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UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE
PROGRAM CHANGE PROPOSALS

LIST #4– 2003/2004

 List #4 of Course Change Proposals is
located at http://www.csus.edu/acaf/policies/03-04crslst4.stm for your review.

The Curriculum Subcommittee will meet on
Tuesday, October 28, 2003, at 1:30 in SAC 150
to review the Program Change Proposals contained in this list.
(Response due to Academic Affairs by October 28, 2003)

Program Proposals

Past Program Change Proposal Lists:

College of Arts and Letters
College of Education
College of Health and Human Services
College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics
College of Social Sciences & Interdisciplinary Studies

Program Change List #1
Program Change List #2
Program Change List #3

 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS

Department of Art

NON-SUBSTANTIVE

Subject Matter Program (Pre-Credential Preparation

Justification: The ART subject matter program for the single subject teaching credential needs to be revised in order to include new studio courses ART 97 and Art 198. Art history courses ART 111, Art 117A and Art 117B have to be added. The Art 132 Early Childhood Art has been deleted because it is no longer active. Art 53 has been inserted in the core area because it is a prerequisite for the upper division Art 153 Hand-Built Ceramics course.

Art majors wishing to pursue a teaching credential should contact a credential advisor Dr. Anna Wagner-Ott in the Art Department. Students seeking a teaching credential must complete the Professional Education Program in the College of Education in addition to other requirements.
Note: ART 305 (Art in the Public School) is the required learning methods course for students seeking the Preliminary Teaching Credential.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS • BA
Units required for Major: 48
Minimum total units required for BA: 120
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
A: Core Courses (33 Units)

(3) ART 001A Art in the Western World: From Stone Age to End of Middle Ages
(3) ART 001B Art in the Western World: From Renaissance to Present
(3) ART 020A Beginning Drawing
(3) ART 021 Painting (ART 020A or equivalent)
(3) ART 040A Basis Printmaking: Survey OR
ART 040D Basic Printmaking: Relief OR
ART 040E Basic Printmaking: Silk-screen
(3) ART 050 Beginning Ceramics

(3) ART 130 Aesthetics and Art Criticism
(3) ART 133 Understanding and Creating Art (Upper division status)
(3) ART 135 Secondary School Art Education (ART 133 or instructor permission)



B. Breadth and Perspective Courses (18 units)
(3) Select one of the following:
ART 020B
Intermediate Drawing (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 024
Watercolor (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 027
Beginning Color
ART 053
Beginning Hand-built Ceramics
ART 060
Two-Dimensional Composition
ART 070
Form, Space and Vision
ART 074
Beginning Jewelry Design
ART 080
Materials and Methods
ART 088
Sculpture
(3) Select one of the following:
ART 132
Early Childhood Art
ART 137
Art for Exceptional Children
(3) Select one of the following:
ART 120
Advanced Drawing (ART 020B or equivalent)
ART 121
Advanced Painting (ART 021 or equivalent)
ART 124
Advanced Watercolor (ART 024 or equivalent)
ART 125
Life Studio (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 145
Advanced Printmaking
ART 148
Barrio Art for Ethnic Groups
ART 160 Photography in the Arts (One semester of basic photography or instructor permission)
(3) Select one of the following:
Art 150 Advanced Ceramics (ART 050 or equivalent, or instructor permission)
ART 153 Hand-Built Ceramic Techniques (ART 053 or instructor permission)

ARTt 180 Figure sculpture (Art 20A or instructor permission)
(6) Select two of the following:
ART 100 Origins of American Indian Art
ART 101 Art and Photography
ART 103 Greco-Roman Art (ART 001A or equivalent)Art 105 Medieval Art (ART 001A or equivalent)Art 106 Renaissance Art (ART 001A or ART 001B or equivalent)
ART 107 Baroque and Rococo Art (ART 001B or equivalent)
ART 108 19th Century Art (ART 001B or equivalent)
ART 109 20th Century Art (ART 001B or equivalent)
ART 110 American Art (ART 001B or equivalent)
ART 118 Modern Architecture

A: Core Courses (33 Units)

(3) Art 001A Art in the Western World: From Stone Age to End of Middle Ages
(3) ART 001B Art in the Western World: From Renaissance to Present
(3) ART 020A Beginning Drawing
(3) ART 021 Painting (ART 020A or equivalent)
(3) ART 040A Basis Printmaking: Survey OR
(3) ART 040D Basic Printmaking: Relief OR
(3) ART 040E Basic Printmaking: Silk-screen
(3) Art 050 Beginning Ceramics OR
(3) Art 053 Beginning Hand-Built Ceramics
(3) Art 097 Electronic Art
(3) ART 130 Aesthetics and Art Criticism
(3) ART 133 Understanding and Creating Art (Upper division status)
(3) ART 135
Secondary School Art Education (ART 133 or instructor permission)
(3) Art 137 Art for Exceptional Children

B. Breadth and Perspective Courses (15 units)
(3) Select one of the following:
ART 020B
Intermediate Drawing (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 024
Watercolor (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 027
Beginning Color

ART 060
Two-Dimensional Composition
ART 070
Form, Space and Vision
ART 074
Beginning Jewelry Design
ART 080
Materials and Methods
ART 088
Sculpture
(3) Select one of the following:
Art 120 Advanced Drawing (ART 020B or equivalent)
ART 121
Advanced Painting (ART 021 or equivalent) ART 124
Advanced Watercolor (ART 024 or equivalent) ART 125
Life Studio (ART 020A or equivalent)
ART 145
Advanced Printmaking
ART 148
Barrio Art for Ethnic Groups

ART 160 Photography in the Arts (One semester of basic photography or instructor permission)

(3) Select one of the following
ART 150 Advanced Ceramics (ART 050 or Art 050 or equivalent, or instructor instructor permission)
ART 153 Hand-Built Ceramic Techniques (ART 053 or instructors permission)
ARTt 174 Advanced Jewelry Design (ART 074 or equivalent, or instructor permission.)
ART 180 Figure Sculpture (Art 20 A r or equivalent
( (6) Select two of the following:
ART 100 Origins of American Indian Art
ART 101 Art and Photography
ART 103 Greco-Roman Art (Art 001 Or equivalent)
ART 105 Medieval Art (ART 001A or equivalent)
ART 106 Renaissance Art (Art 001A or ART 001B or equivalent) Art 107 Baroque and Rococo Art (ART 001B or equivalent) Art 108 19th Century Art (ART 001B or equivalent)
ART 109 20th Century Art (ART 001B or equivalent)
ART 110 American Art (ART 001B or equivalent)
ART 111 Latin American and Latino Art
ART 112 Contemporary Art (ART 001B or equivalent)
ART 117 A Art of India and Southeast Asia East Asia
ART 117B Art of China and Japan
ART 118 Modern Architecture


 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Department of Child Development

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Child Development Major A: Academic Program

Justification: This proposal reflects two major changes in the Major A Academic Program. First, the new program incorporates course changes made in the revision of the Major B Subject Matter Program during spring of 2003. Some of these course changes also impact Major A (changes in units for specific courses, for example). Second, the proposal increases the required elective units and allows students the option of organizing electives in academic or career-related emphases. The development of suggested emphases is in follow-up to recommendations from the department’s recent program review.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
Units Required: 48


A. Required Foundation Courses (12-13
units)

(3-4) Bio 10 Basic Biological Concepts OR
Bio 20 Bio: Human Perspective OR
Bio 5 General Biology
(3) CHDV 30 Human Development
(3) FACS 50 Family and Social Issues
(3) CHDV 133 Research Methods

B. Required Upper Division Courses (25
units)

(3) CHDV 131 Language Development
(3) CHDV 135 Cross Cultural Child Dev.
(5) CHDV 137 Cognitive Development
(5) CHDV 138 Social/Emotional Dev.
(3) FACS 154 Issues in Parenting
(3) CHDV 136 Developmental Experiences,
Methods and Curriculum OR COMS-
FACS 108 Family Communication
(3) CHDV 132 Fieldwork in Child Dev.


C. Electives (10-11 units)

An additional 10-11 units must be selected from the list of approved electives in the Child Development Handbook available from Child Development advisors. Additional electives may be added to the list if approved by a Child Development advisor.

Units Required: 49-50


A. Required Foundation Courses (12-13
units)

(3-4) Bio 10 Basic Biological Concepts OR
Bio 20 Bio: Human Perspective OR
Bio 5 General Biology
(3) CHDV 30 Human Development OR
CHDV 35 Child and Adolescent Dev.
(3) FACS 50 Family and Social Issues
(3) CHDV 133 Research Methods

B. Required Upper Division Courses (22
units)

(3) CHDV 131 Language Development
(3) CHDV 135 Cross Cultural Child Dev.
(4) CHDV 137 Cognitive Development
(4) CHDV 138 Social/Emotional Dev.
(3) FACS 154 Issues in Parenting
(3) CHDV 136 Developmental Experiences,
Methods and Curriculum OR COMS-
FACS 108 Family Communication
(2) CHDV 132 Fieldwork in Child Dev.


C. Electives (15 units)

An additional 15 units of coursework focused on an academic or career-related emphasis must be selected from the list available in the Child Development Handbook. It is highly recommended that students confer with faculty advisors when choosing an emphasis.

 

Child Development Major B Elementary Subject Matter Program

Justification: Very recent changes in requirements of the State Board of Education as well as the Commission on Teacher Credentialing will mean that students pursing a multiple subjects credential must take the CSET subject matter examination, even if they are enrolled in an approved subject matter program. In addition, the Commission has made changes in the Assessment requirements (Standard 6) of the Standards for Elementary Subject Matter programs. Consequently, the Major B program will no longer need to require a portfolio as part of its assessment plan. This program change therefore eliminates the capstone seminar class (where the portfolios were created) from the Major B curriculum. This change lowers the total units in the program by one unit.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
CHILD DEVELOPMENT 34-35 units
CHDV 30 (3) Human Development
FACS 50 (3) The Family & Social Issues
CHDV 133 (3) Research in Hum. Devel.
FACS 154 (3) Issues in Parenting

CHDV 135 (3) Cross-Cultural Child Devel.
CHDV138 (5) Soc. & Emotional Devel.
CHDV 137 (5) Cognitive Development
CHDV 131 (3) Language and Learning
CHDV 136 OR FACS 108 (3) Dev Experiences/Curriculum
CHDV 151 (optional) (1) Portfolio Seminar
No early Field Exp required (0)
CHDV 132 (3) Fieldwork in Child Dev.

LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 18 units
English 30 (3) Intro to Creative Writing
English 1A or 2B (3) College Composition
English 20 (3) Expository English
Pick one: COMS 4, 5, THEA 30 (3) Oral Communication
Pick one: COMS 2, ENGL 1C, HIST 35, (3) Critical Thinking SOC 8, JOUR 50, PHIL 4, PSYC 49
Pick One: ENGL 11A, 50A, 50B, (3) Literature
71A, 71B, 116B, 170, 180, 190

MATHEMATICS 9 units
Math 17 (3) Intro to Exploration
Math 107A (3) Fundamental concepts
Math 107B (3) Fundamental concepts

KINESIOLOGY 6 units

KINS 172 (3) Movement Education
KINS176 (3) Perceptual Motor Devel.

VISUAL/PERFORMING ARTS 12 units

MUSC 5, 8 (3) Beg. Theory/Basic Music
MUSC 18, 101, 118, 119, 127, 129 (3) Music
THEA 1, 2, 3, 16, 102, 103A, 104, (3) Theatre and Dance
115, 117, 118, 144, 162, 173A (3)
ART 132, 133, 137, 148 Art

NATURAL/PHYSICAL SCIENCES 12 to 18
BIO 5 or 10 (3 or 4) General Bio/
BIO 108 (1) Lab Investigations
Pick one: GEOL 1, 1L, 8, 8L, 10, 10L, 11, (3 or 4) Geology/Earth Sciences
50, 118, 121, 130, 140, 184, ASTR 4
PHYS 2, 5A, 7, 100 (2 to 4) Physics
CHEM 6A, 106 (3 to 5) Chemistry

SOCIAL SCIENCES 24 units
HIST 17A OR 17B (3) US History
GOVT 1 OR 113 (3) Govt/Political Thought
HIST 4, 5, 6, 7, 50, 51, 122A, 183A/B (3) World Hist/Civilizations
HRS 10, 11, 70, PHIL 2, 6, GOVT 10 (3) Ideas and Ethics
ECON 1A, 1B, 104, ANTH 2, SOC 1 (3) Economics and Anthro.
GEOG 2, 100, 118 (3) Geography
ANTH 101, 106, 135, 186, EDBM104, (3) Race & Ethnicity
170, ETHN 11, 100, 110, 111, 130,
140, 170, 180, GOVT 165, HIST 177,
SOC 118, 120
ANTH 183, EDTE 165, HIST 167, (3) Gender
WOMS 110, 115, 137, 170

HEALTH
none

INTEGRATIVE STUDY
none

NO CREDENTIAL REQUIREMENTS
OR PREREQUISITES





OTHER REQUIREMENTS

Foreign Language (??)

TOTAL UNITS 115-122*

CHILD DEVELOPMENT 31 units
CHDV 35 (3) Infant thru Adolescent Devel.
FACS 50, ETHN 166, 167, 173 (3) The Family and Soc. Issues
CHDV 133 (3) Research in Hum. Dev.

CHDV 135 (3) Cross-Cultural Child Dev.
CHDV138 (4) Soc/Emotional Devel.
CHDV 137 (4) Cognitive Development
CHDV 131 (3) Language and Learning
CHDV 136 (3) Dev Experiences/Curriculum

CHDV 35F (2) Early Fieldwork Experience
CHDV 132 (2) Fieldwork in Child Dev.

LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 12-15 units


English 1A (3) College Composition
English 20 (3) Expository English
COMS 5 (3) Communication Experience
Pick One: COMS 2, ENGL 1C, (3) Critical Thinking
SOC 8, JOUR 50, PHIL 4, PSYC 49
ENGL 116B or (3) Children's Lit Classics
EDTE 120 Literature for Children

MATHEMATICS 9 units
Math 17 (3) Intro to Exploration
Math 107A (3) Fundamental concepts
Math 107B (3) Fundamental concepts

KINESIOLOGY 3 units
KINS 172 (3) Movement Education


VISUAL/PERFORMING ARTS 9 units
MUSC 101 (3) Experiences in Music

THEA 118 (3) Children's Theatre

ART 133 (3) Understanding/creating art

NATURAL/PHYSICAL SCIENCES 15 units
BIO 7 (4) Intro to Biology

GEOL 8 + 8T (4) Earth Sci for Teachers +Lab


PHYS 107 (4) Conceptual Physics
CHEM 106 (3) Intro to Chem concepts

SOCIAL SCIENCES 21 units
HIST 17A (3) US History 1607-1877
GOVT 1 (3) Essentials of Govt.
HIST 132 (3) Topics in World History

LIBS 110 CAL STUDIES * (3) California Studies
HIST 50 (3) World Civilizations

GEOG 100 * (3) Themes in World Geo.
HIST 187 (3) Topics in US Hist. 1600-1900 OR:
ECON 104 Intro. To U.S. Economy

*two courses together fulfill
advanced study/writing intensive requirement


HEALTH

HLSC 136 (2)r School Health Ed.

INTEGRATIVE STUDY
INTEGRATE INTO CHDV 136 COURSE

CREDENTIAL REQUIREMTS/PREREQS 6 units

EDBM 170 (3) Intro to Bilingual Ed.
EDS 100 A/B (3) Education of Exceptional
Children/Youth +Lab

OTHER REQUIREMENTS

Foreign Language ??

TOTAL UNITS 108-111* *without foreign language

 

Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation and School Psychology

NON-SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Early Childhood Special Education Credential

Justification: EDS 210A/B was approved as part of the Early Childhood Special Education Credential program and was inadvertently left out of the 2002-2004 catalog. EDS 233, Student Teaching Seminar: Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe, has been used up to now for the Early Childhood Special Education credential candidates. Creating EDS 234, Directed Fieldwork Seminar: Early Childhood Special Education, will ease advising and staffing difficulties by giving these students a number specific to their program.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
REQUIREMENTS – ECSE SPECIALIST CREDENTIAL – LEVEL I

Prerequisites required:

• 30 hours documented field experience with young children (birth to 5 years)
• Course work in child development or related field approved by ECSE Coordinator
• (3) CHDV 030 Human Development

SEQUENCE 1

(3) EDS 119
Introduction to Inclusive Education
(3) EDS 130A / B
Typical and Atypical Developmental Characteristics and Outcomes for Young Children with Disabilities / Lab (CHDV 030 or approved equivalent)
(3) EDS 131A / B
Introduction to Family Centered Service Delivery in Early Childhood Special Education / Lab (EDS 130A and EDS 130B or its equivalent)
(3) EDS 215A / B
School and Community: Systems of Service / Lab
(3) EDS 220
Language and Literacy in General and Special Education I (Admission to the Mild/Moderate Specialist Credential, Moderate/Severe Specialist Credential, or Special Education Master's Programs at CSUS)

SEQUENCE 2

(3) EDS 211A / B
Curriculum, Intervention Strategies, and Environments in ECSE I: Infancy / Lab (EDS 130A /EDS 130B, EDS 131A /EDS 131B, and EDS 210A /EDS 210B or their equivalents; may be concurrently enrolled)
(3) EDS 212A / B
Curriculum, Intervention Strategies, and Environments in ECSE II: Preschool / Lab (EDS 130A /EDS 130B, EDS 131A /EDS 131B, EDS 210A /EDS 210B, and EDS 211A /EDS 211B or their equivalents; may be concurrently enrolled)
(3) EDS 216A / B
Movement, Mobility, Sensory, and Specialized Health Care/Lab
(1) EDS 233
Student Teaching Seminar: Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe (Corequisite: EDS 472)
(10-20) EDS 474
Directed Field Experience: Infants with Special Educational Needs (Corequisite: EDS 233) OR
EDS 476
Internship: Infants with Special Educational Needs (Corequisite: EDS 233) AND
EDS 475
Directed Field Experiences: Preschoolers with Special Educational Needs (Corequisite: EDS 233) OR
EDS 477
Internship: Preschoolers with Special Educational Needs (Corequisite: EDS 233)

REQUIREMENTS – ECSE SPECIALIST CREDENTIAL – LEVEL I

Prerequisites required:

• 30 hours documented field experience with young children (birth to 5 years)
• Course work in child development or related field approved by ECSE Coordinator
• (3) CHDV 030 Human Development

SEQUENCE 1


(3) EDS 119
Introduction to Inclusive Education
(3) EDS 130A / B
Typical and Atypical Developmental Characteristics and Outcomes for Young Children with Disabilities / Lab (CHDV 030 or approved equivalent)
(3) EDS 131A / B
Introduction to Family Centered Service Delivery in Early Childhood Special Education / Lab (EDS 130A and EDS 130B or its equivalent)
(3) EDS 210A/B Assessment and Evaluation in ECSE/Lab
(3) EDS 215A / B
School and Community: Systems of Service / Lab
(3) EDS 220
Language and Literacy in General and Special Education I (Admission to the Mild/Moderate Specialist Credential, Moderate/Severe Specialist Credential, or Special Education Master's Programs at CSUS)

SEQUENCE 2

(3) EDS 211A / B
Curriculum, Intervention Strategies, and Environments in ECSE I: Infancy / Lab (EDS 130A /EDS 130B, EDS 131A /EDS 131B, and EDS 210A /EDS 210B or their equivalents; may be concurrently enrolled)

(3) EDS 212A / B
Curriculum, Intervention Strategies, and Environments in ECSE II: Preschool / Lab (EDS 130A /EDS 130B, EDS 131A /EDS 131B, EDS 210A /EDS 210B, and EDS 211A /EDS 211B or their equivalents; may be concurrently enrolled)

(3) EDS 216A/B Movement, Mobility, Sensory, and Specialized Health Care/Lab

(1) EDS 234 Directed Fieldwork Seminar: Early Childhood Special Education (EDS 474/475 and 476/477)

(10-20) EDS 474 Directed Field Experience: Infants with Special Educational Needs (Corequisite: EDS 234) OR

EDS 476 Internship: Infants with Special Educational Needs (Corequisite: EDS 234) AND

EDS 475 Directed Field Experiences Preschoolers with Special Educational Needs (Corequisite: EDS 234) OR

EDS 477 Internship: Preschoolers with Special Educational Needs (Corequisite: EDS 234)


SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Level II Program - Education Specialist: Mild/Moderate, Moderate/Severe, and Early Childhood Special Education Credentials

Justification: The modified (was previously the alternate program) Level II Program has been determined to be more effective in allowing students to pursue areas of needed professional growth. Both programs were offered for several years. Data from students and faculty have shown that the modified program is more effective in meeting the Level II objectives of professional training during the first five years of teaching under a Level I Preliminary Credential.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM

Level II Mild/Moderate/Severe Course Requirements

Note: Besides the Level II requirements listed
below, EDS has a CTC and university-approved
Alternative Level II Program. Information
about the Alternative Program is available
from the EDS Department Office. Also, Level II
requirements can be coordinated with pursuit
of the MA in Education, Special Education Option
for candidates meeting admission requirements
to that program. Faculty advisors can assist in
coordinating the programs.

(2) EDS 252 Advanced Teacher Induction Seminar

(3) EDS 253A/B Advanced Studies in
Curriculum, Assessment, and Transition
Planning/Lab

(3) EDS 254A/B Developing Positive
Supports for Students with Behavior
Problems/Lab

(3) EDS 255A/B Advanced Studies in
Interprofessional and Community
Collaboration/Lab

(6) Electives (at least 2 courses) from a
specific emphasis area approved by Level II
faculty advisor; advisor may approve 45 hours
of specified in service activities in lieu of one
course.

(1) EDS 256 Advanced Professional
Assessment (Must be taken in the final
semester of Level II coursework at CSUS)

Level II Program—Mild/Moderate/Severe/ECSE
Specialist Credentials

Prerequisites:

1) Completion of a valid Preliminary Level I
Specialist Credential;

2) A public school teaching position working
with students officially designated as receiving
special education services; and

3) Submit an Application for Level II Clear
Specialist Credential program (see
Department –Eureka Hall, rm. 316)

Required Courses (18 units)

(3) EDS 252A/B Advanced Teacher Induction
Seminar/Lab

(6) EDS 267A/B Advanced Studies in
Collaboration & Teaching

(6) EDS 268A/B Advanced Studies in
Curriculum, Assessment & Behavior Management

(3) One elective course (Level II advisor
approval required)


Education Specialist: Mild/Moderate (M/M) and/or Moderate/Severe (Mod/Svr) Credentials and Multiple Subject and Education Specialist: M/M and/or Mod/Svr Credentials

Justification: This program proposal for the three special education credential pathways represents a reconfiguring of catalog copy and the inclusion of elements that were approved for addition to the multiple subject credential program. It also includes all program changes approved since the last catalog was written. It includes language that clarifies questions that students and faculty have expressed.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM

Prerequisites to the Level I M/M and M/S Programs:

(3) EDBM 104 Multicultural Education for a
Pluralistic Society - Multiple Subject
(2) EDS 100A / Education of Exceptional
Children/Youth (Corequisite: EDS
100B )
(1) EDS 100B Education of Exceptional
Children/Youth Lab (Corequisite:
EDS 100A )
(3) EDS 101 Consultation Skills in Inclusive and
Supportive Environments
(2) EDS 130A / Typical and Atypical
Developmental Characteristics and
Outcomes for Young Children with
Disabilities (CHDV 030 or approved
equivalent. Corequisite: EDS 130B)
(1) EDS 130B Typical and Atypical Development
Characteristics and Outcomes for
Young Children with Disabilities
Lab (CHDV 030 or approved
equivalent. Corequisite: EDS 130A)

Prerequisites to the Level I ECSE Program:
• 30 hours documented field experience with young
children (birth to 5 years)
• Coursework in child development or related field
approved by ECSE Coordinator
• (3) CHDV 030 Human Development

Level I Mild/Moderate or Moderate/Severe (No Other
Credential Held)

The following program is designed to serve those
candidates who hold no other teaching credential and who
are not currently teaching in any classroom. The program described below is altered slightly for candidates who are currently teaching, e.g. on an emergency credential. These candidates are not required to take EDS 411, EDS 471, or
EDTE 421A in Sequence 1. This arrangement is designed
to ensure that all beginning candidates have substantial
contact with the field.

SEQUENCE 1
(3) EDS 119 Introduction to Inclusive Education
(3) EDS 120A / B Management of Learning and
Teaching / Lab
(3) EDS 220 Language and Literacy in General
and Special Education: Part I
(3) EDS 225A / B Assessment of Learning and
Teaching Across the Educational
Continuum / Lab
(3) EDS 292A / B Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in
Inclusive and Supportive
Educational Environments / Lab
(4-5) EDS 411* Initial Student Teaching:
Moderate/Severe OR
EDS 471 Initial Student Teaching:
Mild/Moderate OR
EDTE 421A Student Teaching

*Not required of candidates teaching in their own
classrooms. Candidates enrolling in this experience will not
be required to register for the lab or "B" sections of
methods courses during the semester of enrollment. With
advisor approval, may be taken either in Sequence 1 or 2.

SEQUENCE 2

(3) EDS 122A / B The Social Sciences: Teaching and
Learning in Inclusive Environments / Lab
(3) EDS 123A / B Math: Teaching and Learning in
Inclusive Environments / Lab
(3) EDS 124A / B Science: Teaching and Learning in
Inclusive Environments / Lab
(3) EDS 221 Language and Literacy in General and
Special Education II (EDS 220)

SEQUENCE 3
(3) EDS 273 Instructional Design and Strategies for
Students with Mild/Moderate/Severe
Learning Challenges (Corequisite: To be
taken with final student teaching
experience in special education.)
(3) EDS 216A / B Movement, Mobility, Sensory, and
Specialized Health Care / Lab
(1) EDS 233 Student Teaching Seminar:
Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe
(Corequisite: EDS 472)
(10-15) EDS 472 Student Teaching: Mild/Moderate
(Corequisites: EDS 233) OR
EDS 473 Student Internship: Mild/Moderate OR
EDS 412 Student Teaching: Moderate/Severe
(Corequisites: EDS 233) OR
EDS 421 Student Internship: Moderate/Severe

Level I Mild/Moderate or Moderate/Severe (Multiple or Single Subject Already Held)

SEQUENCE 1

(3) EDS 119 Introduction to Inclusive Education
(3) EDS 120A / B Management of Learning and
Teaching / Lab
(3) EDS 220 Language and Literacy in General
and Special Education I (Admission
to the Mild/Moderate Specialist
Credential, Moderate/Severe
Specialist Credential, or Special
Education Master's Programs at
CSUS)
(3) EDS 292A / B Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in
Inclusive and Supportive Educational
Environments / Lab

SEQUENCE 2


(3) EDS 216A / B Movement, Mobility, Sensory, and
Specialized Health Care / Lab
(3) EDS 221 Language and Literacy in General and
Special Education II (EDS 220)
(3) EDS 225A / B Assessment of Learning and Teaching
Across the Educational Continuum / Lab
(3) EDS 273 Instructional Design and Strategies for
Students with Mild/Moderate/Severe
Learning Challenges (Corequisite: To be
taken with final student teaching
experience in special education)
(1) EDS 233 Student Teaching Seminar:
Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe
(Corequisite: EDS 472)
(10-15) EDS 472 Student Teaching: Mild/Moderate
(Corequisites: EDS 233) OR
EDS 473 Student Internship: Mild/Moderate OR
EDS 412 Student Teaching: Moderate/Severe
(Corequisites: EDS 233) OR
EDS 421
Student Internship: Moderate/Severe

Note: Special Education Programs are in the process of revision. Please see department office for current program requirements.

