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UNDERGRADUATE & GRADUATE
COURSE CHANGE PROPOSALS

LIST #7 - 2003/2004

If there are no objections reported to Academic Affairs by December 9, 2003, the course change proposals listed below are approved as submitted.

 List #7 Program Change Proposals are located at http://www.csus.edu/acaf/policies/03-04prgmlst7.stm for your review.

Course Change Proposals:
Past Course Change Proposal Lists:

College of Arts & Letters
College of Engineering & Computer Science


Course Change List #1
Course Change List #2
Course Change List #3
Course Change List #4
Course Change List #5
Course Change List #6


COLLEGE OF ARTS & LETTERS

Department of Communication Studies

COURSE CHANGE

COMS 126 Advanced Capturing and Editing Digital Media. No change to course description.
Prerequisite: ComS 20A and 20B and (ComS 26 or ComS 27A and 27B) each with a grade of B- or better
Justification: We want to change the prerequisites to include ComS 27A and 27B as a choice instead of taking ComS 26. We want to broaden the prerequisite for ComS 126 so Digital Video majors would not be excluded from taking the class.

Department of Design

COURSE CHANGES

GPHD 100 Design Production Management.
Change to:
GPHD 135 Design Production Management.
No change to course description.
Prerequisite: GPHD 120, GPHD 125 (newly proposed numbers for GPHD 103A and GPHD 102)
Corequisite: GPHD 130 (newly proposed number for GPHD 103B)
Justification: Course number change and pre/corequisite change: To better order the newly approved cohort system AND facilitate the sign-off of graduation petitions for grandfathered GPHD students.

GPHD 101 Visual Principles I.
Change to:
GPHD 145 Visual Principles II.
No change to course description.
Prerequisite: GPHD 130, GPHD 135 (newly proposed numbers for GPHD 103B and GPHD 100)
Corequisite: GPHD 140 (newly proposed name of GPHD 113)
Justification: Course number/name change and pre/corequisite change: To better order the newly approved cohort system AND facilitate the sign-off of graduation petitions for grandfathered GPHD students.

GPHD 102 Visual Principles II.
Change to:
GPHD 125 Visual Principles I.
No change to course description.
Prerequisite: ART 20A, GPHD 10, GPHD 25, GPHD 30, PHOT 40, and acceptance into upper division coursework through the program's portfolio review.
Corequisite:
GPHD 120 (the newly proposed number for GPHD 103A)
Justification:
Course number/name change and pre/corequisite change: To better order the newly approved cohort system AND facilitate the sign-off of graduation petitions for grandfathered GPHD students.

GPHD 103A Typography I: Theory.
Change to:
GPHD 120 Typography I: Theory.
No change to course description.
Prerequisite: ART 20A, GPHD 10, GPHD 25, GPHD 30, PHOT 40, and acceptance into upper division coursework through the program's portfolio review.
Corequisite:
GPHD 125 (newly proposed number for GPHD 102)
Justification: Course number change and pre/corequisite change: To better order the newly approved cohort system AND facilitate the sign-off of graduation petitions for grandfathered GPHD students.

GPHD 103B Typography II. Change to:
GPHD 130 Typography II.
No change to course description. Prerequisite: GPHD 120, GPHD 125 (newly proposed numbers for GPHD 103A and GPHD 102)
Corequisite: GPHD 135 (newly proposed number for GPHD 100)
Justification: Course number change and pre/corequisite change: To better order the newly approved cohort system AND facilitate the sign-off of graduation petitions for grandfathered GPHD students.

GPHD 104 Corporate Identity.
Change to:
GPHD 155 Corporate Identity.
No change to course description.
Prerequisite: GPHD 113, GPHD 101 (newly proposed numbers for GPHD 140 and GPHD 145)
Corequisite: GPHD 150 (newly proposed number for GPHD 129)
Justification: Course number change and pre/corequisite change: To better order the newly approved cohort system AND facilitate the sign-off of graduation petitions for grandfathered GPHD students.

