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UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE
PROGRAM CHANGE PROPOSALS

LIST #3– 2003/2004

 List #3 of Course Change Proposals is
located at http://www.csus.edu/acaf/policies/03-04crslst3.stm for your review.

The Curriculum Subcommittee will meet on
Tuesday, October 14, 2003, at 1:30 in SAC 275
to review the Program Change Proposals contained in this list.
(Response due to Academic Affairs by October 14, 2003)

Program Proposals

Past Program Change Proposal Lists:

College of Arts and Letters
College of Business Administration
College of Education
College of Engineering and Computer Science
College of Health & Human Services
College of Social Science and Interdisciplinary Studies


Program Change List #1
Program Change List #2

 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS

Department of Art

NEW PROGRAM

Art
Justification: To make it possible to offer a new concentration in Art History, the Art department proposes to change the existing “Art Studio” major to “Art Studio” concentration. The “Art Studio concentration” offers exactly the same curriculum as the former “Art Studio major.” The only change proposed is the change in status from “major” to “concentration” within the general “Art” major. (See old program/new program table listed below under "Art History Concentration.)

Art History Concentration
Justification:
The Art Department proposes to establish a concentration in Art History. The new concentration would replace what was called the “advising track” in Art History that was discontinued in 1995 following a review by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD). NASAD questioned the Art Department’s curricular format, which then consisted of three "advising tracks": Art Education, History, and Studio. The three tracks shared a Studio core curriculum, which did not provide an adequate foundation for a degree in art history. The proposed new concentration in art history corrects this and offers an excellent education in art history that meets NASAD requirements. Furthermore, as the 1994 NASAD review noted, due to unexpected retirements, the Art Department had only one full-time art historian when the track was discontinued. This too has changed; three full-time historians have been hired since 1994. Universities with student enrollment equal to that of California State University, Sacramento invariably offer majors or concentrations in Art History. It is considered a standard part of a liberal arts curriculum. A survey of CSU Art Departments (Spring, 2003) indicates that CSUS has the only Art Department in the system that does not offer an Art History major or concentration, with the exception of CSU Channel Islands (total campus enrollment of 1320) and alternative art programs such as the one at CSU Monterey Bay in public art. Student interest in art history at CSUS is present and will grow when the concentration is official. We have a small number of special majors in art history and recently graduated two M.A. students with a Special Major in Art History. One of the two M.A graduates is enrolled in a Ph.D. program, and the other has received a Getty fellowship. Another recent B.A. graduate is pursuing a Masters degree in Museum Studies at San Francisco State. CSUS art history students have completed the M.A. program at UC Davis.

Three program changes are needed to institute the proposed Art History concentration. First, the name of the major must be changed from “Art Studio” to “Art.” Second, the “Art Studio Major” must be changed to the “Art Studio Concentration.” Third, the “Art History Concentration” must be instituted within the “Art” major.

NEW PROGRAM
OLD PROGRAM
ART MAJOR


ART STUDIO CONCENTRATION

A. Required Lower Division Core Courses
(24 units)

(3)ART 001A
Art in the Western World:
From Stone Age to End of Middle Ages
(3)ART 001B
Art in the Western World:
From Renaissance to Present
(3)ART 020A
Beginning Drawing
(3)ART 020B
Intermediate Drawing (ART 020A
or equivalent)
(6) Select two of the following:
ART 027
Beginning Color
ART 060
Two-Dimensional Composition
ART 070
Form, Space and Vision
ART 080
Materials and Methods
ART 097
Beginning Electronic Art
(3) Select one of the following:
ART 021Painting
(ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 024
Watercolor (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 040A
Basic Printmaking: Survey
ART 040B
Basic Printmaking: Etching
ART 040C
Basic Printmaking: Lithography
ART 040D
Basic Printmaking: Relief
ART 040E
Basic Printmaking: Silkscreen
ART 040H
Beginning Printmaking/Portfolio
(Portfolio Review)
(3) Select one of the following:
ART 050
Beginning Ceramics
ART 053
Beginning Hand-Built Ceramics
ART 074
Beginning Jewelry Design
ART 075
Beginning Metalsmithing
ART 086
Clay Sculpture
ART 087
Wood Sculpture
ART 088
Sculpture and Experimental Furniture

B. Required Upper Division Core Courses (18 units)

(6) Select 6 units of upper division art history courses. Independent study courses, such as ART 119, ART 195 and ART 199 are not applicable.
(3)ART 120
Advanced Drawing (ART 020B
or equivalent)
(3)ART 192
BA Seminar/Culmination Experience
(Senior Status)
(6) Select two upper division art studio courses
from the following:
ART 121
Advanced Painting (ART 021
or equivalent)
ART 123
Figure Drawing (ART 020A
or equivalent)
ART 124
Advanced Watercolor (ART 024
or equivalent)
ART 125
Life Studio (ART 020A
or equivalent)
ART 126
Life Painting (ART 020A
or equivalent)
ART 127
Collage and Assemblage
ART 141
Advanced Silk-screen (ART 040E
or equivalent)
ART 145
Advanced Printmaking
ART 150
Advanced Ceramics (ART 050
or equivalent, or instructor permission.)
ART 153
Hand-Built Ceramic Techniques
(ART 053 or instructor permission.)
ART 160
Photography in the Arts (One semester of basic photography or instructor permission.)
ART 161
Photography in the Field (PHOT 040
or equivalent)
ART 162
Alternative Photographic Processes
(PHOT 040 or other basic photography)
ART 174
Advanced Jewelry Design (ART 074
or equivalent, or instructor permission. )
ART 180
Figure Sculpture (ART 020A
or equivalent)
ART 183
Advanced Sculpture I (ART 088
or equivalent)
ART 197
Intermediate Electronic Art (ART 097
or equivalent)
ART 198
Advanced Electronic Art (ART 197
or equivalent, as evidenced in portfolio)

C. Upper Division Elective Courses (6 units)

(6) Select two of the following:
ART 100 Origins of American Indian Art
ART 100 Art and Photography
ART 103
Greco-Roman Art (ART 001A
or equivalent)
ART 105
Medieval Art (ART 001A
or equivalent)
ART 106
Renaissance Art (ART 001A
or ART 001B or equivalent)
ART 107
Baroque and Rococo Art (ART 001B
or equivalent)
ART 108
19th Century Art (ART 001B
or equivalent)
ART 109
20th Century Art (ART 001B
or equivalent)
ART 110
American Art (ART 001B
or equivalent)
ART 113A
Primitive Art and Mythology
ART 113B
Oriental Art and Mythology
ART 113C
Occidental Art and Mythology
ART 113D
Creative Art and Mythology
ART 117A
Art of India and Southeast Asia
ART 117B
Art of China and Japan
ART 118
Modern Architecture
ART 119*
Directed Research in Art History
(Instructor permission and Department Chair
via signed petition form)
ART 121
Advanced Painting (ART 021 or equivalent)
ART 123
Figure Drawing (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 124
Advanced Watercolor (ART 024 or equivalent)
ART 125
Life Studio (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 126
Life Painting (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 127
Collage and Assemblage
ART 128
Art and Artist in the Marketplace
ART 129*
Painting/Drawing Studio (Instructor
permission and Department Chair
via signed petition form)
ART 130
Aesthetics and Art Criticism
ART 132
Early Childhood Art
ART 133
Understanding and Creating Art (upper division status)
ART 135
Secondary School Art Education (ART 133 or instructor permission)

ART 137
Art for Exceptional Child
ART 139*
Directed Research in Art Education (Instructor permission and
Department Chair via signed petition form)
ART 141
Advanced Silk-screen (ART 040E or equivalent)
ART 145
Advanced Printmaking
ART 148
Barrio Art for Ethnic Groups
ART 149*
Graphics/Printmaking Studio (Instructor permission and Department
Chair via signed petition)
ART 150
Advanced Ceramics (ART 050 or equivalent, or instructor permission)
ART 153
Hand-Built Ceramic Techniques (ART 053
or instructor permission )
ART 159*
Ceramics Studio (Instructor permission
and Department Chair via
signed petition form)
ART 160
Photography in the Arts (One semester of
basic photography or instructor permission)
ART 161
Photography in the Field (PHOT 040
or equivalent)
ART 162
Alternative Photographic Processes
(PHOT 040 or other basic
photography)
ART 169
Photography Studio (Instructor
permission and Department Chair
via signed petition form)
ART 174
Advanced Jewelry Design (ART 074
or equivalent, or instructor permission.)

ART 179*
Crafts/Art Metal Studio (Instructor
permission and Department Chair via
signed petition form)
ART 180
Figure Sculpture (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 183
Advanced Sculpture I (ART 088 or equivalent)
ART 189*
Sculpture Studio (Instructor permission
and Department Chair via
signed petition form)
ART 191
Film as an Art Form
ART 193
Art Gallery Management
ART 195*
Fieldwork
ART 196
Experimental Offerings in Art
ART 197
Intermediate Electronic Art (ART 97
or equivalent experience, such
as PHOT 100, Introduction to Digital
Imaging)
ART 198
Advanced Electronic Art (ART 197
or equivalent experience, evidenced in
portfolio)
ART 199*
Special Problems
Independent study and supervisory courses
in the major are limited to two (no more
than 6 units) and may be applied only to
the elective category.
Note: Students may, with permission of the
instructor, enroll in graduate (200 level)
classes.


SUBJECT MATTER PROGRAM
(Pre-Credential Preparation)

A. Core Courses (30 units)
(3)ART 001A
Art in the Western World: From Stone Age
to End of Middle Ages

(3)ART 001B
Art in the Western World:
From Renaissance to Present
(3)ART 020A
Beginning Drawing
(3)ART 021
Painting (ART 020A or equivalent)
(3)ART 040A
Basis Printmaking: Survey OR
ART 040D
Basic Printmaking: Relief OR
ART 040E
Basic Printmaking: Silk-screen
(3)ART 050
Beginning Ceramics
(3)ART 130
Aesthetics and Art Criticism
(3)ART 133
Understanding and Creating Art
(Upper division status)
(3)ART 135
Secondary School Art Education
(ART 133 or instructor permission)
(3)ART 197
Intermediate Electronic Art
(ART 97 or equivalent experience,
such as PHOT 100, Introduction to
Digital Imaging)

B. Breadth and Perspective Courses
(18 units)

(3) Select one of the following:
ART 020B
Intermediate Drawing (ART 020A
or equivalent)
ART 024
Watercolor (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 027
Beginning Color
ART 053
Beginning Hand-built Ceramics
ART 060
Two-Dimensional Composition
ART 070
Form, Space and Vision
ART 074
Beginning Jewelry Design
ART 080
Materials and Methods
ART 088
Sculpture
(3) Select one of the following:
ART 132
Early Childhood Art
ART 137
Art for Exceptional Children
(3) Select one of the following:
ART 120
Advanced Drawing (ART 020B or equivalent)
ART 121
Advanced Painting (ART 021 or equivalent)
ART 124
Advanced Watercolor (ART 024 or equivalent)
ART 125
Life Studio (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 145
Advanced Printmaking
ART 148
Barrio Art for Ethnic Groups
ART 160
Photography in the Arts (One semester
of basic photography or
instructor permission)
(3) Select one of the following:
ART 150
Advanced Ceramics (ART 050 or
equivalent, or instructor permission)
ART 153
Hand-Built Ceramic Techniques
(ART 053 or instructor permission)
ART 180
Figure Sculpture (ART 020A
or equivalent)

(6) Select two of the following:
ART 100
Origins of American Indian Art
ART 101
Art and Photography
ART 103
Greco-Roman Art (ART 001A
or equivalent)
ART 105
Medieval Art (ART 001A
or equivalent)
ART 106
Renaissance Art (ART 001A
or ART 001B or equivalent)
ART 107
Baroque and Rococo Art
(ART 001B or equivalent)
ART 108
19th Century Art (ART 001B
or equivalent)
ART 109
20th Century Art (ART 001B
or equivalent)
ART 110
American Art (ART 001B
or equivalent)
ART 118
Modern Architecture


ART HISTORY CONCENTRATION

Total units required for BA: 120
Total units required for concentration: 48

Note: All lower-division art history requirements and demonstrated writing proficiency as prescribed by California State University Sacramento must be completed prior to enrollment in upper-division courses. A minimum grade of “C” is required in all courses applied to the major. Students should satisfy the CSUS Foreign Language Proficiency Requirement before the senior year. Those who plan further graduate study in art history are encouraged to learn French, German, or another foreign language through the advanced intermediate reading level.

A. Required Lower Division Courses (15 units)
(3) ART 001A Art in the Western World: From Stone Age to End of Middle Ages
(3) ART 001B Art in the Western World:
From Renaissance to Present
(3) Select one of the following:
ART 001C Art in the Asian World
ART 005 Native American Art
(3) ART 020A Beginning Drawing
(3) Select one lower-division course from Photography or Art Studio in a medium other than drawing

B. Required Upper Division Courses (21 units)
(3) HIST 100
Introduction to Historical Skills
This course should be taken in the second semester of the sophomore year or the first semester of the junior year for transfer students. Students are strongly advised to take History 17B and History 51 before taking History 100.
(18) Six courses: select one course from each of
the following groups plus two additional courses toward a specialization.

Group 1
ART 103 Greco-Roman Art
ART 105 Medieval Art
ART 106 Renaissance Art
ART 107 Baroque and Rococo Art

Group 2
ART 113A Primitive Art and Mythology
ART 113B Asian Art and Mythology
ART 113C Occidental Art and Mythology
ART 113D Creative Art and Mythology
ART 117A
Arts of India and Southeast Asia
ART 117B Arts of China and Japan

Group 3
ART 100 Origins of American Indian Art
ART 110 American Art
ART 111 Latin American & Latino Art
ART 114
Visual Form and the African Diaspora

Group 4
ART 101 Art and Photography
ART 108 19th Century
ART 109 20th Century
ART 118 Modern Architecture
ART 112 Contemporary Art

C. Electives (9): With the approval of the art history advisor, select 9 units of electives. At least 3 units must be taken outside the Art Department (possible areas include, but are not limited to, Anthropology, Asian Studies, Ethnic Studies, History, Humanities and Religious Studies, Interior Design, and Women's Studies). The Art Department electives are:

ART 119
Directed Research in Art History*
ART 193 Art Gallery Management
ART 196 Experimental Offerings in Art
ART 199 Special Problems*
Upper division art history class(es) outside the area of specialization
Upper division art education or art studio class(es)

*Independent study and supervisory courses in the Art History concentration are limited to one (no more than 3 units) and may be applied only in the elective category.

D. Senior Seminar in Art History (3)
ART 194
Culminating course for students with senior status after completion of all lower-division requirements, History 100, the CSUS Foreign Language Proficiency Requirement and demonstration of writing proficiency as prescribed by CSUS

ART STUDIO MAJOR


xxxxxxxxxxxxx

A. Required Lower Division Core Courses
(24 units)

(3)ART 001A
Art in the Western World:
From Stone Age to End of Middle Ages
(3)ART 001B
Art in the Western World:
From Renaissance to Present
(3)ART 020A
Beginning Drawing
(3)ART 020B
Intermediate Drawing (ART 020A
or equivalent)
(6) Select two of the following:
ART 027
Beginning Color
ART 060
Two-Dimensional Composition
ART 070
Form, Space and Vision
ART 080
Materials and Methods
ART 097
Beginning Electronic Art
(3) Select one of the following:
ART 021Painting
(ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 024
Watercolor (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 040A
Basic Printmaking: Survey
ART 040B
Basic Printmaking: Etching
ART 040C
Basic Printmaking: Lithography
ART 040D
Basic Printmaking: Relief
ART 040E
Basic Printmaking: Silkscreen
ART 040H
Beginning Printmaking/Portfolio
(Portfolio Review)
(3) Select one of the following:
ART 050
Beginning Ceramics
ART 053
Beginning Hand-Built Ceramics
ART 074
Beginning Jewelry Design
ART 075
Beginning Metalsmithing
ART 086
Clay Sculpture
ART 087
Wood Sculpture
ART 088
Sculpture and Experimental Furniture

B. Required Upper Division Core Courses (18 units)

(6) Select 6 units of upper division art history courses. Independent study courses, such as ART 119, ART 195 and ART 199 are not applicable.
(3)ART 120
Advanced Drawing (ART 020B
or equivalent)
(3)ART 192
BA Seminar/Culmination Experience
(Senior Status)
(6) Select two upper division art studio courses
from the following:
ART 121
Advanced Painting (ART 021
or equivalent)
ART 123
Figure Drawing (ART 020A
or equivalent)
ART 124
Advanced Watercolor (ART 024
or equivalent)
ART 125
Life Studio (ART 020A
or equivalent)
ART 126
Life Painting (ART 020A
or equivalent)
ART 127
Collage and Assemblage
ART 141
Advanced Silk-screen (ART 040E
or equivalent)
ART 145
Advanced Printmaking
ART 150
Advanced Ceramics (ART 050
or equivalent, or instructor permission.)
ART 153
Hand-Built Ceramic Techniques
(ART 053 or instructor permission.)
ART 160
Photography in the Arts (One semester of basic photography or instructor permission.)
ART 161
Photography in the Field (PHOT 040
or equivalent)
ART 162
Alternative Photographic Processes
(PHOT 040 or other basic photography)
ART 174
Advanced Jewelry Design (ART 074
or equivalent, or instructor permission. )
ART 180
Figure Sculpture (ART 020A
or equivalent)
ART 183
Advanced Sculpture I (ART 088
or equivalent)
ART 197
Intermediate Electronic Art (ART 097
or equivalent)
ART 198
Advanced Electronic Art (ART 197
or equivalent, as evidenced in portfolio)

C. Upper Division Elective Courses (6 units)

(6) Select two of the following:
ART 100 Origins of American Indian Art
ART 100 Art and Photography
ART 103
Greco-Roman Art (ART 001A
or equivalent)
ART 105
Medieval Art (ART 001A
or equivalent)
ART 106
Renaissance Art (ART 001A
or ART 001B or equivalent)
ART 107
Baroque and Rococo Art (ART 001B
or equivalent)
ART 108
19th Century Art (ART 001B
or equivalent)
ART 109
20th Century Art (ART 001B
or equivalent)
ART 110
American Art (ART 001B
or equivalent)
ART 113A
Primitive Art and Mythology
ART 113B
Oriental Art and Mythology
ART 113C
Occidental Art and Mythology
ART 113D
Creative Art and Mythology
ART 117A
Art of India and Southeast Asia
ART 117B
Art of China and Japan
ART 118
Modern Architecture
ART 119*
Directed Research in Art History
(Instructor permission and Department Chair
via signed petition form)
ART 121
Advanced Painting (ART 021 or equivalent)
ART 123
Figure Drawing (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 124
Advanced Watercolor (ART 024 or equivalent)
ART 125
Life Studio (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 126
Life Painting (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 127
Collage and Assemblage
ART 128
Art and Artist in the Marketplace
ART 129*
Painting/Drawing Studio (Instructor
permission and Department Chair
via signed petition form)
ART 130
Aesthetics and Art Criticism
ART 132
Early Childhood Art
ART 133
Understanding and Creating Art (upper division status)
ART 135
Secondary School Art Education (ART 133 or instructor permission)

ART 137
Art for Exceptional Child
ART 139*
Directed Research in Art Education (Instructor permission and
Department Chair via signed petition form)
ART 141
Advanced Silk-screen (ART 040E or equivalent)
ART 145
Advanced Printmaking
ART 148
Barrio Art for Ethnic Groups
ART 149*
Graphics/Printmaking Studio (Instructor permission and Department
Chair via signed petition)
ART 150
Advanced Ceramics (ART 050 or equivalent, or instructor permission)
ART 153
Hand-Built Ceramic Techniques (ART 053
or instructor permission )
ART 159*
Ceramics Studio (Instructor permission
and Department Chair via
signed petition form)
ART 160
Photography in the Arts (One semester of
basic photography or instructor permission)
ART 161
Photography in the Field (PHOT 040
or equivalent)
ART 162
Alternative Photographic Processes
(PHOT 040 or other basic
photography)
ART 169
Photography Studio (Instructor
permission and Department Chair
via signed petition form)
ART 174
Advanced Jewelry Design (ART 074
or equivalent, or instructor permission.)

ART 179*
Crafts/Art Metal Studio (Instructor
permission and Department Chair via
signed petition form)
ART 180
Figure Sculpture (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 183
Advanced Sculpture I (ART 088 or equivalent)
ART 189*
Sculpture Studio (Instructor permission
and Department Chair via
signed petition form)
ART 191
Film as an Art Form
ART 193
Art Gallery Management
ART 195*
Fieldwork
ART 196
Experimental Offerings in Art
ART 197
Intermediate Electronic Art (ART 97
or equivalent experience, such
as PHOT 100, Introduction to Digital
Imaging)
ART 198
Advanced Electronic Art (ART 197
or equivalent experience, evidenced in
portfolio)
ART 199*
Special Problems
Independent study and supervisory courses
in the major are limited to two (no more
than 6 units) and may be applied only to
the elective category.
Note: Students may, with permission of the
instructor, enroll in graduate (200 level)
classes.


SUBJECT MATTER PROGRAM
(Pre-Credential Preparation)

A. Core Courses (30 units)
(3)ART 001A
Art in the Western World: From Stone Age
to End of Middle Ages

(3)ART 001B
Art in the Western World:
From Renaissance to Present
(3)ART 020A
Beginning Drawing
(3)ART 021
Painting (ART 020A or equivalent)
(3)ART 040A
Basis Printmaking: Survey OR
ART 040D
Basic Printmaking: Relief OR
ART 040E
Basic Printmaking: Silk-screen
(3)ART 050
Beginning Ceramics
(3)ART 130
Aesthetics and Art Criticism
(3)ART 133
Understanding and Creating Art
(Upper division status)
(3)ART 135
Secondary School Art Education
(ART 133 or instructor permission)
(3)ART 197
Intermediate Electronic Art
(ART 97 or equivalent experience,
such as PHOT 100, Introduction to
Digital Imaging)

A. Breadth and Perspective Courses
(18 units)

(3) Select one of the following:
ART 020B
Intermediate Drawing (ART 020A
or equivalent)
ART 024
Watercolor (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 027
Beginning Color
ART 053
Beginning Hand-built Ceramics
ART 060
Two-Dimensional Composition
ART 070
Form, Space and Vision
ART 074
Beginning Jewelry Design
ART 080
Materials and Methods
ART 088
Sculpture
(3) Select one of the following:
ART 132
Early Childhood Art
ART 137
Art for Exceptional Children
(3) Select one of the following:
ART 120
Advanced Drawing (ART 020B or equivalent)
ART 121
Advanced Painting (ART 021 or equivalent)
ART 124
Advanced Watercolor (ART 024 or equivalent)
ART 125
Life Studio (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 145
Advanced Printmaking
ART 148
Barrio Art for Ethnic Groups
ART 160
Photography in the Arts (One semester
of basic photography or
instructor permission)
(3) Select one of the following:
ART 150
Advanced Ceramics (ART 050 or
equivalent, or instructor permission)
ART 153
Hand-Built Ceramic Techniques
(ART 053 or instructor permission)
ART 180
Figure Sculpture (ART 020A
or equivalent)

(6) Select two of the following:
ART 100
Origins of American Indian Art
ART 101
Art and Photography
ART 103
Greco-Roman Art (ART 001A
or equivalent)
ART 105
Medieval Art (ART 001A
or equivalent)
ART 106
Renaissance Art (ART 001A
or ART 001B or equivalent)
ART 107
Baroque and Rococo Art
(ART 001B or equivalent)
ART 108
19th Century Art (ART 001B
or equivalent)
ART 109
20th Century Art (ART 001B
or equivalent)
ART 110
American Art (ART 001B
or equivalent)
ART 118
Modern Architecture

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Art
Justification
: To make it possible to offer a new concentration in Art History, the Art department proposes to change the existing “Art Studio” major to an “Art” major. The “Art” major would have two concentrations: Art Studio and Art History. (See old program/new program table listed above under "Art History Concentration.)


NON-SUBSTANTIVE CHANGES

BA Art
Justification:
ART 114, Visual Form and the African Diaspora, is a new course submitted for College approval and for addition to the Art Department curriculum. For a justification of the course itself, see Form A. Form B also is needed so that the course can be inserted into the appropriate part of the Degree Requirements for the BA (Section C: Upper Division Electives). Attached to Form B is a comparison of Section C before and after the addition of ART 114.

OLD PROGRAM
With addition of ART 114
C. Upper Division Elective Courses
(6 units)

(6) Select two of the following:

ART 100
Origins of American Indian Art

ART 101
Art and Photography

ART 103
Greco-Roman Art
(ART 001A or equivalent)

ART 105
Medieval Art
(ART 001A or equivalent)

ART 106
Renaissance Art (ART 001A or
ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 107
Baroque and Rococo Art
(ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 108
19th Century Art
(ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 109
20th Century Art
(ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 110
American Art (ART 001B
or equivalent)

ART 113A
Primitive Art and Mythology

ART 113B
Oriental Art and Mythology

ART 113C
Occidental Art and Mythology

ART 113D
Creative Art and Mythology

 


ART 117A
Art of India and Southeast Asia

ART 117B
Art of China and Japan

ART 118
Modern Architecture

ART 119*
Directed Research in Art History
(Instructor permission and Department
Chair via signed petition form)

ART 121
Advanced Painting
(ART 021 or equivalent)

ART 123
Figure Drawing
(ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 124
Advanced Watercolor
(ART 024 or equivalent)

ART 125
Life Studio
(ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 126
Life Painting

ART 127
Collage and Assemblage

ART 128
Art and Artist in the Marketplace

ART 129*
Painting/Drawing Studio (Instructor
permission and Department Chair
via signed petition form)

ART 130
Aesthetics and Art Criticism

ART 132
Early Childhood Art

ART 133
Understanding and Creating
Art (upper division status)

ART 135
Secondary School Art Education
(ART 133 or instructor permission)

ART 137
Art for Exceptional Child

ART 139*
Directed Research in Art Education
(Instructor permission and Department
Chair via signed petition form)

ART 141
Advanced Silk-screen
(ART 040E or equivalent)

ART 145
Advanced Printmaking

ART 148
Barrio Art for Ethnic Groups

ART 149*
Graphics/Printmaking Studio
(Instructor permission and Department
Chair via signed petition)

ART 150
Advanced Ceramics (ART 050 or
equivalent, or instructor permission)

ART 153
Hand-Built Ceramic Techniques
(ART 053 or instructor permission )

ART 159*
Ceramics Studio (Instructor
permission and Department
Chair via signed petition form)

ART 160
Photography in the Arts (one
semester of basic photography
or instructor permission)

ART 161
Photography in the Field
(PHOT 040 or equivalent)

ART 162
Alternative Photographic Processes
(PHOT 040 or other basic photography)

ART 169
Photography Studio (Instructor
permission and Department
Chair via signed petition form)

ART 174
Advanced Jewelry Design (ART 074
or equivalent, or instructor permission.)

ART 179*
Crafts/Art Metal Studio (Instructor
permission and Department Chair
via signed petition form)

ART 180
Figure Sculpture
(ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 183
Advanced Sculpture I
(ART 088 or equivalent)

ART 189*
Sculpture Studio (Instructor permission
and Department Chair via
signed petition form)

ART 191
Film as an Art Form

ART 193
Art Gallery Management

ART 195*
Fieldwork

ART 196
Experimental Offerings in Art

ART 197
Intermediate Electronic Art (ART 97
or equivalent experience, such as
PHOT 100, Introduction to Digital Imaging)

ART 198
Advanced Electronic Art (ART 197 or
equivalent experience, evidenced in portfolio)

ART 199*
Special Problems


C. Upper Division Elective Courses
(6 units)

(6) Select two of the following:

ART 100
Origins of American Indian Art

ART 101
Art and Photography

ART 103
Greco-Roman Art
(ART 001A or equivalent)

ART 105
Medieval Art
(ART 001A or equivalent)

ART 106
Renaissance Art (ART 001A or
ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 107
Baroque and Rococo Art
(ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 108
19th Century Art
(ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 109
20th Century Art
(ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 110
American Art (ART 001B
or equivalent)

ART 113A
Primitive Art and Mythology

ART 113B
Oriental Art and Mythology

ART 113C
Occidental Art and Mythology

ART 113D
Creative Art and Mythology

ART 114
Visual Form and the African Diaspora


ART 117A
Art of India and Southeast Asia

ART 117B
Art of China and Japan

ART 118
Modern Architecture

ART 119*
Directed Research in Art History
(Instructor permission and Department
Chair via signed petition form)

ART 121
Advanced Painting
(ART 021 or equivalent)

ART 123
Figure Drawing
(ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 124
Advanced Watercolor
(ART 024 or equivalent)

ART 125
Life Studio
(ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 126
Life Painting

ART 127
Collage and Assemblage


ART 129*
Painting/Drawing Studio (Instructor
permission and Department Chair
via signed petition form)

ART 130
Aesthetics and Art Criticism

ART 132
Early Childhood Art

ART 133
Understanding and Creating
Art (upper division status)

ART 135
Secondary School Art Education
(ART 133 or instructor permission)

ART 137
Art for Exceptional Child

ART 139*
Directed Research in Art Education
(Instructor permission and Department
Chair via signed petition form)

ART 141
Advanced Silk-screen
(ART 040E or equivalent)

ART 145
Advanced Printmaking

ART 148
Barrio Art for Ethnic Groups

ART 149*
Graphics/Printmaking Studio
(Instructor permission and Department
Chair via signed petition)

ART 150
Advanced Ceramics (ART 050 or
equivalent, or instructor permission)

ART 153
Hand-Built Ceramic Techniques
(ART 053 or instructor permission )

ART 159*
Ceramics Studio (Instructor
permission and Department
Chair via signed petition form)

ART 160
Photography in the Arts (one
semester of basic photography
or instructor permission)

ART 161
Photography in the Field
(PHOT 040 or equivalent)

ART 162
Alternative Photographic Processes
(PHOT 040 or other basic photography)

ART 169
Photography Studio (Instructor
permission and Department
Chair via signed petition form)

ART 174
Advanced Jewelry Design (ART 074
or equivalent, or instructor permission.)

