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UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE
PROGRAM CHANGE PROPOSALS

LIST #10– 2003/2004

 List #10 of Course Change Proposals is
located at http://www.csus.edu/acaf/policies/crslst.stm for your review.

 List #2 of Program Proposals to be reviewed by CPSP (Council on the Preparation of School Personnel) is
located at
http://www.csus.edu/acaf/policies/cpsplst.stm.

The Curriculum Subcommittee will meet on
Tuesday, April 13, 2004, at 1:30 p.m. in SAC 275
to review the Program Change Proposals contained in this list.
(Response due to Academic Affairs by April 13, 2004)

Program Proposals:

Past Program Change Proposal Lists:
CPSP:

College of Arts & Letters
College of Continuing Education
College of Education


Program Change List #1
Program Change List #2
Program Change List #3
Program Change List #4

Program Change List #5
Program Change List #6
Program Change List #7

Program Change List #8
Program Change List #9

CPSP Change List #1
CPSP Change List #2

 

 


 

COLLEGE OF ARTS & LETTERS

Department of History

NEW PROGRAM

Hellenic Studies (Minor)
The Hellenic Studies minor is an interdisciplinary program stressing the study of modern or ancient Greek language, Greek history, and Greek literature and the arts. The program of study includes at least 8 units in Greek language, two courses in History, one course in Humanities and Religious Studies, and two courses in electives chosen from a variety of courses in the university dealing with Hellenic Studies. Most of the courses in the program will be taught by current university faculty. The exception is the Modern Greek Language sequence that will be taught by part-time instructors in the Department of Foreign Languages; the funds to support these courses will be provided by the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Foundation. The Hellenic Studies minor is being created pursuant to CSUS’ Gift Deed Agreement with Angelo Tsakopoulos (September 26, 2002) that arranged for the donation of the Vryonis Center collection to the CSUS Library; the agreement called for the creation of “an academic minor based on existing university courses,” and eventually for a major of 39-40 units. The University recently approved the creation of a Hellenic Studies Center whose purpose is to support the Hellenic Studies academic programs (including the minor) and to support outreach activities associated with the Tsakopoulos Collection in the University Library. This minor would be the first step in the creation of a Hellenic Studies program of study at CSUS.

Program Description: The Hellenic Studies minor emphasizes coursework and independent study in the areas of Greek language, Greek History, Greek politics, and Greek arts and literature. The Hellenic Studies curriculum includes lower and upper division classes offered by the departments of Foreign Languages, History, Humanities and Religious Studies, Philosophy, Government and Art. The minor is associated with the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection in the CSUS Library.

Minor Requirements
Total number of units required in the minor: 23 units with at least 12 in upper division.

Course Requirements:

8 units - Modern Greek Language
3 units - History 111
3 units - HRS 113
3 units - History 101 or 103.
6 units - Electives chosen from the following list of courses or from other relevant courses. Additional Greek language may be included.

TOTAL: 23 units

Elective List:

Art 1A - Art in the Western World: From Stone Age to End of Middle Ages
Art 103 - Greco-Roman Art
Govt 110 - Political Thought I
HRS 010 - Arts and Ideas of the West, I.
HRS 119 - Classical Mythology
HRS 120 - Reason and Revelation: the Origins of Western Culture
Hist 143B - The Modern Middle East
Phil 020 - History of Ancient Philosophy
Phil 112 - History of Ethics
Phil 192D - Space and Time: Plato to Einstein
Thea 002 - History of the Theater: Ancient to Renaissance

Students are required to seek advising from a Hellenic Studies adviser.

Faculty
Katerina Lagos, Program Contact

Henry Chambers, Afshin Marashi, History; Brad Nystrom, Jeffrey Bross, Humanities and Religious Studies; Catherine Turrill, Art; William A. Dillon, Government; Robert Foreman, Gale Justin, Philosophy.

Program Office: Tahoe Hall 3089, (916) 278-7103.

II. Additional Required Information

Director of Hellenic Studies: Katerina Lagos

New Courses to be Developed:

Greek 6A, Elementary Modern Greek, and Greek 6B, Elementary Modern Greek, are now being developed by the Department of Foreign Languages. For the first two years or so, they will be taught by part-time instructors.

