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UNDERGRADUATE & GRADUATE
COURSE CHANGE PROPOSALS

LIST #1 - 2004/2005

If there are no objections reported to Academic Affairs by September 14, 2004, the course change proposals listed below are approved as submitted.

 List #1 Program Change Proposals are located at
http://www.csus.edu/acaf/policies/04-05prgmlst1.stm
for your review.

Course Change Proposals:

College of Business Administration
College of Education
College of Health and Human Services

College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics
College of Social Sciences and Interdisciplinary Studies


COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Department of Management

COURSE CHANGE

MGMT 226 Product and Service Marketing
Change to:
MGMT 226 Contemporary Marketing Functions and Practices. An in-depth coverage of a marketing function(s). Explores traditional and contemporary theories, strategies, practices, and issues of the selected functional area(s). 3 units.
Justification: One of the College’s Mission Attributes is “Offers a quality business education that is responsive to the changing regional, global and technology-driven environment” (CBA Mission and Goals Table, September 12, 2001). Accordingly, the topical focus of MGMT 226 is being expanded to allow coverage of a broader spectrum of marketing functions, paradigms, strategies and practices that have been singularly or jointly affected by physical, technological, political, cultural and/or social changes in the environment.
Prerequisite: MGMT 223.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Department of Bilingual Multicultural Education

NEW COURSES

EDBM 372 Advanced Methods and Assessments for the Teaching of English Learners (Multiple Subjects). Course meets advanced study of teaching English learners CCTC requirements for Level 2 (Induction) Multiple Subject Teaching Credentials. Builds on knowledge and skills acquired during preliminary preparation programs for delivery of comprehensive, specialized instruction for ELs. Candidates critically examine schools’ organizational structures and resources designed to meet EL students’ needs and further develop skills in planning and delivering instruction and assessment in English language development, academic language comprehension and production, and Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE). 3 units
Justification: Advanced coursework in methods and assessments for the teaching of English Learners to meet specific standards and competencies as outlined by the new California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) mandates per legislative action, 2042. Course will meet state guidelines for Multiple Subject Level 2 (Induction) requirements, and pedagogically enhanced programmatic structures.
Prerequisite: CCTC Preliminary Multiple Subject credential. CSUS graduate status.

EDBM 379 Advanced Methods and Assessments for the Teaching of English Learners (Single Subject). Course meets advanced study of teaching English learners CCTC requirements for Level 2 (Induction) Single Subject Teaching Credentials. Builds on knowledge and skills acquired during preliminary preparation programs for delivery of comprehensive, specialized instruction for secondary ELs. Candidates critically examine schools’ organizational structures and resources designed to meet EL students’ needs and further develop skills in planning and delivering instruction and assessment in English language development, academic language comprehension and production, and Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE). 3 units
Justification: Advanced coursework in methods and assessments for the teaching of English Learners to meet specific standards and competencies as outlined by the new California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) mandates per legislative action, 2042. Course will meet state guidelines for Single Subject Level 2 (Induction) requirements, and pedagogically enhanced programmatic structures.
Prerequisite: CCTC Preliminary Single Subject credential. CSUS graduate status.

COURSE CHANGE

EDBM 350 Technology for Multilingual/Multicultural Classrooms
Change to:
EDBM 350 Technology Use in Multilingual/Multicultural Classrooms.
A Technology lab delivered in the form of mini workshops, a web-based resource center and one-on-one facilitation. In this lab candidates will learn how to develop and implement technology projects that focus on closing the digital divide for secondary students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and from under-served communities. Candidates will explore basic, intermediate, and advanced technology skills using a variety of media, and will be required to produce a technology-based project in the secondary content area. 1 unit
Justification:
Responding to SB 2042 and the new requirements from the CCTC, the technology lab will support candidates as they: (a) gain computer skills to serve students in multilingual classrooms; (b) complete technology assignments for their program courses and field experiences; and (c) build an electronic portfolio aligned with teaching performance expectations. It is anticipated that students will need an average of three hours each week of contact with an educational technology faculty member to complete technology assignments from within their program and to build an electronic portfolio of their work.
Prerequisite: Enrollment in Multilingual/Multicultural Single Subject Credential Program.