ART 179*
Crafts/Art Metal Studio (Instructor
permission and Department Chair
via signed petition form)

ART 180
Figure Sculpture
(ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 183
Advanced Sculpture I
(ART 088 or equivalent)

ART 189*
Sculpture Studio (Instructor permission
and Department Chair via
signed petition form)

ART 191
Film as an Art Form

ART 193
Art Gallery Management

ART 195*
Fieldwork

ART 196
Experimental Offerings in Art

ART 197
Intermediate Electronic Art (ART 97
or equivalent experience, such as
PHOT 100, Introduction to Digital Imaging)

ART 198
Advanced Electronic Art (ART 197 or
equivalent experience, evidenced in portfolio)

ART 199*
Special Problems

* Independent study and supervisory courses in the major are limited to two (no more than 6 units) and may be applied only to the elective category.

BA/Minor Art
Justification:
Three new classes—ART 97, ART 111, and ART 112—already have been added to the curriculum (the Course Changes were approved and the courses are all in the Catalog). However, we neglected to turn in the paperwork that would insert them into all of the appropriate places in the degree requirements. This paperwork is intended to put ART 97 into the 2-D section of the Art Studio minor, and ART 111 and 112 into the Upper Division Elective section of the major. A similar proposal for a new art history course, ART 114, has just been sent over to the College.

Attachment for Form B in support of insertion of ART 97 into the Art Studio Minor (entry in italics). A previous version of this attachment was used to support the insertion of ART 3 (Art in the Asian World) into the Minor, so I have left that entry in place.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
CURRENT MINOR
Art Studio Minor (21 units)

(6) Select two of the following:

ART 001A
Art in the Western World:
From Stone Age to End of Middle Ages

ART 001B
Art in the Western World:
From Renaissance to Present

 


ART 005
Native American Art

ART 007
Art Appreciation

(3) Select one of the following:

ART 020A
Beginning Drawing

ART 021
Painting (ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 024
Watercolor (ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 040B
Basic Printmaking: Etching

ART 40C
Basic Printmaking: Lithography

ART 040D
Basic Printmaking: Relief

ART 040E
Basic Printmaking: Silkscreen

ART 040H
Beginning Printmaking/Portfolio
(Portfolio Review)

 


(3) Select one of the following:

ART 050
Beginning Ceramics

ART 053
Beginning Hand-Built Ceramics

ART 070
Form, Space, and Vision

ART 074
Beginning Jewelry Design

ART 075
Beginning Metalsmithing

ART 086
Clay Sculpture

ART 087
Wood Sculpture and Experimental Furniture

ART 088
Sculpture


(9) Nine units of upper division courses
in studio art must be selected in consultation
with a faculty advisor.


REVISED MINOR
Art Studio Minor (21 units)

(6) Select two of the following:

ART 001A
Art in the Western World
From Stone Age to End of Middle Ages

ART 001B
Art in the Western World:
From Renaissance to Present

ART 003
Art in the Asian World


ART 005
Native American Art

ART 007
Art Appreciation

(3) Select one of the following:

ART 020A
Beginning Drawing

 


ART 024
Watercolor (ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 040B
Basic Printmaking: Etching

ART 40C
Basic Printmaking: Lithography

ART 040D
Basic Printmaking: Relief

ART 040E
Basic Printmaking: Silkscreen

ART 040H
Beginning Printmaking/Portfolio
(Portfolio Review)

Art 097
Beginning Electronic Art

(3) Select one of the following:

ART 050
Beginning Ceramics

ART 053
Beginning Hand-Built Ceramics

ART 070
Form, Space, and Vision

ART 074
Beginning Jewelry Design

ART 075
Beginning Metalsmithing

ART 086
Clay Sculpture

ART 087
Wood Sculpture and Experimental Furniture

ART 088
Sculpture


(9) Nine units of upper division courses
in studio art must be selected in consultation
with a faculty advisor.

Attachment for Form B in support of insertion of two art history courses into the Upper Division elective part of the BA (ART 111 and 112). This is a comparison of the Upper Division elective part of the BA degree before and after the introduction of ART 111 and 112 (entries in italics). It also includes ART 114, the subject of a separate proposal.

OLD PROGRAM
With addition of ART 114
C. Upper Division Elective Courses (6 units)

(6) Select two of the following:

ART 100
Origins of American Indian Art

ART 101
Art and Photography

ART 103 Greco-Roman Art
(ART 001A or equivalent)

ART 105
Medieval Art
(ART 001A or equivalent)

ART 106
Renaissance Art (ART 001A or
ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 107
Baroque and Rococo Art
(ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 108
19th Century Art
(ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 109
20th Century Art
(ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 110
American Art (ART 001B
or equivalent)


C. Upper Division Elective Courses (6 units)

(6) Select two of the following:

ART 100
Origins of American Indian Art

ART 101
Art and Photography

ART 103 Greco-Roman Art
(ART 001A or equivalent)

ART 105
Medieval Art
(ART 001A or equivalent)

ART 106
Renaissance Art (ART 001A or
ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 107
Baroque and Rococo Art
(ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 108
19th Century Art
(ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 109
20th Century Art
(ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 110
American Art (ART 001B
or equivalent)

ART 111
Latin American and Latino Art History

 

OLD PROGRAM
With addition of ART 111 and 112

 



ART 113A
Primitive Art and Mythology

ART 113B
Oriental Art and Mythology

ART 113C
Occidental Art and Mythology

ART 113D
Creative Art and Mythology


ART 117A
Art of India and Southeast Asia

ART 117B
Art of China and Japan

ART 118
Modern Architecture

ART 119*
Directed Research in Art History
(Instructor permission and Department
Chair via signed petition form)

ART 121
Advanced Painting
(ART 021 or equivalent)

ART 123
Figure Drawing
(ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 124
Advanced Watercolor
(ART 024 or equivalent)

ART 125
Life Studio
(ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 126
Life Painting
(ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 127
Collage and Assemblage

ART 128
Art and Artist in the Marketplace

ART 129*
Painting/Drawing Studio (Instructor
permission and Department Chair
via signed petition form)

ART 130
Aesthetics and Art Criticism

ART 132
Early Childhood Art

ART 133
Understanding and Creating
Art (upper division status)

ART 135
Secondary School Art Education
(ART 133 or instructor permission)

ART 137
Art for Exceptional Child

ART 139*
Directed Research in Art Education
(Instructor permission and Department
Chair via signed petition form)

ART 141
Advanced Silk-screen
(ART 040E or equivalent)

ART 145
Advanced Printmaking

ART 148
Barrio Art for Ethnic Groups

ART 149*
Graphics/Printmaking Studio
(Instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition)

ART 150
Advanced Ceramics (ART 050 or
equivalent, or instructor permission)

ART 153
Hand-Built Ceramic Techniques
(ART 053 or instructor permission )

ART 159*
Ceramics Studio (Instructor
permission and Department
Chair via signed petition form)

ART 160 Photography in the Arts (one
semester of basic photography
or instructor permission)

ART 161
Photography in the Field
(PHOT 040 or equivalent)

ART 162
Alternative Photographic Processes
(PHOT 040 or other basic photography)

ART 169
Photography Studio (Instructor
permission and Department
Chair via signed petition form)

ART 174
Advanced Jewelry Design (ART 074
or equivalent, or instructor permission.)

ART 179* Crafts/Art Metal Studio (Instructor
permission and Department Chair
via signed petition form)

ART 180
Figure Sculpture
(ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 183
Advanced Sculpture I
(ART 088 or equivalent)

ART 189*
Sculpture Studio (Instructor permission
and Department Chair via
signed petition form)

ART 191
Film as an Art Form

ART 193
Art Gallery Management

ART 195*
Fieldwork

ART 196
Experimental Offerings in Art

ART 197
Intermediate Electronic Art (ART 97
or equivalent experience, such as
PHOT 100, Introduction to Digital Imaging)

ART 198
Advanced Electronic Art (ART 197 or
equivalent experience, evidenced in portfolio)

ART 199*
Special Problems

ART 112
Contemporary Art (ART 001B, ART 109, or instructor permission)

ART 113A
Primitive Art and Mythology

ART 113B
Oriental Art and Mythology

ART 113C
Occidental Art and Mythology

ART 113D
Creative Art and Mythology

ART 114
Visual Form and the African Diaspora


ART 117A
Art of India and Southeast Asia

ART 117B
Art of China and Japan

ART 118
Modern Architecture

ART 119*
Directed Research in Art History
(Instructor permission and Department
Chair via signed petition form)

ART 121
Advanced Painting
(ART 021 or equivalent)

ART 123
Figure Drawing
(ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 124
Advanced Watercolor
(ART 024 or equivalent)

ART 125
Life Studio
(ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 126
Life Painting
(ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 127
Collage and Assemblage

ART 128
Art and Artist in the Marketplace

ART 129*
Painting/Drawing Studio (Instructor
permission and Department Chair
via signed petition form)

ART 130
Aesthetics and Art Criticism

ART 132
Early Childhood Art

ART 133
Understanding and Creating
Art (upper division status)

ART 135
Secondary School Art Education
(ART 133 or instructor permission)

ART 137
Art for Exceptional Child

ART 139*
Directed Research in Art Education
(Instructor permission and Department
Chair via signed petition form)

ART 141
Advanced Silk-screen
(ART 040E or equivalent)

ART 145
Advanced Printmaking

ART 148
Barrio Art for Ethnic Groups

ART 149*
Graphics/Printmaking Studio
(Instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition)

ART 150
Advanced Ceramics (ART 050 or
equivalent, or instructor permission)

ART 153
Hand-Built Ceramic Techniques
(ART 053 or instructor permission )

ART 159*
Ceramics Studio (Instructor
permission and Department
Chair via signed petition form)

ART 160 Photography in the Arts (one
semester of basic photography
or instructor permission)

ART 161
Photography in the Field
(PHOT 040 or equivalent)

ART 162
Alternative Photographic Processes
(PHOT 040 or other basic photography)

ART 169
Photography Studio (Instructor
permission and Department
Chair via signed petition form)

ART 174
Advanced Jewelry Design (ART 074
or equivalent, or instructor permission.)

ART 179* Crafts/Art Metal Studio (Instructor
permission and Department Chair
via signed petition form)

ART 180
Figure Sculpture
(ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 183
Advanced Sculpture I
(ART 088 or equivalent)

ART 189*
Sculpture Studio (Instructor permission
and Department Chair via
signed petition form)

ART 191
Film as an Art Form

ART 193
Art Gallery Management

ART 195*
Fieldwork

ART 196
Experimental Offerings in Art

ART 197
Intermediate Electronic Art (ART 97
or equivalent experience, such as
PHOT 100, Introduction to Digital Imaging)

ART 198
Advanced Electronic Art (ART 197 or
equivalent experience, evidenced in portfolio)

ART 199*
Special Problems

* Independent study and supervisory courses in the major are limited to two (no more than 6 units) and may be applied only to the elective category.

Studio Art Minor
Justification:
ART 3 (Art in the Asian World), a new art history course currently being proposed for introduction in the 2004-2005 academic year (see separate application), needs to be added to the lower division elective section of the degree requirements for the minor in Studio Art (section C in the University Catalogue description.)

NEW PROGRAM

OLD PROGRAM

Art Studio Minor (21 units) Art Studio Minor (21 units)

(6) Select two of the following:

ART 001A
Art in the Western World
From Stone Age to End of Middle Ages

ART 001B
Art in the Western World:
From Renaissance to Present

ART 003
Art in the Asian World

ART 005
Native American Art

ART 007
Art Appreciation


(3) Select one of the following:

ART 020A
Beginning Drawing


ART 024
Watercolor (ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 040B
Basic Printmaking: Etching

ART 040C
Basic Printmaking: Lithography

ART 040D
Basic Printmaking: Relief

ART 040E
Basic Printmaking: Silk-screen

ART 040H
Beginning Printmaking/Portfolio
(Portfolio Review)


(3) Select one of the following:

ART 050 Beginning Ceramics

ART 053 Beginning Hand-Built Ceramics

ART 070 Form, Space, and Vision

ART 074 Beginning Jewelry Design

ART 075 Beginning Metalsmithing

ART 086 Clay Sculpture

ART 087 Wood Sculpture and Experimental
Furniture

ART 088 Sculpture

(9) Nine units of upper division courses in studio art must be selected

(6) Select two of the following:

ART 001A
Art in the Western World:
From Stone Age to End of Middle Ages

ART 001B
Art in the Western World:
From Renaissance to Present



ART 005
Native American Art

ART 007
Art Appreciation

 

(3) Select one of the following:

ART 020A
Beginning Drawing

ART 021
Painting (ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 024
Watercolor (ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 040B
Basic Printmaking: Etching

ART 040C
Basic Printmaking: Lithography

ART 040D
Basic Printmaking: Relief

ART 040E
Basic Printmaking: Silk-screen

ART 040H
Beginning Printmaking/Portfolio
(Portfolio Review)


(3) Select one of the following:

ART 050 Beginning Ceramics

ART 053 Beginning Hand-Built Ceramics

ART 070 Form, Space, and Vision

ART 074 Beginning Jewelry Design

ART 075 Beginning Metalsmithing

ART 086 Clay Sculpture

ART 087 Wood Sculpture and Experimental Furniture

ART 088 Sculpture

(9) Nine units of upper division in consultation courses in studio art must be selected with a faculty advisor.



Department of Communications Studies

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Journalism
Justification:
Deletes Jour 30 and adds Jour 20 as a required lower division course. Required upper division courses increased by 6 units to reflect split of Jour 130 into 130A and 130B and to add Jour 128. These changes will better prepare students for journalism careers by providing more intensive instruction in reporting and editing.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM

JOUR MAJOR REQUIREMENTS - BA

Total units required for BA: 124
Total units required for Major: 36-37 plus a required minor
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.

Special Program Requirements

Majors are required to compile and maintain an assessment portfolio, which must be submitted to the Department office prior to graduation. Specific portfolio requirements are available in the Department Office.

Pre-Major to Journalism

Prior to acceptance as a Journalism major, students must first complete a pre-major consisting of all required lower-division courses JOUR 130. Students must successfully complete each pre-major course with a grade of C- or better. Students with a CSUS grade point average of 2.3 or better may request early admission to the major.

A. Required Lower Division Courses (9 units)
(3) JOUR 30 Basic News Reporting
(3) JOUR 33 Editing & Production (JOUR 30)
(3) JOUR 50 Mass Media and Critical Thinking OR
JOUR 55 Media Communication & Society

B. Required Upper Division Courses (12 units)
-
(3) JOUR 130 Advanced News Writing (JOUR 30, 33)
-
(3) JOUR 135 Reporting Public Issues (JOUR 30, 33)
(3) JOUR 153 Mass Media Law
(3) Select one of the following:
JOUR 195 Fieldwork in Journalism (JOUR 130)
-
JOUR 197A Journalism Laboratory (JOUR 30)
JOUR 197B Journalism Laboratory (JOUR 30, permission of instructor)

C. Electives (15 units)

15 elective units chosen in consultation with an advisor from among journalism faculty. At least 12 of the 15 units must be upper division. No more than a total of nine units in JOUR 195/197A/197B/198/ or JOUR 199 combined may be counted toward the Journalism or Government-Journalism majors, and no more than six units of any one of these courses is counted toward a major.

Suggested advising sequences are available in the department office for Print Journalism and Broadcast Journalism.

D. Required Minor
The Journalism major requires a minor. Consult advisor for selection of an appropriate minor.
Note: Up to 6 units of course work from photography or graphic design may be applied toward a major or minor in Journalism with approval of a journalism advisor.

E. Special Program Requirement

Majors are required to compile and maintain an assessment portfolio that must be submitted to the Department Office prior to graduation. Specific portfolio requirements are available in the Department Office.


GOVERNMENT/JOURNALISM
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS • BA
Units required for the Major: 51
Minimum total units required for the BA: 120
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.
A. Required Lower Division Courses (9 units)
(3) GOVT 001* Essentials of Government
(3) JOUR 030 Basic News Reporting (ENGL 001A or equivalent; ENGL 001A may be taken concurrently. Keyboarding proficiency required)
(3) JOUR 055 Media Communication and Society OR
JOUR 050 Mass Media and Critical Thinking

* If a student has not taken GOVT 001 or its equivalent, then G0VT 150 may count as the prerequisite for the major; however, students are cautioned that if they must direct GOVT 150 to fulfilling the GE requirement in American institutions, they may not also then count GOVT 150 toward the major.

B. Required Upper Division Courses (33 units)

1. Government

(3) GOVT 170* Public Policy Development (Passing score on the WPE)
(3) GOVT 180* California State and Local Government

(3) Select one of the following:
GOVT 151* Bureaucracy
GOVT 153* The American Presidency
GOVT 154* Political Parties and Campaigning
GOVT 155* The Legislative Process
GOVT 156* Pressure Groups and Lobbyi ng
GOVT 157* Politics, Opinion and Participation n
GOVT 184* Introduction to Urban Politic s
GOVT 185* Problems of Urbanization

(3) Select one of the following:
GOVT 120A* Constitutional Law
GOVT 120B* Constitutional Rights and Liberties
GOVT 125* Politics of Justice

(3) Select one of the following:
GOVT 130 International Politics
GOVT 131* International Organization
GOVT 135* American Foreign Policy
2. Journalism

(3) JOUR 153 Mass Media Law and Regulation
(3) JOUR 130 Advanced News Writing (JOUR 030, passing score on the WPE )
(3) JOUR 135 Reporting Public Issues (JOUR 030, JOUR 033)
(3) JOUR 120 History of the Media (COMS 055 / JOUR 055 or equivalent; may be taken concurrently with prerequisite).
(3) JOUR 134 War, Peace and the Mass Media

3. Internship

3) GOVT 195 Government Internship (GOVT 180 or GOVT 182) OR
JOUR 195 Journalism Internship (JOUR 130)

C. Electives (9 units)
(6) Select 6 units of upper division courses in Government.
(The department particularly recommends at least one course in political theory.) GOVT 150 may not be used as an elective.
(3) Select one upper division course in Journalism
*Course prerequisite: GOVT 001 or equivalent.
Note: Government/Journalism majors should have both an advisor in the Government Department and a Journalism Advisor in the Communication Studies Department.

MINOR REQUIREMENTS
A minor in journalism consists of 21 units. JOUR 030, JOUR 033, JOUR 055 are required classes with 12 additional upper division elective units required. No more than 3 units may be from JOUR 195, JOUR 197A, JOUR 198, JOUR 199.
Note: Up to 6 units of coursework from Photography or Graphic Design may be applied toward a major or minor in Journalism with approval of a Journalism advisor.

 



JOUR MAJOR REQUIREMENTS - BA

Total units required for BA: 120
Total units required for Major: 37 plus a required minor
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.

Special Program Requirements

Majors are required to compile and maintain an assessment portfolio, which must be submitted to the Department office prior to graduation. Specific portfolio requirements are available in the Department Office.

Pre-Major to Journalism

Prior to acceptance as a Journalism major, students must first complete a pre-major consisting of all required lower-division courses JOUR 130. Students must successfully complete each pre-major course with a grade of C- or better. Students with a CSUS grade point average of 2.3 or better may request early admission to the major.

A. Required Lower Division Courses (7 units)
(1) JOUR 20 Grammar for Media Writers
(3) JOUR 30 Basic News Reporting (JOUR 20, keyboarding proficiency required)
(3) JOUR 50 Mass Media and Critical Thinking OR
JOUR 55 Media Communication & Society

B. Required Upper Division Courses (18 units)
(3) JOUR 128 Copy Editing and Ethics (JOUR 20, 30)
(3) JOUR 130A News Reporting I (prerequisite JOUR 20, JOUR 30, corequisite JOUR 130B)
(3) JOUR 130B News Reporting II (prerequisite JOUR 20, JOUR 30, corequisite JOUR 130A)
(3) JOUR 135 Reporting Public Issues (JOUR 130A, 130B)
(3) JOUR 153 Mass Media Law
(3) Select one of the following:
JOUR 195 Fieldwork in Journalism (JOUR 130A, 130B)
JOUR 197A Journalism Laboratory (JOUR 30)
JOUR 197B Journalism Laboratory (JOUR 30, permission of instructor)

C. Electives (12 units)

12 elective units chosen in consultation with an advisor from among journalism faculty. At least 9 of the 12 units must be upper division. No more than a total of nine units in JOUR 195/197A/197B/198/ or JOUR 199 combined may be counted toward the Journalism or Government-Journalism majors, and no more than six units of any one of these courses is counted toward a major.

D. Required Minor
The Journalism major requires a minor. Consult advisor for selection of an appropriate minor.
Note: Up to 6 units of course work from photography or graphic design may be applied toward a major or minor in Journalism with approval of a journalism advisor.
E. Special Program Requirement

Majors are required to compile and maintain an assessment portfolio that must be submitted to the Department Office prior to graduation. Specific portfolio requirements are available in the Department Office.


GOVERNMENT/JOURNALISM
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS • BA
Units required for the Major: 51
Minimum total units required for the BA: 120
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.
A. Required Lower Division Courses (9 units)
(3) GOVT 001* Essentials of Government
(3) JOUR 030 Basic News Reporting (JOUR 20, keyboarding proficiency required)
(3) JOUR 055 Media Communication and Society OR
JOUR 050 Mass Media and Critical Thinking


* If a student has not taken GOVT 001 or its equivalent, then G0VT 150 may count as the prerequisite for the major; however, students are cautioned that if they must direct GOVT 150 to fulfilling the GE requirement in American institutions, they may not also then count GOVT 150 toward the major.


B. Required Upper Division Courses (33 units)

1. Government

(3) GOVT 170* Public Policy Development (Passing score on the WPE)
(3) GOVT 180* California State and Local Government

(3) Select one of the following:
GOVT 151* Bureaucracy
GOVT 153* The American Presidency
GOVT 154* Political Parties and Campaigning
GOVT 155* The Legislative Process
GOVT 156* Pressure Groups and Lobbying
GOVT 157* Politics, Opinion and Participation
GOVT 184* Introduction to Urban Politic s
GOVT 185* Problems of Urbanization

(3) Select one of the following:
GOVT 120A* Constitutional Law
GOVT 120B* Constitutional Rights and Liberties
GOVT 125* Politics of Justice

(3) Select one of the following:
GOVT 130 International Politics
GOVT 131* International Organization
GOVT 135* American Foreign Policy

2. Journalism

(3) JOUR 153 Mass Media Law and Regulation
(3) JOUR 130A Reporting 1 (JOUR 020, JOUR 030)
(3) JOUR 130B Reporting 2 (JOUR 020, JOUR 030)
(3) JOUR 135 Reporting Public Issues (JOUR 130A, JOUR 130B)
(3) JOUR 134 War, Peace and the Mass Media


3. Internship

3) GOVT 195 Government Internship (GOVT 180 or GOVT 182) OR
JOUR 195 Journalism Internship (JOUR 130A, JOUR 130B)

C. Electives (9 units)
(6) Select 6 units of upper division courses in Government.
(The department particularly recommends at least one course in political theory.) GOVT 150 may not be used as an elective.
(3) Select one upper division course in Journalism
*Course prerequisite: GOVT 001 or equivalent.
Note: Government/Journalism majors should have both an advisor in the Government Department and a Journalism Advisor in the Communication Studies Department.

MINOR REQUIREMENTS
A minor in journalism consists of 21 units. JOUR 030, JOUR 055, and JOUR 128 are required classes with 12 additional upper division elective units required. No more than 3 units may be from JOUR 195, JOUR 197A, JOUR 198, JOUR 199.
Note: Up to 6 units of coursework from Photography or Graphic Design may be applied toward a major or minor in Journalism with approval of a Journalism advisor.



Public Relations Concentration

Justification:
We are changing the electives listing to have students meet with their advisor to pick electives rather than listing specific classes. This should make scheduling easier for both students and our department.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
III. Public Relations Concentration (48 units)

This concentration, developed from the Commission on Public Relations Education recommendations, is designed to:

• Prepare students to assume professional entry level roles in the practice of public relations,
• Help students understand the integration of public relations and marketing,
• Prepare students to compose, develop and analyze print and broadcast messages,
• Help students develop demonstrable competencies in writing, analyzing, problem-solving and critical thinking,
• Provide opportunities for testing public relations theory and practice, not only in the classroom, but in the field as well, and
• Develop relationships with local public relations professions as well as with community organizations

A. Required Lower Division Core Courses (12 units)
(3) ComS 2 Argumentation
(3) ComS 8 Interpersonal Communication
(3) ComS 55 Media Communication and Society
(3) Jour 30 Basic News Reporting

B. Required Upper Division Core Courses (9 units)
(3) ComS 100A Survey of Communication Studies
(3) ComS 100B Critical Analysis of Messages
(ComS 2, 4, 100A, ENGL 20)
(3) ComS 100C Introduction to Scientific Methods in Communication (ComS 100A)

C. Concentration Requirements (21 units)
(3) ComS 118 Survey of Public Relations
(3) Mgmt 120 Principles of Marketing
(3) ComS 123 Writing for Public Relations (Jour 30, passing score on WPE)
(3) Mgmt 125 Advertising (Mgmt 120)
(3) ComS 158 Public Relations Planning and Management (ComS 112, 118, 123, Mgmt 120, 125)
(3) ComS 171 Survey Methods in Communication Research (ComS 100C)
(3) ComS 187 Issues Management and Case Studies in Public Relations (ComS 158)

(Note: ComS 123 and 158 are offered as distance education courses during one semester of each academic year.)

D. Electives (6 units)

(6) Select two of the following:

(3) ComS 114 Communication and American Culture
(3) ComS 116 Intercultural Communication
(3) ComS 117 Multimedia Communication
(3) ComS 119 Conflict Resolution
(3) ComS 136 Introduction to Publishing on the WWW (Gphd 101, or 103A, or ComS 121 with consent of instructor)
(3) ComS 145 Organizational Communication
(3) ComS 151 Visual Communication
(3) ComS 160 Political Communication
(3) ComS 166 Theories of Persuasion and Attitude Change
(3) ComS 170 Data Analysis in Communication Research (ComS 100C)
(3) ComS 175 Creative Problem Solving
(3) ComS 195 Internship in Communication Studies (100A)
(3) Jour 197A Journalism Laboratory (Jour 30)

Notes:
• All Communication Studies majors except Digital Media are required to complete at least one three-unit public speaking course such as ComS 4, 104, or transfer equivalent. Public speaking courses taken to fulfill the GE oral communication requirement also fulfill this department major requirement.
• Majors must complete each core course with a grade of "C-" or better.
• Students in the PR Concentration would be encouraged to minor in the social sciences or business).
• Not more than 3 units of Internship (ComS 195) can be applied to the major requirements.