Prerequisites to the Education Specialist: Mild/Moderate (M/M) and Moderate/Severe (Mod./Svr.) Credentials and Multiple Subject (MS) and Education Specialist: M/M and/or Mod./Svr. Credentials

Units Required: 9

(3) EDS 100A/B Education of Exceptional Children/Youth-Lab

(3) EDS 101 Consultation Skills in Inclusive and Supportive Environments

(3) EDS 130A/B Typical and Atypical Developmental Characteristics and Outcomes for Young Children With Disabilities (CHDV 030 or approved equivalent)


Requirements - Multiple Subject (MS) and Education Specialist: M/M and/or Mod./Svr. Credentials

Units required: 71-76 plus the prerequisite units noted above.

LEVEL I

(3) EDS 119 Introduction to Inclusive Education

(3) EDS 120A/B Management of Teaching and Learning/Lab

(3) EDS 122A/B Social Science: Teaching and Learning in Inclusive Environments/Lab

(3) EDS 123A/B Mathematics: Teaching and Learning in Inclusive Environments/Lab

(3) EDS 124A/B Science: Teaching and Learning in Inclusive Environments/Lab

(3) EDS 216A/B Movement, Mobility, Sensory, and Specialized Health Care

(3) EDS 220 Language and Literacy in General and Special Education: Part I

(3) EDS 221 Language and Literacy in General and Special Education: Part II (EDS 220)

(3) EDS 225A/B Assessment of Learning and Teaching Across the Educational Continuum/Lab

(1) EDS 233 Student Teaching Seminar: Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe (To be taken twice – First it must be taken within the first two semesters of prog. or concurrently with initial student teaching. It must also be taken during the final phase of student teaching.)

(3) EDS 273 Instructional Design and Strategies for Students with Learning Challenges

(3) EDS 291A/B Technology in Special Education/Lab

(3) EDS 292 Teaching English Learners in Inclusive Classrooms (EDBM 170)

(3) EDBM 104 Multicultural Education

(3) EDBM 170 Introduction to Bilingual Education

(1) EDTE 307 Seminar in Problems of Teaching, A (Co-requisite: EDTE 420B)

(1) EDTE 317 Visual and Performing Arts Methods for the Diverse K-8 Classroom

(10) EDTE 420B Student Teaching-Multiple Subject Credential (Corequisite: EDTE 307)

(4) EDTE 421A* Student Teaching, Phase II OR

(5) EDS 411* Initial Student Teaching: Moderate/Severe OR

(5) EDS 471* Initial Student Teaching: Mild/Moderate

(10) EDS 412* Student Teaching: Moderate/Severe
OR
(15) EDS 421* Student Internship: Moderate/Severe

(10) EDS 472* Student Teaching: Mild/Moderate OR

(15) EDS 473* Student Internship: Mild/Moderate

*To be taken concurrently with EDS 233

Note: To obtain clear multiple subject credential the following coursework is required:

HLSC 136
EDTE 232


Requirements - Education Specialist: M/M and/or Mod./Svr. Credentials (Multiple Subject or Single Subject Credential Already Held)

Units required: 47-52 plus the prerequisite units noted above.

LEVEL I

(3) EDS 119 Introduction to Inclusive Education

(3) EDS 120A/B Management of Teaching and Learning/Lab

(3) EDS 216A/B Movement, Mobility, Sensory, and Specialized Health Care

(3) EDS 220 Language and Literacy in General and Special Education: Part I

(3) EDS 221 Language and Literacy in General and Special Education: Part II (EDS 220)

(3) EDS 225A/B Assessment of Learning and Teaching Across the Educational Continuum/Lab
(1) EDS 233 Student Teaching Seminar: Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe (To be taken twice-First it must be taken within the first two semesters of prog. or concurrently with initial student teaching. It must also be taken during the final phase of student teaching.)

(3) EDS 273 Instructional Design and Strategies for Students with Learning Challenges

(3) EDS 291A/B Technology in Special Education/Lab

(3) EDS 292 Teaching English Learners in Inclusive Classrooms (EDBM 170)

(3) EDBM 104 Multicultural Education

(5) EDS 411* Initial Student Teaching: Moderate/Severe OR

(5) EDS 471* Initial Student Teaching: Mild/Moderate

(10) EDS 412* Student Teaching: Moderate/Severe
OR
(15) EDS 421* Student Internship: Moderate/Severe

(10) EDS 472* Student Teaching: Mild/Moderate OR

(15) EDS 473* Student Internship: Mild/Moderate

*To be taken concurrently with EDS 233

Requirements - Education Specialist: M/M and/or Mod./Svr. Credentials (No Other Credential Held)

Units required: 56-61 plus the prerequisite units noted above.

LEVEL I

(3) EDS 119 Introduction to Inclusive Education

(3) EDS 120A/B Management of Teaching and Learning/Lab

(3) EDS 122A/B Social Science: Teaching and Learning in Inclusive Environments/Lab

(3) EDS 123A/B Mathematics: Teaching and Learning in Inclusive Environments/Lab

(3) EDS 124A/B Science: Teaching and Learning in Inclusive Environments/Lab

(3) EDS 216A/B Movement, Mobility, Sensory, and Specialized Health Care

(3) EDS 220 Language and Literacy in General and Special Education: Part I

(3) EDS 221 Language and Literacy in General and Special Education: Part II (EDS 220)

(3) EDS 225A/B Assessment of Learning and Teaching Across the Educational Continuum/Lab

(1) EDS 233 Student Teaching Seminar: Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe (to be taken twice – First it must be taken within the first two semesters of prog. or concurrently with initial student teaching. It must also be taken during the final phase of student teaching.)

(3) EDS 273 Instructional Design and Strategies for Students with Learning Challenges


(3) EDS 291A/B Technology in Special Education/Lab

(3) EDS 292 Teaching English Learners in Inclusive Classrooms (EDBM 170)

(3) EDBM 104 Multicultural Education

(5) EDS 411* Initial Student Teaching: Moderate/Severe OR

(5) EDS 471* Initial Student Teaching: Mild/Moderate

(10) EDS 412* Student Teaching: Moderate/Severe
OR
(15) EDS 421* Student Internship: Moderate/Severe

(10) EDS 472* Student Teaching: Mild/Moderate OR

(15) EDS 473* Student Internship: Mild/Moderate

*To be taken concurrently with EDS 233


Department of Teacher Education

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Certificate in Educational Technology

Justification: The Certificate in Computers in the Classroom is being brought into the 21st Century and the title updated. Three options will now be available: Option 1 is for credentialed teachers or candidates in a current credential program; Option 2 is for credentialed teachers seek a Master of Arts in Education (Curriculum and Instruction) with an elective area in educational technology; and Option 3 is for anyone interested in teaching with technology, specifically seeking the Master of Arts in Education (Educational Technology). In the 1980’, when these courses were designed, credential candidates were not required, as a matter of course, to take classes requiring the learning of technology. Until recently, newly credentialed teachers were only required to complete the first course in the Certificate series (EDTE 230/231) by their fifth year of teaching. Today, new CTC regulations require pre-service teachers meet the 230/231 objectives during their program. Since new teachers will have already met the objectives required in the traditional 230/231 courses (now offered in Teacher Education as EDTE 330A and EDTE 330B), it is no longer realistic to require this course as part of the computer certificate program. Additionally, other computer courses have not been updated since the early 1980s. The Internet and similar technologies have changed educational technology practice and theory and that should be reflected in our courses. Finally, the educational technology specialist of today, instead of being the ‘lone wolf’ concerned only with his or her classroom, must possess significant staff development skills in order to disseminate knowledge and lead other teachers in integrating technology into teaching and learning.

Overview of Changes:

1. Change Title of program from Certificate Program for Computers in the Classroom
TO Certificate Program in Educational Technology

2. All courses and titles updated to reflect change of focus from computers only to educational technology in general, which would include the Internet.

3. EDTE 230/231 deleted as a requirement (now a prerequisite)

4. Reduction from 15 to 12 units.

5. Elimination of elective options (EDTE 235 was an elective and is now required). EDTE 232,
EDTE 233, and EDTE 234 are still required.

6. EDTE 232 prerequisites changed to EDTE 230 or EDTE 231; EDTE 330 and EDTE 330B;
EDS 271A/B or equivalent.

7. EDTE 233 title changed to : Teaching Problem-Solving with Educational Technology.
Prerequisites changed to EDTE 230 or EDTE 231; or EDTE 330 and EDTE 330B; or equivalent.
Sentence added to update content: Includes Internet problem-solving and principles of distributed
learning.

8. EDTE 234 title changed to Curriculum and Staff Development with Educational Technology.
Prerequisites changed to EDTE 232 or equivalent. Sentence added to update content: Includes the
Internet and staff development.

9. EDTE 235 title changed to Enhancing Curriculum with Multimedia and the Web. Prerequisites
changed to EDTE 232 or equivalent. Sentence added to update content: Includes Internet-based multimedia.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
None


Required Courses: 12 units
(3) EDTE 230 or EDTE 231
(3) EDTE 232
(3) EDTE 234

(3) EDTE 235


Elective Courses: ( 3 units)

3 units of elective coursework can substitute for 3 units of courses listed above (e.g., Special
Education Technology course; course taken
at another university)

Elective work may be completed through approved courses and workshops related to use of computers in education. Contact an advisor in the Computer Certificate Program for information regarding approved electives

Prerequisites: EDTE 230 or EDTE 231; or
EDTE 330A and EDTE 330B; or EDTE 330

Required Courses: 12 units
Option 1: 12 units
(3) EDTE 232
(3) EDTE 233
(3) EDTE 234
(3) EDTE 235

OR

Option 2: 12 units

(3) EDTE 281
(3) EDTE 283
(3) EDTE 284
(3) EDTE 285


COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Department of Kinesiology and Health Science

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Master of Science Degree in Kinesiology

Justification: Removal of KINS 270 from core required courses. Currently the core required courses are KINS 210, KINS 211, KINS 260, and KINS 270. The core would decrease to 7 units with the 3 units from KINS 270 going into the respective options as directed by advisors.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
Required Courses (10 units)
(3) KINS 210 Research Methods in Kinesiology
(1) KINS 211 Research Seminar
(3) KINS 260 Psychology of Sport and Exercise
(3) KINS 270 Instructional Strategies for Physical Activity and Sport

Option Requirements (16 units)
1. Exercise Physiology Option
(3) KINS 250 Advanced Exercise Physiology Lab
(3) KINS 254 Advanced Biomechanics
(3) KINS 259 Research in Exercise Physiology
(7) Electives selected in consultation with advisor


2. Sport Performance Option
(6) Select two of the following:
KINS 203 Specificity of Conditioning
KINS 236 Sport and Society
KINS 262 Psychological Aspects of Peak Performance
(10) Electives selected in consultation with advisor
OR Strength/Conditioning Concentration
(3) KINS 203 Specificity of Conditioning
(3) Select one of the following:
KINS 236 Sport and Society
KINS 258 Research in Motor Learning
KINS 262 Psychological Aspects of Peak Performance
(4) KINS 295 Practicum
(6) Electives selected in consultation with advisor




A. Culminating Experience (4 units)

(1-4) KINS 500 Culminating Experience

Required Courses (7 units)
KINS 210 Research Methods in Kinesiology – 3 units
KINS 211 Research Seminar – 1 unit
KINS 260 Psychology of Sport – 3 units


Option Requirements (19 units)
1. Exercise Physiology Option

(3) KINS 250 Advanced Exercise Physiology Lab
(3) KINS 252 Advanced Exercise Physiology
(3) KINS 254 Advanced Biomechanics
(3) KINS 259 Research in Exercise Physiology
(7) Electives selected in consultation with advisor

2. Sport Performance Option
(6) Select two of the following:
KINS 203 Specificity of Conditioning
KINS 236 Sport and Society
KINS 262 Psychological Aspects of Peak Performance
(13) Electives selected in consultation with advisor
OR Strength/Conditioning Concentration
(3) KINS 203 Specificity of Conditioning
(3) Select one of the following:
KINS 236 Sport and Society
KINS 258 Research in Motor Learning
KINS 262 Psychological Aspects of Peak Performance
(4) KINS 295 Practicum
(9) Electives selected in consultation with advisor

A. Culminating Experience (4 units)
(1-4) KINS 500 Culminating Experience

 

NON-SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Master of Science Degree in Kinesiology

Justification: The current Exercise Physiology option is being renamed Exercise Science. The reasons behind the name change include the desire to appropriately represent the course specializations being offered in the option, which extend beyond exercise physiology. Students may also have an emphasis in biomechnaics. The name change allows for the option listed on transcripts and diplomas to accurately represent the students' course of study.