Department of
Special Education, Rehabilitation, and School Psychology

COURSE CHANGES

EDS 281 Assessing Achievement in Adults with Learning Disabilities
Change to:
EDS 281 Assessing Achievement in Adults with Learning Disabilities.
Obtain an historical overview of the general assessment theories that apply to adults with learning disabilities (LD). Topics include: a review of commonly used K-12 assessment instruments and an evaluation of their appropriateness for use with an adult population, factors that may impact assessment with culturally and/or linguistically diverse populations and the community college and university prescreen and intake processes. Participants will also have an opportunity to practice the administration and scoring of commonly used achievement instruments.
Justification:
This course serves as the foundation in assessment for the Certificate Program in Adult Learning Disabilities. It provides the theoretical background of LD assessment as well as educationally relevant information about assessment of adults with LD. However, in order to provide a more comprehensive coverage of the course content, an increase of one unit (from 2.0 to 3.0 units) is being proposed. This course change will create a more balanced exploration of the course content and provide a well-rounded educational experience in the program overall.

EDS 282 Assessing Cognitive Skills in Adults with Learning Disabilities
Change to:
EDS 282A Assessing Cognitive Skills in Adults with Learning Disabilities: I.
Get an historical overview of cognitive assessment in the adult population as it applies to the adult with learning disabilities (LD). Topics include: the reasons for conducting cognitive assessments, adaptations for culturally and linguistically diverse populations and the examination, comparison and application of standardized cognitive instruments normed on adult populations (e.g., the Woodcock-Johnson Psychological-educational Battery). Appropriate terminology and report writing are also presented. Pre-requisite: Assessing Achievement of Adults with Learning Disabilities.
Justification: This course provides the theoretical background and educationally relevant information about adult LD cognitive assessment. The proposed course change, which results in the split of one formerly five-unit course into two separate courses of three units each, provides a concentrated focus on the study and administration of the Woodcock Johnson III (WJIII) Test of Cognitive Abilities test batteries. It is recommended that this course be taken after completion of the prerequisite, EDS 281, Assessing Achievement in Adults with Learning Disabilities, in the Certificate Program in Adults with Learning Disabilities.

EDS 282B Assessing Cognitive Skills in Adults with Learning Disabilities II
Change To:
EDS 282B Assessing Cognitive Skills in Adults with Learning Disabilities II.
Get an historical overview of cognitive assessment in the adult population as it applies to the adult with learning disabilities (LD). Topics include: the reasons for conducting cognitive assessments, adaptations for culturally and linguistically diverse populations and the examination, comparison and application of standardized cognitive instruments normed on adult populations (e.g., the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale). Appropriate terminology and report writing are also presented. Pre-requisite: Assessing Achievement of Adults with Learning Disabilities.
Justification: This course provides the theoretical background and educationally relevant information about adult LD cognitive assessment. The proposed course change, which results in the split of one formerly five-unit course into two separate courses of three units each, provides a concentrated focus on the study and administration of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) test batteries. It is recommended that this course be taken after completion of the prerequisite, EDS 281, Assessing Achievement in Adults with Learning Disabilities, in the Certificate Program in Adults with Learning Disabilities.

EDS 284 Introduction to Counseling of Adults with Learning Disabilities
Change to:
EDS 284 Collaborative Approaches for Working with Adults with Learning Disabilities.
Analyze the most common social, emotional and psychological problems of adults with learning disabilities (LD) and define the impact of dual diagnosis in which more than one disorder is present. Topics include: the stages of the counseling process, the identification of specific strategies, the role of the disabilities specialist/counselor, issues of professional conduct, ethics and legality. Participants will also develop strategies for self-determination and self-advocacy as the service provider.
Justification:
Extremely limited graduate coursework exists in the area of collaborative approaches and strategies for working with adults with learning disabilities (LD). Professional training is critically needed to meet the complex social, emotional and psychological issues of adults with LD. This course will be an integral part of the Certificate Program in Adult Learning Disabilities. It will provide a basic understanding of collaboration and will emphasize the unique disability-related personal issues of the adult with LD.