III. Public Relations Concentration (48 units)

This concentration, developed from the Commission on Public Relations Education recommendations, is designed to:

• Prepare students to assume professional entry level roles in the practice of public relations,
• Help students understand the integration of public relations and marketing,
• Prepare students to compose, develop and analyze print and broadcast messages,
• Help students develop demonstrable competencies in writing, analyzing, problem-solving and critical thinking,
• Provide opportunities for testing public relations theory and practice, not only in the classroom, but in the field as well, and
• Develop relationships with local public relations professions as well as with community organizations

A. Required Lower Division Core Courses (12 units)
(3) ComS 2 Argumentation
(3) ComS 8 Interpersonal Communication
(3) ComS 55 Media Communication and Society
(3) Jour 30 Basic News Reporting

B. Required Upper Division Core Courses (9 units)
(3) ComS 100A Survey of Communication Studies
(3) ComS 100B Critical Analysis of Messages
(ComS 2, 4, 100A, ENGL 20)
(3) ComS 100C Introduction to Scientific Methods in Communication (ComS 100A)

C. Concentration Requirements (21 units)
(3) ComS 118 Survey of Public Relations
(3) Mgmt 120 Principles of Marketing
(3) ComS 123 Writing for Public Relations (Jour 30, passing score on WPE)
(3) Mgmt 125 Advertising (Mgmt 120)
(3) ComS 158 Public Relations Planning and Management (ComS 123)
(3) ComS 171 Survey Methods in Communication Research (ComS 100C)
(3) ComS 187 Issues Management and Case Studies in Public Relations (ComS 158)

(Note: ComS 123 and 158 are offered as distance education courses during one semester of each academic year.)

D. Electives (6 units)

(6) Upper division journalism courses to be selected in consultation with your major advisor.


 

 

 

 


Notes:
• All Communication Studies majors except Digital Media are required to complete at least one three-unit public speaking course such as ComS 4, 104, or transfer equivalent. Public speaking courses taken to fulfill the GE oral communication requirement also fulfill this department major requirement.
• Majors must complete each core course with a grade of "C-" or better.
• Students in the PR Concentration would be encouraged to minor in the social sciences or business).
• Not more than 3 units of Internship (ComS 195) can be applied to the major requirements.

 

Digital Media Concentration
Justification: The Digital Media core and option cores are changed to reflect better use of our course offerings and lab facilities. The overall unit requirement does not change. The proposed changes reflect a realignment of courses that the Department feels better prepare students for the Digital Media field. They also make more efficient use of laboratory space.

NEW PROGRAM

OLD PROGRAM

IV. Digital Media Concentration (48 units)

This concentration is designed to:
• Assist students in acquiring technical skills,
• Assist students in improving aesthetic talents,
• Provide an understanding of communication processes, such that technical skills and aesthetic talents can be harnessed to achieve communication objectives,
• Prepare students for managerial and leadership roles within the Digital Media industry, and
• Motivate students to actively embrace the entrepreneurial, dynamic, and innovative nature of their chosen profession.

A. Required Core Courses (15 units)


(2) ComS 20A Audio Production (Corequisite: ComS 20B)
(1) ComS 20B Audio Production Lab (Corequisite: ComS 20A)
(3) ComS 100A Survey or Communication Studies
(3) ComS 106 Introduction to Digital Media
(3) ComS 121 Media Aesthetics
(3) ComS 154 Instructional Design and Training

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Option Requirements

Two approved options currently comprise the Digital Media Concentration. Students choosing this concentration must complete the requirements for Digital Video or Multimedia.

Digital Video (33 units)

Required Courses (21 units)

(2) ComS 27A Television Production (Corequisite: ComS 27B)
(1) ComS 27B Television Production Lab (Corequisite: ComS 27A
(3) ComS 117 Multimedia Communication
(3) ComS 124 Advanced Writing for Video (ENGL 1A and ENGL 20
(3) ComS 127 Producing and Directing (ComS 20A, ComS 20B, ComS 27A&ComS 27B each with a grade of B- or better)
(3) ComS 128 Nonstudio Television Production (ComS 20A, ComS 20B, ComS 27A, and ComS 27B each with a grade of B- or better)
(3) ComS 185 Practicum in Video Production (ComS 127 and ComS 128)
(3) ComS 185 Practicum in Video Production (repeat) OR
ComS 195 Internship in Communication (ComS 100A)

.
Electives (12 units)

(Choose 12 units of upper-division electives with advisor approval—see advising handout in Department office.)


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Multimedia (33 units)

Required Courses (27 units)

(3) ComS 26 Introduction to Capturing and Editing Digital Media
(3) ComS 122 Writing for Interactive Media (ENGL 1A and ENGL 20 or passing score on the WPE)
(3) ComS 126 Advanced and Editing Digital Media (ComS 20A, ComS 20B, ComS 26 ch with a grade of B- or better)
(3) ComS 136 Introduction to Electronic Publishing (ComS 20A, ComS 20B, ComS 26 each with a grade of B- or better)
(3) ComS 144 Multimedia Design for the World Wide Web (ComS 20A, ComS 20B, ComS 26 each with a grade of B- or better)
(3) ComS 149A Introduction to Multimedia Authoring (ComS 20A, ComS 20B, ComS 126 each with a grade of B- or better)
(3) ComS 149B Advanced Multimedia Authoring (ComS 149A)
(3) ComS 184A Multimedia Project Planning and Management (ComS 149A and Corequisite ComS 184B)
(3) ComS 184B Multimedia Project Completion (Corequisite 184A)

Elective Courses (6 units)

(Choose 6 units of upper-division electives with advisor approval—see advising handout in Department Office)

 


IV. Digital Media Concentration (48 units)

This concentration is designed to:
• Assist students in acquiring technical skills,
• Assist students in improving aesthetic talents,
• Provide an understanding of communication processes, such that technical skills and aesthetic talents can be harnessed to achieve communication objectives,
• Prepare students for managerial and leadership roles within the Digital Media industry, and
• Motivate students to actively embrace the entrepreneurial, dynamic, and innovative nature of their chosen profession.

A. Required Lower Division Core Courses (6 units)

(2) ComS 20A Audio Production (Corequisite: ComS 20B)
(1) ComS 20B Audio Production Lab (Corequisite: ComS 20A)
(2) ComS 27A Television Production (Corequisite: ComS 27B)
(1) ComS 27B Television Production Lab (Corequisite: ComS 27A

B. Required Upper Division Core Courses (42 units)
Recommended semester course sequence:

1. First Semester (12 units)

(3) ComS 100A Survey or Communication Studies
(3) ComS 106 Introduction to Digital Media
(3) GHPD 101 Graphics – Visual Principles (GHPD 10) OR
ComS 121 Media Aesthetics
(3) ComS 122 Writing for Interactive Media (ENGL 1A and ENGL 20 or passing score on the WPE)
Note: Digital Media majors must complete ComS 20A /20 B and 27A /27 B with a grade of B- or better and all other courses and option core courses with a grade of C- or better

Option Requirements

Two approved options currently comprise the Digital Media Concentration. Students choosing this concentration must complete the requirements for Digital Video or Multimedia.

Digital Video (30 units)

2. Second Semester (12 units)

(2) ComS 27A Television Production (Corequisite: ComS 27B)
(1) ComS 27B Television Production Lab (Corequisite: ComS 27A
(3) ComS 117 Multimedia Communication
(3) ComS 124 Advanced Writing for Video (ENGL 1A or equivalent)
(3) ComS 127 Producing and Directing (ComS 20A, ComS 20B, ComS 27A&ComS 27B each with a grade of B- or better)
(3) ComS 142B Film as Communication

3. Third Semester (12 units)

(3) ComS 128 Nonstudio Television Production (ComS 20A, ComS 20B, ComS 27A, and ComS 27B each with a grade of B- or better)
(3) ComS 129 Production Management
(3) ComS 130 Lighting & Set Design
(3) ComS 185A* Practicum in Video Production (ComS 20A, ComS 20B, ComS 27A, and ComS 27B each with a grade of B- or better)


4. Fourth Semester (6 units)

(3) ComS 185B* Practicum in Video Production OR
ComS 195 Internship in Communication (ComS 100A)

(6) Select one of the following:

ComS 126 Capturing & Editing Digital Media (ComS 20A, ComS 20B, ComS 27A&ComS 27B each with a grade of B- or better)
ComS 129 Video Production Management (ComS 20A, ComS 20B, ComS 27A&ComS 27B, and 121)

ComS 136 Introduction to Electronic Publishing (GPHD 101 and GPHD 103A; or ComS 121 with instructor permission)
ComS 183 Senior Seminar in Media Issues & Ethics (ComS 055 or Jour 055 or equivalent; completion of 12 units of upper division COMS courses)
ComS 191 Senior Seminar in Telecommunication/ Multimedia (Completion of 12 units of upper division COMS courses)

*ComS 184A and ComS 184B are “senior projects” and may be taken by students from Digital Video in place of ComS 185A and ComS 185B.

Multimedia (33 units)

2. Second Semester (12 units)

(3) ComS 126 Capturing and Editing Digital Media (ComS 20A, ComS 20B, ComS 27A&ComS 27B each with a grade of B- or better)
(3) ComS 136* Introduction to Electronic Publishing (GPHD 101 and GPHD 103A; or ComS 121 with instructor permission) OR
CSC 80 Information Exchange on the Web (CSC 008
(3) ComS 149A Introduction to Multimedia Authoring (ComS 106, ComS 126)
(3) ComS 151 Visual Communication

3. Third Semester (12 units)

(3) ComS 105 Communication in Small Groups
(3) ComS 149B Advanced Authoring & Writing (ComS 149A and instructor permission
(3) ComS 154 Instructional Design and Training
(3) ComS 184A Senior Project I: Management (ComS 149A and instructor permission)

4. Fourth Semester (6 units)

(3) ComS 184B Senior Project II: Production (ComS 184A; and instructor permission) OR
ComS 195 Internship in Communication

Select one of the following:

(3) ComS 144 Message Design: World Wide Web (ComS 136 or CSC 080; and ComS 117 or instructor permission
(3) ComS 183 Senior Seminar in Media Issues & Ethics (ComS 055 or Jour 055 or equivalent; completion of 12 units of upper division COMS courses)
(3) ComS 191 Senior Seminar in Telecommunication/ Multimedia (Completion of 12 units of upper division COMS courses)
(3) Jour 197C Online Journalism (Jour 30 and permission of instructor)
(3) GPHD 102 Visual Principles II – Color and Symbol (GPHD 101. Corequisite: GPHD 101 or GPHD 103A but not both)



 

Department of Design

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGES

Graphic Design
Justification:
1) Proposal of an official entrance application requirement for all majors before admission to GPHD upper division units to better prepare our students for the competitive job market. Such a requirement would entail the following:
- the creation of a “pre-major” classification in Graphic Design to distinguish between those who have
been admitted into GPHD upper division units from those who have not.
- screening of applicants from “pre-major” status to full major status through a juried portfolio process.
The program would accept 80 applicants per year.
- the introduction of a required overall GPA of 2.5+ before applying for the portfolio entrance
- the introduction of a required minimum grade of “C” or better in all lower division coursework
- the shoring up of our current lower division sequence (specifically two new LD classes, and the
migration of one UD class to LD) to better prepare non-transfer students to be competitive in a portfolio
process. Generally, area community college students transfer into our program better prepared in their
composition, drawing and craft skills. The proposed course changes and additions would better prepare
non-transfer students for the entrance portfolio.
2) Proposal of a few adjustments in the upper division:
- changing of the current minimum required grade in major upper division classes from “C-“ to “C”.
The grade requirement needs to be adjusted to demand increased student excellence in UD classes.
- a substantial increase of elective upper division course offerings. Courses would draw from already
existing courses in the Art, Photography and Digital Media majors. The additions would offer
more options for students in study subject matter as well as increased flexibility in scheduling around
required GPHD courses offered on a limited basis.
(See a side-by-side comparison of the current requirements and proposed requirements on page 3)
3) Creation of a cohort system, wherein students accepted in the program are put into specific course sequence tracks, addressing two current problems:
a. difficulty in securing classes when they need them
b. not graduating in a timely and predictable manner

OLD PROGRAM NEW PROGRAM
Current Sequence
Total Units: 66

A. Required LD (24 units)
GPHD 10 (3)
GPHD 20 (3)
PHOT 40 (3)
Select two from the following:
ART 20A (3)
ART 20B (3)
ART 60 (3)

ART 1A (3)
ART 1B (3)

INTD 20 (3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


B. Required UD (33 units)
GPHD 100A (3)
GPHD 100B (3)
GPHD 101 (3)
GPHD 102 (3)
GPHD 103A (3)
GPHD 103B (3)
GPHD 104 (3)
GPHD 113 (3)
COMS 117 (3)
COMS 136 (3)
INTD 129 (2)#
(# One unit waived for this course)


C. Required Electives (9 units)
GPHD 184A (3)
GPHD 184B (3)
GPHD 195 (3)
GPHD 199 (3)
ART 197 (3)
COMS 106 (3)
PHOT 100 (3)


Proposed cohort sequence
Semester 01
- GPHD 101**
- GPHD 103A**
- select remaining requirement or elective
- select remaining requirement or elective
Semester 02
- GPHD 100**
- GPHD 102**
- select remaining requirement or elective
- select remaining requirement or elective
Semester 03
- GPHD 103B**
- GPHD 113**
- select remaining requirement or elective
- select remaining requirement or elective
Semester 04
- GPHD 104**
- GPHD 129**
- select remaining requirement or elective
- select remaining requirement or elective

(** Denotes courses that are fixed in the sequence.).

Proposed Sequence
Total Units: 66

A. Required LD (30 units)
GPHD 10* (3)
GPHD 20 (3)
PHOT 40* (3)
Select two from the following:
ART 20A* (3)
ART 20B (3)
ART 60 (3)

Select one from the following two:
ART 1A (3)
ART 1B (3)

INTD 20 (3)

GPHD 05 (3) proposed course
GPHD 25* (3) proposed course
GPHD 30* (3) migration of GPHD 100A
to lower division
(*These courses or their articulated equivalent
must be taken before applying for portfolio
entrance. Students with catalog rights prior to
Fall 2004 should contact a CSUS Graphic
Design advisor to determine acceptable
alternatives to GPHD 25 and GPHD 30).

==JURIED PORTFOLIO for admission
into upper division==

B. Required UD (27 units)
*****
GPHD 100 (3) previously known as GPHD 100B
GPHD 101 (3)
GPHD 102 (3)
GPHD 103A (3)
GPHD 103B (3)
GPHD 104 (3)
GPHD 113 (3)
*****
COMS 136 (3)
GPHD 129 (3)

C. Required Electives (9 units)

*****
*****
GPHD 195 (3)
GPHD 199 (3)
ART 197 (3)
COMS 106 (3)
PHOT 100 (3)
ART 109 (3) additional elective
ART 110 (3) additional elective
ART 120 (3) additional elective
ART 128 (3) additional elective
ART 141 (3) additional elective
ART 160 (3) additional elective
ART 162 (3) additional elective
ART 198 (3) additional elective
COMS 117 (3) additional elective
COMS 144 (3) additional elective
INTD 124C (3) additional elective
PHOT 110 (3) additional elective
PHOT 143A (3) additional elective
PHOT 148 (3) additional elective
THEA 122 (3) additional elective
THEA 123 (3) additional elective


Interior Design
Justification: The Interior Design Degree currently requires majors to complete two upper division CAD (computer aided design) courses for a total of six units. IntD 121A is required of all majors and is a prerequisite course for IntD 121B and IntD 121C. Majors must then complete either IntD 121B or IntD 121C. We are proposing to move IntD 121A down to Lower Division and to change course numbers for each of the three courses. There would be no change in unit requirements and IntD 30 would remain the prerequisite course for IntD 130A and IntD 130B. The lower division CAD course could be articulated with many Community Colleges. There would be no change in staffing needs nor would additional resources be required if approved.

NEW PROGRAM

OLD PROGRAM

Proposed Course List: (69 units)

Current Course List: (69 units)

A. Required Lower Division: (23 units)

(3) INTD 20
(2) INTD 21
(3) INTD 27
(3) INTD 30
(3) PHOTO 40
(3) One of the following
ART1A
ART 1B
(3) One of the following:
ART 20A
ART 27
ART 60
ART 70
(3) GPHD 10

B. Required Upper Division: (46 units)

(3) PHOTO100
(3) GPHD 101
(3) GPHD 102
(2) INTD 100
-------------

--------------
--------------
(3) INTD 122
(3) INTD 123
(6) Two of the following:
INTD 124A
INTD 124B
INTD 124C
INTD 124D
(3) INTD 126A
(3) INTD 126B
(3) INTD 127A
(3) INTD 127B
(3) INTD 127C
(2) INTD 129
(3) One of the following:
INTD 130A
INTD 130B

(3) INTD 195C


A. Required Lower Division: (20 units)

(3) INTD 20
(2) INTD 21
(3) INTD 27

(3) PHOTO 40
(3) One of the following
ART1A
ART 1B
(3) One of the following:
ART 20A
ART 27
ART 60
ART 70
(3) GPHD 10

B. Required Upper Division: (49 units)

(3) PHOTO100
(3) GPHD 101
(3) GPHD 102
(2) INTD 100
(3) INTD 121A
(3) One of the following:
INTD 121B
INTD 121C
(3) INTD 122
(3) INTD 123
(6) Two of the following:
INTD 124A
INTD 124B
INTD 124C
INTD 124D
(3) INTD 126A
(3) INTD 126B
(3) INTD 127A
(3) INTD 127B
(3) INTD 127C
(2) INTD 129

(3) INTD 195C


Department of English

NEW PROGRAMS

Creative Writing Minor
Justification:
We are proposing an 18-unit minor in Creative Writing, which would serve students in a number of programs at CSUS. We have, in fact, received numerous requests from CSUS students to develop such a minor. The literature requirements of our existing minor in English do not offer students enough freedom to concentrate in an intensive way on developing their creative writing skills. In fact, the core requirements in our minor prevent students from concentrating on craft as is necessary for them to continue to improve as creative writers. Since these students are particularly interested in the production of poetry, fiction, and/or creative non-fiction, they need a minor that allows them to take enough course work to focus on the writing of literature, not just the reading of literature. The minor encompasses courses already in existence, so we will need to design any new courses.

Required Courses (6 units)

(3) ENGL 30A Introduction to Creative Writing
(3) ENGL 30B Introduction to Writing Fiction
or
(3) ENGL 30C Introduction to Poetry Writing

Choose Four from the Following (12 units)

(3) ENGL 130A Writing Short Fiction
(3) ENGL 130B Poetry Writing I
(3) ENGL 130C Poetry Writing II
(3) ENGL 130E Grandmother, Mother, Me
(3) ENGL 130J Writing Feature Filmscripts
(3) ENGL 130M Art of Autobiography
(3) ENGL 130N Writing Subjective Non-Fiction
(3) ENGL 130P The Literary Journal

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
Justification:
We are proposing an 18-unit minor in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) which would serve students in a number of programs at CSUS. We have, in fact, received numerous requests from CSUS students to develop such a minor. The coursework would give students the strong knowledge base critical for working with English Language Learners in secondary or post-secondary settings. This preparation will include theories of first- and second-language acquisition, English linguistics (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics), the structure of English with a focus on teaching English Language Learners, a special emphasis on preparing English Language Learners for academic reading and writing, and practical ESL teaching experience through tutoring. Students in such degree programs as English, English Education, Liberal Studies, Foreign Languages and Communication Studies, as well as students in other programs who are preparing to teach in California’s schools, would benefit from this additional preparation. The minor encompasses courses already in existence, with one exception (see attached course proposal).

Proposed Minor in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
Additional Required Information

1. Campus submitting request:
California State University, Sacramento
Minor in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

2. Degree program:
Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the English Department
(Note: This is an MA program; there currently is no TESOL undergraduate major)

3. Options, concentrations and special emphases already existing
The TESOL Program (English Department) offers two 18-unit options for the Certificate of Advanced Study in TESOL as well as a Master’s Degree in TESOL and a Master’s International degree in conjunction with service in the Peace Corps.

4. Department to offer the aggregate of courses:
Department of English, CSUS
Marie E. Helt, TESOL Coordinator
(916) 278-5394
Marie.Helt@csus.edu

5. Purpose of the proposed minor:
The purpose of the proposed minor is to provide students in other degree programs with the additional, strong knowledge base which is critical for working with English Language Learners in secondary and post-secondary school settings. This preparation will include theories of first- and second-language acquisition, broad knowledge of English linguistics (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics), a strong command of English grammar with an emphasis on teaching English Language Learners, a special emphasis on preparing English Language Learners for academic reading and writing demands, and practical training/experience through ESL tutoring. With this coursework and experience, students from numerous programs will be well-equipped to work with California’s diverse student populations as well as students in other states or overseas.

6. Need for the proposed minor:
Over the last several semesters, numerous students have asked our faculty why we do not offer a minor in TESOL. These include students from English, Foreign Languages, Communication Studies and other programs. The TESOL minor would fill this gap by providing these students and others with a strong preparation for working with English Language Learners in multiple settings. This preparation will broaden their perspectives on teaching, learning and culture, and enhance their prospects in various job markets.

7. Courses to be required:
The 18-unit TESOL minor will consist of the following requirements:

Course Number & Name
Title
Units
ENGL 110A Linguistics and the English Language
03
ENGL 110P Second Language Learning and Teaching
03
ENGL 110Q English Grammar for ESL Teachers
03
*ENGL 125E Reading and Writing for Second Language Students
03
ENGL 195A Field Study Tutoring
03
One Elective Select from other ENG 110s, or with approval
03
Total Units  
18

*new course

8. New courses to be developed:
We are proposing one new course, ENG 125E Reading and Writing for Second Language Students (3 units) to be included in the TESOL Minor requirements. See attached proposal.

9. Required courses in the major:
There currently is no TESOL major.

10. Faculty in TESOL:

The TESOL faculty includes:

Associate Professor Linda C. Buckley, Ph.D. (1994) Anthropology; full-time
Twenty years experience teaching ESL/EFL; fifteen years teacher training experience in US, Taiwan, Japan, Thailand, Korea, Vietnam, Egypt; administrator of international ESL programs; author of numerous articles in the field of TESOL and second language acquisition; presentations at numerous professional meetings.

Professor Roberta Ching, MA (1970) Comparative Literature; ABD (1973); full-time
Learning Skills faculty 1983 to present; University ESL Director; Director of the Learning Skills Center; ESL Instructor K-12 and CSUS for eight years; journal editor for state-wide TESOL organization.

Assistant Professor John Clark, Ph.D. (1998) Applied Linguistics/English Education; full-time
Fifteen years experience teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language. Served as full-time lecturer in the CSUS English Dept. before becoming a full-time tenure-track assistant professor in fall 2003.

Professor Dana Ferris, Ph.D. (1991) Applied Linguistics; full-time
Numerous years of ESL teaching in university/college/adult school settings; three years as TESOL Program Coordinator; current English Dept. ESL Coordinator; has created two courses and supervised interns, TA’s and instructors; authored three books on second language writing and over 20 articles and book chapters on ESL teaching and research.

Assistant Professor Marie E. Helt, Ph.D. (1997) Applied Linguistics; full-time
Extensive experience teaching ESL/EFL in U.S. and Germany; teacher training in Egypt (US-AID); teacher preparation for both K-12 and TESOL; research in the application to TESOL of corpus-linguistic analyses of English grammar.

Assistant Professor Julian Heather, Ph.D. (2003) Technology-Assisted Language Learning and Language Assessment; full-time. Has taught English to second language learners in France, Japan and the U.S.

Professor Fred Marshall, Ph.D. (1987) Linguistics; full-time
Peace Corps service; teacher preparation in U.S. and Thailand; service as TESOL Program Coordinator; research in the applications of technology to instruction.

Professor Sue McKee, MA (1986) English/TESOL; full-time
Learning Skills Writing Program Coordinator; has taught ENG 410B/195B, the tutoring practicum, numerous times; has taught every ESL course offered at CSUS.

Professor Cherryl Smith, Ph.D. (1985) Composition & Literature; full-time
Director of the CSUS Writing Center for the past five years; author of a textbook on college writing; frequent presenter at national composition conferences.

11. Resources needed:
(a) within the department/college:
With the exception of the new course proposed (ENG 125E), all required courses for the TESOL Minor are already in place, and all faculty required to teach those courses are also already in place. In addition, at least two current TESOL faculty members have the experience and expertise to teach the proposed new course. Moreover, the TESOL program has received approval to hire a new, tenure-track faculty member during the 2002-3 hiring cycle.

(b) level and nature of additional funding:
not applicable

(c) additional space, equipment and other resources needed:
not applicable

12. Catalog copy for proposed TESOL Minor:

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

The TESOL Minor requires 18 units. Six courses are required and must be taken at California State University, Sacramento. Specific Requirements:

(3) ENGL 110A Linguistics and the English Language
(3) ENGL 110P Second Language Learning and Teaching
(3) ENGL 110Q English Grammar for ESL Teachers
(3) ENGL 195A Field Study – Tutoring
(3) ENGL 125E Reading and Writing for Second Language Students
(3) ENGL 110 Elective course to be chosen from the ENG 110 strand. Substitution of another course for an ENGL 110 elective course may be possible with the prior approval of the TESOL Coordinator.

NOTE: Courses being applied to other degree programs (e.g., to English majors) cannot also be applied to the TESOL Minor. See the TESOL Coordinator for prior approval of substitute courses.

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

English
Justification:
The new English major creates a variety of possible areas of concentration/specialization from which students may choose while also retaining some features of the present major (4 lower division surveys, a 120A composition requirement, and a Shakespeare class). We instituted this concentration plan to give students greater flexibility in selecting the English major most suitable for them, to be more responsive to new areas of research in English and language study, and to represent more fully the various areas of expertise practiced by our faculty. Even with the addition of a senior seminar class as a requirement we have retained a 45 unit major with 27 upper division units required.

NEW PROGRAM
OLD PROGRAM

A. Required Lower Division Courses
Courses: 12 units
Choose 4 of the following:
English 40A
English 40B
English 50A
English 50B
English 65

B. Required Upper Division Courses
Courses: 9 units
English 120A
English 145B or English 145C
English 198T (Senior Seminar)

C. Additional Requirements
Concentration (12 units)
Choose 4 courses from one of the eleven following categories of concentration).
Note: Courses in concentration may not overlap with required courses.

American Literature:
English 50A (if not taken as requirement)
English 50B (if not taken as requirement)
Any course from English 150 series
Any course from English 155 series
Any course from English 180 series
English 185D, 185E, 185I, 197L, 197M

British Literature:
English 40A (if not taken as requirement)
English 40B (if not taken as requirement)
Any course from English 140 series
Any course from English 145 series
(if not taken as requirement)
English 185C

English Language
English 16
Any course from English 110 series
English 116A, 125B, 195A

Creative and Professional Writing
Any course from English 30 series
Any course from English 130 series
English 118T, 195C

Poetry
English 30C, 130B, 130C, 140D,
145A, 145I, 150E, 150G, 170G, 180A

Fiction
English 30B, 130A, 116B, 140G,
140H, 140L, 150C, 150D, 150F, 150H,
150I, 150L, 150M, 150N, 155E, 155F,
170E, 170K, 170Z, 180B, 185B, 185C,
185I, 197K

Drama
English 145B (if not taken as requirement)
English 145C (if not taken as requirement)
English 141A, 140E, 140M, 150J,
170D, 170H, 170I, 170L, 190L, 190V

Race, Nation, and Ethnicity
English 65 (if not taken as requirement)
English 165A, 165D, 165E, 165F,
180A, 180B, 180F, 180H, 180L, 180M,
180K, 180W, 185K

Gender and Sexuality
English 110M, 130E, 170M, 185B,
185C, 185D, 185E, 185H, 185I, 185J,
185K

Literary Theory and Cultural Studies
English 100A, 100B, 116B, 150K,
150M, 150N, 180H, 185H, 190C,
190D, 190H, 191A
Any course from English 197 series

English Education
English 110A, 110P, 110Q, 116A,
116B, 125A, 125B, 195A

Electives (12 units)

TOTAL UNITS: 45 (at least 27 units
must be upper division)

A. Required Lower Division Courses
Courses: 12 units
English 40A
English 40B
English 50A
English 50B

B. Required Upper Division Courses
Courses: 18 units
English 120A

English 140 OR
English 145 (exclusive of 145B/C)

English 145B OR
English 145C

English 150 OR
English 155 (from a series)

English 170 (from a series)

English 165 OR
English 180 OR
English 185 (from a series)

C. Additional Requirements
Electives (15 units total, at least 9 of which must be upper division).

Senior Seminar (selected from a number of specifically designated required upper division courses).

TOTAL UNITS: 45

 

Department of Humanities & Religious Studies

NON-SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Humanities and Religious Studies/Religious Studies Concentration
Justification:
Reorganize the list of electives to emphasize the importance of courses in the HRS department to the concentration. Include courses on the electives list that were added to the HRS and University curriculum since 2002. Remove courses from the electives list in which treatments of religious studies topics and approaches are not core objectives. Update and order the upcoming catalog copy for the Religious Studies concentration.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
2. Religious Studies Concentration
Electives (18 units)

Select 18 units of electives in consultation with an advisor. Up to 6 of the 18 units may be taken in related departments, with advisor approval. Up to 3 of the 18 units may be lower division courses; at least 15 Of the 18 units must be upper division.