 

COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS

Department of Physics and Astronomy

NEW PROGRAM

Certificate of Scientific Instrument Development

Justification: The Physics Department believes that to better serve both the needs of our regional technology sector as well as the professional preparation of students pursuing graduate degrees in the sciences, an instrumentation certificate program is needed. The certificate noted on a transcript will be useful to alert potential employers and graduate admissions committees of the specialized skills of these students. Note that one of the required courses could be taken outside the Department of Physics and Astronomy using courses better suited to the needs of chemists or geologists. The remaining courses in the program are considered more general and suitable for anyone in the sciences. Except for the shop class, all of the other courses already exist so that this is essentially a “paper” program; although the instructors will be mindful that their audience may be broadened in these courses by students choosing to pursue this certificate and not majoring in a science discipline (i.e. engineering students). However, even with regard to the shop class, our department currently offers a shop class under the auspices of Physics 99 and only a slight modification of this course (Physical Science 75) will be necessary to serve the needs of this program.

A certificate in Scientific Instrument Development is available through the Department of Physics and Astronomy. The Scientific Instrument Development certificate program focuses not only on using scientific instruments, but also will teach the fundamentals of electronics, computer interfacing, and machining. Students that earn this certificate will be prepared to design, prototype, and construct instruments for a wide range of scientific applications. A minimum of 11 units is required.

Specific course requirements are:
(2) PHSC 75 Machine Shop Practices
(4) PHYS 115 Electronics and Instrumentation (PHYS 011C or PHYS 005B instructor permission)
(3) PHYS 116 Advanced Electronics and Instrumentation (PHYS 115)
(2 – 4) Select one of the following:
(2) PHYS 175 Advanced Physics Laboratory (6 units of upper division physics)
(4) CHEM 133 Chemical Instrumentation (CHEM 031, CHEM 140B or CHEM 142 instructor permission, ENGL 020 or an equivalent second semester composition course)
(3) CHEM 141 Physical Chemistry Laboratory (ENGL 020 or an equivalent second semester composition course, CHEM 140A, CHEM 140B or CHEM 142 instructor permission, CHEM 140B may be concurrent)
(2-3) GEOL 197 Advanced Laboratory Techniques in Geology (appropriate upper division courses and instructor permission)

Units Required: Lower Division 2 units
Upper Division 9-11 units
Total 11-13 units

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

BA Physics

Justification: Add: 2 units of new course, Senior Project, Physics 191, including the possibility that projects of a pedagogical nature may be included where appropriate. 1 unit deleted from Physics 190.
Units Required: Lower Division 37 (unchanged)
Upper Division 29 (increase of 1 unit)
Total 66 (net increase of 1 unit)
With 51+3 units of G.E., minus 9 overlap, this makes 111 required units, leaving room for 9 units of free electives. The Physics Department believes that the B.A. degree needs some strengthening so that these students, who are often not headed for a Physics advanced degree program, will be more competitive in obtaining technically oriented jobs when they leave our degree program. Because the B.A. degree also is used in conjunction with the Single-Subject program for students aspiring for the secondary credential in Physics, we were careful not to increase the required units significantly. The modifications recommended allow more flexibility in meeting the laboratory requirement, strengthen the theoretical core where it is most needed and appropriate, and add a senior project requirement which will provide the kind of opportunity that employers indicate that they are interested in seeing in our students.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
A. Required Lower Division Courses (37 units)
PHYS 011A General Physics: Mechanics (4
units)
PHYS 011B General Physics: Heat, Light,
Sound (4 units)
PHYS 011C General Physics: Electricity and
Magnetism (4 units)
MATH 030 Calculus I (4 units)
MATH 031 Calculus II (4 units)
MATH 032 Calculus III (4 units)
MATH 045 Differential Equations for Science and Engineering (3 units)
CHEM 001A General Chemistry (5 units)
CHEM 001B General Chemistry (5 units)

B. Required Upper Division Courses (28 units)

PHYS 105 Mathematical Methods in Physics (3
units)
PHYS 106 Introduction to Modern Physics (3
units)
PHYS 110 Intermediate Mechanics (3 units)
PHYS 115A Introduction to Electric and
Electronic Measurement (4 units) ++
+++++++++++++++++
PHYS 124 Thermodynamics and Statistical
Mechanics (3 units)
PHYS 135 Electricity and Magnetism (3 units)
PHYS 175 Advanced Physics Laboratory (2
units)
PHYS 190 Physics Seminar (1 unit)
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

C. Additional Upper Division Requirements
Six elective units in Physics selected in
consultation with an advisor
PHYS 115B Electronic Systems and
Instrumentation (3 units)
PHYS 130 Acoustics (3 units)
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++
PHYS 142 Applied Solid State Physics (3 units)
PHYS 145 Physical Optics (3 units)
PHYS 150 Quantum Mechanics (3 units)
PHYS 151 Modern Physics (3
units)+++++++++
PHYS 162 Computational Physics (3 units)
PHYS 196 Experimental Offerings in Physics
(1-3 units per semester; 4 unit maximum)
PHYS 198 Co-curricular Activities (1-3 units per
semester; 4 unit maximum)
PHYS 199 Special Problems (1-3 units per
semester; 4 unit maximum)
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++
+++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++

A. Required Lower Division Courses (37 units)
PHYS 011A General Physics: Mechanics (4
units)
PHYS 011B General Physics: Heat, Light,
Sound. (4 units)
PHYS 011C General Physics: Electricity and
Magnetism (4 units)
MATH 030 Calculus I (4 units)
MATH 031 Calculus II (4 units)
MATH 032 Calculus III (4 units)
MATH 045 Differential Equations for Science
and Engineering (3 units)
CHEM 001A General Chemistry (5 units)
CHEM 001B General Chemistry (5 units)

B. Required Upper Division Courses (32 units)
PHYS 105 Mathematical Methods in Physics (3
units)
PHYS 106 Introduction to Modern Physics (3
units)
PHYS 110 Classical Mechanics (3 units)

PHYS 115 Electronics and Instrumentation (4
units) OR PHYS 145 Optics (4 units)
PHYS 124 Thermodynamics and Statistical
Mechanics (3 units)
PHYS 135 Electricity and Magnetism (3 units)
PHYS 175 Advanced Physics Laboratory (2
units)
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
PHYS 191 Senior Project (2 units)

C. Additional Upper Division Requirements
Six elective units in Physics selected in
consultation with an advisor
PHYS 116 Advanced Electronics and
Instrumentation (3 units)
PHYS 130 Acoustics (3 units)
PHYS 136 Electrodynamics of Waves, Radiation, and Materials (3 units)
PHYS 142 Applied Solid State Physics (3 units)
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
PHYS 150 Quantum Mechanics (3 units)
PHYS 151 Advanced Modern Physics (3
units)
PHYS 162 Computational Physics (3 units)
PHYS 196 Experimental Offerings in Physics (1 -
3 units per semester; 4 unit maximum)
PHYS 198 Co-curricular Activities (1-3 units per
semester; 4 unit maximum)
PHYS 199 Special Problems (1-3 units per
semester; 4 unit maximum)
And whichever of the courses below not
previously used to fulfill the upper division
requirement:
PHYS 115 Electronics and Instrumentation (4
units)
PHYS 145 Optics (3 units)


BS Physics

Justification: Delete: Delete Physics 190 (1 unit). Seminar requirement to be fulfilled outside of
Course.
Add: 3 units in new Electrodynamics course, Physics 136
2 units in Senior Project, Physics 191
Reduce: Physics Elective requirement, from 9 units to 6 units.
Modify: Instead of specifying Physics 115A (renumbered to 115) , allow choice of either 115
or 145 as a lab-oriented upper division course.
Units Required: Lower Division 37
Upper Division 38 (increase of 2-1=1unit)
Total 75 (net increase of 1 unit)
With 51+3 units of G.E., minus 9 overlap, this makes 120 required units, meaning that free
electives would go beyond university minimum grand total.
The Physics Department believes that the B.S. degree needs some strengthening so that it is more in line with the content requirements of other B.S. programs, particularly within the CSU system. These students are often headed for a Physics advanced degree program and we desire that our students be better prepared and more competitive in obtaining admission into graduate degree programs. The modifications recommended allow more flexibility in meeting the laboratory requirement, strengthen the theoretical core where it is most needed and appropriate, and add a senior project requirement which will provide the kind of opportunity that would make our graduating students more attractive to graduate programs and employers.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM

A. Required Lower Division Courses (37 units)

PHYS 011A General Physics: Mechanics (4 units)
PHYS 011B General Physics: Heat, Light,
Sound. (4 units)
PHYS 011C General Physics: Electricity and
Magnetism. (4 units)
MATH 030 Calculus I. (4 units)
MATH 031 Calculus II. (4 units)
MATH 032 Calculus III. (4 units)
MATH 045 Differential Equations for Science and
Engineering (3 units)
CHEM 001A General Chemistry. (5 units)
CHEM 001B General Chemistry. (5 units)

B. Required Upper Division Courses (37 units)

PHYS 105 Mathematical Methods in Physics (3
units)
PHYS 106 Introduction to Modern Physics (3
units)
PHYS 110 Intermediate Mechanics (3 units)
PHYS 115A Introduction to Electric and
Electronic Measurement (4 units) +++++++++
PHYS 124 Thermodynamics and Statistical
Mechanics (3 units)
PHYS 135 Electricity and Magnetism (3 units)
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
PHYS 150 Quantum Mechanics (3 units)
PHYS 151 Modern Physics (3 units)
PHYS 175 Advanced Physics Laboratory (2
units)
PHYS 190 Physics Seminar (1 unit)
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

C. Additional Upper Division Requirements
Nine elective units in Physics selected in
consultation with an advisor from the following
menu:
PHYS 115B Electronic Systems
and Instrumentation (3 units)
PHYS 130 Acoustics (3 units)
PHYS 142 Applied Solid State Physics (3 units)
PHYS 145 Physical Optics (3 units)
PHYS 162 Computational Physics (3 units)
PHYS 196 Experimental Offerings in Physics (1-
3 units per semester; 4 unit maximum)
PHYS 198 Co-curricular Activities (1-3 units per
semester; 4 unit maximum)
PHYS 199 Special Problems (1-3 units per
semester; 4 unit maximum)
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++ ++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++

A. Required Lower Division Courses (37 units)

PHYS 011AGeneral Physics: Mechanics (4
units)
PHYS 011B General Physics: Heat, Light,
Sound. (4 units)
PHYS 011C General Physics: Electricity and
Magnetism. (4 units)
MATH 030 Calculus I. (4 units)
MATH 031 Calculus II. (4 units)
MATH 032 Calculus III. (4 units)
MATH 045 Differential Equations for Science and Engineering (3 units)
CHEM 001A General Chemistry. (5 units)
CHEM 001B General Chemistry. (5 units)

B. Required Upper Division Courses (38 units)
PHYS 105 Mathematical Methods in Physics (3
units)
PHYS 106 Introduction to Modern Physics (3
units)
PHYS 110 Classical Mechanics (3 units)
PHYS 115 Electronics and Instrumentation (4
units) OR PHYS 145 Optics (3 units)
PHYS 124 Thermodynamics and Statistical
Mechanics (3 units)
PHYS 135 Electricity and Magnetism (3 units)
PHYS 136 Electrodynamics of Waves, Radiation, and Materials (3 units)
PHYS 150 Quantum Mechanics (3 units)
PHYS 151 Advanced Modern Physics (3 units)
PHYS 175 Advanced Physics Laboratory (2 units)
+++++++++++++++++++++
PHYS 191 Senior Project (2 units)


C. Additional Upper Division Requirements

Six elective units in Physics selected in
consultation with an advisor from the following
menu:
PHYS 116 Advanced Electronics
and Instrumentation (3 units)
PHYS 130 Acoustics (3 units)
PHYS 142 Applied Solid State Physics (3 units)
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
PHYS 162 Computational Physics (3 units)
PHYS 196 Experimental Offerings in Physics (1-
3 units per semester; 4 unit maximum)
PHYS 198 Co-curricular Activities (1-3 units per
semester; 4 unit maximum)
PHYS 199 Special Problems (1-3 units per
semester; 4 unit maximum)
And whichever of the courses below not previously used to fulfill the upper division requirement:
PHYS 115 Electronic s and Instrumentation (4 units)
PHYS 145 Optics (3 units)



Physics Minor

Justification: The Physics Department believes that the Physics Minor needs some strengthening to be more in-line with the unit requirements of other programs, particularly those within the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. The minor is especially useful to engineering students who are interested in pursuing graduate studies in engineering and the extra units have been added so that these students will be more prepared and competitive when they leave our degree program.

Units Required: Lower Division 12 (unchanged)
Upper Division 9 (increase of 3 units)
Total 21 (net increase of 3 units)

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
A. Required Lower Division Courses (12 units)
PHYS 011A General Physics: Mechanics (4 units)
PHYS 011B General Physics: Heat, Light, Sound.
(4 units)
PHYS 011C General Physics: Electricity and
Magnetism. (4 units)

B. Required Upper Division Courses (6 units)
PHYS 106 Introduction to Modern Physics (3 units)

C. Additional Upper Division Requirements
Three elective units in Physics selected in
consultation with an advisor
PHYS 105 Mathematical Methods in Physics (3
units)
PHYS 110 Intermediate Mechanics (3 units)
PHYS 115A Introduction to Electric and Electronic
Measurement (4 units)
PHYS 124 Thermodynamics and Statistical
Mechanics (3 units)
PHYS 130 Acoustics (3 units)
PHYS 135 Electricity and Magnetism (3 units)
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++
PHYS 142 Applied Solid State Physics (3 units)
PHYS 145 Physical Optics (3 units)
PHYS 162 Computational Physics (3 units)
PHYS 150 Quantum Mechanics (3 units)
PHYS 151 Modern Physics (3 units)
PHYS 175 Advanced Physics Laboratory (2 units)

Note: PHYS 005A, PHYS 005B, PHYS 106, PHYS
110 and an additional upper division physics
course may be substituted for the program outlined
above if approved by a Physics advisor.