GPHD 113 Visual Principles of Publication Design.
Change to:
GPHD 140 Visual Principles of Publication Design.
No change to course description.
Prerequisite: GPHD 130, GPHD 135 (newly proposed numbers for GPHD 103B and GPHD 100)
Corequisite: GPHD 145 (newly proposed number for GPHD 101)
Justification: Course number change and pre/corequisite change: To better order the newly approved cohort system AND facilitate the sign-off of graduation petitions for grandfathered GPHD students.

GPHD 129 Graphic Design Digital Portfolio.
Change to:
GPHD 150 Graphic Design Digital Portfolio.
No change to course description.
Prerequisite: GPHD 140, GPHD 145 (newly proposed numbers for GPHD 113 and GPHD 101)
Corequisite: GPHD 155 (newly proposed number for GPHD 104)
Justification: Course number change and pre/corequisite change: To better order the newly approved cohort system AND facilitate the sign-off of graduation petitions for grandfathered GPHD students.

 

Department of English

NEW COURSES

ENGL 130D Meter & Rhythm. Course offers an in-depth study of prosody including the principles of meter (line measurement) and scansion (the marking of stressed and unstressed syllables to determine meter and rhythm), as well as examining the relationship of these principles to verse in English. Course also examines a variety of poetic schemes, tropes, and forms. 3 units. 3 hours, lecture and guided practice.
Justification: While a rudimentary coverage of meter and rhythm (prosody) is included in some creative writing and literature courses, an in-depth investigation of prosody appears nowhere in the current CSUS curriculum. Due to the considerable breadth and difficulty of such material, anything less than a semester-long study of prosodic principles does little more than, at best, familiarize students with the most basic vocabulary, and at worst, cause confusion and mistrust of this vital aspect of poetic composition and appreciation. A mere introduction to prosody cannot provide students with the scansion and writing practice necessary in order to develop an "ear" for the rhythms of English meter; such development is achieved only through consistent practice in reading, scanning and writing metered verse.

ENGL200E Curriculum and Assessment Design for Language Classrooms. Examine the interplay between curriculum design and classroom assessment. The goals are 1) to familiarize prospective teachers with the terminology and practices underlying curriculum design and classroom assessment; 2) to develop the ability to analyze student needs and propose appropriate changes to curricula; and 3) to construct and implement language tests that reflect curricula. May be counted as an elective for the M.A. TESOL program. 3 units.
Justification: Curriculum and assessment design are key elements in the success of any educational program. In their employment, students who graduate from the M.A. TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) Program are likely to find themselves in positions of leadership where they have responsibility for enacting curricular change and developing assessment at the level of individual classes and/or at the program level. While several of the required courses currently taught in the M.A. TESOL Program include elements of curriculum design and assessment, none allow enough time to cover these important topics in detail. This course is designed to remedy this situation by offering an in-depth exploration of curriculum and assessment design tied to practical application of these principles in a two-part project. While the primary audience for this course is students in the M.A. TESOL Program, students in other areas are likely to find it useful. In particular, the course may be attractive to M.A. candidates completing the Graduate Certificate in Composition and students in foreign languages departments.


Department of History

COURSE CHANGE

HIST 131 Contemporary World History Project. No change to course description.
Justification: I would like to change the course classification to seminar from its present classification. This course is linked to the California International Studies Project (CISP), one of several state-funded subject matter projects designed to enhance teaching and learning in K-12 schools. The CISP participates in a world affairs simulation for high school students that must address, negotiate, and solve global problems. Students in History 131 represent the United States in the simulation, and they spend most of their class time in small group discussions, using email and presentation technology in a university computer lab, and participating in other activities that require a smaller class size. Little class time is devoted to lecture, and the class has always been taught as a seminar enrolling between 15 and 20 students. The only reason that it is classified as a lecture class is through an error: it began as an experimental course in the history department that is listed as a generic lecture course, and when I proposed to make the class a regular offering, I neglected to change the classification to seminar. This is a non-substantial, minor course change.