(15-21) Select 15 to 21 upper division units from the following:
HRS 110 Global Cultures in Conflict
HRS 120 Reason and Revelation: The Origins of Western Culture (Passing score on the WPE)
HRS 121 Introduction to the Hebrew Bible (Old
Testament)
HRS 122 Introduction to the New Testament
HRS 126 Evolution of Christianity to the Reformation
HRS 127 Evolution of Christianity Since the
Reformation
HRS 141 Introduction to Judaism
HRS 144 Introduction to Islam
HRS 145 Introduction to Islamic Culture
HRS 151 World Mythology
HRS 153 Christian Mysticism
HRS 173 Chinese Philosophy and Religion
HRS 175 Zen Buddhism and Daoism


(0-3) Select 0-3 units from the following:
ANTH 013 Magic, Witchcraft and Religion
ANTH 118 Biblical Archaeology
ANTH 166 Rise of Religious Cults
ETHN 050 Native American Religion and Philosophy
ETHN 171 African Religions and Philosophies
HIST 143A Middle Eastern History to 1800
HIST 170 History of Religion in the United States
PHIL 131 Philosophy of Religion
PHIL 145B Indian Philosophy (Passing score on the WPE)

Note: At the discretion of the advisor, 3-4 units of foreign language study may be applied to the 18 units. The advisor and student together will determine if the language is appropriate to the student’s area of interest in Religious Studies or plans for future work in theology or the academic study of religion

2. Religious Studies Concentration
Electives (18 units)

Select 18 units of electives in consultation with an advisor. Up to 6 of the 18 units may be taken in related departments, with advisor approval. Up to 3 of the 18 units may be lower division courses; at least 15 of the 18 units must be upper division.

(12-18) Select 12 to 18 upper division units from the following:
HRS 117 Paganism in the Roman World
HRS 119 Classical Mythology
HRS 120 Reason and Revelation: The Origins of Western Culture (Passing score on the WPE)
HRS 121 Introduction to the Hebrew Bible (Old
Testament)
HRS 122 Introduction to the New Testament
HRS 126 History of Christianity to the Reformation
HRS 127 History of Christianity Since the Reformation
HRS 141 Introduction to Judaism
HRS 142 Exploring Rabbinic Literature
HRS 144 Introduction to Islam
HRS 145 Introduction to Islamic Culture
HRS 151 World Mythology
HRS 152 Great Mystics of the World
HRS 153 Christian Mysticism
HRS 155 Religion and Ecology
HRS 173 Chinese Philosophy and Religion
HRS 175 Zen Buddhism and Daoism
HRS 176 The Confucian Tradition
HRS 178A South Asian Religions I: The Formative Years
HRS 183 Religion and Film


(0-6) Select 0-6 units from such courses as the following:
ANTH 013 Magic, Witchcraft and Religion
ANTH 166 Rise of Religious Cults
ETHN 050 Native American Religion and Philosophy
ETHN 171 African Religions and Philosophies
HIST 110 The Ancient East: Cultural History
HIST 170 History of Religion in the United States
HRS 131 Medieval Culture
PHIL 131 Philosophy of Religion
SOC 162 Middle Eastern Societies and Culture
SOC 171 Sociology of Religion
WOMS 145 Feminism and the Spirit
Note: At the discretion of the advisor, foreign language study may be applied to the 18 units. The advisor and student together will determine if the language is appropriate to the student’s area of interest in Religious Studies or plans for future work in theology or the academic study of religion. Students should consult with an advisor before choosing any electives.


SUBSTANTIVE CHANGES

Humanities and Religious Studies/Religious Studies Minor
Justification:
Increase number of units in core of minor to 6 (from 3) by adding HRS 108: Approaches to Religious Studies to HRS 140: Exploring World Religions. Reduce total number of elective units to maintain 21 unit minor. Reorganize elective units to emphasize centrality of HRS classes. Revise elective course list to include courses that have been added to the curriculum since 2002. Remove courses from the electives list in which the treatment of religious studies topics or approaches is not a central objective. The department believes this revision strengthens the level of fundamental preparation in the minor while continuing to allow students a measure of flexibility in making elective course choices. HRS courses have been “clustered” on the electives list to reflect the multiple areas of religious studies in the department and to “foreground” the importance of choosing HRS courses as electives. Allowing students the opportunity to choose non-HRS courses from another list of electives reinforces the department’s understanding that religious studies is an interdisciplinary field. The non-HRS courses on the electives list allow students to explore various discipline-based approaches to the study of religion.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
Religious Studies Minor (21 units)
Total units required for Minor: 21
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.

(3) HRS 140 Exploring World Religions (Passing score on the WPE)
(6-9) Select two or three courses from the following:
ETHN 050 Native American Religion and Philosophy
ETHN 171 African Religions and Philosophies
HIST 170 History of Religion in the United States
HRS 070 Arts and Ideas of Asia, I
HRS 071 Arts and Ideas of Asia, II
HRS 108 Approaches to Religious Studies
HRS 121 Introduction to the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament)
HRS 122 Introduction to the New Testament
HRS 126 Evolution of Christianity to the Reformation
HRS 127 Evolution of Christianity Since the Reformation
HRS 141 Introduction to Judaism
HRS 144 Introduction to Islam
HRS 173 Chinese Philosophy and Religion
HRS 175 Zen Buddhism and Daoism
HRS 220 Seminar in Religious Studies

(3) Select one of the following:
ANTH 013 Magic, Witchcraft and Religion
ANTH 118 Biblical Archeology
ANTH 166 Rise of Religious Cults
ANTH 168 Folklore in Anthropological Perspective
PSYC 166 Humanistic Psychology (PSCY 005)
(6-9) Select two or three courses from the following:
HIST 110 The Ancient Near East: A Cultural History (Passing score on the WPE
HIST 111 Ancient Greece
HIST 112 Ancient Rome
HIST 113 Early Medieval Europe
HIST 114 Europe in the High Middle Ages
HIST 115 The Renaissance and Reformation in Europe
HRS 110 Global Cultures in Conflict
HRS 113 The Culture of Classical Greece
HRS 114 The Culture of Classical Rome
HRS 119 Classical Mythology
HRS 120 Reason and Revelation: The Origins of Western Culture (Passing score on the WPE
HRS 131 Medieval Culture
HRS 132 Renaissance (Passing score on the WPE)
HRS 145 Introduction to Islamic Culture
HRS 151 World Mythology
HRS 153 Christian Mysticism
HRS 171 Introduction to the Eastern Asian World
Religious Studies Minor (21 units)
Total units requires for Minor: 21
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.
(3) HRS 108 Approaches to Religious Studies
(3) HRS 140 Exploring World Religions (Passing score on the WPE)
(9-15) Select nine or more units from the following:
HRS 117 Paganism in the Roman World
HRS 119 Classical Mythology
HRS 120 Reason and Revelation: The Origins of Western Culture (Passing score on the WPE)
HRS 121 Introduction to the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament)
HRS 122 Introduction to the New Testament
HRS 126 History of Christianity to the Reformation
HRS 127 History of Christianity Since the Reformation
HRS 141 Introduction to Islam
HRS 142 Exploring Rabbinic Literature
HRS 144 Introduction to Islam
HRS 145 Introduction to Islamic Culture
HRS 151 World Mythology
HRS 152 Great Mystics of the World
HRS 153 Christian Mysticism
HRS 155 Religion and Ecology
HRS 173 Chinese Philosophy and Religion
HRS 175 Zen Buddhism and Daoism
HRS 176 The Confucian Tradition
HRS 178A South Asian Religions I: The Formative Years
HRS 183 Religion and Film
(0-6) Select up to six units from the following:
ANTH 013 Magic, Witchcraft, and Religion
ANTH 166 Rise of Religious Cults
ETHN 050 Native American Religion and Philosophy
ETHN 171 African Religions and Philosophies
HIST 110 The Ancient East: A Cultural History
HIST 170 History of Religion in the United States
HRS 131 Medieval Culture
PHIL 131 Philosophy of Religion
SOC 162 Middle Eastern Societies and Culture
SOC 171 Sociology of Religion
WOMS 145 Feminism and the Spirit
HRS 172 The Classical Culture of China
HRS 174 Modern Japanese Literature and Culture
HRS 230 Seminar in Medieval Studies
PHIL 131 Philosophy of Religion
PHIL 145A Chinese Philosophy (Passing score on the WPE)
PHIL 145B Indian Philosophy (Passing score on the WPE)
SOC 162 Middle Eastern Societies and Culture

Religious Studies Minor (21 units)
Total units requires for Minor: 21
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.
(3) HRS 108 Approaches to Religious Studies
(3) HRS 140 Exploring World Religions (Passing score on the WPE)
(9-15) Select nine or more units from the following:
HRS 117 Paganism in the Roman World
HRS 119 Classical Mythology
HRS 120 Reason and Revelation: The Origins of Western Culture (Passing score on the WPE)
HRS 121 Introduction to the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament)
HRS 122 Introduction to the New Testament
HRS 126 History of Christianity to the Reformation
HRS 127 History of Christianity Since the Reformation
HRS 141 Introduction to Islam
HRS 142 Exploring Rabbinic Literature
HRS 144 Introduction to Islam
HRS 145 Introduction to Islamic Culture
HRS 151 World Mythology
HRS 152 Great Mystics of the World
HRS 153 Christian Mysticism
HRS 155 Religion and Ecology
HRS 173 Chinese Philosophy and Religion
HRS 175 Zen Buddhism and Daoism
HRS 176 The Confucian Tradition
HRS 178A South Asian Religions I: The Formative Years
HRS 183 Religion and Film
(0-6) Select up to six units from the following:
ANTH 013 Magic, Witchcraft, and Religion
ANTH 166 Rise of Religious Cults
ETHN 050 Native American Religion and Philosophy
ETHN 171 African Religions and Philosophies
HIST 110 The Ancient East: A Cultural History
HIST 170 History of Religion in the United States
HRS 131 Medieval Culture
PHIL 131 Philosophy of Religion
SOC 162 Middle Eastern Societies and Culture
SOC 171 Sociology of Religion
WOMS 145 Feminism and the Spirit


Humanities and Religious Studies/Humanities Minor

Justification:
Increase number of units in core requirements for minor to 9 (from 6) by adding HRS 105: Approaches to the Humanities to HRS 10: Arts and Ideas of the West, I and HRS 11: Art and Ideas of the West, II. Retain number of units of electives in minor as 12. Students will be able to choose four elective classes----three of which must be chosen from different subject areas (Ancient Civilizations, Medieval/Renaissance Studies, Modern World, American Studies, Asian Cultures.) All other requirements for the minor remain the same—the number of units required for the minor remains 21 and 12 of the units in the minor must be upper division. The department also proposes that the catalog copy organize the minor’s electives by subject area, where relevant. While the total number of units required for the minor will remain at 21, the distribution of the units will change to include the core methods course (HRS 105), which is also part of the major. This change strengthens the common elements of the minor to include both lower-division, introductory basic survey classes and an upper-division methodology course. Minors must still also choose classes from at least 3 of the 5 subject areas offered by the department. The department believes this revision strengthens the level of fundamental preparation in the minor while still allowing students flexibility in making elective course choices.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
Humanities Minor (21 units)
Total units required for the Minor: 21; a minimum of 12 upper division units required. Specific course requirements are:
(3) HRS 010 Arts and Ideas of the West, I
(3) HRS 011 Arts and Ideas of the West, II

(9) Select one course from three of the following specialization areas:
Ancient Civilization: HRS 110, HRS 113, HRS 114, HRS 119, HRS 120, HRS 121, HRS 122, HRS 140, HRS 141, HRS 151;
Medieval/Renaissance Studies: HRS 131, HRS 132, HRS 144, HRS 153;
Modern World: HRS 135, HRS 136, HRS 169, HRS 174, HRS 180, HRS 181, HRS 188
American Studies: HRS 161, HRS 168, HRS 169, HRS 185, HRS 186;
Eastern Studies: HRS 070, HRS 071, HRS 145, HRS 171, HRS 172, HRS 173, HRS 174, HRS 175
Humanities Minor (21 units)
Total units required for the Minor: 21; a minimum of 12 upper division units required. Specific course requirements are:
(3) HRS 010 Arts and Ideas of the West, I
(3) HRS 011 Arts and Ideas of the West, II
(3) HRS 105 Approaches to Humanities
(6) Select at least one course from each of three of the following areas:
Ancient Civilization:
HRS 110 Global Cultures in Conflict
HRS 113 The Culture of Classical Greece
HRS 114 The Culture of Classical Rome
HRS 117 Paganism in the Roman World
HRS 119 Classical Mythology
HRS 120 Reason and Revelation: The Origins of Western Culture (Passing score on the WPE)
HRS 121 Introduction to the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament)
HRS 122 Introduction to the New Testament
HRS 140 Exploring World Religions (Passing score on the WPE)
HRS 141 Introduction to Judaism
HRS 151 World Mythology
Medieval/Renaissance Studies:
HRS 131 Medieval Culture
HRS 132 Renaissance (Passing score on the WPE)
HRS 144 Introduction to Islam
HRS 153 Christian Mysticism
Modern World:
HRS 135 The Romantic Spirit
HRS 136 The Modern Temper
HRS 143 The Holocaust
HRS 169 Hollywood and America
HRS 174 Modern Japanese Literature and Culture
HRS 177 Modern East Asian Cinema
HRS 180 The Film
HRS 181 Contemporary Issues in Film
HRS 183 Religion and Film
HRS 188 Fantasy and Romance
American Studies:
HRS 161 Multicultural America
HRS 162 American Space and Identity
HRS 168 Images of America (Passing score on the WPE)
HRS 169 Hollywood and America
HRS 185 Women in Film and American Culture
Asian Cultures:
HRS 070 Arts and Ideas of Asia, I
HRS 071 Arts and Ideas of Asia, II
HRS 144 Introduction to Islam
HRS 145 Introduction to Islamic Culture
HRS 171 Introduction to the Eastern Asian World
HRS 172 The Classical Culture of China
HRS 173 Chinese Philosophy and Religion
HRS 174 Modern Japanese Literature and Culture
HRS 175 Zen Buddhism and Daoism
HRS 176 The Confucian Tradition
HRS 177 Modern East Asian Cinema
HRS 178A South Asian Religions I: The Formative Years

 

Department of Theatre & Dance

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Dance Concentration
Justification:
This is a non-substantive change in the dance concentration. There are no overall changes in units. Per our NASD accreditation report, it was strongly recommended that our majors are required to take Adv. Jazz as well as Adv. Modern. And changing THEA 101 to THEA 118 and THEA 132 to THEA 114A.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM

Total units required for BA: 124
Total units required for Major: 52

A. Required Lower Division Courses (16 units)
(2) DNCE 011 Intermediate Jazz
(2) DNCE 013 Intermediate Ballet
(3) THEA 009 Appreciation of Acting
(3) THEA 011 Acting Study 1
(2) Select one of the following:
DNCE 012 Intermediate Modem
DNCE 014 Intermediate Tap
(4) Select two of the following:
DNCE 040 Basic Dance Production A
DNCE 041 Basic Dance Production B
THEA 016 Tech Production I
THEA 020 Tech Production II
B. Required Upper Division Courses (36 units)
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(2) DNCE 120 Principles of Choreography
(2) DNCE 121 Choreographic Form & Style
(1) DNCE 122 Dance Improvisation
(3) DNCE 130 App. and History of Dance
(3) DNCE 131 Dance Cultures of America
(3) DNCE 132 African Caribbean Dance
(4) DNCE 142 Dance Performance Skills
(1 unit class, must be taken four times)
(2) DNCE 143 Dance Practicum
(1 unit class, must be taken twice)
(3) DNCE 150 Dance Theory
(2) DNCE 151 Dance Criticism
(2) DNCE 160 Creative Dance for Children
(3) KINS 151 c Dance Kinesiology
(1) THEA 120 Practicum in Tech. Production
(2) Select one of the following:
DNCE 111 Advanced jazz
DNCE 112 Advanced Modem
(3) Select one of the following:
THEA 101 Acting Study II
THEA 109 Acting Tech. in Musical Theatre
THEA 132 Movement for the Actor

Total units required for BA: 120
Total units required for Major: 52

A. Required Lower Division Courses (16 units)
(2) DNCE 011 Intermediate jazz
(2) DNCE 013 Intermediate Ballet
(3) THEA 009 Appreciation of Acting
(3) THEA 011 Acting Study 1
(2) Select one of the following:
DNCE 012 Intermediate Modem
DNCE 014 Intermediate Tap
(4) Select two of the following:
DNCE 040 Basic Dance Production
DNCE 041 Basic Dance Production B
THEA 016 Tech Production I
THEA 020 A Tech Production II
B. Required Upper Division Courses'(36 units)
(2) DNCE 111 Advanced Jazz
(2) DNCE 112 Advanced Modem
(2) DNCE 120 Principles of Choreography
(2) DNCE 121 Dance Improvisation
(2) DNCE 122 Choreographic Form & Style
(3) DNCE 130 App. and History of Dance
(3) DNCE 131 Dance Cultures of America
(3) DNCE 132 African Caribbean Dance
(1) DNCE 142 Dance Performance Skills

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
(2) DNCE 143 Dance Practicum
(1 unit class, must be taken twice)
(3) DNCE 150 Dance Theory
(2) DNCE 151 Dance Criticism
(2) DNCE 160 Creative Dance for Children
(3) KINS 151c Dance Kinesiology
(1) THEA 120 Practicum in Tech. Production
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
(3) Select one of the following:
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
THEA 109 Acting Tech. in Musical Theatre
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
THEA 114A Voice + Movement I
THEA 118 Children's Theatre

 

NEW PROGRAM

Dance Minor
Justification:
Heretofore, we have offered the Dance Minor as a Special Minor. As a part of the Dance Program accreditation process, it has been recommended by the accrediting association that we replace our special minor with a formal minor in dance.

Units required for Minor: 18
The minor requires that all courses be taken in Dance, 9 units of which must
be upper division.

Requirements:

Technique - 6 units (choose from the following)

Select one of the following:
001 Beginning Jazz
002 Beginning Modern
003 Beginning Ballet
004 Beginning Tap
006 Popular Jazz Styles

Select two of the following:
011 Intermediate Jazz
012 Intermediate Modern
013 Intermediate Ballet
014 Intermediate Tap
111 Advanced Jazz
112 Advanced Modern

Choreography - 2 units
120 Principles of Choreography

Production - 2 units
040 Basic Dance Production A

History/Cultural Studies - 3-6 units
130 Appreciation and History of Dance
131 Dance Cultures in America

Electives 2-5 units (choose from the following)
005 Mexican Folklorico Dance
041 Basic Dance Production B
121 Choreographic Form and Style
122 Dance Improvisation
132 African-Caribbean Dance
142 Dance Performance Skills
143 Dance Practicum
151 Dance Criticism
160 Creative Dance for Children


COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Department of Management

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

International Business Concentration

Justification: The International Business Concentration (IB) has been revised to improve its course structure and the effectiveness of its curriculum to prepare students. The required number of units is being reduced from 24 to 21. IB students will complete twelve (12) units of IB core instead of nine (9) units. They will gain solid fundamental nderstanding in the IB discipline. All IB students will be required to take International Business, Multinational Marketing, and Multinational Business Finance.
Cultural breadth and functional emphasis previously available for IB students are being consolidated into area emphasis. Details of the changes are provided in the supporting documentation. These changes incorporate the most recent changes in the IB discipline and ensure that IB graduates will have knowledge of current theory and practices in international business.

NEW PROGRAM

Core Courses (12 units)

(3) MGMT 172 International Business
(3) MGMT 173 Multinational Marketing
(3) MGMT 174 Multinational Business Finance

Select one course from following courses:
(3) MGMT 187 Entrepreneurship
(3) ACCY 151 International Accounting

Area Emphasis (9 units)
Select nine (9) units from one of the following areas:

A. Marketing
MGMT 121 Marketing Research and Information
MGMT 122 Buyer Behavior
MGMT123 Public Relations and Ethics in Business
MGMT 125 Advertising
MGMT 126 Salesmanship
MGMT 129 Marketing Management

B. Finance
MGMT 134 Financial Management
MGMT 135 Investments
MGMT 136 Modern Portfolio Management
MGMT 137 Financial Institutions and Markets
MGMT 138 Principles of Risk Management and Insurance

C. Accounting
ACCY 111 Intermediate Accounting I
ACCY 121 Cost Accounting
ACCY 171 Federal Tax Procedures I.

D. Operations Management
MGMT 160 Principles of Quality Management
MGMT 181 Supply Chain Logistics Management
MGMT 186 Operations Planning and Inventory Control
MGMT 188 Operations Strategy and Design

E. Economics
GEOG 141 Geography of Economic Activity
ECON 190 International Economic Relations
ECON 192 International Finance: Theory & Practice
ECON 193 Economics of Underdeveloped Countries

F. Human Resources Management
OBE 153 Management of Human Resources
OBE 155 Conflict Management and Negotiations
OBE 156 Compensation Management
OBE 157 Industrial Relations

G. Foreign Language
(9) Upper division foreign language approved by IB coordinator

H. Overseas University Study
(9) Overseas university study approved by IB coordinator

I. Special Emphasis
(9) Other area emphasis approved by IB coordinator

Total Units = 21

 

OLD PROGRAM

Core Courses (9 units)

(3) MGMT 172 International Business

(6) Select two of the following:

ACCY 151 International Accounting
MGMT 173 Multinational Marketing (MGMT 120 or instructor permission)
MGMT 174 Multinational Business Finance (MGMT 133 or instructor permission)

ELECTIVES

(9) Select one of the following:

Upper Division Foreign Language Requirements (beyond 4th semester)
Upper Division Area Studies Requirements*
Approved Overseas University Study

Successful completion of an overseas internship program may be substituted for units in any of the three areas.

(6) Select two courses from one of the following areas:

A. Marketing
MGMT 121 Marketing Research & Information
MGMT 122 Buyer Behavior
MGMT 126 Salesmanship
MGMT 129 Marketing Management

B. Finance
MGMT 134 Financial Management
MGMT 135 Investments
MGMT 137 Financial Institutions & Markets
MGMT 138 Principles of Risk Management & Insurance

C. Accounting
ACCY 160A Intermediate Accounting I
ACCY 160B Intermediate Accounting II
ACCY 161A Cost Accounting
ACCY 161B Advanced Management Accounting

D. Economics
GEOG 141 Geography of Economic Activity
ECON 190 International Economic Relations
ECON 192 International Finance: Theory & Practice
ECON 193 Economics of Underdeveloped Countries

E. Human Resources Management
OBE 153 Management of Human Resources
OBE 154 Management Skills Seminar
OBE 156 Compensation Management
OBE 157 Industrial Relations

F. Management Information Systems
MIS 102 Advanced COBOL
MIS 121 Computer-Based Information Systems
MIS 125 Microcomputers for Managers

G. Operations Management
MGMT 170 Fundamentals of Business Strategy
MGMT 187 Entrepreneurship
MGMT 188 Operations Strategy and Design

Total Units = 24


COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Department of Bilingual/Multicultural Education

NEW PROGRAM

Master of Arts in Education: Teacher Leadership in Multicultural Education and Multicultural Educators in Non-traditional Settings.
Justification:
The Bilingual/Multicultural Education Department (BMED) has revised course content, course sequencing and course names as well as created new courses in order to better meet graduate students’ needs and interests and more fully build on faculty expertise. As a result the new options in the Master of Arts in Education program offered by BMED will be Teacher Leadership in Multicultural Education and Multicultural Educators in Non-traditional Settings.

The Department of Bilingual/Multicultural Education (BMED) has redesigned its Master of Arts program based on an analysis of student professional interests and needs, the current context of public education in California and the expertise of the department faculty.

Description of the New Master of Arts Program in BMED
For the past several years, BMED has wrestled with several recurring issues in its M.A. program: a sizable group of students who make intermittent and haphazard progress through the program, a similar group that completes coursework but does not complete the culminating experience, coursework that under emphasizes concrete examination of professional practices, courses that are loosely integrated, and coursework that does not fully meet the needs of the students in the program, a portion of whom teach in public school settings as well as others who are educators in non-traditional teaching settings.
During the last two years, the Department’s graduate committee, comprised of nine department faculty, has proposed several alternatives in an attempt to address these issues. In Spring 2001, the department admitted its first group of graduate students who have progressed through the program together, allowing for more intensive advising, better articulation across courses, and more support for the culminating experience. Subsequent cohorts have been admitted in Fall 2002 and Fall 2003, and the department faculty have voted to admit M.A. students into cohorts only as a general practice. During the past year, the committee has also worked to revise existing courses and develop new courses that would address the academic and professional needs of the two groups of students that predominate in our program. These revisions have been oriented by the following design principles:

• Develop coursework for two distinct populations: public school teachers and educators in non-traditional settings. Some coursework will mix these two groups; other coursework will be designed for their distinct needs and offered separately.
• Consistent critical theory/pedagogy orientation throughout courses in the program.
• Strengthen ties between theoretical content and opportunities to experiment with and reflect on practice.
• Maximize connections between content presented across courses.
• Expose students to high quality and current research in the field across all courses.
• Expose students to important local, state and national leaders in the education and social justice/social change community, as possible.
• Provide students with multiple opportunities to analyze their professional experiences within regional, state, national and international contexts.
• Provide students with multiple opportunities throughout the program to develop a broad skill set that will enable their success as educators working for social justice.
• Structure opportunities for members of the student cohort to develop collaborative professional relationships with each other.
• Provide opportunities for graduate students to attend professional and academic events that would strengthen their connections to and knowledge of the bilingual and multicultural education fields.
• Maximize support and guidance available to students during all phases of the program, but especially the culminating experience.
The proposed BMED Master of Arts Program includes several new courses and substantial revisions to existing courses. The revised program drops the two existing options and creates two new M.A. options: Teacher Leadership in Multicultural Education (34-37 unit minimum) and Multicultural Educators in Non-traditional Settings (31-34 unit minimum).
New courses include EDBM 200, EDBM 220B, EDBM 230, EDBM 240, EDBM 245, EDBM 260, EDBM 265, EDBM 280, and EDBM 285. EDBM 200 Pro-Seminar in Bilingual and Multicultural Education is designed to provide students with an in-depth overview of the fields of bilingual and multicultural education as well as introduce them to the department faculty and their professional interests and expertise. This course will assist students in gaining an overview of critical issues in the field as well as familiarizing them with the faculty, thus facilitating their eventual selection of a thesis/project advisor. EDBM 220B Afrocentric Curriculum & Instruction focuses on an in-depth analysis of the African American experience in public schools and alternative approaches to maximizing success for these students. EDBM 240 Advanced Seminar in Methods will offer candidates opportunities to delve deeply into current literature and advanced pedagogical practices in several key areas: cooperative learning, arts in education and education in the content areas. The focus of the seminar will vary depending on students’ professional interests and the expertise of the faculty teaching it. EDBM 245A Advocacy, Change and Community will support students’ development of skills needed to create change and transformation in their community and professional settings. EDBM 245B Cultural Dialogue, Advocacy and the Development will emphasize the identification of community based educational initiatives and agendas that were successfully developed and implemented by diverse cultural groups. EDBM 260 Social and Psychological Foundations of Race and Gender among African Americans examines racial and gender dimensions of identity development among African Americans and analyzes these experiences within family, school, work, and community contexts. . EDBM 265 Project/Thesis Writing continues learning initiated in EDBM 250 on the research process and offers students targeted support during the interim stages of thesis/project research and writing. EDBM 280 Action Research for Critical Educators provides educators in public school and non-traditional settings with the tools for conducting inquiry on elements of their own practice or practices within their institutional settings. In EDBM 285 Education Policy and the Law students engage in advanced study of the significant legislation (state and federal) and legal decisions impacting educational equity efforts.
Revisions to existing courses include changes in content, sequencing and numbering of existing EDBM courses. EDBM 251 Education for a Democratic Pluralistic Society has been renumbered to EDBM 205 (same title), indicating that it is a course to be taken early in the graduate sequence. The focus has expanded from a treatment of current issues to also include study of historical contexts and events that shape public school, educational reforms and the teaching profession. EDBM 278 Theoretical Perspectives on Cross Cultural Education has been renumbered and renamed to EDBM 210 Critical Race Theory and Critical Pedagogy: Concepts and Practice, and while the focus on cross cultural education will remain, the course will deal substantially with the theoretical and applied tenets of critical race theory and critical pedagogy. EDBM 273 Research Seminar on Bilingualism and Language Varieties, EDBM 275 Assessment of the Bilingual Learner, and EDBM 277 Curriculum for Multicultural Schools will change in number and/or title only to: EDBM 235 Research Seminar on Bilingualism and Language Varieties, EDBM 230 Assessment in Multicultural Schools, and EDBM 220A Curriculum for Multicultural Schools, respectively. Currently, the department differentiates between thesis (EDBM 565) and project (EDBM 566) units. This designation causes undue confusion and complication; we will now only use one culminating experience course number: EDBM 565 Thesis/Project.
Consultation with departments within the College of Education and in other CSUS Colleges and Schools. The changes in our program do not affect other department either in the College or in the university.