A. Required Lower Division Courses (12 units)
PHYS 011A General Physics: Mechanics (4 units)
PHYS 011B General Physics: Heat, Light, Sound. (4 units)
PHYS 011C General Physics: Electricity and Magnetism. (4 units)

B. Required Upper Division Courses (9 units)

PHYS 106 Introduction to Modern Physics (3 units)

C. Additional Upper Division Requirements
Six elective units in Physics selected in consultation with an advisor
PHYS 105 Mathematical Methods in Physics (3
units)
PHYS 110 Classical Mechanics (4 units)
PHYS 115 Electronics and Instrumentation (4
units)
PHYS 124 Thermodynamics and Statistical
Mechanics (4 units)
PHYS 130 Acoustics (3 units)
PHYS 135 Electricity and Magnetism A (3 units)
PHYS 136 Electrodynamics of Waves, Radiation, and Materials (3 units)
PHYS 142 Applied Solid State Physics (3 units)
PHYS 145 Optics (4 units)
PHYS 162 Computational Physics (3 units)
PHYS 150 Quantum Mechanics (4 units)
PHYS 151 Advanced Modern Physics (4 units)
PHYS 175 Advanced Physics Laboratory (2 units)

Note:
PHYS005A,PHYS005B may be substituted
for PHYS011A, PHYS011C, but the 21 unit
minimum must be met by additional courses in one
of two ways:
PHYS106 plus three other upper division
Physics courses
PHYS106 plus PHYS011B plus two other
upper division Physics courses.


NON-SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

BA Physical Science

Justification: Instead of specifying Physics 115A (renumbered 115), and allow choice of either Physics 130 or Physics 145 as the other required lab-oriented upper division course, we propose choosing any two of the three courses Physics 115, 130, or 145. Physics 145 can be used irrespective of whether it is increased to 4 units as per our current proposal. The Physics Department believes that the B.A. degree in Physical Science requires more flexibility in satisfying the upper division laboratory requirement. Because a few students use this B. A. degree as a preparation for the secondary credential in Physics, we were careful not to increase the required units. There is absolutely no fiscal impact nor programmatic impact on other academic units.


COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Department of Anthropology

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Anthropology Major

Justification: The proposed program change is intended to revise course requirements of the major in a manner that better reflects current substantive and theoretical content of the discipline, and properly prepares matriculating students for future academic or professional goals.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS - BA
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.

A. Required Lower Division Courses (10 units)
(3) ANTH 1 Introduction to Physical Anthropology
(1) ANTH 1A Laboratory in Physical Anthropology
(3) ANTH 2 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
(3) ANTH 3 Introduction to Archaeology


B. Method & Theory Requirements (15 units)

(3) ANTH 104 History of Anthropology (ANTH 002)
(3) ANTH 110 Archaeological Method & Theory (ANTH 003)
(3) ANTH 141 Culture Theory (ANTH 002, 104)
(3) ANTH 155 Physical Method & Theory (ANTH 001, 001A)
(3) ANTH 160 Linguistic Anthropology (ANTH 002)

C. Breadth Requirements (9 units)
One course from each section
(3) Social/Cultural/Linguistics:
ANTH 140 Social Anthropology (ANTH 002 or 102, and 104; or instructor permission)
ANTH 164 Culture Change (ANTH 002)
(3) Physical:
ANTH 151 Human Paleontology (ANTH 155, or instructor permission)
ANTH 154 Primatology
(3) Archaeology*:
ANTH 107 Anthropology of Hunters & Gatherers
ANTH 109 Ecological & Evolutionary Approaches to Anthropology

E. Distributed Electives (9 units)
One course from each section
(3) Ethnographic:
ANTH 128 Indians of California
ANTH 131 Folk Societies of Europe & the
Mediterranean
ANTH 134 Japanese Culture & Society
ANTH 135 Indians of North America
ANTH 143 Culture & Society in Mexico
ANTH 144 Contemporary American Culture in Anthropological Perspective
ANTH 145 Peoples and Cultures of Latin America
ANTH 147 Peoples of Southeast Asia
ANTH 148 Anthropology of Chinese Societies
(3) Archaeological*:
ANTH 111 California Archaeology (ANTH 003)
ANTH 112 Great Basin Archaeology (ANTH 003)
ANTH 114 North American Prehistory (ANTH 003)
ANTH 115 Origins of Agriculture
ANTH 116 Old World Prehistory: Paleolithic Archaeology (ANTH 003)
ANTH 117 Archaeology & Anthropology of Peru
ANTH 118 Biblical Archaeology
ANTH 119 Egyptian Archaeology
ANTH 190B Prehistory of the Southwest
(3) Physical:
ANTH 150 Human Osteology (ANTH 001 and ANTH 001A or BIO 022 or instructor permission)
ANTH 152 Primate Adaptations (ANTH 150)
ANTH 157 Human Variation (ANTH 001, BIO 010, or instructor permission)
ANTH 158 Forensic Anthropology (Anth 150 or instructor permission)
*Recommended that ANTH 110 be taken prior to selecting a course from the archaeology courses

E. Undistributed Electives (3 units)
(3) Choose from all of the above plus the following:
ANTH 103 Psychological Anthropology (ANTH 002 or ANTH 102)
ANTH 105 Anthropology of War
ANTH 106 Culture & Personality of Chicano Child
ANTH 108 Economic Anthropology
ANTH 123 Ancient Technology
ANTH 124 Environmental Archaeology
ANTH 126 Techniques of Archaeological Analysis: Typologies & Syntheses
ANTH 127 Cultural Resource Management in
Theory & Practice
ANTH 162 Language & Culture
ANTH 163 Urban Anthropology
ANTH 165 Applied Anthropology
ANTH 166 Rise of Religious Cults
ANTH 168 Folklore in Anthropological Perspective
ANTH 183 Women Cross-Culturally
ANTH 186 Culture & Poverty (Passing score on the WPE)
ANTH 187 Anthropology of Tourism
ANTH 188 Anthropology of the Body
ANTH 190 Advanced Topics in Anthropology


F. Field Work/Research (3 units)

(3) Select one of the following:
ANTH 195A Fieldwork in Archaeology (ANTH 192A taken concurrently) AND
ANTH 192A Laboratory Work in Archaeology (ANTH 195A; may be waived with instructor permission) OR
ANTH 195B Fieldwork in Ethnology (ANTH 140 or ANTH 141 and ANTH 163; ANTH 163 may be taken concurrently. Corequisite:
ANTH 192B) AND
ANTH 192B Laboratory in Ethnographic Techniques (ANTH 140 or ANTH 141 and ANTH 163; ANTH 163 may be taken
concurrently. Corequisite: ANTH 195B)
OR
ANTH 195C** Fieldwork in Physical Anthropology
** Recommended that ANTH 150, ANTH 152, ANTH 154, or ANTH 158 be taken prior to ANTH 195C

 


G. Other Requirements

Anthropology majors must take a statistics course (e.g., SOC 101, STATS 001, or one approved by the Department).
Notes:
• ANTH 104, ANTH 110, ANTH 141, ANTH 155, and ANTH 160 must be completed with a grade “C-“ or better.

GRADUATE PROGRAM
Admission Requirements

Admission to classified graduate standing in Anthropology requires:

• a baccalaureate degree;
• a minimum 3.0 GPA for the last 60 units attempted;
• satisfactory completion of the following 15 units of advanced undergraduate work in Anthropology, or their equivalent: ANTH 104, ANTH 110, ANTH 141, ANTH 155, and ANTH 160 (Note: prerequisites for advanced upper division courses are: ANTH 001, ANTH 001A, ANTH 002 and ANTH 003); and

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS - BA
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.

A. Required Lower Division Courses (13 units)
(3) ANTH 1 Introduction to Physical Anthropology
(1) ANTH 1A Laboratory in Physical Anthropology
(3) ANTH 2 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
(3) ANTH 3 Introduction to Archaeology
(3) ANTH 4 Language, Culture, and
Communication

B. Method & Theory Requirements (12 units)
(3) ANTH 104 History of Anthropology (ANTH 002)
(3) ANTH 110 Archaeological Method & Theory (ANTH 003)
(3) ANTH 141 Culture Theory (ANTH 002, 104)
(3) ANTH 155 Physical Method & Theory (ANTH 001, 001A)
(3) ANTH 160 Linguistic Anthropology (ANTH 002)

 

C. Breadth Requirements (9 units)
One course from each section
(3) Social/Cultural/Linguistics:
ANTH 140 Social Anthropology (ANTH 002 or
102, and 104; or instructor permission)
ANTH 164 Culture Change (ANTH 002)
(3) Physical:
ANTH 151 Human Paleontology (ANTH 155, or
instructor permission)
ANTH 154 Primatology
(3) Archaeology*:
ANTH 107 Anthropology of Hunters & Gatherers
ANTH 109 Ecological & Evolutionary Approaches to Anthropology


D. Distributed Electives (9 units)

One course from each section
(3) Ethnographic:
ANTH 128 Indians of California
ANTH 131 Folk Societies of Europe & the
Mediterranean
ANTH 134 Japanese Culture & Society
ANTH 135 Indians of North America
ANTH 143 Culture & Society in Mexico
ANTH 144 Contemporary American Culture in Anthropological Perspective
ANTH 145 Peoples and Cultures of Latin America
ANTH 147 Peoples of Southeast Asia
ANTH 148 Anthropology of Chinese Societies
ANTH 149 Cultures of South Asia
(3) Archaeological*:
ANTH 111 California Archaeology
ANTH 112 Great Basin Archaeology
ANTH 113 Prehistory of Southwest
ANTH 114 North American Prehistory
ANTH 115 Origins of Agriculture
ANTH 116 Old World Prehistory: Paleolithic Archaeology
ANTH 117 Archaeology & Anthropology of Peru
ANTH 118 Biblical Archaeology
ANTH 119 Egyptian Archaeology

ANTH 122 The Evolution of Early
Mesoamerican States
ANTH 190B Prehistory of the Southwest

(3) Physical:
ANTH 150 Human Osteology (ANTH 001 and
ANTH 001A, or BIO 022 or instructor
permission)
ANTH 152 Primate Adaptations (ANTH 150)
ANTH 157 Human Variation (ANTH 001, or BIO 010, or instructor permission)
ANTH 158 Forensic Anthropology (Anth 150 or
instructor permission)
*Recommended that ANTH 110 be taken prior to selecting a course from the archaeology courses

 


E. Undistributed Electives (3 units)

(3) Choose from all of the above plus the following:
ANTH 103 Psychological Anthropology (ANTH 2
or ANTH 102)
ANTH 105 Anthropology of War
ANTH 106 Culture & Personality of Chicano Child
ANTH 108 Economic Anthropology
ANTH 123 Ancient Technology
ANTH 124 Environmental Archaeology
ANTH 126 Techniques of Archaeological Analysis: Typologies & Syntheses
ANTH 127 Cultural Resource Management in
Theory & Practice
ANTH 142 Political Anthropology
ANTH 160 Linguistic Anthropology

ANTH 162 Language & Culture
ANTH 163 Urban Anthropology
ANTH 165 Applied Anthropology
ANTH 166 Rise of Religious Cults
ANTH 168 Folklore in Anthropological Perspective
ANTH 183 Women Cross-culturally
ANTH 186 Culture & Poverty (Passing score on the WPE)
ANTH 187 Anthropology of Tourism
ANTH 188 Anthropology of the Body
ANTH 190 Advanced Topics in Anthropology

F. Field Work/Research (3 units)
(3) Select one of the following:
ANTH 195A Fieldwork in Archaeology (ANTH
192A taken concurrently) AND
ANTH 192A Laboratory Work in Archaeology
(ANTH 195A; may be waived with
instructor permission) OR
ANTH 195B Fieldwork in Ethnology (ANTH 140 or ANTH 141 and ANTH 163; ANTH 163
may be taken concurrently.
Corequisite: ANTH 192B) AND
ANTH 192B Laboratory in Ethnographic Techniques (ANTH 140 or ANTH 141 and ANTH 163; ANTH 163 may be taken
concurrently. Corequisite: ANTH
195B) OR
ANTH 195C** Fieldwork in Physical Anthropology
OR
ANTH 195D Fieldwork in Linguistic
Anthropology (ANTH 004)

** Recommended that ANTH 150, ANTH 152, ANTH 154, or ANTH 158 be taken prior to ANTH 195C

G. Other Requirements
Anthropology majors must take a statistics course (e.g., ANTH 120, SOC 101,STATS 001, or one approved by the Department).
Notes:
• ANTH 104, ANTH 110, ANTH 141, and ANTH 155, and ANTH 160 must be completed with a grade “C-“ or better.

GRADUATE PROGRAM
Admission Requirements

Admission to classified graduate standing in Anthropology requires:

• a baccalaureate degree;
• a minimum 3.0 GPA for the last 60 units attempted;
• satisfactory completion of the following 15 units of advanced undergraduate work in Anthropology, or their equivalent: ANTH 104, ANTH 110, ANTH 141, ANTH 155, and ANTH 160 an upper division linguistics course (Note: prerequisites for advanced upper division courses are: ANTH 001, ANTH 001A, ANTH 002, and ANTH 003, and ANTH 004); and

 

Department of Economics

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Certificate in Economics Education

Justification: 1. CHANGING THE PROGRAM DESCRIPTION TO REFLECT THE CHANGE IN CENTER DIRECTOR AND TO RE-WORD TO MORE ACCURATELY DEPICT THE GOALS OF THE PROGRAM.