Partial List of Full-Time Faculty Members to Teach in the Program:

Katerina Lagos, Asst. Professor of History, D. Phil, Oxford University, 2004
Henry Chambers, Professor of History, Ph.D., Indiana University.
Brad Nystrom, Professor of Humanities and Religious Studies,, Ph. D., U.C. Davis
Jeffrey Brodd, Asst. Professor of Humanities and Religious Studies, Ph.D., U.C. Santa Barbara
William A. Dillon, Professor of Government, Ph.D., U.C. Berkeley
Robert Foreman, Professor of Philosophy, Ph.D.
Gale Justin, Professor of Philosophy, Ph.D., University of Chicago

There are no plans for a scheduling pattern for the courses to be offered in this program. The proposed courses in Modern Greek will be offered once a year. The other required and elective courses will be offered frequently enough (from every semester to every two years) so that a student will be able to take all of them in a two-year period.

The proposed minor will have no significant fiscal impact on the College of Arts and Sciences or the University. The required courses in Modern Greek will be funded by the Tsakopoulos Foundation for at least the first two years. All the other courses are existing courses that will not be offered more frequently than at present. The Director of the Hellenic Studies Minor is an existing assistant professor in the Department of History. The clerical costs of the program are currently borne by the Department of History.



COLLEGE OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

NEW PROGRAM

California Community College Leadership Certificate Program
As California’s community colleges struggle to meet the growing demands for service with shrinking financial resources, they face a potential crisis of leadership. Researchers estimate that at least one-half of the current community college senior administrators will leave office or retire within the next decade. At the same time, there is a serious lack of dedicated leadership training programs for two-year mid through high-level administrators and deans, classified staff and faculty leaders. Currently, there exist only a handful of programs to help prepare educational leaders for the difficult task of leading community colleges into the next century. California State University, Sacramento can meet this urgent need for community college leadership training through its California Community College Leadership Certificate Program.

This program was designed in cooperation with representatives from community colleges; the California Community College Chancellor’s Office; the Community College League of California; California State University, Sacramento; California State University, Bakersfield; California State University, Chico; and California State University, Fresno.

This program will enable participants to: increase their understanding of the community college environment and the key issues facing community college leaders; dialogue with influential leaders’ in California’s community college system and educational organizations; strengthen their ability to provide leadership in a community college setting; prepare for and pursue leadership positions in community colleges by enhancing their marketability as a position candidate; and gain applicable leadership strategies, tools and techniques.

1.0 TITLE: California Community College Leadership Certificate Program


2.0 TYPE OF CERTIFICATE TO BE AWARDED: Certificate of Academic Achievement


3.0 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

3.1 Specific objectives are as follows:

3.1.1 Increase participant’s understanding of the community college environment and the key issues facing community college leaders
3.1.2 Provide participants with opportunities to dialogue with influential leaders’ in California’s community college system and community college policy and advocacy agencies
3.1.3 Provide applicable leadership strategies, tools and techniques to strengthen participants’ ability to provide leadership in a community college setting
3.1.4 Provide participants with two levels of pedagogical experience: formal course meetings on the CSUS campus and a leadership practicum field experience at a community college.

3.2 General Objective:

3.2.1 The overall objective of this certificate program is to provide quality and relevant course work and community college leadership experiences specifically designed to prepare participants to become effective leaders in California’s Community College system.

4.0 STRUCTURE OF PROGRAM

4.1 The California Community College Leadership Certificate Program, Certificate of Academic Achievement will be a twelve (12) unit certificate program. Students are required to take nine (9) units of academic course work and three (3) units of a leadership field experience (practicum) at a community college (including but not limited to Los Rios Community College, Sierra College and Yuba College Districts). Participants may take all four courses to complete the certificate or they make take individual courses to strengthen specific areas of knowledge and skill set.


4.1.1 Proposed Curriculum

CORE COURSES
REQUIRED/ELECTIVE

Meeting the Leadership Challenge (3 units)
Required

Leading the Way for Student Success: Student and Instructional Services (3 units)
Required

Innovative Leadership for Troubled Times: Budget/Finance and Human Resources (3 units)
Required
Community College Leadership Practicum (3 units) Required

 

Elective Courses: None

Attachment A contains course descriptions for all courses.

4.2 Scheduling: Classes will be scheduled in an appropriate format to meet the needs of the student profile, which will include a combination of evening, day and weekend sessions. For example, all lecture-based classes will be scheduled during the evening and weekends. The scheduling of the leadership practicum will accommodate the specific needs of the participant and partnering college representative which may be day, evening or weekend.

5.0 NAMES AND QUALIFICATIONS OF THE INITIATORS AND/OR ACADEMIC UNITS

5.1 Academic Units: CSUS College of Continuing Education; CSUS Institute of Higher Education; CSUS Center for California Studies; CSUS College of Education (Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies).