Below we list the changes that are proposed for the BMED Master of Arts Program and are listed in comparison to existing program offerings described in the 2002-2004 CSUS Catalog of Courses.

Proposed Changes to the BMED Master of Arts Program

1. Make EDBM 170 a pre-requisite to the Master of Arts program, both options
2. Make Ethnic Studies 195 an additional pre-requisite to the Master of Arts program, Multicultural Educators in Non-Traditional Settings option, only.
3. Change EDBM 251, EDBM 278, EDBM 275, EDBM 277, EDBM 273 and EDBM 566 to EDBM 205, EDBM 210, EDBM 230, EDBM 220A, EDBM 235, and EDBM 565, respectively.
4. Add EDBM 200, EDBM 205, EDBM 210, EDBM 220A, EDBM 220B, EDBM 250, EDBM 230, EDBM 235, EDBM 240, EDBM 245A, EDBM 265 and EDBM 565 as requirements for all students in the Teacher Leadership in Multicultural Education option of the M.A. program.
5. Add EDBM 200, EDBM 205, EDBM 210, EDBM 220B, EDBM 250, EDBM 235, EDBM 245B, EDBM 265 and EDBM 565 as requirements for all students in the Multicultural Educators in Non-Traditional Settings option of the M.A. program.
6. Add EDBM 260, EDBM 280, and EDBM 285 as electives in the M.A. program
7. Create Teacher Leadership in Multicultural Education Option and Multicultural Educators in Non-traditional Settings Option
8. Delete Multicultural Education and Bilingual/Cross Cultural Language Development Options

**NOTE: There is no one-to-one correspondence between text in the left column (proposed program) and text in the right column (current catalog copy).

New BMED Master of Arts Program
Old BMED Master of Arts Program Options
The Bilingual/Multicultural Education Department offers two options for the Master of Arts degrees: the Teacher Leadership in Multicultural Education option and the Multicultural Educators in Non-traditional Settings option. The department invites all prospective students with a commitment to working with culturally and linguistically diverse students to consider one of the two M.A. options, after a careful review of admissions requirements and procedures. Students who are admitted to either option within the M.A. program proceed through the program in a cohort, with pre-programmed course offerings and experiences.

Admission Requirements for both M.A. options
Admission as a classified graduate student in Bilingual/Multicultural Education requires:
• A baccalaureate degree;
• A minimum 2.5 GPA in the last 60 units;
• Successful completion of EDBM 170 or its equivalent (as determined by the Graduate Coordinator);
• Proficiency in written English composition as demonstrated either by passing the CSUS Writing Proficiency Exam or equivalent, or enrolling in ENGL 109W until the WPE is passed;
• Completion and successful review of Department application (due on April 1 for Fall admission and November 1 for Spring admission); and,
• Successful interview with a faculty team. Interviews are scheduled within one month of the due date for submitting completed department applications.
• Applicants for the Teacher Leadership in Multicultural Education Option must also have a valid teaching credential.
• Concurrent enrolment in either option of the M.A. program and a teacher credential program is not permitted.
Applicants who have deficiencies in admission requirements that can be removed by specified additional preparation may be admitted with conditionally classified graduate status. Students will be notified of any deficiencies through written communication.

Admission Procedures for both M.A. options
Deadlines for submitting all application materials are: October 1st for those wishing to begin graduate studies in the Spring semester and April 1st for those wishing to begin graduate studies in the Fall semester. Prospective graduate students must file the following materials with the CSUS Office of Graduate Studies:

• An application for admission and a supplemental application for graduate admission
• One set of official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended, other than CSUS.

At the same time, each applicant must complete the following procedures with the Bilingual/Multicultural Education Department by the same due dates noted above:

• Complete and submit a department application to the Bilingual/Multicultural Education Department Office. Applications are available in this same location.
• Participate in an oral interview (applicants schedule interview upon submitting their department application). Interviews are scheduled within one month after the department and Graduate Center applications are due.
Note: A Guide to Graduate Studies: Policies, Procedures and Forms and the latest edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association are available for purchase in the Hornet Bookstore and are highly recommended for all graduate students.

Advancement to Candidacy for both M.A. options
Each student must file an application for Advancement to Candidacy indicating a proposed program of study for the M.A. The student must be advanced to candidacy prior to enrolling in EDBM 565. This procedure should begin as soon as the classified graduate student has:
• removed any deficiencies in Admission Requirements;
• completed at least 6, but not more than 12, units of courses in the graduate program (see Degree Requirements) with a minimum 3.0 GPA; and
• successfully met the University Writing Proficiency requirement.
Advancement to candidacy forms are available in the Office of Graduate Studies or the department office. The student will complete the form after planning a degree program in consultation with the Graduate Coordinator. The form must be submitted to the Bilingual/Multicultural Education Department Graduate Coordinator and the Office of Graduate Studies for approval.
Project/Thesis Registration
• Check in the department office for the policies regarding Report in Progress ("RP") grades and continuous enrollment. The culminating experience for the M.A. is a thesis or project.
• A 3-unit course is required when doing the thesis/project. Enrollment in the culminating experience may occur only after Advancement to Candidacy.
• Project/thesis course requires the student to file and have an approved Project/Thesis Petition form and Advisor Reservation form on record with the BMED at least one full semester in advance of registration. Both forms are due by March 1st for Fall enrolment and by October 1st for Spring enrolment. Failure to meet these deadlines will result in the inability to enroll in the Project/thesis course for the desired semester.
• The Project/Thesis Petition and reservation forms must be submitted to the Graduate Coordinator at least one month prior to the submission due date (i.e., February or September); the forms will then be forwarded to the Graduate Committee for review and recommendations.
• Students may enroll in the Project/Thesis course a maximum of two semesters for credit. Students must submit the Reservation Form only to continue in the Project/Thesis course for the second semester. Failure to do so will result in inability to work with the thesis/project advisor for the desired semester.
• Approved Master's Thesis/Project Format: American Psychological Association (APA) - Latest Edition.
Degree Requirements for the Teacher Leadership in Multicultural Education M.A. option
The Master of Arts in Education with the Teacher Leadership in Multicultural Education option requires completion of 34-37 units of approved coursework with a minimum 3.0 GPA. A minimum of 18 units of approved 200-series offerings must be earned, not including EDBM 299. A minimum of 24 units in 100-, 200-, and 500-series offerings must be earned in residence at CSU Sacramento. The Department does not accept units earned through Open University and they will not be credited towards the M.A. Students who completed EDBM 170 during undergraduate or teacher credential programs will be credited with fulfilling the program pre-requisite. All work must be completed within a 7-year period. An outline of degree requirements for the Teacher Leadership in Multicultural Education M.A. option follows:

REQUIREMENTS – MASTER OF ARTS – TEACHER LEADERSHIP IN MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION

A. Pre-requisite Courses (3 units)

(3) EDBM 170 Bilingual Education: Introduction to Educating English Learners

B. Required Core Courses (6 units)
(3) EDBM 205 Education for a Democratic, Pluralistic Society
(3) EDBM 250 Education Research

C. Other Course Requirements (25 units)
(1) EDBM 200 Pro-seminar in Bilingual & Multicultural Education
(3) EDBM 210 Critical Race Theory and Critical Pedagogy: Concepts and Practice
(3) EDBM 220A Curriculum for multicultural schools
(3) EDBM 220B: Afrocentric Curriculum & Instruction
(3) EDBM 230 Assessment in multicultural schools
(3) EDBM 235 Research Seminar on Bilingualism and Language Varieties
(3) EDBM 240 Advanced Seminar in Teaching Strategies for Multicultural Schools
(3) EDBM 245A: Advocacy, Change and Community
(3) EDBM 265: Project/Thesis Writing

D. Culminating Experience (3-6 units)

(3-6) EDBM 565 MA Thesis/Project (EDBM 250, advancement to candidacy, and permission of the Graduate Coordinator one semester prior to registration)

Total Required Units: 34-37

E. Other Elective Courses

(3) EDBM 260 Social and Psychological Foundations of Race and Gender among African Americans
(3) EDBM 280 Action Research for Critical Educators
(3) EDBM 285 Education Policy and the Law
(3) EDLP 218 Computers and Technology in Educational Administration

Degree Requirements
The Master of Arts in Education with a Multicultural Educators in Non-traditional Settings option requires completion of 31-34 units of approved coursework with a minimum 3.0 GPA. A minimum of 18 units of 200-series offerings must be earned, not including EDBM 299. A minimum of 24 units in 100-, 200-, and 500-series offerings must be earned in residence at CSU Sacramento. Units earned through Open University will not be credited towards the M.A. Students who completed EDBM 170 during undergraduate or teacher credential programs will be credited with fulfilling the program pre-requisite. All work must be completed within a 7-year period. An outline of degree requirements for the Multicultural Educators in Non-traditional Settings M.A. option follows:

REQUIREMENTS – MASTER OF ARTS –MULTICULTURAL EDUCATORS IN NON-TRADITIONAL SETTINGS

A. Pre-requisite Courses (6 units)

(3) EDBM 170 Bilingual Education: Introduction to Educating English Learners
(3) ETHN 195 Field Work Ethnic Studies

B. Required Core Courses (6 units)

(3) EDBM 205 Education for a Democratic Pluralistic Society
(3) EDBM 250 Education Research

C. Other Course Requirements (16 units)
(1) EDBM 200 Pro-seminar in bilingual & multicultural education
(3) EDBM 210 Critical Race Theory and Critical Pedagogy: Concepts & Practice
(3) EDBM 220B Afro-centric Curriculum & Instruction
(3) EDBM 235 Research Seminar on Bilingualism and Language Varieties
(3) EDBM 245B Cultural Dialogue, Advocacy and the Development of Community Based Educational Programs
(3) EDBM 265: Project/Thesis Writing

D. Other Elective Courses (at least 6 units). Students may choose from department offerings listed below or from courses in other departments with approval from the Graduate Coordinator
(3) EDBM 260 Social and Psychological Foundations of Race and Gender among African Americans
(3) EDBM 280 Action Research for Critical Educators
(3) EDBM 285 Education Policy and the Law
(3) EDLP 218 Computers and Technology in Educational Administration

E. Culminating Experience (3-6 units)

(3-6) EDBM 565 MA Thesis/Project (EDBM 250, advancement to candidacy, and permission of the Graduate Coordinator one semester prior to registration)

Total required units: 31-34

The Bilingual/Cross-cultural Language Development and Multicultural Master of Arts is designed so that the courses are compatible with various versions of the CLAD or BCLAD Credential/Certificate.

The Multicultural Education Master of Arts is flexible. Anyone with a Bachelor's degree who is interested in the field of Multicultural Education is welcome to apply for admission to this program.

Note: Several courses offered as part of CLAD by Course Work can be applied to either graduate program.

Note: Current program offerings are being modified. Consult Department for specifics, including course sequencing and prerequisites.
Admission Requirements and Procedures
Department of Bilingual/Multicultural Education graduate programs require:
• a baccalaureate degree;
• a minimum 2.5 overall GPA;
• a University Graduate Studies Application completed and submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies [Riverfront Center 206, phone: (916) 278-6470]
• Departmental Application filled out and delivered to the department (you may pick up a copy in the Department office, Eureka Hall 435D); and
• successful completion of oral interview. You are notified for this interview after you submit the departmental application. The interviews take place in late Fall and Spring.
Admission Procedures
Applications are accepted as long as room for new students exists. However, students are required to apply by June 1 for the following Fall or December 1 for the following Spring in order to allow time for admission before Computer Access Student Phone Entry Registration (CASPER). All prospective graduate students, including CSUS graduates and CLAD through course work candidates, must file the following with the CSUS Office of Graduate Studies, River Front Center 206.
• an application for graduate admission using the "Graduate Post-baccalaureate Admission" form, also known as the "University Graduate Application;" and
• two sets of official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended, other than CSUS.
Approximately six weeks after receipt of all items listed above, a decision regarding admission will be mailed to the applicant.
Note: The CLAD through course work is an exception and does not require the departmental application or an interview unless the student is pursuing an MA degree at the same time.
Note: A Guide to Graduate Studies: Policies, Procedures and Format, is available for purchase in the Hornet Bookstore and is highly recommended for all graduate students.
Advancement to Candidacy
Each student must file an application for Advancement to Candidacy indicating a proposed program of study for the MA. This procedure should begin as soon as the classified graduate student has:
• removed any deficiencies in Admission Requirements;
• completed at least 6, but not more than 12, units of courses in the graduate program (see Degree Requirements) with a minimum 3.0 GPA; and
• successfully met the University Writing Proficiency requirement.
Advancement to candidacy forms are available in the Office of Graduate Studies or the department office. The student will complete the form after planning a degree program in consultation with a program faculty advisor (as assigned by the department Graduate Coordinator). The form must be submitted to the Bilingual/Multicultural Education department office for approval.
Project/Thesis Registration
• Check in the department office for the policies regarding Report in Progress ("RP") grades and continuous enrollment. The culminating experience for the MA may be a thesis, project or comprehensive examination.
• A 3-unit course is required when doing the thesis/project. The topic must be selected with advisor approval. Enrollment in the culminating experience may occur only after Advancement to Candidacy.
• For the Comprehensive Examination, you may need to complete an additional three units selected in consultation with an advisor to replace the three units of thesis/project. The Comprehensive Examination may be taken a total of three times, but never more than once in any one semester. The first and/or second try may result in additional course work required.
• Approved Master's Thesis/Project Format: American Psychological Association (APA) - Latest Edition. Project and thesis courses require the student to file and have an approved Project Petition at least one full semester in advance of registration. The reservation form for Fall semester is due by March and the reservation form for Spring is due by October. The petition requires the advisor and Department Chair approval.


GRADUATE PROGRAMS

The Bilingual/Cross-cultural Language Development and Multicultural Master of Arts is designed so that the courses are compatible with various versions of the CLAD or BCLAD Credential/Certificate.

The Multicultural Education Master of Arts is flexible. Anyone with a Bachelor’s degree who is interested in the field of Multicultural Education is welcome to apply for admission to this program.

Note: Several courses offered as part of CLAD by Course Work can be applied to either graduate program.

Note: Current program offerings are being modified. Consult Department for specifics, including course sequencing and prerequisites.

Admissions Requirements and Procedures

Department of Bilingual/Multicultural Education graduate programs require:

• a baccalaureate degree;
• a minimum 2.5 overall GPA;
• a University Graduate Studies Application completed and submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies [Riverfront Center 206, phone: (916) 278-6470]
• Departmental Application filled out and delivered to the department (you may pick up a copy in the Department office, Eureka Hall 435D); and
• successful completion of oral interview. The interviews take place in late Fall and Spring.

Admission Procedures

Applications are accepted as long as room for new students exists. However, student are required to apply by June 1 for the following Fall or December 1 for the following Spring in order to allow time for admission before Computer Access Student Phone Entry Registration (CASPER). All prospective graduate students, including CSUS graduates and CLAD through course work candidates, must file the following with the CSUS Office of Graduate Studies, River Front Center 206.

• an application for graduate admission using the “Graduate Post-baccalaureate Admission” form, also known as the “University Graduate Application;” and
• two sets of official transcripts form all colleges and universities attended, other than CSUS.

Approximately six weeks after receipt of all items listed above, a decision regarding admission will be mailed to the applicant.

Note: The CLAD through course work is an exception and does not require the departmental application or an interview unless the student is pursuing an MA degree at the same time.

(3) EDBM 270 Methods and Materials in
Bilingual Education

(3) EDBM 273 Research Seminar in
Bilingualism and Language
Varieties in Education

(3) EDBM 275 The Assessment of
Bilingual Learners

(3) EDBM 277 Curriculum for Multicultural
Schools (ED 252 or
instructor permission)

(3) EDBM 278 Theoretical Perspectives on
Crosscultural Education

(3) EDBM 471 Advanced Fieldwork in
Bilingual/Crosscultural
Education

C. Recommended Electives (3-6 units)

(3) EDBM 170 Bilingual Education:
Introduction to Educating
English Learners OR

EDBM 272A Curriculum and Methods for
Developing Language and
Literacy in the Bilingual
Child-Spanish (EDBM 170
and a reading course in
teacher preparation program
or equivalent) OR

EDBM 279 Methods in Teaching a
Second Language
(EDBM170)

D. Culminating Experience (0-3 units)

(3) EDBM 565 MA Thesis (EDBM 250)
OR

EDBM 566 MA Project (EDBM 250)
OR

Comprehensive MA
Examination (written and
oral)*

* EDBM 276 (Advanced Seminar in Bilingual/Cross-cultural Education) may be helpful in preparing for the comprehensive MA examination.

REQUIREMENTS – MASTER OF ARTS – MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION

A teaching credential is not required for this MA which focuses on Multicultural Education. The MA student, in conjunction with an advisor, can choose a program of electives from one of the academic disciplines closely related to education, (e.g. linguistics, psychology, ethnic studies, curriculum and instruction) or choose a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of a Multicultural Education issue. This program is designed to be flexible.

A. Required Core Courses (6 units)

(3) EDBM 250 Education Research

(3) EDBM 251 Education for a Democratic,
Pluralistic Society

B. Other Course Requirements (9 units)

(3) EDBM 170 Introduction to Bilingual
Education

(3) EDBM 277 Curriculum for
Multicultural Schools (ED
252 or instructor
permission)

(3) EDBM 278 Theoretical Perspectives on
Cross-cultural Education

C. Language Acquisition Requirement (3 units)

(3) EDBM 273 Research Seminar in
Bilingualism and Language
Varieties in Education OR

EDBM 279 Methods in Teaching a
Second Language (EDBM
170)

D. Other Elective Courses (9-12 units) in consultation with MA advisor

E. Culminating Experience (0-3 units)

(3) EDBM 565 MA Thesis (EDBM 250 and
permission of the
Department Chair one
semester prior to
registration.) OR

EDBM 566 MA Project (EDBM 250 and
permission of the
Department Chair one
semester prior to
registration.) OR

Comprehensive MA Examination (written
and oral)*

* EDBM 276 (Advanced Seminar in Bilingual/Cross-cultural Education) may be helpful in preparing for the comprehensive MA examination.

PROGRAM DELETION

Master of Arts in Education: Multicultural Education and Bilingual/Cross-cultural Language Development Leadership
Justification:
The Bilingual/Multicultural Education Department (BMED) has revised course content, course sequencing and course names as well as created new courses in order to better meet graduate students’ needs and interests and more fully build on faculty expertise. As a result the existing options in the Master of Arts in Education program offered by BMED will be deleted. These options are: Multicultural Education and Bilingual/Cross-cultural Language Development Leadership.


Department of Child Development

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

M.A. in Education – Early Childhood Education
Justification:
The proposed program change is designed to add important content to the required foundations section of the program. In addition, some content currently in the required foundations belongs more appropriately in the list of core choice courses:
1.The current program does not include coursework in the required foundation courses which addresses developmental theory, research and the application of this research to educational and community settings. This change adds a new course (CHDV 242, Advanced Child Development) to the required foundation courses which emphasizes developmental theory and research in all areas of Child Development.
2.CHDV 214, Assessment of Text, Context and Learners, will be moved from the foundation courses to the set of core courses from which students can choose, where it more appropriately fits into the program.
3.The content of CHDV 251 is being broadened to include a focus on developmental issues, and to address the diversity of career interests and directions of ECE M.A. students.
4.CHDV 247 will now focus more closely on theoretical and applied perspectives of cross cultural development. Content in this course related to socio-political influences on education will be incorporated into the required CHDV 251 course.
I. Overview of Proposed Changes: Effective Spring, 2004
1) Move CHDV 214 from (required) foundation to core courses
2) Add CHDV 242 (Advanced Child Development) to (required) foundation courses
3) Change course descriptions/titles for CHDV 247 and CHDV 251
II. Comparison of Current and Proposed Programs
A. Required (Foundation) Courses (9 units):

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
CHDV 250 – Education Research (3 units) CHDV 250 - Education Research (3 units)
EDTE 251 - Education for a Democratic, Pluralistic Society (3 units) CHDV 251 – Development and Education for a Democratic, Pluralistic Society
CHDV 214 - Assessment of Text, Context and Learners (3 units). Moved to core courses
  CHDV 242 – Advanced Child Development (3 units)

B. Core Course Requirements (students choose 12 units):

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
Select four of the following: Select four of the following:

CHDV 245 - Selected Topics in Childhood Development (3 units) CHDV 245 - Selected Topics in Childhood Development (3 units)
CHDV 246 - Motivation and Learning in Children (3 units). CHDV 246 - Motivation and Learning in Children (3 units).
CHDV 247 - Theoretical and Applied Perspectives on Cultural Diversity (3 units). CHDV 247 - Theoretical and Applied Perspectives on Cross Cultural Development (3 units).
CHDV 248 - Curriculum and Instruction (3 units).. CHDV 248 - Curriculum and Instruction (3 units)..
EDS 290 - Issues in Early Childhood Education for Children with Disabilities (3 units).. EDS 290 - Issues in Early Childhood Education for Children with Disabilities (3 units)..
CHDV 249 - Language and Cognitive Development: Implications for Learning and Instruction (3 units). CHDV 249 - Language and Cognitive Development: Implications for Learning and Instruction (3 units).
  CHDV 214 - Assessment of Text, Context and Learners (3 units). (moved from foundation courses)

C. Elective (3 units) NO PROPOSED CHANGE

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
(3) Select 3 upper division or graduate units in Education selected with approval of an Early Childhood Education advisor. (3) Select 3 upper division or graduate units in Education selected with approval of an Early Childhood Education advisor.


D. Culminating Requirement (6 units) NO PROPOSEDCHANGES

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
CHDV 290 - Seminar for Culminating Experience (3 units). CHDV 290 - Seminar for Culminating Experience (3 units)
CHDV 504 - Culminating Experience: Early Childhood Education (3 units). CHDV 504 - Culminating Experience: Early Childhood Education (3 units).

 

Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation and School Psychology

PROGRAM DELETION

Master of Science in Counseling (School Psychology)
Justification: The Master of Arts in Education (School Psychology) was adopted to meet state and national accreditation recommendations and the requirements of practicing School Psychologists in today’s schools. The Master of Science in Counseling (School Psychology) is no longer needed. Students presently in the M.S. Program will be able to finish and graduate.


Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation and School Psychology

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGES

Master of Arts in Education (Curriculum and Instruction)
Justification: Fifteen units of required seminar courses (1/2 of the total units) would be required in Department of Teacher Education Courses. Up to this point, the Department has been only recommending that students take the Culminating Seminar. This has been found to be an excellent venue to pull together all of the content learned from the previous seminars and elective courses toward the goal of defining the research and strategies they will use for their individual thesis or project. A complete description the the course follows: “Course needed to provide students with the following topics: defining and narrowing a topic for study; abstract writing; differentiation of primary/secondary sources of evidence; development of organizational schemes for a literature review; computer searching; format requirements; time management; range and breadth of evidence for an adequately comprehensive review; connecting the review and project/thesis; writing style and quality; revisions and critical feedback; social/psychological dimensions of thesis/project process; data analysis and statistics help on campus for thesis.”

NEW PROGRAM
OLD PROGRAM
A. Required Courses (15 units)

(3) EDTE 250 Education Research (Graduate Standing)
[EDTE 250 is to be taken as one of the first 9 units of the program.]


(3) EDTE 251 Education for a Democratic, Pluralistic
Society (Graduate Standing)


(3) EDTE 226 Seminar: Strategies for Teachers


(3) EDTE 227 Seminar in Curriculum and Instruction, K-12
[EDTE_227 is to be taken as one of the last
9 units of the program.]


(3) EDTE 290 Seminar for Culminating Experience (permission of instructor)

A. Other Course Requirements (12 units)

Fifteen Twelve elective units in Curriculum and Instruction coursework are to be selected from Department of Teacher Education courses by the student in consultation with a program advisor. Students may focus their elective units in a program of their interest or select courses from various programs. Examples of Curriculum and Instruction elective programs include: Computers in the Classroom, Mathematics Education, Multi-cultural Education, Reading/English/ Language Arts, Women in Education, and Arts in Education (offered in cohorted groups only). With advisor approval, program courses may include one of the following:
3 transfer elective units
3 units of 300-level methods courses
3 units of extension credit


 

 

C. Culminating Requirement (3 units)

(3) EDTE 505 Culminating Experience: Curriculum
and Instruction (Prerequisites: EDTE 250 and
EDTE or CHDV 290)

A. Required Courses (12 units)

(3) EDTE 250 Education Research (Graduate Standing) [EDTE 250 is to be taken as one of the first
9 units of the program.]

(3) EDTE 251 Education for a Democratic, Pluralistic Society (Graduate Standing)

(3) EDTE 226 Seminar: Strategies for Teachers

(3) EDTE 227 Seminar in Curriculum and Instruction, K-12 [EDTE 227 is to be taken as one of the last
9 units of the program.]

B. Other Course Requirements (15 units)

Fifteen Twelve elective units in Curriculum and Instruction coursework are to be selected from Department of Teacher Education courses by the student in consultation with a program advisor. Students may focus their elective units in a program of
their interest or select courses from various programs. Examples of Curriculum and Instruction elective programs include: Computers in the Classroom, Mathematics Education, Multicultural Education, Reading/English/ Language Arts, and Women in Education. With advisor approval, program courses may include one of the following:

3 transfer elective units
3 units of 300-level methods courses
3 units of extension credit

C. Culminating Requirements (3 units)

(3) EDTE 505 Culminating Experience: Curriculum and Instruction (Prerequisite: EDTE 250)

 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

Department of Civil Engineering

NEW PROGRAM

Graduate Certificate Program in Civil Engineering
Justification:
A graduate certificate program is needed to meet the demand of specialization by practicing engineering within greater Sacramento area. The program is designed to issue a graduate certificate to participants in the program after taking a number of graduate classes specified for each specialty area (see attached description). The program is available for students who are admitted in the graduate program.

The description and the requirements of the proposed program are shown in the attached document. This program is developed to meet the needs of practicing engineers. Professional engineers in most cases have no time to allocate for completing their Masters degree. However, they are interested in developing their skills in their specialty area. This program is designed to capture this demand and offer a program that is needed by the professional community. The program benefits are:
1) Strengthen the department’s ties to the professional community by demonstrating our willingness to be responsive to our community needs,
2) Strengthen the graduate program by recruiting potential graduate students that could be interested in continuing their masters degree,
3) Shorten the graduation time for graduate students because of more frequent offering of graduate classes, and
4) Improve the cost of offering graduate classes by increasing enrollment in graduate classes.

Potentially, the graduate certificate program could grow to a point that the department may need to offer some of the classes more frequently. In such case, the department may need to grow gradually to about 18 faculty members (the size of the department in mid 80s). At this point, the department cannot predict the growth rate of the graduate certificate program. The most likely scenario is that the enrollment will be stronger than our current enrollment and will allow us to offer the graduate classes.

The graduate certificate program in civil engineering is designed to recognize students who have completed core graduate courses in a specialty area in civil engineering. This program meets the need of professional engineers that are interested in sharpening their skills in their specialty area. The certificate program is available to matriculated students in the CE graduate program. A grade point average of 3.0 must be attained for all courses taken in the program. Certificates in the following areas are offered:

Environmental Engineering:

(1) Treatment Systems Certificate – ENGR 203, CE 252 A, CE 252B, and CE 252C.
(2) Water Quality Certificate – ENGR 203, CE 250, CE 252 A, and CE 254.
(3) Geo-Environmental Certificate – ENGR 203, CE 181, CE 252A, and CE 255.

Geotechnical Engineering:

(1) Foundation Engineering Certificate – CE 280A, CE 280B, CE 280C and CE 284.
(2) Ground Modification Certificate – ENGR 203, CE 283, CE 285, and CE 286.

Structural Engineering:

(1) Structural Engineering Certificate – CE 231A, CE 232, CE 234, and CE 266.

Transportation Engineering:

(1) Transportation Planning Certificate – ENGR 203, CE 250, CE 261, and CE 262.
(2) Traffic Engineering Certificate – ENGR 203, CE 250, CE 263, and CE 265.


Water Resources Engineering:

(1) Water Resources Planning Certificate – ENGR 203, CE 250, CE 251, and CE 271
(2) Engineering Hydraulics Certificate – ENGR 203, CE 272, CE 274, and CE 276


Department of Computer Science

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Certificate Program in Software Engineering
Justification:
Retaining the 9-unit requirement, make CSC 230 an optional course instead of a required course and add three additional optional courses, CSC 235, CSC 236, and CSC 238. Students would be able to take any three of the following courses: CSC 230, CSC 231, CSC 232, CSC 233, CSC 234, CSC 235, CSC 236, and CSC 238. Students would have more flexibility in fulfilling the certificate requirement. Also, the additional courses were developed after the Software Engineering Certificate was initially approved.