Department of
Teacher Education

NEW COURSES

EDTE 371C Schools and Community C. In preparation for student teaching, structured opportunities for students to discuss, analyze, and reflect upon data gathered from their observation placements, become familiar with university, community and school resources available with emphasis on issues related to English Language Development and on Special Needs students in multicultural settings, grades 7-12.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the CSUS Single Subject Teaching Credential Program
Justification: This course has been developed as a prerequisite to Student Teaching I, EDTE 470A, and the relevant “Standards of Quality and Effectiveness for Professional Teacher Preparation Programs” and “Teaching Performance Expectations” as delineated by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing per legislative action, SB 2042.

EDTE 371D Schools and Community D. Structured opportunities for student teachers to discuss, analyze, and reflect upon data gathered from their field placements. Attention to expectations, procedures, resources, and management strategies and activities that contribute to the classroom and school as locations for student engagement and learning. Continued emphasis on issues related to English Language Development, Special Needs students, the cycle of teaching and school law pertaining to the student. Corequisite: Enrollment in EDTE 470A. 2 units.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of the 1st semester of the CSUS Single Subject Teacher Preparation Program (2042)
Justification: This course has been developed as the nexus to Student Teaching I, EDTE 470A, and the relevant “Standards of Quality and Effectiveness for Professional Teacher Preparation Programs” and “Teaching Performance Expectations” as delineated by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing per legislative action, SB 2042.

EDTE 371E Schools and Community E. Structured opportunities for student teachers to discuss, analyze, and reflect upon data gathered from their field placements. Attention to policies, school law including teachers’ rights and responsibilities, resources, strategies, routines, and activities that contribute to productive management of the school and classroom as locations for student engagement and learning. Special emphasis will be on issues related to English Language Development, Special Needs students, the cycle of teaching and selection of artifacts for the professional portfolio. Corequisite: Completion of semesters 1 and 2 of the three-semester Single Subject Teacher Preparation Program. 2 units.
Prerequisite: Completion of semesters 1 and 2 of the three semester Single Subject Teacher Preparation Program (2042).
Justification: This course has been developed as the nexus to final semester of student teaching I, EDTE 470B, and the relevant “Standards of Quality and Effectiveness for Professional Teacher Preparation Programs” and “Teaching Performance Expectations” as delineated by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing per legislative action, SB 2042.

 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Division of Nursing

COURSE CHANGES

NURS 128 Therapeutic Interpersonal and Group Communication in Nursing
Change to:
NURS 18 Therapeutic Interpersonal and Group Communication in Nursing. No change in description.
Justification: With implementation of the CSU pre-requisite alignment legislation in Fall 2004, the sequence of nursing courses has changed (previously approved Program Change). In anticipation of the changes for Fall 2004, the faculty recognized that NURS 128 would be better scheduled concurrently with NURS 11, 14 and 17 which will be the beginning semester in the clinical nursing program. The number change would be consistent with the lower division courses in the program. Also the course is required by the Board of Registered Nursing and is found in all pre-licensure programs—the move to lower division would increase the lower division units articulated from a community college program. Accepting as many units in the pre-licensure nursing curriculum from the community college nursing programs is strongly supported by the Chancellor and legislature.
Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical nursing program
Corequisite: NURS 011, NURS 014, NURS 017 or instructor permission

Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies

COURSE CHANGE

RLS 33 Cultural Perspectives on Leisure
Change to:
RLS 33 Leisure in a Diverse Society. The course will examine leisure’s role in the social construction of markers of identity across gender, race, class, sexuality and disability; and leisure’s role in the construction of institutional oppressions such as racism, sexism, homophobia and discrimination based on class and disability. Course will be taught in a seminar style format and students will assume various leadership roles throughout the semester. 3 units
Justification: Although this course is listed in our curriculum, it has not yet been taught. Currently, this course focuses on examining the leisure experiences of underrepresented ethnic/racial minority groups in the United States. We want to expand this focus to include two additional components. First, we want to examine the role that leisure plays in terms of the social construction of “markers” of identity across gender, race, class, sexuality, and disability (e.g., the role of play in constructing and reinforcing narrowly proscribed gender roles or roles based in one’s ability, class, sexuality) and/or race (e.g., the ghetto to glory narratives popularized in contemporary popular culture). Second, we want to examine leisure as it has contributed to the creation and perpetuation of structural inequalities (e.g., leisure has been a site for the production and reproduction of racism – Jim Crow laws were applied to “public accommodations” including public parks and recreation spaces. Leisure has also been a site for the production and reproduction of sexism – women have less leisure than men because of societal expectations of women as primary caretakers of children and family). Moreover, leisure has been identified within the social sciences and the humanities as an important context for the creation of individual and social identity; and as a context for social/cultural change. For example, researchers across disciplines would agree that the context in which individuals have formed voluntary associations to work for social, political and cultural change has occurred within “leisure,” or “free time”. Thus, the purpose of this course will be to examine the phenomenon of leisure through both a micro and a macro lens vis-à-vis issues of identify, diversity and social/racial/economic justice.

Division of Social Work

COURSE CHANGE

SWRK 268 Health Policy and Services
Change to:
NURS 268 Health Policy and Services. No change in description.
Justification: The MS in Nursing core courses require SWRK 268. The Division of Nursing is currently providing the faculty to teach SWRK 268. After discussion with the Chair of Social Work, it was decided the course would be renumbered as a nursing course, which would be open to students in other graduate programs, space available. Concurrently health policy is not a required focus of the MSW, very few social work students take the course, and the Division of Social Work would not offer the course unless nursing provided the faculty.

COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS

Department of Biological Sciences

NEW COURSE

BIO 131A Advanced Problems in Physiology. Advanced problem-solving in physiology designed for students concurrently enrolled in BIO 131 (Systemic Physiology). Students explore solutions to challenging problem sets under the direct supervision an experienced section leader. Discussion: 3 hours. 1 unit
Justification: This course has been successfully run as BIO 199A for the past three semesters but doesn't accurately fit the BIO 199 description. Scheduling and enrollment are difficult in its present format.
Corequisite: BIO 131 must be taken concurrently.

Department of Chemistry

COURSE CHANGES

CHEM 189 Directed Research. Directed undergraduate research involving a project that requires inquiry and use of chemical literature. A well-written, comprehensive and well-documented final report must be submitted to receive a final grade.
Note: Course may be repeated; however only three units may be applied toward the major requirement in chemistry for the BA or BS degrees. May be used for credit toward BS degree if an upper division laboratory course is completed prior to enrolling. Additionally, the final report must be based on experimental techniques or advanced computer modeling and demonstrate a significant ability to use chemical literature and information retrieval. 1-3 units
Justification: The course is designed to serve the needs of students first doing research or who may not be seniors. The revisions clarify further the expectations for a final report. It is also changed to a graded course.
Prerequisite: ENGL 20 or an equivalent second semester composition course and permission of instructor and department chair.

CHEM 198 Senior Research. The student will conduct an independent study of a chemical research topic that is based on experimental techniques or advanced computer modeling. Significant use of chemical literature and information retrieval is required. A well-written, comprehensive, and well-documented final report must be submitted to receive a final grade. A weekly seminar is required. Seminar one hour, and laboratory activities are a minimum of six hours per week. 3 units
Justification: This course is designed for senior students, particularly those who plan to enter graduate school or do research in industry. The expectation for a final report has been clarified and other minor changes in its description.
Prerequisite: One upper division chemistry laboratory class, ENGL 020 or an equivalent second semester composition course and permission of instructor and department chair. Spring only.

COURSE DELETION

CHEM 199 Special Problems.
Justification:
With the proposed changes to CHEM 189 and 198, CHEM 199 becomes redundant and is not needed.