5.2 Primary Coordinators: College of Continuing Education: Christine Tupaz, Program Manager of Higher Education Programs and Health and Human Service Programs; for Institute of Higher Education: Nancy Shulock; for Center of California Studies: Donna Hoeing Couch; for College of Education: (Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies): Cirenio Rodriguez; Ric Brown, Interim Vice President, Academic Affairs.

5.3 Advisory Committee:
Brice Harris, Chancellor, Los Rios Community College District
Tony Cantu, Dean of Instruction, Fresno City College
Gene Blackwelder, Dean of Administrative Services and Business Manager, Reedly Community College
Barbara Hioco, President, Lemoore College
Fusako Yokotobi, Director Personnel Services, Yuba Community College District
Jackie Fisher, VP for Academic Affairs, Antelope Valley Community College
John Williams, VP for Student Affairs, San Joaquin Delta College
Kathryn Campbell, Dean of Instruction, San Joaquin Delta College
Marie Smith, President, American River College
Sue Lorimer, Dean of Staff Development and Planning, American River College
Merrilee Lewis, President, Cosumnes River College
William Karns, VP for Instruction, Cosumnes River College
Tom Burke, Business Manager, Kern County Community College District
Janet Fulks, Bakersfield Community College
Carl Simms, Director of Maintenance and Operations, State Centre Community College District
Janice Emerzian, District Disabled Student Services, State Center Community College District
Thelma Scott-Skillman, President, Folsom Lake College
Jack Hernandez, Bakersfield Community College
Sonya Christian, Bakersfield Community College
David Viar, Executive Director, Community College League of California
Stan Arterberry, President, Solono Community College
Carl Ehmann, Interim President, College of the Siskiyous
Sunny Greene, College of the Siskiyous
Denis Hagarty, College of the Siskiyous
Kim Lopez, College of the Siskiyous
Ed Hallberg, Ombudsman Press
Kaylene Hallberg, Former Dean of Student Services; California Community College Chancellor’s Office
Matthew Jackson, Butte College

5.4 Faculty for the program will be hired from the ranks of CSUS faculty, community college faculty and administrators, and other individuals who work or have worked within the California community college system. Guest presenters will be a regular component of the program and will include community college leaders from colleges and district offices, the Community College Chancellors Office, and from community college policy and advocacy organizations.


6.0 DURATION OF PROGRAM: The program is ongoing. Students should be able to complete the program in one year. Program will be offered once a year.


7.0 RESOURCE NEEDS FOR THE PROGRAM: It is anticipated that this will be a self-support program. Primary site for the classes will be at Napa Hall, the College of Continuing Education building at CSUS. Secondary sites for the leadership practicum will include, but are not limited to, Los Rios Community College District, Sierra College District and Yuba College District.


8.0 EXPECTED NUMBER OF STUDENTS AND THEIR PROBABLE BACKGROUND:
We anticipate three major types of students to be enrolled in this program: 1) CSUS matriculated graduate students who want to obtain both their master’s degree and this Certificate of Academic Achievement; 2) current community college faculty and deans, classified staff, and administrators who aspire to leadership positions and/or want to take on a greater leadership role in their campus community; and 3) individuals who are seeking a career change into California community colleges and want to increase their knowledge and skill set in understanding and working within California’s community college system. Participants may either be seeking to complete the courses for the entire certificate program or may want to take one or more of the academic courses as a part of their professional development.

We anticipate approximately 20 to 25 students in each class of the program.


9.0 OTHER PERTINENT INFORMATION:

9.1 For method of evaluation, see the individual course descriptions in Attachment A.

9.2 Associations and Organizations Supporting the Program:
American River College
California Community College Chancellor’s Office
Community College League of California
Cosumnes River College
CSU, Bakersfield
CSU, Chico
CSU, Fresno
CSUS Center for California Studies
CSUS Institute of Higher Education
CSUS Office of Research, Graduate and Extended Programs
CSUS School of Education, Department of Educational Administration and Policy Studies
Folsom Lake College
Los Rios Community College District
Sacramento City College
Sierra College
Sierra College District
Yuba College
Yuba College District



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Department of Counselor Education