NEW PROGRAM
OLD PROGRAM

Certificate in Software Engineering (9 units)

(9) Select at least three of the following:

+++ CSC 230 Software System Engineering
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++(Fully classified
graduate standing in Computer Science
or Software Engineering)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

CSC 231 Software Engineering Metrics
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++
(Fully classified graduate standing
in Computer Science or
Software Engineering)

CSC 232 Software Requirements Analysis
and Design +++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
(Fully classified graduate
standing in Computer Science or
Software Engineering)

CSC 233 Advanced Software Engineering
Project Management +++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
(Fully classified graduate standing
in Computer Science or
Software Engineering)

CSC 234 Software Verification and
Validation ++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(Fully classified graduate
standing in Computer Science or
Software Engineering)

CSC 235 Software Architecture (Fully
classified graduate standing in
Computer Science or Software Engineering)

CSC 236 Formal Methods in Software
Engineering (Fully classified
graduate standing in Computer
Science or Software Engineering)

CSC 238 Human-Computer Interface
Design (Fully classified graduate
standing in Computer Science or
Software Engineering)

CSC 288D Special Topics in Computer
Science – Software Engineering
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++ (Fully classified
graduate standing in Computer
Science or Software Engineering)

Certificate in Software Engineering (9 units)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

(3) CSC 230 Software System Engineering
(CSC 131 or equivalent
experience in software
development) +++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++

(6) Select at least two of the following:

CSC 231 Software Engineering Metrics
(Two years of industrial
experience in software
development or CSC 230)
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++

CSC 232 Software Requirements Analysis
and Design (Two years of
industrial experience in software
development or CSC 230)
++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++

CSC 233 Advanced Software Engineering
Project Management (Two years
of industrial experience in
software development or CSC
230) +++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++

CSC 234 Software Verification and
Validation ( Two years of
industrial experience in software
development or CSC 230) +++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++

++++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++++

++++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++

++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++

CSC 288D Special Topics in Computer
Science – Software Engineering
(Fully classified graduate status
or instructor permission) ++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++


M.S. in Computer Science

Justification:
In section B, “Breadth Requirement,” in the area of Intelligent Systems, add course options CSC 214 and CSC 219; in the area of Software Engineering, add course options CSC 231, CSC 232, CSC 233, CSC 234, CSC 235, CSC 236, and CSC 238. In both areas, only one course was previously listed and students have found it difficult to fulfill the breadth requirement with these areas. These additions would provide more flexibility for students to select courses which better suit their backgrounds, interests, and educational needs.

NEW PROGRAM
OLD PROGRAM
B. Breadth Requirement (9 units)

Select one course from three of the following areas:

Software Engineering

CSC 230 Software System Engineering +++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ (Fully classified graduate standing in Computer Science or Software Engineering)

CSC 231 Software Engineering Metrics (Fully
classified graduate standing in
Computer Science or Software
Engineering)

CSC 232 Software Requirements Analysis and
Design (Fully classified graduate
standing in Computer Science or
Software Engineering)

CSC 233 Advanced Software Engineering
Project Management (Fully classified graduate
standing in Computer Science or
Software Engineering)

CSC 234 Software Verification and Validation
(Fully classified graduate standing in
Computer Science or Software
Engineering)

CSC 235 Software Architecture (Fully classified
graduate standing in Computer Science
or Software Engineering)

CSC 236 Formal Methods in Software
Engineering (Fully classified graduate
standing in Computer Science or
Software Engineering)

CSC 238 Human-Computer Interface Design
(Fully classified graduate standing in
Computer Science or Software
Engineering)

System Software

CSC 239 Advanced Operating System Principles
and Design (CSC 205)

CSC 246 Principles of Concurrent Programming
(MATH 101, CSC 139; or fully
classified graduate standing in
Computer Science or Software
Engineering)

CSC 250 Computer Security and Privacy (fully
classified graduate standing in
Computer Science or Software
Engineering)

CSC 251 Principles of Compiler Design (CSC
151 or CSC 201)


Intelligent Systems

CSC 214 Knowledge-Based Systems (fully
classified graduate standing in
Computer Science or Software
Engineering)

CSC 215 Artificial Intelligence (fully
classified graduate standing in
Computer Science or Software
Engineering)

CSC 219 Machine Learning (fully classified
graduate standing in Computer
Science or Software Engineering)

Database Management Systems

CSC 244 Database ++++++++ Design
(CSC 174 or CSC 204)

Networks and Communications

CSC 255 Computer Networks (CSC 138 or
CPE 138 +++++++++)

CSC 258 Distributed Systems (CSC 138,
CPE 138, or CSC 205; fully
classified graduate standing in
Computer Science or Software
Engineering)

CSC 275 Advanced Data Communication
Systems (CSC 138 or CPE 138 or
CSC 205 ++++++++++++++++)

Computer Architecture/Computer Engineering

CSC 237 Microprocessor Systems
Architecture (CSC 205)

CSC 242 Computer-Aided Design
Methodology for Computer
Systems (CSC 205)

CSC 273 Hierarchical Digital Design
Methodology (CSC 205, CPE 064
or equivalent)

CSC 280 Advanced Computer Architecture
(CSC 205 and fully classified
graduate standing in Computer
Science or Software Engineering)

B. Breadth Requirement (9 units)

Select one course from three of the following areas:

Software Engineering

CSC 230 Software System Engineering (CSC
131 or equivalent experience in
software development) +++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++

++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++

++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++

++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++

++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++

++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++

++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++

System Software

CSC 239 Advanced Operating System Principles
and Design (CSC 205)

CSC 246 Principles of Concurrent Programming
(MATH 101, CSC 139; or fully
classified graduate standing ++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++)

CSC 250 Computer Security and Privacy (fully
classified graduate standing ++ ++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++
++++++++)

CSC 251 Principles of Compiler Design (CSC
151 or CSC 201)


Intelligent Systems

++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++

CSC 215 Artificial Intelligence (fully
classified graduate standing in
Computer Science or Software
Engineering)

++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++

Database Management Systems

CSC 244 ++++++++ Data Base Design
(CSC 174 or CSC 204)

Networks and Communications

CSC 255 Computer Networks (CSC 138, ++
CPE 138 or instructor permission)

CSC 258 Distributed Systems (CSC 138
+++++++ or CSC 205; fully
classified graduate standing ++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++)

CSC 275 Advanced Data Communication
Systems (CSC 138, ++ CPE 138, ++
CSC 205 or instructor permission)

Computer Architecture/Computer Engineering

CSC 237 Microprocessor Systems
Architecture (CSC 205)

CSC 242 Computer-Aided Design
Methodology for Computer
Systems (CSC 205)

CSC 273 Hierarchical Digital Design
Methodology (CSC 205, CPE 064
or equivalent)

CSC 280 Advanced Computer Architecture
(++++++++++ Fully classified
graduate standing ++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++)


Construction Management Program

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Bachelor of Science Construction Management, Minor in Business Admin.
Justification: A. Changes for program improvement.
1. Re-sequence catalog copy to provide agreement with program flowchart and to provide a traditional Fall Start-Spring Graduation to minimize confusion and reduce time to graduation.
2. Add prerequisites of ENGL 001A and CM 010 to CM 020 to increase successful completion rate of students in this required class.
3. Require OBE 117 instead of choice of OBE 117 or OBE 130 to meet new accreditation requirement of a minimum of 15 hours instruction in ethics and also reduce total units required for graduation.
4. Replace BIOS 005 with ENVS 010 to provide a more relevant class for CM majors.
B. Changes relating to the Business Minor.
1. Replace OBE 018 by OBE 118 as per revision to the Business Minor by the College of Bus. Admin.
2. Replace MIS 001A, B, & C with competency requirement to maintain conformity with College of Business Administration and reduce total units required for graduation.
CHANGES DO NOT REQUIRE ANY ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

NEW PROGRAM
OLD PROGRAM

Lower Division Premajor: 33 units
Business Minor: 9 units
Upper division Major: 42 units
Business Minor: 15 units
Minimum total units for the BS: 132
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
A. Required Lower Division Courses (Pre-major)
1. First Semester Freshman Year – Fall (16 units)

(3) CE 009 Plane and Topographic Surveying (MATH 026A or MATH 030; may be taken concurrently)
(3) MATH 026A* Calculus I for the Social and Life
Sciences (MATH 011 or three years of high school
mathematics which includes two years of algebra and
one year of geometry; completion of ELM requirement and the Intermediate Algebra Diagnostic Test) OR
MATH 030* Calculus I (MATH 029 or four years
of high school mathematics which includes two years
of algebra, one year of geometry, and one year of
mathematical analysis; completion of ELM
requirement and Pre-Calculus Diagnostic Test )
(1) CM 010 The Construction Industry

(3) ENGL 001A* College Composition
(EPT score of 151 or above, or completion
of ENGL 001)
(3) ECON 001A* Introduction to Macroeconomic
Analysis OR
ECON 001B* Introduction to Microeconomic Analysis

(3) General Education Course

+++++++++++++++++++++++++


2. Second Semester Freshman Year - Spring (16 units)

(4) PHYS 005A* General Physics: Mechanics, Heat, Sound [Recently completed three years of high school algebra and geometry; and a college course in algebra and trigonometry (MATH 009 recommended) for those having an inadequate mathematics background]
(3) MATH 026B* Calculus II for the Social and Life Sciences (MATH 026A or appropriate high school based AP credit) OR
MATH 031* Calculus II (MATH 030 or appropriate high school based AP credit )
(3) CM 020 Construction Materials and Processes (CM 010, ENGL 001A)
(3) ACCY 001 Accounting Fundamentals
(3) ENGL 020* Expository Writing
(ENGL 001A with a grade C- or better, or equivalent ) OR
ENGL 020T* Expository Writing - Technical
Communications
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
3. First Semester Sophomore Year - Fall (16 units)
(4) PHYS 005B* General Physics: Light, Electricity
and Magnetism, Modern Physics (PHYS 005A
or instructor permission)
(3) CM 040 Properties of Construction Materials
(CM 020, PHYS 005A)
(3) CM 021 Construction Graphics (CM 020,
competence in mechanical drawing)
(3) ACCY 002* Managerial Accounting (ACCY 001)
(3) General Education Course
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
4. Second Semester Sophomore Year -
Spring (18 units)

(3) CM 030 Engineering Mechanics--Statics
(CM 021, MATH 026B, PHYS 005A; MATH 026B may be taken concurrently, )
(3) CM 022 Construction Documents (CM 010, CM 021)
(3) STAT 001*
Introduction to Statistics (MATH 009 or three years of high school mathematics which includes two years of algebra and one year of geometry; completion of ELM requirement and the Intermediate Algebra Diagnostic Test)
(3) COMS 004* Introduction to Public Speaking OR
COMS 005* The Communication Experience
(3) General Education Course


(3) ENVS 010* Environmental Science
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
*Indicates courses that can also be used to satisfy General Education requirements. For the degree, students must satisfy all the University's General Education requirements for Construction Management. Students should contact the program office for a complete list of these requirements. A second year foreign language course (2A or equivalent) may also satisfy 3 units of GE when the course is being
taken to comply with the CSUS foreign language
requirement. Students should consult with an
advisor for exact GE eligibility of these courses.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Notes:
• High school chemistry (one year), mechanical
drawing (one year), and trigonometry (one-half year)
also required. Students without this high school
preparation must take the necessary courses
in addition to those listed above.
• The recommended course sequence in
lower division may change. Students should
consult the Civil Engineering Department for
current information.

Computer Literacy and Competency
All majors and pre-majors shall demonstrate
computer literacy and competency prior to
taking 100-level construction management or
business courses. This requires passing scores
on examinations as administered by the College
of Business Administration in each of the following areas:
• Elements of microcomputer hardware and
systems software for PC compatible computers, a
nd use of internet browsers (covered in MIS 001A).
• Basic facility with spreadsheets using the College
of Business Administration's standard
spreadsheet package (covered in MIS 001B).
• Word processing and presentation graphics
(covered in MIS 001C). ++++++++++++++++++++++++++
B. Required Upper Division Courses (Major)
Upper division Construction Management courses are open only to students who have satisfactorily completed all required lower division preparation and have been admitted to the major. Lower division prerequisites are noted below only to show the relationship of the subjects

1. First Semester Junior Year – Fall (18 units)
(3) CM 130 Structures I - Design Principles and Structural Steel Design (CM 030, CM 040)
(3) CM 136 Principles of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering (PHYS 005B, CM 030)
(3) CM 121 Fundamentals of Construction Estimating (CM 022; Corequisite: CM 120)
(3) CM 120 Construction Operations and Methods Analysis (CM 022)
(3) OBE 118 Legal Environment of Business
(3) OBE 117* Business, Ethics, and Society
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

2. Second Semester Junior Year - Spring (15 units)
(3) CM 140 Structures II - Timber and Formwork Design (CM 130)
(3) CM 135 Soils and Foundations (CM 130)
(3) CM 125 Advanced Estimating and
Bidding (CM 121)
(3) CM 127 Planning, Scheduling and
Control (CM 120, CM 121)
(3) CM 111 Construction Labor Relations
++++++++++++++++++++++++++
3. First Semester Senior Year - Fall (18 units)

(3) CM 150 Structures III - Concrete and Masonry (CM 140)
(3) CM 124 Engineering Construction (CM 125, CM 135)
(3) CM 126 Construction Project Management (CM 125, CM 127)
(3) CM 110 Legal Aspects of Construction (OBE 118, CM 022)
(3) OBE 150 The Management of Contemporary Organizations
(3) General Education Course
+++++++++++++++++++++++

4. Second Semester Senior Year - Spring (15 units)
(3) CM 129* Construction Management (CM 110, CM 111, CM 124, CM 126, OBE 150)
(3) BA Elective A 100-level Business Administration course

(3) Select one of the following
MGMT 120 Principles of Marketing
MGMT 133 Business Finance
MGMT 180 Operations Management
(3) General Education Course
(3) General Education Course
++++++++++++++++++++++++++
*Indicates courses that also can be used to satisfy General Education requirements. For the degree, students must satisfy all the University's General Education requirements for Construction Management. Students should contact the program office for a complete list of these requirements
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Note: Business Administration lower and upper division courses apply both to the major and to a Business Administration minor. Students interested in pursuing a pre-MBA sequence should contact the Degree Program Center in the College of Business Administration
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Mechanical-Electrical-Environmental Elective Sequence
For a limited number of students who specifically plan careers in mechanical or electrical contracting, or in environmental remediation it may be possible to arrange a different sequence of courses in the engineering fundamentals component. Subject to space being available in the MET, EE and CE courses, and subject to approval by the departments involved, courses selected from the mechanical, electrical and civil engineering curriculum can be substituted for certain upper division courses in the construction management curriculum.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Cooperative Education
Students are encouraged to participate in the Cooperative Education Program which provides alternate periods of study at the University and practical work experience in industry or government for pay. Most participants of the Co-op plan will complete one six-month work period in their j unior year and the other in their senior year.
Academic credit is granted for successful completion of the Co-op phase. Students interested in the Cooperative Education Program should apply in the satellite office in
Riverside Hall 2004 or the main office in
Lassen Hall 2008. For information call 278-7234.

Lower Division Premajor: 33 units
Business Minor: 15 units
Upper division Major: 42 units
Business Minor: 12 units
Minimum total units for the BS: 139
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
A. Required Lower Division Courses (Pre-major)
1. First Semester Freshman Year – Spring (16 units)

(3) ENGL 001A* College Composition (EPT score of 151
or above, or completion of ENGL 001)
(1) MIS 001A Microcomputer Hardware and Software
(1) MIS 001B Spreadsheets (MIS 001A, instructor
permission, or a passing score on the MIS 001A
competency examination)
(1) MIS 001C Word Processing and Presentation
Graphics (MIS 001A, instructor permission, or a
passing score on the MIS 001A competency examination)
(3) MATH 026A Calculus I for the Social and Life
Sciences (MATH 011 or three years of high school
mathematics which includes two years of algebra and
one year of geometry; completion of ELM requirement
and the Intermediate Algebra Diagnostic Test) OR
MATH 030* Calculus I (MATH 029 or four years
of high school mathematics which includes two years
of algebra, one year of geometry, and one year of
mathematical analysis; completion of ELM requirement
and Pre-Calculus Diagnostic Test )
(4) PHYS 005A* General Physics: Mechanics, Heat,
Sound [Recently completed three years of high school
algebra and geometry; and a college course in algebra and
trigonometry (MATH 009 recommended) for those having
an inadequate mathematics background]
(3) General Education Course
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 


2. Second Semester Freshman Year - Fall (17 units)

(1) CM 010 The Construction Industry
(3) CM 020 Construction Materials and Processes
(3) MATH 026B Calculus II for the Social and Life Sciences (MATH 026A or appropriate high school based AP credit)
OR
MATH 031* Calculus II (MATH 030 or appropriate high
school based AP credit )
(3) ENGL 020 Expository Writing (ENGL 001A with a
grade C- or better, or equivalent) OR
ENGR 150 Technical Communications
(3) OBE 018 Business Law
(4) PHYS 005B* General Physics: Light, Electricity and
Magnetism, Modern Physics (PHYS 005A or instructor permission) ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++



3. First Semester Sophomore Year - Spring (16 units)

(3) ACCY 001 Accounting Fundamentals
(3) CE 009 Plane and Topographic Surveying
(MATH 026A or MATH 030; may be taken concurrently)
(3) CM 021 Construction Graphics (CM 020,
competence in mechanical drawing)
(3) CM 040 Properties of Construction Materials
(CM 020, PHYS 005A)
(4) BIO 005 General Biology

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

4. Second Semester Sophomore Year - Fall (18 units)
(3) ACCY 002 Managerial Accounting (ACCY 001)
(3) CM 022 Construction Documents (CM 010, CM 021,
OBE 018)
(3) CM 030 Engineering Mechanics--Statics (CM 021,
MATH 026B, PHYS 005A; MATH 026B may be taken
concurrently, )
(3) COMS 004* Introduction to Public Speaking OR
COMS 005* The Communication Experience
(3) STAT 001* Introduction to Statistics (MATH 009 or
three years of high school mathematics which includes two
years of algebra and one year of geometry; completion of
ELM requirement and the Intermediate Algebra Diagnostic
Test)
(3) ECON 001A Introduction to Macroeconomic Analysis
OR
ECON 001B Introduction to Microeconomic Analysis
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

*Indicates courses that can also be used to satisfy General
Education requirements. For the degree, students must satisfy
all the University's General Education requirements for
Construction Management. Students should contact the
program office for a complete list of these requirements. A
second year foreign language course (2A or equivalent) may
also satisfy 3 units of GE when the course is being taken to
comply with the CSUS foreign language requirement.
Students should consult with an advisor for exact GE
eligibility of these courses.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Notes:
• High school chemistry (one year), mechanical drawing (one
year), and trigonometry (one-half year) also required. Students
without this high school preparation must take the necessary
courses in addition to those listed above.
• The recommended course sequence in lower division may
change. Students should consult the Civil Engineering
Department for current information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
B. Required Upper Division Courses (Major)
Upper division Construction Management courses are open
only to students who have satisfactorily completed all required lower division preparation and have been admitted to the major. Lower division prerequisites are noted below only to show the relationship of the subjects


1. First Semester Junior Year - Spring (18 units)

(3) CM 120 Construction Operations and Methods
Analysis (CM 022)
(3) CM 121 Fundamentals of Construction Estimating
(CM 022; Corequisite: CM 120)
(3) CM 130 Structures I - Design Principles and
Structural Steel Design (CM 030, CM 040)
(3) Select one of the following
OBE 117 Business, Ethics, and Society
OBE 130 Business Communications (Completion of Area A in General Education and English 20. Recommend COMS 002 and COMS 004
(3) General Education Course
(3) General Education Course
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
2. Second Semester Junior Year - Fall (18 units)
(3) CM 111 Construction Labor Relations
(3) CM 125 Advanced Estimating and Bidding (CM 121)
(3) CM 127 Planning, Scheduling and Control (CM 120, CM 121)
(3) CM 135 Soils and Foundations (CM 130)
(3) CM 140 Structures II - Timber and Formwork Design
(CM 130)
(3) General Education Course
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

3. First Semester Senior Year - Spring (18 units)

(3) CM 110 Legal Aspects of Construction (OBE 018, CM 022)
(3) CM 124 Engineering Construction (CM 125, CM 135)
(3) CM 126 Construction Project Management (CM 125,
CM 127)
(3) CM 150 Structures III - Concrete and Masonry (CM 140)
(3) OBE 150 The Management of Contemporary Organizations
(3) Select one of the following
MGMT 120 Principles of Marketing
MGMT 133 Business Finance
MGMT 180 Operations Management
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
4. Second Semester Senior Year - Fall (18 units)
(3) CM 129* Construction Management (CM 110,
CM 111, CM 124, CM 126, OBE 150)
(3) CM 136 Principles of Mechanical and Electrical
Engineering (PHYS 005B, CM 030)
(3) BA Elective A 100-level Business Administration course
(3) General Education Course
(3) General Education Course
(3) General Education Course
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++



*Indicates courses that also can be used to satisfy General
Education requirements. For the degree, students must satisfy
all the University's General Education requirements for
Construction Management. Students should contact the program office for a complete list of these requirements
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Note: Business Administration lower and upper division
courses apply both to the major and to a Business Administration minor. Students interested in pursuing a pre-MBA sequence should contact the Degree Program Center in the College of Business Administration
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Mechanical-Electrical-Environmental Elective Sequence
For a limited number of students who specifically plan
careers in mechanical or electrical contracting, or in
environmental remediation it may be possible to arrange
a different sequence of courses in the engineering
fundamentals component. Subject to space being available
in the MET, EE and CE courses, and subject to approval
by the departments involved, courses selected from the
mechanical, electrical and civil engineering curriculum can
be substituted for certain upper division courses in the
construction management curriculum.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


Cooperative Education
Students are encouraged to participate in the Cooperative
Education Program which provides alternate periods of
study at the University and practical work experience in
industry or government for pay. Most participants of the
Co-op plan will complete one six-month work period in
their junior year and the other in their senior year. Academic
credit is granted for successful completion of the Co-op phase.
Students interested in the Cooperative Education Program
should apply in the satellite office in Riverside Hall 2004 or
the main office in Lassen Hall 2008. For information
call 278-7234.

 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Division of Criminal Justice

NON-SUBSTANTIVE CHANGES

Criminal Justice Graduate Program
Justification:
This proposal substitutes new catalog language to provide for a limitation on admissions to the Criminal Justice Graduate Program when demand exceeds the capacity of the Division to serve all qualified applicants.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
Admission Procedures
Applications are accepted as long as space for new students is available. However, students are strongly urged to apply by April 1 for the following Fall or October 1 for the following Spring in order to allow time for admission before the Computer Access Student Phone Entry Registration (CASPER). All prospective graduate students, including CSUS graduates, must file the following with the Graduate Center:
• an application for admission and a supplemental application for graduate admission (Forms A and B in the CSU application booklet); and
• two sets of official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended, other than CSUS.
At the same time, each prospective graduate student must forward to the Graduate Coordinator in the Division of Criminal Justice the following:
• a letter outlining in some detail the applicant's interests, goals, and expectations in pursuing the MS in Criminal Justice; and
• three letters of recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant's potential for graduate study.
Approximately six weeks after receipt of all items listed above, a decision regarding admission will be mailed to the applicant.
Applications are accepted as long as space for new students is available. However, students are strongly urged to apply by April 1 for the following Fall or October 1 for the following Spring in order to allow time for admission before the Computer Access Student Phone Entry Registration (CASPER).
If applications for graduate admissions exceed the capacity of the department, the department will limit admissions. Applicants will be rank ordered for admission based on an evaluation of the academic record, GRE scores, professional and life experience, references, proposed academic plan and potential for diversifying and enriching the criminal justice graduate program.

All prospective graduate students, including CSUS graduates, must file the following with the Graduate Center:
• an application for admission and a supplemental application for graduate admission (Forms A and B in the CSU application booklet); and
• two sets of official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended, other than CSUS.
At the same time, each prospective graduate student must forward to the Graduate Coordinator in the Division of Criminal Justice the following:
• a letter outlining in some detail the applicant's interests, goals, and expectations in pursuing the MS in Criminal Justice; and
• three letters of recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant's potential for graduate study.
Approximately six weeks after receipt of all items listed above, a decision regarding admission will be mailed to the applicant.


Criminal Justice Graduate Program

Justification:
This proposal provides catalog language for the Graduate Program in Criminal Justice Section B “Electives” that requires students to complete or be concurrently enrolled in the “Required Courses” prior to enrolling in the elective courses.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
Master of Science in Criminal Justice
A. Required Courses (9 units)

(3)
CRJ 200*
Research Methods in Criminal Justice (Basic statistics course)

(3)
CRJ 255*
Crime, Criminology and Criminal Justice

(3)
CRJ 260*
Management of Complex Justice Organizations


B. Electives (18 units)

(18) Select six of the following:


CRJ 205*
Criminal Justice Policy Analysis


CRJ 207*
Criminal Justice Research and Program Evaluation


CRJ 210*
Critical Examination of Criminal Law


CRJ 220
Politics of Crime Legislation


CRJ 230*
The Prison


CRJ 231*
Change and Penal Institutions


CRJ 233*
Psychodynamics of Confinement


CRJ 250*
Comparative Analysis of Criminal Justice Systems


CRJ 252*
Violence and Victims


CRJ 256*
Historical Analysis of the American Criminal Justice System


CRJ 257
The Nature of Terrorism


CRJ 262*
Administration of Juvenile Justice


CRJ 267*
Criminal Justice Issues in Collective Bargaining and Arbitration


CRJ 295*
Internship


CRJ 296*
Experimental Offerings in Criminal Justice


CRJ 299*
Special Problems


*Prerequisite: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status.

C. Culminating Experience (3 units)

(3)
CRJ 500
Culminating Experience


Note: Students requiring more than one semester to complete their culminating experience must either reenroll in CRJ 500 or must enroll in RCE 599, Graduate Continuous Enrollment, which is offered by the College of Continuing Education (CCE) through concurrent enrollment (Open University).

Master of Science in Criminal Justice
A. Required Courses (9 units)

(3)
CRJ200*
Research Methods in Criminal Justice (Basic statistics course)

(3)
CRJ 255*
Crime, Criminology and Criminal Justice

(3)
CRJ 260*
Management of Complex Justice Organizations


B. Electives (18 units)

(18) Select six of the following:


CRJ 205*
Criminal Justice Policy Analysis


CRJ 207*
Criminal Justice Research and Program Evaluation


CRJ 210*
Critical Examination of Criminal Law


CRJ 220 *
Politics of Crime Legislation


CRJ 230*
The Prison


CRJ 231*
Change and Penal Institutions


CRJ 233*
Psychodynamics of Confinement


CRJ 250*
Comparative Analysis of Criminal Justice Systems


CRJ 252*
Violence and Victims


CRJ 256*
Historical Analysis of the American Criminal Justice System


CRJ 257
The Nature of Terrorism


CRJ 262*
Administration of Juvenile Justice


CRJ 267*
Criminal Justice Issues in Collective Bargaining and Arbitration


CRJ 295*
Internship


CRJ 296*
Experimental Offerings in Criminal Justice


CRJ 299*
Special Problems

*Prerequisites for elective courses: Classified or conditionally classified graduate status and successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in the "Required Courses" (CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ260), and completion of the WPE requirement; or permission of the instructor.

* C. Culminating Experience (3 units)

(3)
CRJ 500
Culminating Experience


Note: Students requiring more than one semester to complete their culminating experience must either reenroll in CRJ 500 or must enroll in RCE 599, Graduate Continuous Enrollment, which is offered by the College of Continuing Education (CCE) through concurrent enrollment (Open University).