Marine Sciences

NEW COURSES

MSCI 201 Library Research Methods. Students will gain advanced understanding of the nature of scientific information. The course will provide the framework for using and evaluating a variety of information sources in marine and ocean sciences. Strong emphasis will be placed on developing critical skills to interweave knowledge of the history of science into the context of bibliographic tools including the digital realm. Lecture: 3 hours. 1 unit.
Justification: Students are required to extensively review the literature of marine science topics. This course will prepare students for conducting library research and evaluating sources. Along with fundamental library research skills, students will also receive an extensive introduction to Internet search tools. Strong emphasis will be placed on the ability to critically evaluate bibliographic tools and sources. Copyright, intellectual property and scholarly publishing will also be included to provide a framework for understanding the complex nature of scientific information.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing in MLML's M.S. program and consent of instructor.

MSCI 248 Marine Benthic Habitat Techniques. Collection and interpretation of geophysical data used to characterize marine benthic habitats. Basic geophysical principles will be reviewed. Application of techniques to identify and characterize marine benthic habitats, including echosounders, multibeam bathymetry and backscatter, sidescan sonar, seismic profiling, and GIS. Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 6 hours. 4 units.
Justification: This course is in demand by both geology and biology students. It is a unique class in that it allows students to accurately correlate marine and terrestrial geology and to experience hands on field and sea data collection and interpretation.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and instructor's consent.

 

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Department of Psychology

NEW COURSE

PSYC 281 Advanced Experimental Analysis of Behavior. Advanced consideration of small-N research designs. Analysis of complex contingencies of reinforcement and stimulus control as they apply to such topics as perceiving, thinking, abstraction, and concept formation. In depth examination of behavior analytic principles in relation to choice behavior and verbal behavior. 4 units
Justification: To bring into conformity with the other dual listed courses in order for the CSUS Applied Behavior Analysis Program to be approved by the National Behavior Analysis Certification Board. This will allow our students to sit for the national board examination in order for them to be certified. Certification has become the standard for employment in the field and program approval is rapidly becoming the standard for acceptance by the national board.
Prerequisite: PSYC 271

COURSE CHANGES

PSYC 271 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis. 3 units
Change to:
PSYC 271 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis. 4 units. No change in description.
Justification: The course requires 3 hours of class and 3 hours of lab per week. As such, it should be a 4 unit course to accurately reflect the students’ hours in class. In addition, the 4 units will qualify the course for approval from the Behavior Analysis Certification Board which is the national body that approves programs in applied behavior analysis. This means that the course will count toward the didactic requirements to sit for the national examination in applied behavior analysis. The additional units will not add to the units needed for the student to obtain an MA degree from the Psychology Department.

PSYC 284 Advanced Applied Child Psychology. 3 units
Change to:
PSYC 284 Advanced Applied Child Psychology. 4 units. No change in description.
Justification: The course requires 3 hours of class and 3 hours of lab per week. As such, it should be a 4 unit course to accurately reflect the students’ hours in class. In addition, the 4 units will qualify the course for approval from the Behavior Analysis Certification Board which is the national body that approves programs in applied behavior analysis. This means that the course will count toward the didactic requirements to sit for the national examination in applied behavior analysis. The additional units will not add to the units needed for the student to obtain an MA degree from the Psychology Department.

PSYC 296M Psychological Issues in Film.
Change to:
PSYC 211 Psychological Issues in Film. Examines films with psychological content. Students will explore various psychological topics and discuss whether selected films and film clips portray those topics in accordance with psychological research findings and the DSM-IV. Course includes weekly lecture on research findings on selected topics and viewing of accompanying films/film clips. Topics will be drawn primarily from developmental and clinical psychology. Cross-listed as LIBA 211; only one of these courses may be counted for credit. 3 units
Justification: Media issues have become an important area of psychology. There are many commercial films that deal with psychological topics; some accurately portray the psychologist or psychological condition and some do not. Either way, viewing these films with discussion can be an effective teaching method; they portray disabilities and mental illnesses of individuals and families visually, in a way that texts cannot. This course will take theories and findings of research out of the journals to critically assess popular culture outside of the classroom, such as when viewing a current movie in the theater. This proposal changes the course from experimental to permanent status within the Psychology curriculum as justified by its continuing popularity as a graduate elective in the Liberal Arts and Psychology Master’s programs.