


Department of Environmental Studies

COURSE DELETION

ENVS 196A Aquatic Pollution Assessment and Management. No change in course description.
Justification: This class has been assigned a permanent number (ENVS 175 - Aquatic Pollution Assessment). ENVS 196A is no longer needed.

Department of Family & Consumer Sciences

COURSE CHANGES

FACS 118B Medical Nutrition Therapy II. No change in course description.
Justification: Add the prerequisite of FACS 118A, as it was inadvertently omitted in the last catalog with the course change. Students must have knowledge from FACS 118A to take FACS 118B. Change CHEM 161 prerequisite to delete ability to take course concurrently, as it has hindered some students' ability to excel in the course, and add "or instructor permission" instead.
Prerequisite: FACS 118A, CHEM 161 or instructor permission.

FACS 143 Consumer Policy. No change in course description.
Justification: Add "or instructor permission" to prerequisite. Instructor will have some flexibility in allowing students who have taken a course similar to GOVT 001 or GOVT 150 to take the course.
Prerequisite: GOVT 001 or GOVT 150 or instructor permission.


Department of Government

COURSE CHANGE

GOVT 179 Politics, Planning and the Law.
Change to:
GOVT 179 Politics, Planning and Land Use.
No change to course description.
Justification: Reason for title change is to make course title more accurately reflect course content.


Department of Interdisciplinary Studies

NEW COURSES

ID 195B Sexual Violence Peer Education Training. This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of peer education concerning the issue of sexual violence. Includes both academic and experiential aspects allowing students to develop a better understanding of sexual violence, presentation skills, and community outreach. Each student will submit written assignments, plan and implement campus events, and present classes to peer groups on campus regarding issues of sexual violence.
Justification: This course would provide internship opportunities for students who wish to go into the field of education and advocacy on social issues. Currently, there is no course designed to educate and utilize peer educators on issues relating to sexual violence. This course would provide students with both education on the issues unique to sexual violence as well as the task of educating the community on the issue. Education through social activism is a key component of this course.

ID 195C Advanced Sexual Violence Peer Education Training. This course will further explore the theory and practice of peer education concerning the issue of sexual violence. Includes both academic and experiential aspects allowing students to develop a better understanding of sexual violence, presentation skills, and community outreach. Each student will submit written assignments, plan and implement campus events, and present classes to peer groups on campus regarding issues of sexual violence. In addition, students will participate in the legislation process and victim advocacy, on campus as well as in the community.
Justification: This course would provide internship opportunities for students who wish to go into the field of education and advocacy on social issues. Currently, there is no course designed to educate and utilize peer educators on issues relating to sexual violence. This course would provide students with both education on the issues unique to sexual violence as well as the task of educating the community on the issue. Education through social activism is a key component of this course.
Prerequisite: ID 195B and instructor's approval.

 

Department of Psychology

COURSE CHANGES

PSYC 103 Perception. An examination of how information about the outside world is sensed and how that information is organized and interpreted to form perceptions. Vision and audition will be primarily examined, along with some coverage of the other senses. Topics may include psychophysical methods, basic physiology and function of sensory systems, perception of color and form, motion, distance, auditory patterns, body and limb position, temperature, pain, perceptual constancies, attention, perceptual learning, adaptation, and perceptual development.
Justification: We are requesting a change in the catalog description for this course only. The current description has become outdated, and we want to update the description to reflect the current knowledge and topics within the field of Perception that are currently being covered in the course. Furthermore, some students have avoided taking this course because of its apparent overlap with the existing Cognition (PSYC 110) course. We want to make a clear how the two courses differ.

PSYC 228 Practicum. Supervised practice in counseling individuals, couples and families with personal, marital, family, vocational and educational problems. Students counsel clients and meet on a one-to-one and small group basis with the instructor to plan and evaluate effective interventions and counseling techniques.
Justification: This proposed course change reduces the PSYC 228 Practicum units from 5 units to 4 units. In addition, the course classification for PSYC 228 will be changed to C6 Clinical Processes. This change is justified on the basis that it more accurately reflects the content of the Practicum experience. Specifically, a C6 Clinical Processes classification describes the counseling work that students conduct within this course. Students will also be required to take 1 unit of PSYC 292 Laboratory as a corequiste. The Co requisite of the PSYC 292 Laboratory reflects the frequent 1:1 instructor-student supervision and small group supervision consistent with a laboratory course. This change is pedagogically necessary and also meets the requirements established the Board of Behavioral Sciences to prepare students for licensure as marriage and family therapists.
Prerequisite: PSYC 201, PSYC 223, PSYC 227, PSYC 268 and one of the following: PSYC 225, PSYC 235 or PSYC 253
Co requisite: PSYC 292, Laboratory, 1 unit.


Department of Women's Studies

NEW COURSES

WOMS 121 Women of the Middle East. Provides an introduction to historical and contemporary conditions affecting women's lives and contributions to Middle Eastern societies. Readings will be framed with a focus on women within state systems and political life, economic activity, family systems, religious thought and law, health, arts and literature.
Justification: This course description change is a slight modification that more accurately reflects the course as it is currently taught.

WOMS 145 Feminism and Spirit. Provides a critique of traditional patriarchal religions and traces women's participation in the evolution of the human spirit. Consideration is given to the history of Goddess religion and its resurgence in the contemporary world; sexism in institutionalized religions and the current advances women are making in the churches; and dimensions of woman spirit incorporated in today's feminist art and literature.
Justification: This is a minor course description change for the catalog. The intent is to update the description. This description change does not reflect substantive changes in the course.

WOMS 147 International Feminist Trends.
Change to:
WOMS 147 Transnational Feminisms. No change in course description.
Justification: This is a minor course description change for the catalog. The intent is to update the description. This description change does not reflect substantive changes in the course.


COURSE DELETION

WOMS 132 A Society of Women.
Justification: This course has not been taught for several semesters, because it is difficult to fill, and subject matter is addressed in several other Women's Studies courses.
.