NON-SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

M.S. in Counseling
The Department of Counselor Education proposes changing the prerequisite EDC 171 A, B, C, D, E series of five one-unit courses to a one four-unit EDC 171 course. The current model provides the theoretical knowledge base to understand five major ethnic groups: Asian Americans, Native Americans, Latinos, African Americans, and European Americans by focusing on psychological, cultural, historical, and political background of each and the implications for counseling.
By integrating the content of the five one-unit classes (that were sporadically scheduled and therefore causing schedule conflicts with other classes) into one four-unit class, continuity and consistency (one instructor covering the same content as opposed to five instructors) will ultimately provide a stronger foundation for students entering the counseling/psychology professions. The intent of the change is to integrate a paradigm for understanding the nature of oppression by developing a greater understanding of social justice issues and developing the importance of one’s role as an ally (beyond the five ethnic groups) for marginalized communities and populations. Development of understanding of self development and one’s relation to others in how to deconstruct forces that limit socioeconomic mobility as well as building cultural competence within the counseling context will be key elements of the EDC 171 class. The name of the course will be entitled Power, Privilege & Self Identity in Counseling.

NEW PROGRAM
OLD PROGRAM
Admission Requirements
Psyc 168 Abnormal Psychology
EDC 170: Introduction to Counseling
EDC 171-Power, Privilege and Self Identity in
Counseling

 

Required Courses for All
Specializations (36 units)

(3) EDC 210 Multicultural/Ethnic Counseling
(EDC 171)
(3) EDC 212 Gender Roles and Sexuality in Counseling
(3) EDC 214 Dynamics of Human Development
(2) EDC 216 Counseling Theory (Corequisite: EDC280)
(3) EDC 218 Appraisal in Counseling
(3) EDC 219 Group Processes in Counseling (EDC 216, EDC 280)
(3) EDC 250 Educational Research (Graduate standing)
(3) EDC 260 Career Development
(2) EDC 280 Practicum in Communication (Corequisite: EDC 216)
(2) EDC 282 Practicum in Group Counseling
(3) EDC 475 Practicum in Counseling
(6) EDC 480 Field Study in Counseling

Admission Requirements
Psyc 168 Abnormal Psychology
EDC 170: Introduction to Counseling
EDC 171A Asian Americans
EDC 171B Native Americans
EDC 171C Latinos
EDC 171D African Americans
EDC 171E European Americans

Required Courses for All
Specializations (36 units)

(3) EDC 210 Multicultural/Ethnic Counseling (EDC
171A, EDC 171B, EDC 171C, EDC 171D, EDC 171E)
(3) EDC 212 Gender Roles and Sexuality in Counseling
(3) EDC 214 Dynamics of Human Development
(2) EDC 216 Counseling Theory (Corequisite: EDC280)
(3) EDC 218 Appraisal in Counseling
(3) EDC 219 Group Processes in Counseling (EDC 216,
EDC 280)
(3) EDC 250 Educational Research (Graduate standing)
(2) EDC 280 Practicum in Communication (Corequisite:
EDC 216)
(2) EDC 282 Practicum in Group Counseling
(3) EDC 475 Practicum in Counseling
(6) EDC 480 Field Study in Counseling

Department of Teacher Education

Substantive Change

MA Program in Education (Language and Literacy) - Overview


1. Change one part of the admission requirements from “a valid California teaching credential” to “a valid teaching credential or advisor and Department approval for waiving this requirement.”

2. Require MA students to take both EDTE 207 (Advanced Practicum in Reading Difficulties: Assessment and Intervention) and EDTE 209 (Literature for the Diverse Pre-K through 12 Classroom: Issues, Models, and Strategies). Currently they take one or the other.

3. Drop EDTE 251 (Education for a Democratic, Pluralistic Society) as a core requirement and replace it with EDTE 202 (Language and Literacy Development in Multicultural Settings).

Justification

1. We wish to change our admission requirements (a) to make them more similar to those for the Education MA with an emphasis in Curriculum and Instruction, (b) to attract students with out-of-state teaching credentials, and (c) to serve students who wish to teach reading at the community college level without making them first earn an elementary or secondary teaching credential.

2. Our major reason for wanting to require both EDTE 207 and EDTE 209 is this: Graduate students in Language and Literacy ought not face the option of choosing between (a) deepening their knowledge of literacy intervention strategies and programs and (b) understanding the content and role of literature in diverse classrooms; both areas are critical in preparing our students to reach advanced levels of knowledge and skill in the field.