 

Department of Humanities & Religious Studies

NEW COURSES

HRS 137 Becoming Postmodern. Exploration of concepts and expressions of postmodernism and its emphasis on irony, citation, and the interconnectedness of politics, aesthetics and philosophy across the disciplines (art, literature, architecture, film) and the continents (Europe, Asia, Africa, America and Latin America).
Justification: Lack of a course on the postmodern period (1960s-present) is a major gap in the department’s offerings. Recent hire of general humanist included expectation of development of such a class. Proposed course completes “thread” of chronological courses in department curriculum beginning with HRS 131: Medieval Culture

HRS 138 Studies in Great World Cities and Cultures.
An interdisciplinary survey of the humanistic expressions of selected world cities during the most productive periods of their histories. Note: HRS 138 will be offered as alphabetically ordered sections.
Justification: With the arrival of new faculty members, the department is moving forward on its plan to expand its curriculum with courses that unite the threads of religious studies, general humanities study and area studies that make up the department’s course offerings. This course also offers the department the chance to develop courses about human cultural expression in formats other than “traditional” surveys of arts and ideas.

HRS 138A Great World Cities and Cultures: Paris. An interdisciplinary survey of the humanistic expressions of selected world cities during the most productive periods of their histories. Note: HRS 138 will be offered as alphabetically ordered sections.
Justification: With the arrival of new faculty members, the department is moving forward on its plan to expand its curriculum with courses that unite the threads of religious studies, general humanities study and area studies that make up the department’s course offerings. This course also offers the department the chance to develop courses about human cultural expression in formats other than “traditional” surveys of arts and ideas.

HRS 138B Great World Cities and Culture: London.
An interdisciplinary survey of the humanistic expressions of selected world cities during the most productive periods of their histories. Note: HRS 138 will be offered as alphabetically ordered sections, each focusing on a different city.
Justification: With the arrival of new faculty members, the department is moving forward with its plans to expand its curriculum with courses that unite the threads of religious studies, general humanities and area studies that make up our course offerings, This course also offers the department the chance to develop courses about human cultural expression in formats other than “traditional” surveys of arts and ideas.

HRS 178B South Asian Religions II: Medieval and Modern. Introduction to South Asian religious life from the 1st century CE to the present. Explores the interrelationship of religious practices and ideas to broader cultural developments, including visual arts and literature. Special focus on the interactions among Mahaayaana Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, Islam, Sikhism, and Western Christian traditions and their influence on the South Asian subcontinent.
Justification: Examination of South Asian religious texts, traditions, and practices is an underdeveloped component of the department’s curriculum. Our fall 2003 appointment of a specialist in this area has begun to address this need, first with the development of HRS 178A: South Asian Religions I: The Formative Period. The proposed course includes treatment of Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, Sikhism and the influence of Western Christian traditions on the South Asian subcontinent. These two courses (HRS 178A and HRS 178B) will expand the department’s ability to provide global perspectives on common human activities.

COURSE CHANGE

HRS 178A South Asian Religions I: The Formative Years.
Change to:
HRS 178A South Asian Religions I: The Formative Period.
No change to course description.
Justification: Typographical error in title.


LIBERAL ARTS MASTER'S PROGRAM

COURSE CHANGE

LIBA 205 Space and Time: Plato to Einstein. Introduction to philosophical issues involving space, time, and matter. The historical development of the issues from Antiquity (Zeno, Plato, and Euclid) through the Early Modern Period (Newton, Leibniz, Berkeley, and Kant) to contemporary treatments (Einstein, Thorne, and Hawking). An investigation into the current state of these issues. No background or work in mathematics or physics is required.
Prerequisite: 6 units in philosophy or instructor permission.
Justification: Philosophy changed course description for catalog 2004-2006.