 

Division of Nursing

NON-SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Undergraduate Clinical Nursing Program
Justification:
As a result of the CSU Nursing Alignment project funded by the CSU Chancellor’s Office from 2000-2003, all CSU Nursing programs beginning not later than 2005 will have the same core pre-requisites for admission to the clinical major. These include anatomy, physiology, microbiology, an integrated chemistry course, speech, English composition, critical thinking, and quantitative reasoning. Additional pre-requisites currently required for admission will become co-requisites. Consequently, it is necessary for the clinical portion of the program to expand to six (6) semesters from the current five (5) semester sequence. The “Core 8” may be completed in one academic year, and admission to the clinical program would be at the Sophomore level. In order to allow students to acquire the foundational knowledge from nutrition, life span, psychology, and pharmacology before taking courses involving patient care, the first official semester of the program will include three co-requisites (life span, psychology, pharmacology); NURS 11, Introduction to Professional Nursing; and NURS 17, Concepts and Processes of Gerontological Nursing, courses currently taken either prior to admission to the clinical program or concurrent with the current first clinical semester. The new second semester of the program will include nutrition as a co-requisite, a GE course of the students choice, and the remaining clinical nursing courses from the current entry semester into the program. This change in pre-requisites was legislated by AB 2314,Thomson, and signed into law on 9/29/2002. The Division of Nursing is requesting implementation of this change effective Fall 2004 to coincide with the 2004-2006 Catalog. There is no change in required courses or total number of units. The requested change reduces the number of pre-requisites, adds co-requisites, and sequences the current first semester of clinical courses over two semesters.

NEW PROGRAM
OLD PROGRAM
A. Required Pre-Clinical Courses (29 units)
When possible, students are encouraged to apply their pre-clinical courses to General Education requirements.
(3) An oral communication course such as:
COMS 004 Introduction to Public Speaking
(3) An introductory college composition course such as:
ENGL 001A College Composition
(3) A critical thinking course such as:
COMS 002 Argumentation
ENGL 001C Critical Thinking and Writing
(3) A quantitative reasoning course such as:
STAT 001 Introduction to Statistics
(5) An organic chemistry course with a lab such as:
CHEM 006B Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry
(4) An anatomy course with a lab such as:
BIO 022 Introductory Human Anatomy OR Introductory Human Anatomy OR
BIO 025 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
(4) A physiology course with a lab such as:
BIO 131 Systemic Physiology OR
BIO 026 Human Anatomy and Physiology II
(4) A microbiology course with a lab such as:
BIO 139 General Microbiology


B. Required Clinical Nursing Program (70-73 units)

1. First Semester Co-Requisites and Nursing Courses
(13 units)
(3) An introductory psychology course such as#:
PSYC 001 Introductory Psychology: Basic Processes OR
PSYC 005 Introductory Psychology: Individual and Social Processes
(3) CHDV 030# Human Development
(3) NURS 011# Introduction to Professional
Nursing
(2) NURS 014# Pharmacology
(2) NURS 017# Concepts and Practices of Gerontological Nursing

2. Required Second Semester Lower Division Clinical Nursing Courses (14 units) (RN-BSN students: 11 units**)
(5) NURS 012* Nursing Care of Adults
(2) NURS 015* Introduction to Clinical
Nursing Practice
(1) NURS 016* Physical Assessment of the Adult
(3) A nutrition course such as*:
FACS 113 Nutrition and Metabolism OR
FACS 010 Nutrition and Wellness
(3) GE course

#These courses are taken as a group in the first semester after admission to the program. The co-requisites may be taken prior to admission, but will not be included in the admission points calculation.
*These courses are taken as a group in the second semester of the nursing program.
**Generally met through completion of basic RN program.

3. Required Upper Division Courses for Generic Students (46 units) (for RN-BSN Students: 52 units)
A. RN-BSN Students Only
(3) NURS 111A* Transitional Concepts for
Professional Nursing
(3) NURS 111B* Bridging Constructs for
Returning Nurses
B. Third Semester Clinical Courses (12 units)
(6) NURS 123° Nursing Families in
Complex Illness
(1) NURS 128° Therapeutic Interpersonal
and Group Communication
in Nursing
(5) NURS 129° Mental Health Nursing
C. Fourth Semester Clinical Courses (12 units)
(1) NURS 136- Nursing the Childbearing
Family: Skills and Assessment
(5) NURS 137- Nursing the Childbearing Family
(5) NURS 138- Nursing the Childrearing Family
(1) NURS 139- Nursing the Childrearing
Family: Assessment and Skill Acquisition
D. Fifth Semester Clinical Courses (13 units)
(6) NURS 143^ Leadership and Management
in Nursing Practice
(5) NURS 144^ Community Health Nursing
(2) NURS 191^ Service-Learning in Nursing
E. Sixth Semester Clinical Courses (9 units)
(2) NURS 150^ Research in Nursing
(1) NURS 155± Senior Forum
(3) NURS 156± Selected Senior Practicum
in Nursing
(3) NURS 169# Reasoning Development in
Health Care Sciences

° Prerequisites are NURS 011, NURS 111A*,
NURS 012, NURS 015, NURS 016, NURS 017,
NURS 111B* or instructor permission.
- Prerequisites are NURS 123, NURS 128, NURS
129 or instructor permission.
^ Prerequisites are NURS 136, NURS 137, NURS
138, NURS 139 or instructor permission.
± Prerequisites are NURS 143, NURS 144 or
instructor permission.
# May be used for upper division GE by nursing
majors.
Note: Satisfactory completion of the program requires a grade of "C" or better in every co-requisite and clinical nursing course. Opportunity to repeat nursing courses will depend upon the number of students enrolled in courses and availability of clinical experiences. A student who receives less than a "C" grade in two co-requisite or nursing courses may not be allowed to continue in the nursing program.


C. Additional Graduation Requirements (3 units)

(3) A course in societal-cultural patterns* prior to certification of eligibility for state licensure such as:
ANTH 002 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 144 Contemporary American Culture in
Anthropological Perspective
ANTH 186 Culture and Poverty
ANTH 188 Anthropology of the Body
HRS 161 Multicultural America
SOC 001 Principles of Sociology


A. Required Pre-Clinical Courses (31 units)
When possible, students are encouraged to apply their pre-clinical courses to General Education requirements.
(3) An introductory college composition course such as:
ENGL 001A College Composition
(3) An introductory psychology course such as:
PSYC 001 Introductory Psychology:
Basic Processes OR
PSYC 005 Introductory Psychology:
Individual and Social Processes
(5) An organic chemistry course with a lab such as:
CHEM 006B Introduction to Organic
and Biological Chemistry
(4) An anatomy course with a lab such as:
BIO 022 Introductory Human Anatomy OR
BIO 025 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
(4) A physiology course with a lab such as:
BIO 131 Systemic Physiology OR
BIO 026 Human Anatomy and Physiology II
(4) A microbiology course with a lab such as:
BIO 139 General Microbiology
(3) A nutrition course such as:
FACS 113 Nutrition and Metabolism
(3) A human development course across the life span
such as:
CHDV 030 Human Development
(2) A pharmacology course such as:
NURS 014 Pharmacology

B. Required Clinical Nursing Courses (59-62 units)

 

 

 

 

1. Required Lower Division Courses (13 units) (RN-BSN students: 10 units**)
(3) NURS 011* Introduction to Professional Nursing
(5) NURS 012* Nursing Care of Adults
(2) NURS 015* Introduction to Clinical Nursing Practice
(1) NURS 016* Physical Assessment of the Adult
(2) NURS 017* Concepts and Practices of Gerontological Nursing

*These courses are taken as a group in the first clinical semester. However, NURS 011 and NURS 017 may be taken before admission to clinical nursing.
**Generally met through completion of basic RN program.


2. Required Upper Division Courses (46 units)
(for RN-BSN Students, 52 units)

(3) NURS 111A* Transitional Concepts for
Professional Nursing
(3) NURS 111B* Bridging Constructs for
Returning Nurses
(6) NURS 123° Nursing Families in Complex Illness
(1) NURS 128° Therapeutic Interpersonal and Group Communication in Nursing
(5) NURS 129° Mental Health Nursing
(1) NURS 136- Nursing the Childbearing
Family: Skills and Assessment
(5) NURS 137- Nursing the Childbearing Family
(5) NURS 138- Nursing the Childrearing Family
(1) NURS 139- Nursing the Childrearing Family: Assessment and Skill Acquisition
(6) NURS 143^ Leadership and Management in Nursing Practice
(5) NURS 144^ Community Health Nursing
(2) NURS 150^ Research in Nursing
(1) NURS 155± Senior Forum
(3) NURS 156± Selected Senior Practicum in Nursing
(3) NURS 169# Reasoning Development in Health Care Sciences
(2) NURS 191^ Service-Learning in Nursing

° Prerequisites are NURS 011, NURS 111A*, NURS
012, NURS 015, NURS 016, NURS 017, NURS
111B* or instructor permission.
- Prerequisites are NURS 123, NURS 128, NURS 129
or instructor permission.
^ Prerequisites are NURS 136, NURS 137, NURS 138,
NURS 139 or instructor permission.
± Prerequisites are NURS 143, NURS 144 or instructor
permission.
* Required only of RN-BSN Completion students.
# May be used for upper division GE by nursing
majors.
Note: Satisfactory completion of the program requires a grade of "C" or better in every clinical nursing course. Opportunity to repeat nursing courses will depend upon the number of students enrolled in courses and availability of clinical experiences. A student who receives less than a "C" grade in two nursing courses may not be allowed to continue in the nursing program.

C. Additional Graduation Requirements (3 units)
(3) A course in societal-cultural patterns* prior to certification of eligibility for state licensure such as:
ANTH 002 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 144 Contemporary American Culture in
Anthropological Perspective
ANTH 186 Culture and Poverty
ANTH 188 Anthropology of the Body
HRS 161 Multicultural America
SOC 001 Principles of Sociology


Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies

NON-SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Bachelor of Science, Recreation Administration
Justification:
The change is considered to be non-substantive as no unit changes are involved in either the Therapeutic Recreation or Recreation and Park Management options. Both are presented together. There are two basic changes, any other apparent changes are simply the outcome of existing requirements being listed in a slightly altered order.

The changes:
1. RLS 194 Orientation to Directed Field Experiences (Internships) (1 unit) is removed as a required class for all majors and replaced by RLS 1 Orientation to Recreation and Leisure Studies (1/2 unit) and also RLS 101 Senior Portfolio Seminar (1/2 unit).

Since the recent introduction of a required graduation portfolio, a more formal advising and accountability sequence is necessary. There is currently no formal exit strategy for the requirement. At the same time, the DFE preparation requirement has diminished as students are more familiar with such skills as resume preparation and placement searches. A reduced exposure to the DFE process will still be included in the RLS 1 class, along with an introduction to the major fields of study, advising processes, and the portfolio requirement.

2. The Therapeutic Recreation option loses three units of elective classes in favor of requiring the existing RLS 136 Recreation Program Planning class that is currently required of all other majors.

This was one specific area of concern at our last national accreditation visit. We are approaching program accreditation again and would like to solve the problem in advance.

3. One other change corrects a typographical error – the pre-requisite hours for field placements should have referred to all 195 classes, not just 195D.

4. A provision is added to the existing “Note” to accommodate the accumulation of credits associated with the proposed RLS 197.

A more substantial program review is anticipated during the next catalog cycle, with the addition and involvement of several newly hired faculty. However, these changes seemed prudent at this time.

NEW PROGRAM
OLD PROGRAM
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS • BS
Units required for Recreation and Park Management
Concentration: 66-71
Units required for Therapeutic Recreation
Concentration: 69-74
Minimum total units for the BS: 120
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.
A. Required Lower Division Courses (9.5 units)
(1/2) RLS 1 Orientation to Recreation and
Leisure Studies

(3) RLS 30 Recreation and Leisure Studies
in Contemporary Society
(3) RLS 32 Recreation Activity Leadership
(3) RLS 42 Recreational Use of Natural Resources
B. Required Upper Division Courses (13.5 units)
(1/2) RLS 101 Senior Portfolio Seminar
(3) RLS 105 Management in Leisure Services
(3) RLS 106 Leisure Services and Persons with Disabilities
(2) RLS 109 Computer Applications in Leisure Services
(2) RLS 110 Research Applications to Leisure Behaviors
(3) RLS 136 Leisure Program Planning (RLS 032)
+++++

C. Concentration Requirement
Select one of the following two concentrations:
1. Recreation and Park Management (43-48 units)
+++++


(3) RLS 166 Workshop in Leisure Service Administration (RLS 105)

(3) RLS 183 Marketing Recreation Services (MGMT 120)

(10-15) Select one of the following:

(4) RLS 195B* Directed Field Experience (RLS 030, RLS 194, approval of major advisor) and

(6) RLS 195C* Directed Field Experience (RLS 030, RLS 105, RLS 194, approval of major advisor)

OR

(10-15) RLS 195E* Recreation and Park Management Internship (RLS 194, approval of major advisor)

(18) Any upper division RLS courses approved by major advisor from one of the three areas: commercial recreation, recreation program management, or park and recreation resources management.

(9) Electives, as approved in advance by major advisor, to reflect student's
area of concentration.


2. Therapeutic Recreation (46-51 units)
(3) RLS 116 Therapeutic Recreation Principles and Practices (RLS 106 or instructor permission; RLS 106 may be taken concurrently )

(3) RLS 117 Therapeutic Recreation Service Systems (RLS 106 or instructor permission; RLS 106 may be taken concurrently)

(3) RLS 119 Introduction to Leisure Education

(3) RLS 124 Therapeutic Recreation and Gerontology

(3) RLS 125 Therapeutic Recreation and Persons with Physical Disabilities (RLS 106 or instructor permission; RLS 106 may be taken concurrently)

(3) RLS 126 Therapeutic Recreation and Persons with Emotional Cognitive Disabilities (RLS 106 or instructor permission; RLS 106 may be taken concurrently)

(3) RLS 128 Leisure Services for At-Risk Populations

(10-15) RLS 195D* Therapeutic Recreation Internship (The completion of all required classes for the TR option. Completion of required administrative paperwork in the semester prior to internship, approval of major advisor)

(15) Elective units selected in consultation with a major advisor, including
at least 3 units each in 1) Abnormal Psychology, 2) Lifespan Human Development, and 3) Human Anatomy/Human Physiology. Advisor approval required to assure compliance with certification requirements.

D. Additional Graduation Requirement
Majors are required to compile and consistently maintain an assessment portfolio. The portfolio is a cumulative collection of individual assignments designed to demonstrate competency in specific areas such as written communication, oral communication, group interaction, research and analysis, and computer literacy. Each competency may be assessed at more than one level (e.g., beginning, advanced) and adequate opportunities for completion of all required demonstrations of competency are available within the required major coursework (as listed in requirements A, B and C above). Additionally, opportunities for specific competency level demonstrations may be made available in elective coursework within the major (e.g., RLS 103, RLS 153, RLS 182). In individual course-based assignments, learning outcomes and competencies are assessed based upon specified criteria. Continuing instructor feedback and self-assessment exercises are intended to create a process that improves learning outcomes, as well as facilitating the student's ability to demonstrate those outcomes and competencies both before and after graduation.
It is the responsibility of the student, in consultation with their portfolio advisor, to maintain the portfolio and to insure that all requirements have been successfully completed prior to graduation. The completed portfolio is presented in RLS 101. Full explanations and descriptions of these requirements appear in the Portfolio Manual for Recreation and Leisure Studies Students and Faculty.
* Prerequisites: 600 hours of approved field experience.
Note: Grade of "C-" or better required in all upper division courses applied to the major. No more than 6 units of RLS 197, RLS 198 and RLS 199 in combination may be used to meet major requirements. No more than 3 units of RLS 197 may be used to meet major requirements. No more than 3 units of RLS 198 may be used to meet major requirements.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS • BS
Units required for Recreation and Park Management
Concentration: 66-71
Units required for Therapeutic Recreation
Concentration: 69-74
Minimum total units for the BS: 120
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.
A. Required Lower Division Courses (9 units)
+++++


(3) RLS 30 Recreation and Leisure Studies
in Contemporary Society
(3) RLS 32 Recreation Activity Leadership
(3) RLS 42 Recreational Use of Natural Resources
B. Required Upper Division Courses (11 units)
+++++
(3) RLS 105 Management in Leisure Services
(3) RLS 106 Leisure Services and Persons with Disabilities
(2) RLS 109 Computer Applications in Leisure Services
(2) RLS 110 Research Applications to Leisure Behaviors
+++++

(1) RLS 194 Orientation to Directed Field Experience


C. Concentration Requirement
Select one of the following two concentrations:
1. Recreation and Park Management (46-51 units)
(3) RLS 136 Leisure Program Planning (RLS 032)
(3) RLS 166 Workshop in Leisure Service Administration (RLS 105)

(3) RLS 183 Marketing Recreation Services (MGMT 120)

(10-15) Select one of the following:

(4) RLS 195B* Directed Field Experience (RLS 030, RLS 194, approval of major advisor) and

(6) RLS 195C* Directed Field Experience (RLS 030, RLS 105, RLS 194, approval of major advisor)

OR

(10-15) RLS 195E* Recreation and Park Management Internship (RLS 194, approval of major advisor)

(18) Any upper division RLS courses approved by major advisor from one of the three areas: commercial recreation, recreation program management, or park and recreation resources management.

(9) Electives, as approved in advance by major advisor, to reflect student's
area of concentration.


2. Therapeutic Recreation (49-54 units)
(3) RLS 116 Therapeutic Recreation Principles and Practices (RLS 106 or instructor permission; RLS 106 may be taken concurrently )

(3) RLS 117 Therapeutic Recreation Service Systems (RLS 106 or instructor permission; RLS 106 may be taken concurrently)

(3) RLS 119 Introduction to Leisure Education

(3) RLS 124 Therapeutic Recreation and Gerontology

(3) RLS 125 Therapeutic Recreation and Persons with Physical Disabilities (RLS 106 or instructor permission; RLS 106 may be taken concurrently)

(3) RLS 126 Therapeutic Recreation and Persons with Emotional Cognitive Disabilities (RLS 106 or instructor permission; RLS 106 may be taken concurrently)

(3) RLS 128 Leisure Services for At-Risk Populations

(10-15) RLS 195D* Therapeutic Recreation Internship (The completion of all required classes for the TR option. Completion of required administrative paperwork in the semester prior to internship, approval of major advisor)

(18) Elective units selected in consultation with a major advisor, including
at least 3 units each in 1) Abnormal Psychology, 2) Lifespan Human Development, and 3) Human Anatomy/Human Physiology. Advisor approval required to assure compliance with certification requirements.

D. Additional Graduation Requirement
Majors are required to compile and consistently maintain an assessment portfolio. The portfolio is a cumulative collection of individual assignments designed to demonstrate competency in specific areas such as written communication, oral communication, group interaction, research and analysis, and computer literacy. Each competency may be assessed at more than one level (e.g., beginning, advanced) and adequate opportunities for completion of all required demonstrations of competency are available within the required major coursework (as listed in requirements A, B and C above). Additionally, opportunities for specific competency level demonstrations may be made available in elective coursework within the major (e.g., RLS 103, RLS 153, RLS 182). In individual course-based assignments, learning outcomes and competencies are assessed based upon specified criteria. Continuing instructor feedback and self-assessment exercises are intended to create a process that improves learning outcomes, as well as facilitating the student's ability to demonstrate those outcomes and competencies both before and after graduation.
It is the responsibility of the student, in consultation with their portfolio advisor, to maintain the portfolio and to insure that all requirements have been successfully completed prior to graduation. Full explanations and descriptions of these requirements appear in the Portfolio Manual for Recreation and Leisure Studies Students and Faculty.

* Prerequisites: 600 hours of approved field experience.
Note: Grade of "C-" or better required in all upper division courses applied to the major. No more than 6 units of RLS 198 and RLS 199 in combination may be used to meet major requirements. No more than 3 units of RLS 198 may be used to meet major requirements.

 

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCE AND INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Department of Economics

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGES

Minor in Economics
Justification:
We are removing the MIS 1A, 1B, and 1C or CSC 001 option from the minor, since we will be offering ECON 140 which will cover these skills using examples from economics. This will allow students to learn computing skills while developing analytical skills useful in economic research. We have added 2 new upper division courses that have no prerequisites. We need to change the note referring to these courses so that student can apply them to the minor. Students will now be able to apply 6 units from ECON 112, ECON 120, ECON 181, ECON 84, ECON 186, and ECON 189 to the minor.

Removing MIS 1A, 1B, and 1C or CSC 001 as an option for the minor may reduce the number of our students taking these courses from the Business School or the Computer Science department. The other changes should have no programmatic or fiscal impact on other units.

NEW PROGRAM
OLD PROGRAM
The minor requires 21 units, 12 of which must be upper division Economics units.
Specific course requirements are:

(3)
ECON 001A
Introduction to Macroeconomic Analysis

(3)
ECON 001B
Introduction to Microeconomic Analysis


Notes:
• STAT 001 may be counted toward the
minor. +++++++++++++++++++++++++

• No more than 3 units of ECON 199 and
no more than 6 units from the following
courses may be used to meet the
Economics Minor requirements: ECON
112, ECON 120, ECON 181, ECON
184, ECON 186, ECON 189.

• ECON 104 ECON 195 and ECON 198
cannot be used to meet the
requirements of the Economics minor.

The minor requires 21 units, 12 of which
must be upper division Economics units.
Specific course requirements are:

(3)
ECON 001A
Introduction to Macroeconomic Analysis

(3)
ECON 001B
Introduction to Microeconomic Analysis


Notes:
• STAT 001 or MIS 001A / MIS 001B / MIS 001C or CSC 001 may be counted toward the minor.

• No more than 3 units of ECON 199 and no more than 6 units from the following courses may be used to meet the Economics Minor requirements: ECON 120, ECON 181, ECON 184. +++++++++

• ECON 104 ECON 195 and ECON 198 cannot be used to meet the requirements of the Economics minor.


BA in Economics
Justification:
We are replacing the MIS 1A, 1B, and 1C computing skills requirement with ECON 140. This will allow students to learn computing skills while developing analytical skills useful in economic research. We have added 2 new upper division courses that have no prerequisites. We need to change the note referring to these courses. Students will now be able to apply 3 units from ECON 112, ECON 120, ECON 181, ECON 184, ECON 186, and ECON 189 to the major. We are adding a suggested course sequence so that students can plan their schedule to get the most out of the degree program. We are updating the faculty listed in the catalog.

NEW PROGRAM
OLD PROGRAM

A. Required Lower Division Courses (9 units)

(3)
ECON 001A
Introduction to Macroeconomic Analysis

(3)
ECON 001B
Introduction to Microeconomic Analysis

(3)
STAT 001
Introduction to Statistics (MATH 009 or three years of high school mathematics which includes two years of algebra and one year of geometry; completion of ELM requirement and the Intermediate Algebra diagnostic test)


+++++++
+++++++

+++++++
+++++++


+++++++
+++++++

 

B. Required Upper Division Courses (15 units)

(3)
ECON 100A
Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
(ECON 001A, ECON 001B)

(3)
ECON 100B
Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (ECON 001B)

(3)
ECON 101
History of Economic Thought (ECON 001A, ECON 001B) OR


ECON 113
Economic History of the United States (ECON 001A or ECON 104)

(3)
ECON 140
Quantitative Economic Analysis (ECON 001A, ECON 001B, STAT 1)

(3)
ECON 145
Economic Research Methods
(ECON 100A, ECON 100B, STAT 001, passing score on WPE; for graduating seniors only)

C. Electives (18 units)

(18) Additional upper division courses in Economics, selected in consultation with a faculty advisor.

Notes:
• Minimum grade of "C" required in ECON 100A, ECON 100B, ECON 101 or ECON 113, and ECON 145.
• MATH 026A or MATH 030, or an upper division course in math or statistics selected in consultation with an advisor may be substituted for three of the 30 upper division units in Economics.
• ECON 104 does not meet major requirements.
• No more than 3 units total of ECON 195, ECON 198, ECON 199 may be included in the 30 total required upper division units.
• No more than 3 units from the following set of courses may be used to meet the requirements of the Economics major: ECON 112, ECON 120, ECON 181, ECON 184, ECON 186, ECON 189.
• Students planning graduate work in Economics should consult an advisor regarding additional course work in mathematics, statistics, and computer science. ECON 141, MATH 026A, and MATH 026B are strongly recommended.
• NIGHT STUDENTS: The department schedules courses such that the upper division requirements for the BA can be completed at night within two academic years. Night students should contact the department for assistance in planning a two-year program. Failure to do so may mean a delay in graduation due to scheduling problems.

FACULTY
Kevin Calandri, Sean Corcoran, Smile Dube, Craig Gallet, Al Gutowsky, John Henry, Jessica Howell, Jonathan Kaplan, Stephan Kroll, William Kerby, David Lang, Suzanne O'Keefe, Stephen Perez, Bette Polkinghorn, Terri Sexton, Mark Siegler, Kristin Van Gaasbeck, Rossitza Wooster, Yung Yang


A. Required Lower Division Courses (12 units)

(3)
ECON 001A
Introduction to Macroeconomic Analysis

(3)
ECON 001B
Introduction to Microeconomic Analysis

(3)
STAT 001
Introduction to Statistics (MATH 009 or three years of high school mathematics which includes two years of algebra and one year of geometry; completion of ELM requirement and the Intermediate Algebra diagnostic test)

(1)
MIS 001A
Microcomputer Hardware and Software

(1)
MIS 001B
Spreadsheets (MIS 001A, instructor permission, or a passing score on the MIS 001A competency examination)

(1)
MIS 001C
Word Processing and Presentation Graphics (MIS 001A, instructor permission, or a passing score on the MIS 001A competency examination)


B. Required Upper Division Courses (12 units)

(3)
ECON 100A
Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
(ECON 001A, ECON 001B)

(3)
ECON 100B
Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (ECON 001B)

(3)
ECON 101
History of Economic Thought (ECON 001A, ECON 001B) OR


ECON 113

++++++++
Economic History of the United States (ECON 001A or ECON 104)

+++++++


(3)
ECON 145
Economic Research Methods
(ECON 100A, ECON 100B, STAT 001, passing score on WPE; for graduating seniors only)

C. Electives (18 units)

(18) Additional upper division courses in Economics, selected in consultation with a faculty advisor.

Notes:
• Minimum grade of "C" required in ECON 100A, ECON 100B, ECON 101 or ECON 113, and ECON 145.
• MATH 026A or MATH 030, or an upper division course in math or statistics selected in consultation with an advisor may be substituted for three of the 30 upper division units in Economics.
• ECON 104 does not meet major requirements.
• No more than 3 units total of ECON 195, ECON 198, ECON 199 may be included in the 30 total required upper division units.
• No more than 3 units from the following set of courses may be used to meet the requirements of the Economics major: ECON 112, ECON 120, ECON 151, ECON 181, ECON 184. ++++++
• Students planning graduate work in Economics should consult an advisor regarding additional course work in mathematics, statistics, and computer science. ECON 141, MATH 026A, and MATH 026B are strongly recommended.
• NIGHT STUDENTS: The department schedules courses such that the upper division requirements for the BA can be completed at night within two academic years. Night students should contact the department for assistance in planning a two-year program. Failure to do so may mean a delay in graduation due to scheduling problems.