2. CHANGING THE GRADE REQUIREMENT FROM 2.75 TO A “B” IN ALL RELEVANT COURSES.

3. CHANGING THE REQUIRED UNITS FROM 16 TO 15.

4. CHANGING THE REQUIRED CORE COURSES FROM ECON 104, ECON 106, ECON 107, AND ECON 109 TO ECON 001A, ECON 001B, AND EITHER ECON 195 OR ECON 198. THIS WILL BETTER PREPARE STUDENTS TO MEET THE GOALS OF THE PROGRAM.

5. DELETION OF REQUIREMENT OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT COURSE.

6. INCREASING ELECTIVE COURSE OPTIONS AND CHANGING REQUIREMENT FROM ONE ELECTIVE COURSE TO TWO ELECTIVE COURSES.

VERY FEW STUDENTS HAVE CHOSEN TO PARTICIPATE IN THE CURRENT ITERATION OF THE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM DUE PARTIALLY TO THE FACT THAT SOME OF THE REQUIRED COURSES WERE NOT BEING OFFERED OFTEN ENOUGH AND PARTIALLY TO THE FACT THAT STUDENTS WERE NOT BEING ADEQUATELY PREPARED TO TEACH ECONOMICS.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM
CERTIFICATE IN ECONOMICS EDUCATION

The Economics Education Certificate Program is designed to give participants a solid foundation in economics that will enable them to teach the subject in primary and secondary schools. The Certificate Program is intended for (1) future or practicing teachers who desire credential authorization to teach the one-semester economics course required of all California public high school students; and (2) future or practicing teachers who wish to infuse economics into other K-12 curricula.

The Certificate Program is also designed for students majoring in Liberal Studies or the Social Science Waiver Program, since some of the program's core courses can be used to fulfill the requirements of these majors, while other courses can be applied towards the fifth-year credential program.

The program consists of a minimum of 16 units. A GPA of at least 2.75 is required for all courses taken in the program. Participants who are not enrolled in CSUS may take these courses through the College of Continuing Education. For more information about the program, contact the Director of the Center for Economic Education, Dr. William C. Kerby.

A. Required Core Courses: Economics (10 units)

(3) ECON 104 Introduction to the U.S. Economy

(3) ECON 106 Applied Problems in International Economics (ECON 104 or ECON 001A)

(3) ECON 107 Applied Problems in Public Policy (ECON 001B or ECON 104)

(1) ECON 109 Applied Problems in Macroeconomics (ECON 001A or ECON 104)

B. Required Core Courses: Education (3 units)

(3) A course in Human Development

C. Elective Course: Economics (3 units)

(3) Select one of the following, with advisor assistance:

ECON 113 Economic History of the United States (ECON 001A or ECON 104)

ECON 114 The California Economy (ECON 001A and ECON 001B; or ECON 104)

ECON 132 State and Local Government Finance (ECON 001A and ECON 001B; or ECON 104)

ECON 135 Money and Banking
(ECON 001A; or ECON 104 and ECON 109)

ECON 184 Women and the Economy

CERTIFICATE IN ECONOMICS EDUCATION

The Economics Education Certificate Program is designed to give participants a solid foundation in economics that will enable them to teach the subject in primary and secondary schools. The Certificate Program is intended for (1) future or practicing teachers who desire credential authorization to teach the one-semester economics course required of all California public high school students; and (2) future or practicing teachers who wish to infuse economics into other K-12 curricula. Students majoring in Liberal Studies or Social Science or completing a teacher credential program are especially encouraged to participate.
The program consists of 15 units. A grade of “B” or higher must be obtained in each of these courses. Participants who are not enrolled in CSUS may take these courses through the College of Continuing Education. For more information about the program, contact the Director of the Center for Economic Education, Professor David M. Lang.

 

 

 

 

A. Required Core Courses: Economics (9 units)


(3) ECON 001A Introduction to Macroeconomic Analysis

(3) ECON 001B Introduction to Microeconomic Analysis

(3) ECON 195 Economic Internship

 

 

B. Elective Courses: Economics (6 units)

(6) Select any two upper division economics courses, not including 104 or 106

Note: The ECON 195 requirement will enable the student to serve as a Teaching Assistant to a professor teaching either ECON 001A or ECON 001B. Students must receive the permission of the Director of the Center for Economic Education prior to enrolling in ECON 195 for the Certificate program and will be assigned to a professor by the Director.

 

Department of Government

NON-SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Minor in Government

Justification: The purpose of the revised language for the Government Minor is to clarify the existing language. The existing catalog language implies that all courses must be upper division. Actually, we permit up to 6 units of lower division course work for the minor.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM

MINOR IN GOVERNMENT

Total units required for Minor: 21


Specific requirements are:
(6) Select two of the following:

GOVT 110 Political Thought I
GOVT 111 Political Thought II
GOVT 120A Constitutional Law (GOVT 001 or equivalent)
GOVT 120B Constitutional Rights and Liberties (GOVT 001 or equivalent)
GOVT 130 International Politics
GOVT 170 Public Policy Development (GOVT 001, passing score on WPE)

(15) Select 15 units of upper division Government or Political Science courses. Students may count as many as 6 units of GOVT 195, or 3 units of GOVT 195 and 3 units of GOVT 199 toward completion of the minor. Students may count GOVT 001, or its equivalent, towards the minor; however, no more than three units of Government courses taken to complete general education requirements may be used to complete requirements for the minor.

Note: A "C" average is required in the Minor.

MINOR IN GOVERNMENT

Total units required for minor: 21
The government minor requires 21 units, of which a minimum of 12 must be upper division.

Specific requirements are:

(6) Select two of the following:
Government 110, 111, 120A, 120B, etc.

(15) Select 15 units of government or political science courses, no more than six units of which may be lower division. Students may count as many as (6) units of Government 195, or (3) units of Government 195 and (3) units of Government 199 toward completion of the minor. Students may count Government 001, or it’s equivalent, toward the minor; however, no more than (3) units of Government course work taken to complete general education requirements may be used to complete requirements for the minor.

Note: A “C” average is required in the minor.

 


SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

International Affairs Graduate Program

Justification: Replacing the core course IA 222, Seminar in Comparative Politics, with IA 230, Globalization and International Relations. IA 230 will become a core course and IA 222 will become an elective course. IA 230 is more appropriate as a core course than IA 222 because it not only has a comparative thrust, but it also covers a range of contemporary issues and problems challenging the Global North and the Global South. In addition, the department will have difficulty staffing IA 222 (GOVT 240) in the coming years due to retirement. The rationale for the change, however, is fundamentally based on curricular rather than administrative considerations.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM

The International Affairs (IA) Graduate Program is one of two graduate programs offered by the Department of Government at CSUS. It is a professional two-year interdisciplinary program of graduate studies leading to a Master of Arts degree in International Affairs (MIA). Our students come from diverse backgrounds and undergraduate majors, including the natural, social and engineering sciences, as well as business and the humanities. The program has undergone a major restructuring designed to prepare students for a variety of careers in public and private organizations engaged in international interactions, including governmental agencies, the foreign service, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, international business and trade, multinational corporations, as well as the academy. The newly revised curriculum offers a broad range of options and opportunities for students to concentrate on issues and areas of their interests while obtaining a solid foundational knowledge of international relations and international political economy. The program is particularly suitable for students seeking a curriculum with an applied thrust emphasizing practical training through a combination of flexible electives and internship options that permits tailoring the program to each student's career needs.

GRADUATE PROGRAM
Admission Requirements

Admission as a classified graduate student in International Affairs requires:
a baccalaureate degree from an accredited four year college or university;
a minimum of 3.0 GPA;
scores in the 50th percentile range or higher on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test (verbal, quantitative and analytical abilities);
competence in the English language as demonstrated by academic achievement as well as the verbal score of the GRE. Applicants from non-English speaking countries must have a score of 570 (230 computer-based) or higher in the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL);
three letters of recommendation from individuals (preferably academics), who can best evaluate the applicant's potential for success in the program. The letters must be prepared on forms accompanying the IA application packet;
a written statement by the applicant explaining his or her purpose and goals in pursuing the master's degree in International Affairs;
introductory courses in micro and macro economics with a grade of "B-" or better within seven years of program entry; students who do not meet this admission requirement will be required to complete equivalent coursework (ECON 001 A and B, or ECON 204) with a grade of "B-" or better prior to taking IA 216; these courses cannot be applied to electives;
an introductory statistics course (similar to STAT 001) with a grade of "B-" or better within seven years of program entry; students who do not meet this admission requirement will be required to take STAT 001 (or SOC 101) and receive a grade of "B-" or better prior to taking IA 214; this course cannot be applied to electives.
Students who have deficiencies on admission requirements whose qualification are otherwise acceptable may be granted either a conditional or unclassified admission while they complete coursework to remove those deficiencies. All such courses are treated as pre-requisites and cannot be counted towards the degree requirement. No more than six (6) units of coursework completed under unclassified status can be applied towards the degree requirement.

ADMISSION PROCEDURES

The IA program operates on a “rolling admission” basis. Applications are accepted for both the Fall and Spring semesters as long as room for new students exists. However, students are strongly urged to apply by April 1 for the following Fall and by November 1 for the following Spring to allow sufficient time for application processing. Applicants are urged to contact the IA Graduate Coordinator by e-mail, telephone, or in person to discuss admission and the program. Approximately six weeks after receipt of all items listed above, a decision regarding admission will be mailed to the applicant.

PROCEDURES:

To receive an application packet, applicants should contact the IA Coordinator, Government Department, 6000 J Street, Sacramento, CA 95819-6089, Tel. (916) 278-6380, Fax (916) 278-6488, e-mail: fozounib@csus.edu.
All applicants, including international students, must submit an International Affairs (IA) Application. The IA application material includes:
*an IA Application form
*three letters of recommendation
*applicant's written statement of purpose and goals
*Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores (General test: verbal, analytical and quantitative parts).

The above must be directly mailed to the IA Coordinator, NOT to the Graduate Center.
All applicants (including CSUS graduates), EXCEPT international students, must also submit the CSU Graduate Application for Admission:
an Application for Graduate Admission (Parts A & B in the CSU application booklet)
two sets of official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended, other than CSUS

The above must be filed with the CSUS Graduate Center, 6000 J Street, Sacramento, CA 95819-6112

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS must submit an International Student Application, available from the International Admissions Office. This application must be filed with the Coordinator of International Admissions, Admission and Records, 6000 J Street, Sacramento, CA 95819-6048, NOT with the Graduate Center.

ADVANCEMENT TO CANDIDACY

Each classified student must file an application for Advancement to Candidacy, including a proposed program of graduate studies specifying elective courses, tracks, and choice of culminating experience. The student should initiate the advancement to candidacy upon satisfying the following requirements: completing the 18 units of IA core courses and 9 units of electives (track) with a minimum of 3.0 GPA overall; and fulfilling all university-wide graduate requirements for advancement, including the Writing Proficiency Examination. Students electing the thesis option for culminating experience must submit an approved thesis. PROSPECTUS; students choosing the comprehensive examination option must identify an approved elective field of exam; students electing the internship option must submit an approved internship project.
The Advancement to Candidacy form must be obtained from the Graduate Center. The student must complete the form after planning the degree program in consultation with the IA Coordinator. The completed form is then returned by the program office to the Graduate Center for approval.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

The Master of Arts in International Affairs (MIA) is a two-year program requiring completion of at least 39 units of academic credit with a minimum 3.0 grade point average and no grade below C (not C-) for graduate courses, and B- for undergraduate upper division elective courses. The academic units consist of 18 units mandatory core courses, 18 units elective courses ("tracks"), and 3 units culminating experience.

CORE COURSES (18 UNITS):

The following is the list of required courses in the program. Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.

(3) IA 210--Theories of International Relations
(3) IA 214--Research Methods in International Studies
(STAT 001 or equivalent)
(3) IA 216--Foundations of International Economic Affairs
(ECON 001 A & B, or ECON 204)
(3) IA 220--International Organizations
(3) IA 221--International Political Economy
(3) IA 222--Seminar in Comparative Politics

ELECTIVE COURSES AND TRACKS (18 UNITS)

Elective courses should be chosen in consultation with the IA Coordinator. Each student should choose a minimum of one track. A track consists of (9) or more units of related courses dealing with a particular regional area or functional issues. Every effort should be made to choose an interdisciplinary combination of courses to enhance the interdisciplinary quality of the program. Students may select up to a maximum of 9 units of approved upper-division undergraduate courses toward satisfying the elective/track requirements. The following is the list of elective courses and some possible tracks:

Elective Courses
(3) IA 212--United States Foreign Policy 1945-present
(3) IA 230--Globalization and International Relations
(1-6) IA 295--Internship in International Affairs
(1-3) IA 299--Independent Studies
(3–6) GOVT 138--U.N. Simulation
(3) GOVT 127--Elements of International Law

Elective Tracks (9 or more units)
Below are some examples of elective tracks:

(9) AMERICAN FOREIGN & DOMESTIC POLICY TRACK: This track provides an in-depth analysis of foreign and domestic policies of the United States after the post-WWII period. Students should expect to learn the complex interconnections between domestic and foreign policies and identify the domestic determinants of the U.S. foreign policy.