3. Requiring both EDTE 207 and EDTE 209 would raise our 33 unit MA to 36. We felt this was too high and looked for redundancy in our program. Because issues related to diversity and equity are considered specifically in EDTE 202 (Language and Literacy Development in Multicultural Settings), and are emphasized in at least three others (EDTE 209 - - Literature for the Diverse Pre-K through 12 Classroom: Issues, Models, and Strategies; EDTE 205 - - Psychology and Sociology of Literacy Instruction; and EDTE 206 - - Leadership in Literacy), we decided to drop EDTE 251 (Education for a Democratic, Pluralistic Society). Before reaching this decision, we went beyond the EDTE 251 syllabi, the content of which seemed to vary considerably across instructors, and examined the teaching standards for diversity and equity as described by (a) NCATE, (b) the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, and (c) drafts of the College of Education’s conceptual framework prepared to help the College of Education meet NCATE requirements. An analysis of our courses in terms of these documents indicated issues of diversity and equity are strongly addressed in classes outside of EDTE 251 and that the benefits of requiring both EDTE 207 and EDTE 209 outweighed any drawbacks associated with dropping EDTE 251. Attached is a partial list of readings related to diversity and equity as found in EDTE 202, EDTE 209, EDTE 205, and EDTE 206.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
Units required for the MA: 33
Minimum required GPA: 3.0
No units with a grade lower than ''C'' may apply toward the degree.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:
Admission as a classified graduate student in Education, Language and Literacy Option, requires:
• a valid California Basic Teaching Credential (e.g. Multiple Subjects or Single Subjects Credential);
• a minimum 3.0 GPA in the last 60 units attempted;
• successful completion of a basic course in the Teaching of Reading from an accredited university; if the reading methods course is older than 7 years, must show evidence of: a) current staff development in Language and Literacy by participation in workshops, institutes, etc. (Candidates must show documentation), or b) passing the RICA test within the past seven (7) years.


REQUIRED COURSES (21 units):
TIER 1:
(3) EDTE 200 Practicum in Decoding and Fluency: Assessment and Instruction
(3) EDTE 201 Practicum in Comprehension: Assessment and Instruction
(3) EDTE 203 Teaching and Assessing Writing in the PreK-12 Classroom
(3) EDTE 205 Psychology and Sociology of Literacy Instruction

TIER 2:

(3) EDTE 202 Language and Literacy Development in Multicultural Settings
(3) EDTE 206 Leadership in Literacy

SELECT ONE OF THE FOLLOWING:

(3) EDTE 207 Advanced Practicum in Reading Difficulties: Assessment and Intervention, OR
EDTE 209 Literature for the Diverse PreK-12 Classroom: Issues, Models and Strategies

OTHER REQUIRED COURSES (6 units):

(3) EDTE 250 Education Research
(3) EDTE 251 Education for a Democratic, Pluralistic Society

CULMINATING REQUIREMENT (6 units):

(3) EDTE 290 Seminar for Culminating Experience
(3) EDTE 503 Culminating Experience: Language and Literacy


 

Units required for the MA: 33
Minimum required GPA: 3.0
No units with a grade lower than ''C'' may apply toward the degree.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:
Admission as a classified graduate student in Education, Language and Literacy Option, requires:
• a valid teaching credential or advisor and Department approval for waiving this requirement.
• a minimum 3.0 GPA in the last 60 units attempted;
• successful completion of a basic course in the Teaching of Reading from an accredited university; if the reading methods course is older than 7 years, must show evidence of: a) current staff development in Language and Literacy by participation in workshops, institutes, etc. (Candidates must show documentation), or b) passing the RICA test within the past seven (7) years.


REQUIRED COURSES (24 units):
TIER 1:
(3) EDTE 200 Practicum in Decoding and Fluency: Assessment and Instruction
(3) EDTE 201 Practicum in Comprehension: Assessment and Instruction
(3) EDTE 203 Teaching and Assessing Writing in the PreK-12 Classroom
(3) EDTE 205 Psychology and Sociology of Literacy Instruction

TIER 2:

(3) EDTE 202 Language and Literacy Development in Multicultural Settings
(3) EDTE 206 Leadership in Literacy
(3) EDTE 207 Advanced Practicum in Reading Difficulties: Assessment and Intervention
(3) EDTE 209 Literature for the Diverse PreK-12 Classroom: Issues, Models and Strategies




OTHER REQUIRED COURSES (3 units):

(3) EDTE 250 Education Research

The core courses for the MA in Education (Language and Literacy) are EDTE 250 and EDTE 202.

CULMINATING REQUIREMENT (6 units):

(3) EDTE 290 Seminar for Culminating Experience
(3) EDTE 503 Culminating Experience: Language and Literacy