FACULTY
Kevin Calandri, Smile Dube, Craig Gallet, Al Gutowsky, John Henry, William Kerby, Suzanne O'Keefe, Steve Perez, Bette Polkinghorn, Larry Sander, Terri Sexton, Yung Yang
+++++++++



Department of Environmental Studies

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Environmental Studies
Justification:
To allow students to substitute Environmental Studies 128 “Environment and the Law” with Environmental Studies 171 “ Environmental Politics and Policy”. These are similar courses and providing this option gives students more flexibility in scheduling classes. EnvS 128 is only offered in the spring semester, and EnvS 171 is only offered in the fall. Choosing EnvS 175 results in one more hour in the major.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
REQUIREMENTS - BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE
B. Required Upper Division Courses (26 units)


B. Required Upper Division Courses (26 units)

(3) BIO 160 General Ecology (BIO 011, BIO 012)
(3) ENVS 111 Environmental Ethics (ENVS 010, ENVS 110 or equivalent recommended)
(3) ENVS 112 International Environmental Problems (Passing score on WPE)
(3) ENVS 120 Quantitative Methods For Environmentalists (ability to manipulate algebraic expressions, ENVS 111 or instructor permission)
(2) ENVS 121 Field Methods in Environmental Science (BIO 160, GEOL 010, CHEM 006A, ENVS 128 or concurrent enrollment)

 


(3) ENVS 128 Environment and the Law (ENVS 111 or instructor permission

 

(3) ENVS 190 Senior Seminar


(3) Select one of the following:
ENVS 130
Environmental Toxicology (CHEM 001A or CHEM 006A)
GEOG 109
Geographic Information Systems
GEOG 111
Elements of Meteorology (GEOG 001 or instructor permission)
GEOG 113
Climate (Knowledge of general world distribution of climatic elements as given in an introductory physical geography course)
GEOG 115
Geography of Plants and Soils (GEOG 001)(3) Select one of the following:
ECON 110
Introduction to Public Economics (ECON 001B)
ECON 123
Resource Economics (ECON 001B)
ECON 162
Energy Economics (ECON 001B)

REQUIREMENTS - MINOR
Units required for Minor: 23-25, including courses from Environmental Studies and related departments. A minimum of 14 upper division units is required.
Specific course requirements are:

(3) BIO 010
Basic Biological Concepts
(3) ECON 001A
Introduction To Macroeconomic Analysis
(3) ENVS 010
Environmental Science
(3) ENVS 111
Environmental Ethics (ENVS 010, ENVS 110 or equivalent recommended)
(3) ENVS 112
International Environmental Problems (passing score on WPE) OR
ENVS 128
Environmental Law (ENVS 111 or instructor permission)

 


(3-4) Select one of the following:
BIO 011 (4)
Animal Biology (BIO 010)
BIO 012 (4)
Plant Biology (BIO 010)
BIO 102
Natural History of Plants (college biology course or instructor permission)
BIO 157 (4)
General Entomology (BIO 011)
BIO 160
General Ecology (BIO 011, BIO 012)
BIO 162
Ichthyology: The Study of Fishes (BIO 011) BIO 165 (4)
Vertebrate Natural History (BIO 011)
BIO 166
Ornithology (BIO 011)

(2-3) Select one of the following:
CHEM 106
Chemical Concepts (PHYS 007, ENGL 020 or an equivalent second semester composition course )
ENVS 120
Quantitative Methods for Environmentalist (Ability to manipulate algebraic expressions (Math 9 or 11). For Environmental Studies majors ENVS 111 or instructor permission.)
ENVS 121
Field Methods in Environmental Science (BIO 160, GEOL 010, CHEM 006A, ENVS 128 or concurrent enrollment)

ENVS 130
Environmental Toxicology (CHEM 001A or CHEM 006A)
GEOG 111
Elements of Meteorology (GEOG 001 or instructor permission)
GEOG 113
Climate (Knowledge of general world distribution of climatic elements as given in an introductory physical geography course.)
GEOL 010
Physical Geology
GEOG 109
Geographic Information Systems
GEOG 115
Geography of Plants and Soils (GEOG 001)

(3) Select one of the following:
ECON 110
Introductory Public Economics (ECON 001B)
ECON 123
Resource Economics (ECON 001B)
ECON 162
Energy Economics (ECON 001B)
ENVS 116
The Ecology of Shelter
ENVS 122
Environmental Impact Analysis: The Procedure and the Statement
ENVS 195
Environmental Studies Internship

Note: a minimum grade of “C-“is required in all courses required for the Environmental Studies major.

FACULTY
Valerie Anderson, Mary Brentwood, Dudley Burton, Carlos Davidson, Edward Martinez, Angus Wright

CONTACT INFORMATION
• Dudley Burton, Department Chair
• Marsha Robinson, Administrative Support Coordinator
• Amador Hall 554A
• (916) 278-6620; FAX (916) 278-7582
• www.csus.edu/envs/


REQUIREMENTS - BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE
B. Required Upper Division Courses (26 - 27 units)

B. Required Upper Division Courses (26 units)

(3) BIO 160 General Ecology (BIO 011, BIO 012)
(3) ENVS 111 Environmental Ethics (ENVS 010, ENVS 110 or equivalent recommended)
(3) ENVS 112 International Environmental Problems (Passing score on WPE)
(3) ENVS 120 Quantitative Methods For Environmentalists (ability to manipulate algebraic
expressions, ENVS 111 or instructor permission)
(5 – 6) Select one class from each of the following combinations:
A) ENVS 121 Field Methods in Environmental Science (BIO 160, GEOL 010, CHEM 006A) 2 units OR
ENVS 175 Aquatic Pollution Assessment (BIO 160, Chem 006A) 3 units

B) ENVS 128 Environment and the Law (ENVS 111 or instructor permission) 3 units OR
ENVS 171 Environmental Politics and Policy (ENVS 111 or instructor permission) 3 units

(3) ENVS 190 Senior Seminar Senior Thesis
A, B, or C

(3) Select one of the following:
ENVS 130
Environmental Toxicology (CHEM 001A or CHEM 006A)
GEOG 109
Geographic Information Systems
GEOG 111
Elements of Meteorology (GEOG 001 or instructor permission)
GEOG 113
Climate (Knowledge of general world distribution of climatic elements as given in an introductory physical geography course)
GEOG 115
Geography of Plants and Soils (GEOG 001)(3) Select one of the following:
ECON 110
Introduction to Public Economics (ECON 001B)

ECON 123
Resource Economics (ECON 001B)
ECON 162
Energy Economics (ECON 001B)

REQUIREMENTS - MINOR
Units required for Minor: 23-25, including courses from Environmental Studies and related departments. A minimum of 14 upper division units is required.
Specific course requirements are:

(3) BIO 010
Basic Biological Concepts
(3) ECON 001A
Introduction To Macroeconomic Analysis
(3) ENVS 010
Environmental Science
(3) ENVS 111
Environmental Ethics (ENVS 010, ENVS 110 or equivalent recommended)
(3) Select one of the following:
ENVS 112
International Environmental Problems (passing score on WPE)
ENVS 128
Environmental Law (ENVS 111 or instructor permission)
ENVS 171 Environmental Politics and Policy

(3-4) Select one of the following:
BIO 011 (4)
Animal Biology (BIO 010)
BIO 012 (4)
Plant Biology (BIO 010)
BIO 102
Natural History of Plants (college biology course or instructor permission)
BIO 157 (4)
General Entomology (BIO 011)
BIO 160
General Ecology (BIO 011, BIO 012)
BIO 162
Ichthyology: The Study of Fishes (BIO 011)
BIO 165 (4)
Vertebrate Natural History (BIO 011)
BIO 166
Ornithology (BIO 011)

(2-3) Select one of the following:
CHEM 106
Chemical Concepts (PHYS 007, ENGL 020 or an equivalent second semester composition course )
ENVS 120
Quantitative Methods for Environmentalist (Ability to manipulate algebraic expressions (Math 9 or 11). For Environmental Studies majors ENVS 111 or instructor permission.)
ENVS 121
Field Methods in Environmental Science (BIO 160, GEOL 010, CHEM 006A, ENVS 128 or concurrent enrollment) ENVS 175 Aquatic Pollution Assessment (BIO 160, Chem 006A)
ENVS 130
Environmental Toxicology (CHEM 001A or CHEM 006A)
GEOG 111
Elements of Meteorology (GEOG 001 or instructor permission)
GEOG 113
Climate (Knowledge of general world distribution of climatic elements as given in an introductory physical geography course.)
GEOL 010
Physical Geology
GEOG 109
Geographic Information Systems
GEOG 115
Geography of Plants and Soils (GEOG 001)

(3) Select one of the following:
ECON 110
Introductory Public Economics (ECON 001B) ECON 123
Resource Economics (ECON 001B)
ECON 162
Energy Economics (ECON 001B)
ENVS 116
The Ecology of Shelter
ENVS 122
Environmental Impact Analysis: The Procedure and the Statement
ENVS 195
Environmental Studies Internship
ENVS 199
Special Problems

Note: a minimum grade of “C-“is required in all courses required for the Environmental Studies minor.

FACULTY
Valerie Anderson, Mary Brentwood, Dudley Burton, Carlos Davidson, Edward Martinez, Angus Wright
EMERITUS
Valerie Anderson, Angus Wright

CONTACT INFORMATION
• Dudley Burton, Department Chair
• Marsha Robinson, Administrative Support Coordinator Assistant II
• Amador Hall 554A
• (916) 278-6620; FAX (916) 278-7582
• www.csus.edu/envs/


Department of Family and Consumer Sciences

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

B.A. Family and Consumer Sciences, Family Studies Concentration
Justification:
The proposed changes are based on bringing the Family Area curriculum more in line with the guidelines for Certification in Family Life Education, approved by the National Council on Family Relations.

Three 3-unit courses that were formerly in a list of electives will now be required. This change will strengthen students’ knowledge in the developmental area of Family Studies and will concentrate students in three key upper division courses. Changes will meet the guidelines for Family Life Education approved by the National Council on Family Relations.

Child Development 30 will no longer be accepted in lieu of FACS 52. Child Development 30, Human Development, covers lifespan development (conception to death). In the new program, Family Area students in FACS will have a nine-unit sequence in human development: FACS 52, The Child in the Family; FACS 152, Adolescent Development; and FACS 159, Adulthood and Aging.

Economics 1A, 1B or 104 will no longer be required for students in the Family Studies area. Students are required to take FACS 140, Family Resource Management, and FACS 141, Family Finance, both of which provide adequate information about economic conditions that affect family well-being.

1. Require three courses from the list of upper-division electives instead of two electives. Students will be required to take three upper division courses, FACS 152, Adolescent Development; FACS 155, Family Life Education; and FACS 159, Adulthood and Aging.

This change will strengthen the curriculum by providing all students with two additional developmental courses, FACS 152, Adolescent Development; and FACS 159, Adulthood and Aging; and FACS 155, the Family Life Education course. The proposed curriculum in Family Studies area will meet the requirements for Certification in Family Life Education approved by the National Council on Family Relations. In addition, FACS 155 will be a critical course for all students as we focus on meeting the guidelines of the national certifying body.

2. Delete as required course option, Child Development 30, Human Development, 3 units.

Because the new program will require students to complete a sequence of three 3-unit courses in human development spanning from infancy through adulthood to aging; CHDV 30, which is a lifespan course that covers all the life stages in one course, will be redundant for students when they take the upper-division courses in the sequence. Dr. Susan Gomez, chair of Child Development was consulted.

3. Delete as required course options, Econ 1A, Introduction to Macroeconomic Analysis; Econ 1B, Introduction to Microeconomic Analysis; and Econ 104, Introduction to United States Economy.

Because students are now required to take three upper-division courses instead of two electives, we have decided to delete Economics as a required course. However, students are required to take both FACS 140, Family Resource Management; and FACS 141, Family Finance, as part of their required core in the department. These courses examine how various economic conditions affect family well-being. Additionally, they help students develop the necessary skills to help families manage their financial resources. Dr. Terri Sexton, chair of Economics was consulted.

NEW PROGRAM
OLD PROGRAM
FAMILY STUDIES CONCENTRATION (51 units)

The concentration prepares students for careers
in various human service fields. The program
emphasizes an understanding of human development,
family communication and diverse families. The program
is guided by the National Council on Family
Relations (NCFR) guidelines for academic
programs in Family Life Education. (Also see
certificate program in Family Life Education)

FAMILY STUDIES CONCENTRATION (51 units)

A. Required Core Courses (21 units)
(3) FACS 010 Nutrition and Wellness
(3) FACS 050 The Family & Social Issues
(1) FACS 060 Professional Development in Family &
Consumer Sciences
(3) SOC 008 Sense and Nonsense in Social Research OR
STAT 001 Introduction to Statistics (MATH 009 or three
years of high school mathematics which
includes two years of algebra and one
year of geometry; completion of ELM
requirement and the Intermediate Algebra
Diagnostic Test)
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++
(3) FACS 140 Family Resource Management
(passing score on WPE)
(3) FACS 141 Family Finance
(3) FACS 160 Communication and Education in Family and
Consumer Science (15 FACS units, including
FACS 060, and completion of Area A
GE requirements)
(2) FACS 168 Senior Seminar
(21 FACS units, including FACS 160)



B. Required Lower Division Courses (6 units)
(3) BIO 020 Biology: A Human Perspective
(3) FACS 052 The Child in the Family
+++++++++++++++++++++++++


C. Required Upper Division Courses (24 units)
(3) FACS 108 Family Communication (COMS 008,
FACS 050, SOC 166 or
instructor permission)
(3) FACS 150 Family Stress and Coping: Multicultural Focus
(FACS 050 or equivalent with
instructor permission)
(3) FACS 154 Issues in Parenting (CHDV 030, FACS 052, or
instructor permission)
(3) FACS 162 Family Support Services (FACS 050; FACS 140)
(3) FACS 195C Internship
++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(3) FACS 152 Adolescent Development (CHDV 030,
FACS 052 or instructor permission)
(3) FACS 155 Family Life Education
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(3) FACS 159 Adulthood and Aging in Human Development
(a human development course)
+++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

FAMILY STUDIES CONCENTRATION (51 units)

The concentration prepares students for careers in various human service fields. The program emphasizes an understanding of human development, family communication and diverse families. The program is guided by the National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) guidelines for academic programs in Family Life Education. (Also see certificate program in Family Life Education)

FAMILY STUDIES CONCENTRATION (51 units)

A. Required Core Courses (24 units)
(3) FACS 010 Nutrition and Wellness
(3) FACS 050 The Family & Social Issues
(1) FACS 060 Professional Development in Family &
Consumer Sciences
(3) SOC 008 Sense and Nonsense in Social Research OR
STAT 001 Introduction to Statistics (MATH 009 or three
years of high school mathematics which
includes two years of algebra and one
year of geometry; completion of ELM requirement and the Intermediate Algebra Diagnostic Test)
(3) ECON 001A Introduction to Macroeconomic Analysis OR
ECON 001B Introduction to Microeconomic Analysis OR
ECON 104 Introduction to the United States Economy
(3) FACS 140 Family Resource Management
(passing score on WPE)
(3) FACS 141 Family Finance
(3) FACS 160 Communication and Education in Family and
Consumer Science (15 FACS units, including
FACS 060, and completion of Area A
GE requirements)
(2) FACS 168 Senior Seminar
(21 FACS units, including FACS 160)

B. Required Lower Division Courses (6 units)
(3) BIO 020 Biology: A Human Perspective
(3) FACS 052 The Child in the Family OR
CHDV 030 Human Development

C. Required Upper Division Courses (21 units)
(3) FACS 108 Family Communication (COMS 008,
FACS 050, SOC 166 or
instructor permission)
(3) FACS 150 Family Stress and Coping: Multicultural Focus
(FACS 050 or equivalent with
instructor permission)
(3) FACS 154 Issues in Parenting (CHDV 030, FACS 052, or
instructor permission)
(3) FACS 162 Family Support Services (FACS 050; FACS 140)
(3) FACS 195C Internship
(6) Select two from the following:
FACS 147 Financial and Legal Aspects of
Aging (FACS 141)
FACS 152 Adolescent Development (CHDV 030,
FACS 052 or instructor permission)
FACS 155 Family Life Education
FACS 157 Infant and Toddler: Development and Care
FACS 159 Adulthood and Aging in Human Development
(a human development course)

FACS 166 Contemporary Issues in Family and Consumer
Sciences


B.A. Family and Consumer Sciences, Apparel Marketing and Design Concentration
Justification:
Four 3-unit former elective courses become mandatory which strengthens students’ skills and knowledge of the interrelatedness of apparel marketing and apparel design, as well as knowledge of human behavior, as it relates to textiles, clothing and merchandising. Addition of 3 units to the program to allow one elective course in the program. Changes reflect department’s ongoing curriculum review and assessment, including input from students and the apparel marketplace. Increasing 3 units and switching four 3-unit former elective courses to mandatory will provide a broader and deeper education to our students, which will help them better prepare for the ongoing more and more competitive apparel market. Each of these four courses can strengthen our students’ skills from different perspectives. They will enable our students to build on the foundation of the core courses and provide them updated and advanced skills and knowledge.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
APPAREL MARKETING AND DESIGN CONCENTRATION (51 units)

The concentration prepares students for careers in the field of apparel, including design, manufacturing, distribution, marketing and consumption. The program emphasizes the contemporary and historical ways of meeting the economic, physiological, psychological and sociological needs of consumers relative to apparel and textile products.

a. Required Core Courses (27 units)
(3) INTD 020 Design
(3) FACS 031 Textiles
(3) FACS 032 Fundamentals of Apparel Production
(1) FACS 060 Professional Development in Family & Consumer Sciences

(3) FACS 160 Communication and Education in Family and Consumer Sciences (15 FACS units including FACS 060 and completion of Area A GE requirements)
(2) FACS 168 Senior Seminar (21 FACS units, including FACS 160)
(3) SOC 008 Sense and Nonsense in Social Research OR
STAT 001 Introduction to Statistics
(3) ECON 001B Introduction to Microeconomic Analysis OR
MGMT 120 Principles of Marketing
(6) Select two from the following:
FACS 010 Nutrition & Wellness
FACS 050 The Family & Social Issues
FACS 140 Family Resource Management (passing score on WPE)

b. Required Upper Division Courses (21 units)
(3) FACS 130A History of Western Costume
(3) FACS 130B Contemporary Costume
(3) FACS 131 Quality Analysis: Apparel (FACS 031, FACS 032)
+++++++++++++++

(3) FACS 134 Introduction to Fashion Marketing (ECON 001B or MGMT 120)
(9) Select nine units from the following:
FACS 132 Product Development: Apparel Design (FACS 032)
FACS 133 Creative Principles of Apparel Design
FACS 135
Merchandise Buying (FACS 134)
FACS 136 Fashion Retailing (FACS 134)
FACS 137 Social Psychology of Apparel
( SOC 001)

++++++++++++
++++++++++++
+++++++++++
FACS 138 Consumer Issues in Textiles & Clothing (FACS 031)
FACS 139 Textiles and Apparel in the Global Economy
(FACS 134 or MGMT 120)
FACS 195C Internship
c. Electives (3 units)
(3) Select units in Family and Consumer Science with an advisor’s approval.

APPAREL MARKETING AND DESIGN CONCENTRATION (54 units)

The concentration prepares students for careers in the field of apparel, including design, manufacturing, distribution, marketing and consumption. The program emphasizes the contemporary and historical ways of meeting the economic, physiological, psychological and sociological needs of consumers relative to apparel and textile products.

 

a. Required Core Courses (27 units)
(3) INTD 020 Design
(3) FACS 031 Textiles
(3) FACS 032 Fundamentals of Apparel
Production
(1) FACS 060 Professional Development in Family & Consumer Sciences
(3)
(3) FACS 160 Communication and Education in Family and Consumer Sciences (15 FACS units including FACS 060 and completion of Area A GE requirements)
(2) FACS 168 Senior Seminar (21 FACS units, Including FACS 160)
(3) SOC 008 Sense and Nonsense in Social Research OR
STAT 001 Introduction to Statistics
(3) ECON 001B Introduction to Microeconomic Analysis OR
MGMT 120 Principles of Marketing
(6) Select two from the following:
FACS 010 Nutrition & Wellness
FACS 050 The Family & Social Issues
FACS 140 Family Resource Management (passing score on WPE)

b. Required Upper Division Courses (24 units)
(3) FACS 130A History of Western Costume
(3) FACS 130B Contemporary Costume
(3) FACS 131 Quality Analysis: Apparel (FACS 031, FACS 032)
(3) FACS 133 Creative Principles of Apparel Design (FACS 031 and INTD 020)
(3) FACS 134 Introduction to Fashion Marketing (ECON 001B or MGMT 120)
+++++++++++
+++++++++++

+++++++++++

(3) FACS 135 Merchandise buying (FACS 134)

(3) FACS 136 Fashion Retailing (FACS 134)
(3) FACS 137 Social Psychology of Apparel (SOC 001)

+++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++

c. Electives (3 units)

(3) Select three units from the following:
FACS 132 Product Development: Apparel (FACS 032)

FACS 138 Consumer Issues in Textiles & Clothing (FACS 031)

FACS 139 Textiles and Apparel in the Global Economy (FACS 134 or MGMT 120)

FACS 195C Internship

 

Department of Psychology

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Master of Arts, Counseling Psychology Concentration
Justification:
This Substantive Program Change proposal clarifies the required courses for the Psychology MA, Counseling Psychology Concentration program, streamlines the curriculum from a programmatic and units perspective, and maintains compliance with new and existing Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) requirements for program certification. The 17 program changes include one new course proposal and several modifications and deletions of existing courses. These course level changes are justified largely because they allow us to offer all BBS required courses while still remaining within the 60 unit maximum required by the University. They are programmatically justified because they continue to reflect the breadth and depth of knowledge associated with the field of Counseling Psychology. Examples of course level changes include the addition of a graduate level psychopharmacology course and the combining of couples counseling, spousal/partner abuse, and human sexuality topics into a single three unit course. We also propose to eliminate the catalog section ‘Additional Courses for MFT License’ and incorporate the topics therein into the catalog section ‘Required Courses’. This change is justified by the need to bring degree program requirements and BBS requirements into complete alignment.

Our proposed changes will likely have some programmatic impact on the Master of Science in Counseling degree program in the Department of Counselor Education. First, conversation with program representatives and review of the university catalog shows that they do not have a course in psychopharmacology, which is now required by the Board of Behavioral Sciences. Our proposed addition of a graduate level Advanced Psychopharmacology course may benefit students in their program in that they would be allowed into the class on a space available, instructor approved, basis. Second, we propose reducing the unit requirement of PSYC 250 Alcohol and Chemical Dependency from 3 units to 1 unit, which may affect their decision to continue cross listing it with their EDC 233 course. Third, we will be removing the option for our students to take EDC 231 Diagnosis and Treatment Planning instead of PSYC 268 Advanced Psychopathology because we have moved PSYC 268 into our Required Core Courses category and feel that students should not have cross-listed options for the program core. However, Counselor Education may continue to cross-list PSYC 268 for their students if they choose. Fourth, Counselor Education students are allowed to fulfill their EDC 234 Seminar: Marriage and Family Counseling course requirement with our PSYC 225 Theories and Techniques of Marriage, Family and Child Counseling. Our proposal to change the focus of PSYC 225 to family therapy exclusively and move couples counseling topics to PSYC 236 and child counseling to PSYC 253, is unlikely to have a programmatic impact on Counselor Education because they have an existing child counseling class (EDC 272), they have an Advanced Seminar on Marriage and Family Counseling (EDC 235), and few students opt to take PSYC 225. A copy of correspondence describing the proposed changes to Miguel Martinez, Counselor Education Chair is attached.

The proposed program changes will result in conservation of existing department/college fiscal resources. This will be accomplished by eliminating courses or reducing the unit requirement of courses. For example, PSYC 252 Child Abuse and Neglect and PSYC 254 Spouse/Partner Abuse will be eliminated and their course content will be incorporated into existing courses PSYC 201 and PSYC 256, respectively. PSYC 250 Alcohol and Chemical Dependency will be reduced from 3 units to 1 unit; PSYC 295F will be reduced from 4 units to 3 units; and PSYC 228 will be reduced from 6 units to 5 units. The addition of the proposed Psychopharmacology course will not require additional resources because its units will be offset by the course deletions or unit reductions as described above. In addition, one of our full time tenure track faculty members is intending on offering the course. The scholarly expertise required to carry out our proposed program changes is present in our current full-time faculty, our existing part-time faculty pool, or in our existing plan for new faculty hires.

1. Change the course category for PSYC 210 Theories of Personality from Required Core Courses to Required Courses.

2. Rename PSYC 201 to Professional Issues and Child Abuse Reporting and modify course description to include Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting topics.

3. Rename PSYC 223 to Theories and Techniques of Counseling and Psychotherapy
and modify course description to include theories of psychotherapy topics.

4. Delete PSYC 224 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy and incorporate course
content into PSYC 223.

5. Rename PSYC 225 to Family Therapy and modify course description to reflect course focus on family therapy, omitting couples and child counseling topics which are addressed in PSYC 236 and PSYC 253, respectively.

6. Delete PSYC 229 Practicum Evaluation and incorporate its content into PSYC 228 Practicum.

7. Change the course category for PSYC 268 Advanced Psychopathology from Required Courses to Required Core Courses.

8. Increase the units offered for PSYC 228 Practicum to 5 units that include 4 units of instruction and a 1 unit attached lab. Restructure PSYC 228 as a laboratory course and incorporate the content of PSYC 229 Practicum Evaluation (which will be deleted as a separate course). This proposed change is founded on the nature of instruction required for the course, which is predominantly instructor-student 1:1 supervision and small group instruction and supervision (required by the BBS and state law). PSYC 228 prerequisites are now PSYC 201, PSYC 223, PSYC 227, PSYC 268 and one of PSYC 225, PSYC 235, or PSYC 253.

9. Rename PSYC 236 to Human Sexuality, Partner Abuse, and Couples Counseling and modify course description to include couples counseling and spousal abuse in addition to human sexuality topics. Move PSYC 236 from Additional Courses for MFT license to Required Courses category.

10. Reduce units for PSYC 250 Alcohol and Chemical Dependency: Detection and Treatment from 3 units to 1 unit. Change PSYC 250 course category from Additional Courses for MFT license to Required Courses category.

11. Delete PSYC 252 Child Abuse and Neglect and incorporate course content into PSYC 201.

12. Delete PSYC 254 Spouse/Partner Abuse and incorporate its course content into PSYC 236.

13. Delete course catalog section entitled Additional Courses for MFT License (all courses therein have been deleted or moved).

14. Change status of PSYC 295F Fieldwork in Clinical and Counseling Psychology from an elective course to a required course in the Practicum Requirement category. This change ensures that students fulfill their required 150 hours of client contact by taking all courses in the Practicum Requirement section. PSYC 295F prerequisites are now PSYC 201, PSYC 223, PSYC 227, PSYC 268 and one of PSYC 225, PSYC 235, or PSYC 253.

15. Delete PSYC 293 Fieldwork Evaluation and incorporate its course content into PSYC 295F.

16. Remove PSYC 500B Continued Culminating Experience from the Culminating Requirement category and change the category units to 4. PSYC 500B will remain as an elective course in order to give students the option of enrolling in it should they decide to lengthen the thesis process.

17. Add new course PSYC 220 Psychopharmacology (3 units) to Required Courses category. This change will allow our graduate program to maintain compliance with current BBS requirements. (Note: in order to use this course title, a nonsubstantive course change proposal is concurrently submitted renaming PSYC 117 Psychopharmacology to PSYC 117 Drugs and Behavior).

NEW PROGRAM
OLD PROGRAM
A. Required Core Courses (10 units)
(3) PSYC 200 Methods in Empirical Psychology
(3) PSYC 203 Experimental Design I
(1) PSYC 292 Laboratory
(3) PSYC 268 Advanced Psychopathology
++++++
++++++
B. Required Courses (33 units)
(3) PSYC 201 Professional Issues and Child Abuse Reporting
(3) PSYC 206 Tests and Measurement
(3) PSYC 210 Theories of Personality
(3) PSYC 220 Psychopharmacology
(3) PSYC 223 Theories and Techniques of Counseling and Psychotherapy
++++++
++++++
(3) PSYC 225 Family Therapy
++++++
++++++
OR EDC 234 Seminar: Marriage and Family Counseling
(2) PSYC 227 Pre-Practicum
++++++
++++++
(3) PSYC 235 Counseling of Multicultural Groups
(3) PSYC 236 Human Sexuality, Partner Abuse, and Couples Counseling
(1) PSYC 250 Alcohol and Chemical Dependency: Detection and Treatment
OR EDC 233 Substance Abuse and the Family
(3) PSYC 251 Developmental Processes
(3) PSYC 253 Child Therapy
++++++
++++++
++++++
++++++

 

C. Practicum Requirement (13 units)
(10) PSYC 228 Practicum
(3) PSYC 295F Fieldwork in Clinical and Counseling Psychology


D. Culminating Requirement (4++ units)
(4) PSYC 500A Culminating Experience
+++++++
+++++++

++++++
++++++
++++++
++++++
++++++
++++++
++++++
++++++
++++++
++++++
++++++
++++++

A. Required Core Courses (10 units)
(3) PSYC 200 Methods in Empirical Psychology
(3) PSYC 203 Experimental Design I
(1) PSYC 292 Laboratory
++++++
++++++
(3) PSYC 210 Theories of Personality

B. Required Courses (33 units)
(3) PSYC 201 Professional Issues
++++++
(3) PSYC 206 Tests and Measurement
++++++
++++++
++++++
++++++
(3) PSYC 223 Techniques of Counseling and Psychotherapy
++++++
(3) PSYC 224 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy
(3) PSYC 225 Theories and Techniques of Marriage, Family and Child Counseling
OR EDC 234 Seminar: Marriage and Family Counseling
(2) PSYC 227 Pre-Practicum
(4) PSYC 229 Practicum Evaluation
(3) PSYC 235 Counseling of Multicultural Groups
++++++
++++++
++++++
++++++
++++++
++++++
++++++
++++++
(3) PSYC 251 Developmental Processes
(3) PSYC 253 Child Therapy
(3) PSYC 268 Advanced Psychopathology
OR EDC 231 Diagnosis and Treatment Planning

C. Practicum Requirement (8 units)
(8) PSYC 228 Practicum
++++++
++++++
++++++

D. Culminating Requirement (4-6 units)
(4) PSYC 500A Culminating Experience
(2) PSYC 500B Continued Culminating Experience

Additional Courses for MFT License
(3) PSYC 236 Theories and Techniques of Sexual Counseling
(3) PSYC 250 Alcohol and Chemical Dependency: Detection and Treatment
OR EDC 233 Substance Abuse and the Family
(1) PSYC 252 Child Abuse and Neglect
(1) PSYC 254 Spouse/Partner Abuse