(3) IA 212--United States Foreign Policy 1945-present
(3) GOVT 260--Political Process OR
(3) GOVT 250--Basic Issues of American Government
(3) HIST 159--History of U.S. Foreign Relations

(9) MIDDLE EAST STUDIES TRACK: This track introduces students to the politics, history and culture of the countries in the Middle East. Students choosing this track should expect to gain a sophisticated understanding of the contemporary issues and the causes of conflicts in the region.
(3) GOVT 148--Government & Politics of the Middle East
(3) HIST 143B--The Modern Middle East OR
(3) SOC 163–Conflict, Oil and Development in the Middle East
East OR
(3) SOC 260–Contemporary Issues of the Middle East and North
Africa
(9) INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS AND DEVELOPMENT TRACK: This track provides students with a solid foundation in international economic relations, focusing on development economics and international finance. Students should expect to become familiar with the economic challenges and obstacles confronting the less developed nations.

(3) ECON 151–International and Comparative Industrial Relations
(3) ECON 192–International Finance: Theory and Practice
(3) ECON 193–Economics of Underdeveloped Countries

(9) INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS TRACK: The aim of this track is to introduce students to international and global dimensions of environmental problems and issues. The track is designed to broaden students’ understanding of contemporary international issues beyond the conventional political and economic problems, by intensively focusing on the environmental challenges that transcend national borders.
(3) ENVS 110–Contemporary Environmental Issues
OR
(3) ENVS 128/Govt.128–Environmental Law
(3) ENVS 112–International Environmental Problems
(3) ENVS 296–Experimental Offerings in Environmental Studies

(9) INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS TRACK: The primary aim of this track is to introduce students to the basic concepts of international business. Students should expect to learn about international trade, the role of multinational corporations in international business, and international investment and finance.
(3) MGMT 172–International Business
(3) MGMT 174–International Finance
(3) MGMT 222--Management of International Operations

(14-16) INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT TRACK: This track may be dubbed as the “Mini MBA.” It is appropriate for students who desire to obtain an intensive business background to complement their international studies. The courses in this track emphasize the key business concepts, including accounting, finance, management, and marketing, and applying these concepts to international/multinational business operations.
(2) ACY 201--Accounting
(2) OBE 204--Management and Organization Concepts
(2) MGMT 207--Finance
OR
(3) MGMT 133-–Business Finance
(2) MGMT 208—Marketing
OR
(3) MGMT 223-–Marketing Management
(3) MGMT 222—Management of International Operations
(3) MGMT173--Multinational Marketing
OR
(3) MGMT174--Multinational Business Finance
NOTES:
No more than 9 units of upper division undergraduate courses can be applied to the elective requirements.
Up to 6 units of internship (IA 295) (excluding the culminating experience) can be applied to elective requirements.
Up to 6 units of approved Independent Study (IA 299) can apply to elective requirements.
No more than 9 units of combined internship and independent study (excluding the culminating experience) can apply to the program.
All internships and independent studies must be approved by the IA Coordinator
Up to 6 units of credit may be earned based upon Peace Corps Service.
Lower division undergraduate courses and English composition courses may not be applied to elective requirements.
Culminating Experience (3 units)

(3) IA 500 Culminating Experience
Open only to students who have been advanced to candidacy and have satisfied all program requirements except the culminating experience. Students have a choice of three options for their culminating experience: thesis, comprehensive examination, or internship project. A minimum overall GPA of 3.5 is required for those who choose the thesis option. All other students must either pass a comprehensive examination or complete an approved internship project and submit an internship report for approval. Credit will be given upon successful defense of a thesis, passing of a comprehensive examination, or acceptance of the internship project report. Graded Credit/No Credit.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE:

The MIA program does not have a foreign language requirement. However, we strongly recommend that students who plan to work abroad or seek admission to a Ph.D. program take foreign language courses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


INTERNSHIPS

All IA students are strongly urged to include an internship (IA 295) toward satisfying their elective requirements. The IA Coordinator will assist in identifying and placing students in public and private agencies offering internship programs to graduate students. While most internships will be in the Sacramento area, students may seek internship opportunities elsewhere, including San Francisco, New York, Washington, D.C., etc. Within Sacramento some of the organizations where IA students have interned include: Northern California World Trade Center; California Trade and Commerce Agency, and the Center for International Trade and Development. Internship credits require 16 hours work per week, for a total of 240 hours per semester for 3 units of academic credit (or 80 hours per unit). Upon completion of the internship, students must submit an internship report (15 pages minimum, excluding appendices). The report must be analytical, not descriptive. The second 3 units of internship cannot be approved prior to the completion of the first 3 units. Approval for the second 3 units of internship is contingent on the analytical quality of the internship report for the first 3 units.

OVERSEAS STUDY

Students interested in overseas experience may choose up to 9 units of elective courses (or one track) in an accredited university abroad. IA core courses cannot be completed abroad. To receive graduate credit for overseas coursework, both the university and the courses must be approved by the IA Coordinator prior to enrollment in the overseas university. Students interested in oversea study should contact the Office of Global Education, CSUS (Tel. 278-6686) for information and assistance regarding overseas opportunities.

FINANCIAL AID

Students seeking assistance should contact the CSUS Financial Aid office. The International Affairs Graduate Program and the Department of Government are unable to offer financial assistance to their graduate students.


FACULTY

Buzz Fozouni, Coordinator
All faculty members are drawn from College of Social Science and Interdisciplinary Studies, College of Arts and Letters and College of Business.

CONTACT INFORMATION

Department office: Tahoe Hall 3104
Administrative Assistant: Carolann Forseth
(916) 278-6202

For more information visit the WEB site for the
International Affairs Department,
http://www.csus.edu/ia/index.htm, or contact

Buzz Fozouni-(916) 278-6380 or fozounib@csus.edu

The International Affairs (IA) Graduate Program is one of two graduate programs offered by the Department of Government at CSUS. It is a professional two-year interdisciplinary program of graduate studies leading to a Master of Arts degree in International Affairs (MIA). Our students come from diverse backgrounds and undergraduate majors, including the natural, social and engineering sciences, as well as business and the humanities. The program has undergone a major restructuring designed to prepare students for a variety of careers in public and private organizations engaged in international interactions, including governmental agencies, the foreign service, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, international business and trade, multinational corporations, as well as the academy. The newly revised curriculum offers a broad range of options and opportunities for students to concentrate on issues and areas of their interests while obtaining a solid foundational knowledge of international relations and international political economy. The program is particularly suitable for students seeking a curriculum with an applied thrust emphasizing practical training through a combination of flexible electives and internship options that permits tailoring the program to each student's career needs.

GRADUATE PROGRAM
Admission Requirements

Admission as a classified graduate student in International Affairs requires:
a baccalaureate degree from an accredited four year college or university;
a minimum of 3.0 GPA;
scores in the 50th percentile range or higher on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test (verbal, quantitative and analytical abilities);
competence in the English language as demonstrated by academic achievement as well as the verbal score of the GRE. Applicants from non-English speaking countries must have a score of 570 (230 computer-based) or higher in the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL);
three letters of recommendation from individuals (preferably academics), who can best evaluate the applicant's potential for success in the program. The letters must be prepared on forms accompanying the IA application packet;
a written statement by the applicant explaining his or her purpose and goals in pursuing the master's degree in International Affairs;
introductory courses in micro and macro economics with a grade of "B-" or better within seven years of program entry; students who do not meet this admission requirement will be required to complete equivalent coursework (ECON 001 A and B, or ECON 204) with a grade of "B-" or better prior to taking IA 216; these courses cannot be applied to electives;
an introductory statistics course (similar to STAT 001) with a grade of "B-" or better within seven years of program entry; students who do not meet this admission requirement will be required to take STAT 001 (or SOC 101) and receive a grade of "B-" or better prior to taking IA 214; this course cannot be applied to electives.
Students who have deficiencies on admission requirements whose qualification are otherwise acceptable may be granted either a conditional or unclassified admission while they complete coursework to remove those deficiencies. All such courses are treated as pre-requisites and cannot be counted towards the degree requirement. No more than six (6) units of coursework completed under unclassified status can be applied towards the degree requirement.

ADMISSION DEADLINES AND PROCEDURES
DEADLINES:

The IA program operates on a “rolling admission” basis. Applications are accepted for both the Fall and Spring semesters as long as room for new students exists. However, students are strongly urged to apply by April 1 for the following Fall and by November 1 for the following Spring to allow sufficient time for application processing. Applicants are urged to contact the IA Graduate Coordinator by e-mail, telephone, or in person to discuss admission and the program. Approximately six weeks after receipt of all items listed above, a decision regarding admission will be mailed to the applicant.

PROCEDURES:

To receive an application packet, applicants should contact the IA Coordinator, Government Department, 6000 J Street, Sacramento, CA 95819-6089, Tel. (916) 278-6380, Fax (916) 278-6488, e-mail: fozounib@csus.edu.
All applicants, including international students, must submit an International Affairs (IA) Application. The IA application material includes:
*an IA Application form
*three letters of recommendation
*applicant's written statement of purpose and goals
*Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores (General test: verbal, analytical and quantitative parts).

The above must be directly mailed to the IA Coordinator, NOT to the Graduate Center.
All applicants (including CSUS graduates), EXCEPT international students, must also submit the CSU Graduate Application for Admission:
an Application for Graduate Admission (Parts A & B in the CSU application booklet)
two sets of official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended, other than CSUS

The above must be filed with the CSUS Graduate Center, 6000 J Street, Sacramento, CA 95819-6112

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS must submit an International Student Application, available from the International Admissions Office. This application must be filed with the Coordinator of International Admissions, Admission and Records, 6000 J Street, Sacramento, CA 95819-6048, NOT with the Graduate Center.

ADVANCEMENT TO CANDIDACY

Each classified student must file an application for Advancement to Candidacy, including a proposed program of graduate studies specifying elective courses, tracks, and choice of culminating experience. The student should initiate the advancement to candidacy upon satisfying the following requirements: completing the 18 units of IA core courses and 9 units of electives (track) with a minimum of 3.0 GPA overall; and fulfilling all university-wide graduate requirements for advancement, including the Writing Proficiency Examination. Students electing the thesis option for culminating experience must submit an approved thesis. PROSPECTUS; students choosing the comprehensive examination option must identify an approved elective field of exam; students electing the internship option must submit an approved internship project.
The Advancement to Candidacy form must be obtained from the Graduate Center. The student must complete the form after planning the degree program in consultation with the IA Coordinator. The completed form is then returned by the program office to the Graduate Center for approval.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

The Master of Arts in International Affairs (MIA) is a two-year program requiring completion of at least 39 units of academic credit with a minimum 3.0 grade point average and no grade below C (not C-) for graduate courses, and B- for undergraduate upper division elective courses. The academic units consist of 18 units mandatory core courses, 18 units elective courses ("tracks"), and 3 units culminating experience.

CORE COURSES (18 UNITS):

The following is the list of required courses in the program. Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.

(3) IA 210--Theories of International Relations
(3) IA 214--Research Methods in International Studies
(STAT 001 or equivalent)
(3) IA 216--Foundations of International Economic Affairs
(ECON 001 A & B, or ECON 204)
(3) IA 220--International Organizations
(3) IA 221--International Political Economy
(3) IA 230--Globalization and International Relations

ELECTIVE COURSES AND TRACKS (18 UNITS)

Elective courses should be chosen in consultation with the IA Coordinator. Each student should choose a minimum of one track. A track consists of (9) or more units of related courses dealing with a particular regional area or functional issues. Every effort should be made to choose an interdisciplinary combination of courses to enhance the interdisciplinary quality of the program. Students may select up to a maximum of 9 units of approved upper-division undergraduate courses toward satisfying the elective/track requirements. The following is the list of elective courses and some possible tracks:

Elective Courses
(3) IA 212--United States Foreign Policy 1945-present
(3) IA 222--Seminar in Comparative Politics
(1-6) IA 295--Internship in International Affairs
(1-3) IA 299--Independent Studies
(3–6) GOVT 138--U.N. Simulation
(3) GOVT 127--Elements of International Law

Below are some examples of possible choices of elective tracks. Students may propose other track choices by combining 9 or more units of related courses, subject to the approval of the program coordinator.

(9) AMERICAN FOREIGN & DOMESTIC POLICY TRACK: This track provides an in-depth analysis of foreign and domestic policies of the United States after the post-WWII period. Students should expect to learn the complex interconnections between domestic and foreign policies and identify the domestic determinants of the U.S. foreign policy.

(3) IA 212--United States Foreign Policy 1945-present
(3) GOVT 260--Political Process OR
(3) GOVT 250--Basic Issues of American Government
(3) HIST 159--History of U.S. Foreign Relations

(9) MIDDLE EAST STUDIES TRACK: This track introduces students to the politics, history and culture of the countries in the Middle East. Students choosing this track should expect to gain a sophisticated understanding of the contemporary issues and the causes of conflicts in the region.
(3) GOVT 148--Government & Politics of the Middle East
(3) HIST 143B--The Modern Middle East OR

(3) SOC 163–Conflict, Oil and Development in the Middle East
East OR
(3) SOC 260–Contemporary Issues of the Middle East and North
Africa
(9) INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS AND DEVELOPMENT TRACK: This track provides students with a solid foundation in international economic relations, focusing on development economics and international finance. Students should expect to become familiar with the economic challenges and obstacles confronting the less developed nations.

(3) ECON 151–International and Comparative Industrial Relations
(3) ECON 192–International Finance: Theory and Practice
(3) ECON 193–Economics of Underdeveloped Countries

(9) INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS AND PUBLIC MANAGEMENT TRACK: This track aims at incorporating expertise in public management into students’ international affairs training. Many key foreign policy decisions are made within government agencies. For this reason, it is beneficial to understand how the policy process operates generally as well as how government agencies are organized and managed. Additionally, it is helpful to consider how organizational culture and other organizational features affect decisions.