 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC

COURSE CHANGES

MUSC 139A Jazz Theory & Improvisation I.
Change to:
MUSC 43A Jazz Theory & Improvisation I.
First part of a two-semester study of jazz improvisation required of all jazz majors. Provides the student with basic and intermediate skills of creative improvisation styles in the jazz idiom. In order to expand the skill level of improvisation of each particular jazz student, this class will focus on four main areas of concentration: 1) listening, 2) scale and chord, development, 3) repertory development, 4) transcribing jazz solos.
Prerequisite: Music 006 –Instructor permission
Justification: We are requesting a number change for Jazz Theory & Improvisation to a lower division number. This course should be taken during the sophomore year in preparation for Junior proficiency exams and auditions into the upper-division courses in the Jazz Studies major concentration. Additionally, similar courses are offered at area community colleges with whom we are trying to complete articulation agreements.

MUSC 139B Jazz Theory & Improvisation II.
Change to:
MUSC 43B Jazz Theory & Improvisation II.
Second part of a two-semester study of jazz improvisation required of all jazz majors. Provides the student with intermediate and advanced skills of creative improvisation styles in the jazz idiom. In order to expand the skill levels of improvisation of each particular jazz student, this class will focus on four main areas of concentration: 1) listening, 2) scale and chord, development, 3) repertory development, 4) transcribing jazz solos.
Prerequisite: Music 43A – or Instructor permission
Justification: We are requesting a number change for Jazz Theory & Improvisation to a lower division number. This course should be taken during the sophomore year in preparation for Junior proficiency exams and auditions into the upper-division courses in the Jazz Studies major concentration. Additionally, similar courses are offered at area community colleges with whom we are trying to complete articulation agreements.


DEPARTMENT OF PHOTOGRAPHY

COURSE CHANGES

PHOTO 199 Photography, Special Problems. Individual projects or directed readings in photography. This course is open to students who are working at an advanced level of photography and competent to carry on individual work. 3 units.
Prerequisite: Instructor permission
Justification: Photo 199 is a Special Problems/Independent study course. Because student's projects vary widely in content and objectives, standardizing assessment and assigning letter grades is difficult. Converting this course to a credit/no credit grading system aligns Photo 199 with most experiential courses on campus.

PHOT 299 Photography, Special Problems. Individual projects or directed readings in photography for graduate level students. This course is open to students who are working at an advanced level of photography and competent to carry on individual work. Requires instructor approval. 3 units.
Prerequisite: Instructor permission
Justification: Photo 299 is a Special Problems/Independent study graduate level course. Because each student's project varies widely in content and objectives, standardizing assessment and assigning letter grades is difficult. Converting this course to a credit/no credit grading system aligns Photo 299 with most experiential courses on campus.

 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING & COMPUTER SCIENCE

Department of Civil Engineering

NEW COURSE

CE 296 Prestressed Concrete Bridge Design. This course will introduce graduate students to behavior and design of short- and medium-span prestressed concrete bridges using AASHTO LRFD Specifications. Topics include: basic concepts; bridge types, bridge design process; superstructure load types and live load analysis; limit states and load combinations; prestressed concrete materials; flexural analysis and design for pretensioned and post-tensioned concrete superstructures; shear analysis and design of superstructures; substructure analysis and design, including seismic design criteria. In addition, a design project or special study is required.
Prerequisite: CE 164 or equivalent
Justification: Significant changes in U.S. bridge design practice have recently emerged. The American Association of State and Highway Transportation Officials (AASHTO) has announced that it will no longer develop or support its Standard Specifications. More than a dozen states have already adopted the newer, more progressive AASHTO LRFD Specifications, which include major changes to prestressed concrete bridge design. In addition, the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) is prepared to adopt the AASHTO LRFD Specifications. There is a substantial need for both experienced and inexperienced engineers to gain the proper knowledge and understanding in the background and use of these specifications, particularly related to prestressed concrete, which is the material of choice for the vast majority of new bridges in California. Hence, this course will provide students with up-to-date knowledge and experience in the design of prestressed concrete bridges.