PPA 200 –Introduction to Public Policy and Administration
PPA 240A–Public Management and Administration
PPA 240B–Public Management and Administration
OR
GOVT 270–Public Policy and the Political Process

Students wishing to pursue this track in more depth may take all four of the above specified courses and should also consider taking PPA 230 (Public Budgeting and Finance), although that course is largely focused on budgeting at the state and local levels of government.

(9) INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS TRACK: The aim of this track is to introduce students to international and global dimensions of environmental problems and issues. The track is designed to broaden students’ understanding of contemporary international issues beyond the conventional political and economic problems, by intensively focusing on the environmental challenges that transcend national borders.
(3) ENVS 110–Contemporary Environmental Issues
OR
(3) ENVS 128/Govt.128–Environmental Law
(3) ENVS 112–International Environmental Problems
(3) ENVS 296–Experimental Offerings in Environmental Studies

(9) INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS TRACK: The primary aim of this track is to introduce students to the basic concepts of international business. Students should expect to learn about international trade, the role of multinational corporations in international business, and international investment and finance.
(3) MGMT 172–International Business
(3) MGMT 174–International Finance
(3) MGMT 222--Management of International Operations

(14-16) INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT TRACK: This track may be dubbed as the “Mini MBA.” It is appropriate for students who desire to obtain an intensive business background to complement their international studies. The courses in this track emphasize the key business concepts, including accounting, finance, management, and marketing, and applying these concepts to international/multinational business operations.
(2) ACY 201--Accounting
(2) OBE 204--Management and Organization Concepts
(2) MGMT 207--Finance
OR
(3) MGMT 133-–Business Finance
(2) MGMT 208—Marketing
OR
(3) MGMT 223-–Marketing Management
(3) MGMT 222—Management of International Operations
(3) MGMT173--Multinational Marketing
OR
(3) MGMT174--Multinational Business Finance

NOTES:

No more than 9 units of upper division undergraduate courses can be applied to the elective requirements.
Up to 6 units of internship (IA 295) (excluding the culminating experience) can be applied to elective requirements.
Up to 6 units of approved Independent Study (IA 299) can apply to elective requirements.
No more than 9 units of combined internship and independent study (excluding the culminating experience) can apply to the program.
All internships and independent studies must be approved by the IA Coordinator
Up to 6 units of credit may be earned based upon Peace Corps Service.
Lower division undergraduate courses and English composition courses may not be applied to elective requirements.
Culminating Experience (3 units)

(3) IA 500 Culminating Experience
Open only to students who have been advanced to candidacy and have satisfied all program requirements except the culminating experience. Students have a choice of three options for their culminating experience: thesis, comprehensive examination, or internship project. A minimum overall GPA of 3.5 is required for those who choose the thesis option. All other students must either pass a comprehensive examination or complete an approved internship project and submit an internship report for approval. Credit will be given upon successful defense of a thesis, passing of a comprehensive examination, or acceptance of the internship project report. Graded Credit/No Credit.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE:

The MIA program does not have a foreign language requirement. However, we strongly recommend that students who plan to work abroad or seek admission to a Ph.D. program take foreign language courses.


INTERNSHIPS

All IA students are strongly urged to include an internship (IA 295) toward satisfying their elective requirements. The IA Coordinator will assist in identifying and placing students in public and private agencies offering internship programs to graduate students. While most internships will be in the Sacramento area, students may seek internship opportunities elsewhere, including San Francisco, New York, Washington, D.C., etc. Within Sacramento some of the organizations where IA students have interned include: Northern California World Trade Center; California Trade and Commerce Agency, and the Center for International Trade and Development. Internship credits require 16 hours work per week, for a total of 240 hours per semester for 3 units of academic credit (or 80 hours per unit). Upon completion of the internship, students must submit an internship report (15 pages minimum, excluding appendices). The report must be analytical, not descriptive. The second 3 units of internship cannot be approved prior to the completion of the first 3 units. Approval for the second 3 units of internship is contingent on the analytical quality of the internship report for the first 3 units.

OVERSEAS STUDY

Students interested in overseas experience may choose up to 9 units of elective courses (or one track) in an accredited university abroad. IA core courses cannot be completed abroad. To receive graduate credit for overseas coursework, both the university and the courses must be approved by the IA Coordinator prior to enrollment in the overseas university. Students interested in oversea study should contact the Office of Global Education, CSUS (Tel. 278-6686) for information and assistance regarding overseas opportunities.

FINANCIAL AID

Students seeking assistance should contact the CSUS Financial Aid office. The International Affairs Graduate Program and the Department of Government are unable to offer financial assistance to their graduate students.

FACULTY

Buzz Fozouni, Coordinator
All faculty members are drawn from College of Social Science and Interdisciplinary Studies, College of Arts and Letters and College of Business.

CONTACT INFORMATION

Department office: Tahoe Hall 3104
Graduate Secretary: Carolann Forseth
(916) 278-6202 carolann@csus.edu

For more information visit the WEB site for the
International Affairs Department,
http://www.csus.edu/ia/index.htm, or contact

Buzz Fozouni-(916) 278-6380 or fozounib@csus.edu

 


 

 




Women's Studies Program

NON-SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Women's Studies

Justification: We are updating our program description. We are changing the titles of our elective categories and realigning the courses accordingly. This reorganized list more accurately represents the scope of our interdisciplinary courses. The following changes will be evident in the new reorganized elective categories:

1. Title changes for elective categories
A. “Contemporary Issues and Women Crossculturally” is changed to “Identities and Intersectionality”
B. “ Humanities: Art and Literature” is changed to “The Humanities”
C. “Social Sciences” is changed to “Society, Politics, and Social Movements”
D. A new category “Economic Globalization and Transnational Feminism” has been added.

2. Some courses were taken out of old categories and placed in new categories according to their fit.

OLD PROGRAM
NEW PROGRAM

The Women's Studies Program provides
students with a disciplinary model of the
study of women's contributions to culture,
knowledge, and society. A critique of social
conditions creating women's oppression is
integral to the program.

Women's Studies promotes teaching and
research in the service of eliminating
sexism, racism, and other forms of
oppression. The program is committed to
change and to integrating community
activism and academic study. The program
is based on a mixed model of course
offerings. This model combines Women's
Studies code courses with services and
cross-listed courses from other
departments. The program is grounded in
both the emerging feminist discipline and
the traditional disciplines. The mixed
model allows the Women's Studies
Program to fulfill a dual role, i.e.,
expanding and developing Women's
Studies as a bona fide field of inquiry tied
to the women's movement, while at the
same time infusing feminist scholarship
into the discipline. The program affirms
the Preamble and Purpose of the National
Women's Studies Association, which
states:
"Women's Studies owes its existence to the
movement for the liberation of women; the
women's liberation movement exists
because women are oppressed....Feminist
aims include the elimination of oppression
and discrimination on the basis of sex, race,
class, religion, disability, and sexual
orientation."

The field of Women’s Studies is
dedicated to studying women’s lives
and facilitating political activism and
community participation. What makes
Women’s Studies such a dynamic field
is the conviction that theoretical
knowledge is best illuminated when
connected to political projects and
personal experiences.

Our Women’s Studies curriculum is
multi-disciplinary and focuses on
women, gender, and sexuality in
relation to other social and economic
forces such as racism, ethnocentrism,
capitalism, and militarism. Students
have opportunities to examine
women’s diverse experiences- locally,
nationally, and globally- within
feminist and social justice frameworks.

The course of study situates gender in
specific historical and cultural contexts,
and examines how our lives are shaped
by social and economic institutions,
political movements, and individual
experiences. We also place a strong
focus on community involvement and
activism, and we offer many
opportunities for internships and
service work credit.

The program affirms the Preamble and
Purpose of the National Women's Studies
Association, which states:

"Women's Studies owes its existence to the
movement for the liberation of women; the
women's liberation movement exists
because women are oppressed....Feminist
aims include the elimination of oppression
and discrimination on the basis of sex, race,
class, religion, disability, and sexual
orientation."

A. Required Courses (9 units)

WOMS 110 Introduction to the Women's Movements

WOMS 115 Introduction to Women’s Studies

WOMS 180 Seminar in Feminist Theory (WOMS 110 or instructor permission)

B. Electives (12 units)


Twelve units of electives are required. At least one course must be taken from each of the following categories:

1.Contemporary Issues and Women Crossculturally

EDTE Sex Role Stereotyping in American Education (Passing score on the WPE)

ETHN 132 La Mujer Chicana

ETHN 172 Black Women in America

GOVT 166 Women and Politics in Contemporary America

JOUR 172 Women in Mass Media

OBE 151 Diversity and Management

SWRK 134 Crimes Without Victims

SWRK 278 Family Violence

WOMS 120 Mother, Woman, Person

WOMS 121 Women of the Middle East

WOMS 132 A Society of Women

WOMS 136 Gender, Race and Class
(Passing score on the WPE)

WOMS 137 Women of Color

WOMS 139 Violence Against Women

WOMS 147 International Feminist Trends

WOMS 170 Topics in Feminism

WOMS 186 American Women in the Media and the Arts

(One course in Women's Studies (code or service) and one course in message analysis of media or the arts such as

COMS 100B, HRS 180 or HRS 185, WOMS 146, etc.)

WOMS 196 Experimental Offerings

WOMS 199 Special Problems
(WOMS 115 and instructor
permission)

2.Humanities: Art and Literature

ART 234 Women Studio Artists Seminar

ENGL 185B 20th Century Fiction by Women (Passing score on the WPE)

ENGL 185C British Women Novelists

ENGL 185D American Women Writers

ENGL 185E Chicana/Latina Women Writers

HRS 185 Women in Film and American Culture

WOMS 144 Women and Theatre: Staging Diversity

WOMS 145 Feminism and the Spirit

WOMS 146 Women in Art

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


3. Social Sciences


ANTH 183 Women Cross-Culturally

CRJ 157 Women and the Criminal Justice System (Passing score on the WPE)

ECON 184 Women and the Economy

EDC 212 Gender Roles and Sexuality in Counseling (Approval as a candidate in the Counselor Education Program)

EDTE 266 Women and Education

HIST 122A History of Women in Western Civilization, Prehistory-Middle Ages (Passing score on the WPE)

HIST 122B History of Women in Western Civilization, Renaissance to Present (Passing score on the WPE)

HIST 167 History of American Women

KINS 110 Women and Sport

PSYC 134 Psychology of Human Sexuality (PSYC 001 or PSYC 005)

PSYC 157 Psychology of Women (PSYC 001 or PSYC 005 or WOMS 110 or WOMS 120)

WOMS 138 Women and Work
(Passing score on the WPE)

WOMS 181 Seminar in Gender Roles (SOC 001 or WOMS 115)

A. Required Courses (9 units)

WOMS 110 Introduction to Women’s Movements

WOMS 115 Introduction to Women’s Studies

WOMS 180 Seminar in Feminist Theory (WOMS 110 or instructor permission)

B. Electives (12 units)


Twelve units of electives are required. At least one course must be taken from each of the following categories:

1. Identities and Intersectionality

EDTE 165 Sex Role Stereotyping in American Education (Passing score on the WPE)

ETHN 132 La Mujer Chicana

ETHN 151 Native American Women

ETHN 172 Black Women in America

GOVT 166 Women and Politics in Contemporary America

OBE 151 Diversity and Management

WOMS 120 Mother, Woman, Person

WOMS 136 Gender, Race and Class (Passing score on the WPE)

WOMS 137 Women of Color

WOMS 195A Fieldwork in Women’s Studies (Instructor permission)

WOMS 196 Experimental Offerings in Women’s Studies

WOMS 199 Special Problems (WOMS 115 or instructor permission)

ANTH 183 Women Cross-Culturally

PSYC 134 Psychology of Human Sexuality

PSYC 157 Psychology of Women

WOMS 170 Topics in Feminism

WOMS 181 Seminar in Gender Roles (SOC 001 or WOMS 115)

WOMS 196 Experimental Offerings

WOMS 199 Special Problems (WOMS 115 and instructor permission)

 

 

2. The Humanities

JOUR 172 Women in the Mass Media

WOMS 186 American Women in the Media and the Arts (One course in Women’s Studies and one course in the message analysis of media or arts such as COMS 100B, HRS 180 or HRS 185, WOMS 186, etc.)

ART 234 Women Studio Artists Seminar

ENGL 185B 20th Century Fiction by Women (Passing score on the WPE)

ENGL 185C British Women Novelists

ENGL 185D American Women Writers

ENGL 185E Chicana/Latina Women Writers

HRS 185 Women in Film and American Culture

WOMS 144 Women and Theatre: Staging Diversity

WOMS 145 Feminism and the Spirit

WOMS 146 Women and Art

HIST 122A History of American Women in Western
Civilization: Prehistory- Middle Ages (Passing score on the WPE)

HIST 122B History of American Women in Western Civilization: Renaissance- Present (Passing score on the WPE)

HIST 167 History of American Women

PHIL 126 Philosophy and Feminism

3.Society, Politics. And Social Movements

GOVT166 Women and Politics in Contemporary America

SOC 126 Sociology of Gender

SWRK 134 Crimes Without Victims

SWRK 278 Family Violence

CRJ 157 Women and the Criminal Justice System

EDTE 266 Women and Education

WOMS 139 Violence Against Women

4. Economic Globalization and Transnational Feminism

WOMS 121 Women of the Middle East

WOMS 138 Women and Work (Passing score on the WPE)

WOMS 147 Transnational Feminisms (formerly International Feminist Trends)

ECON 184 Women and the Economy