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LIST #7 - 2005/2006

COURSE CHANGE PROPOSALS
UNDERGRADUATE & GRADUATE


If there are no objections reported to Academic Affairs by noon on
Tuesday, May 9, 2006 the Course Change Proposals
listed below are approved as submitted.
The Curriculum Subcommittee will meet on
Tuesday, May 9, 2006, at 1:30 in SAC 275
to review the Course Change Proposals contained in this list.

 


Deadlines for Submitting Course and Program Proposals

List No.
Deadline to Submit Course and Program Proposals to Academic Affairs
Curriculum Subcommittee Meets

8

Friday, April 28, 2006
Tuesday, May 16, 2006

Course Change Proposals:
Past Program Change Proposal Lists:

College of Arts & Letters
College of Education
Collge of Engineering & Computer Science
College of Health & Human Services
College of Social Sciences & Interdisciplinary Studies

Course List #1
Course List #2
Course List #3
Course List #4
Course List #5
Course List #6

 

COLLEGE OF ARTS & LETTERS

Department of Art

New Courses

ART 121A - Intermediate Painting

Justification: Presently painting is taught only at the beginning (ART 21) and advanced (ART 121) levels.  As a result, students do not have an adequate opportunity to develop their skills between the two levels.  Studio art courses often are offered in three levels, as already is done in drawing, electronic art, and (effective next year) jewelry at Sacramento State .  We would like to establish a comparable three-stage program in painting.  This also will facilitate a more consistent level of technical and conceptual development at each level.

Description: Continuing investigation of the technical and conceptual issues of painting. 3 units.

ART 124A - Intermediate Watercolor

Justification:
Presently watercolor is taught only at the beginning (ART 24) and advanced (ART 124) levels.  As a result, students do not have an adequate opportunity to develop their skills between the two levels.  Studio art courses often are offered in three levels, as already is done in drawing, electronic art, and (effective next year) jewelry at Sacramento State .  We would like to establish a comparable three-stage program in watercolor.  This also will facilitate a more consistent level of technical and conceptual development at each level.

Description: Continuing investigation of the technical and conceptual issues of painting, using transparent water media. 3 units.

Course Changes

ART 21 - Beginning Painting

Justification:
ART 21 always has been the entry-level course in painting at Sacramento State , but this has not been reflected in its title. Now that we are establishing an intermediate level course in painting (ART 121A: see separate proposal), we need to revise the name of ART 21 so that its place in the three-level sequence (beginning, intermediate, and advanced) is clear. Nothing else is changed: the description, note, and prerequisite statement in the current catalogue will remain. The goals and assessment strategies approved for this GE course (Area C-4) also are unchanged.

Description: Introduction to the methods and problems of painting in oil or acrylic medium.

ART 24 - Beginning Watercolor

Justification: ART 24 always has been the entry-level course in watercolor at Sacramento State , but this has not been reflected in its title. Now that we are establishing an intermediate level course in watercolor (ART 124A: see separate proposal), we need to revise the name of ART 24 so that its place in the three-level sequence (beginning, intermediate, and advanced) is clear. Nothing else is changed: the description, note, and prerequisite statement in the current catalogue will remain. The goals and assessment strategies approved for this GE course (Area C-4) also are unchanged.

Description: Introduction to both transparent and opaque watercolor. 3 units.

ART 121B - Advanced Painting

Justification:
Renumbering of existing course to accommodate the proposed intermediate painting course. This proposal is being submitted simultaneously with a proposal for the creation of ART 121A, Intermediate Painting. The description and learning goals have been updated to reflect the change.

Description: Continuing investigation of the technical and conceptual issues of painting, with an emphasis on intensive individual exploration. 3 units.

ART 124B - Advanced Watercolor

Justification:
Renumbering of existing course to accommodate the proposed intermediate watercolor course, ART 124B. Modifications also were made in the course description, prerequisite, and learning outcomes.

Description: Continuing investigation of the technical and conceptual issues of painting using transparent water media, with emphasis on intensive individual exploration. 3 units.

Department of English

New Courses

ENGL 150P - The American Gothic

Justification:
This course offers students the opportunity to trace a mode of writing—the Gothic—across conventional boundaries of time periods, geographical regions and genres. No other class in the undergraduate curriculum in American literature makes such connections possible. By examining works that explore Gothic themes across the spectrum of American literature, students will grasp connections among different cultural moments as well as understand what makes those various cultural moments unique. Analyzing the features of American works in the Gothic mode separate from their European counterparts will bring into focus characteristically American preoccupations, such as slavery, democracy, capitalism, and the fate of the American Indian.

Description: This course will explore American works written in the Gothic mode. In novels, captivity narratives, short stories, and poetry, we will investigate representations of terrifying, uncanny, and supernatural phenomena. As we trace the development of the Gothic mode in American literature, we will examine how narratives and poetic depictions of horror rehearse our individual and cultural fears about sexuality, race, violation, rebellion, madness, and death, and we will inquire into that thrill of macabre pleasure that attends the exploration of the darker side of life. 3 units.

ENGL 190Q - Gay & Lesbian Literature

Justification: This course is designed to introduce students to or renew their acquaintance with literature written by gay men and lesbians. The class will not, however, assume an unchanging, transhistorical idea of the gay self, instead pursuing investigations into the social, historical, and cultural constructions of sexual identity in different moments in different locales. With the removal of ENGL 185H: “Lesbian Writing: Theory & Practice” from department course listings, this course will take its place and change its focus, yet it will also preserve discussions of lesbian and gay work in the English classroom in a seminar setting.

Description: Readings in and analysis of literature by and about lesbians and gay men. Students will work with a variety of texts (fiction, poetry, film, nonfiction) about gay and lesbian identity; at the same time, students will come to understand the historical contexts and shifting theoretical paradigms that have shaped and reshaped conceptions of sexuality. 3 units.

ENGL 197P - British Film

Justification: This course is designed to introduce students to or renew their acquaintance with the films and film makers of Great Britain . Serving as a complement to Engl. 197L “American Film” and 197N “Recent American Film” 197P addresses the film-making of England , Ireland , Wales and Scotland (with possible entries from the Commonwealth) during the last century, providing perspectives on both British culture and English-language film-making beyond the United States.

Description: Screenings and analysis of films produced in Great Britain . Students will view a variety of British films, starting possibly with silents and early Hitchcock and ending with films from the contemporary moment. Students will come to understand the historical and artistic contexts of the films and encounter the shifting definitions of what represents “British” on the screens of the cinema and in the minds of viewers. Course may provide a survey of films or focus on particular themes, studios, or directors. 3 units.

Department of History

New Course

HIST 193 - Oral History: Theory and Practice

Justification:
Oral history is both a research tool and a resource. With increasing use of oral history in historical research and the increasing interest among undergraduate students in conducting oral history (and public history generally), this course will allow the department to offer a specialized course in how to use oral history in academic research projects and how to conduct oral history interviews, and it will also provide an additional feeder course for students interested in pursuing a career as an oral historian/public historian. Therefore, this course will fulfill a growing demand from undergraduates for Public History/Oral History coursework by providing a course that will teach a valuable and marketable skill.

Description: Introduces students to the theory and practice of oral history. Examines ethical and legal issues as well as problems of accuracy in memory. Students will also learn how to conduct, transcribe, and edit oral histories and develop oral history projects. 3 units.

Course Change

HIST 100 - Introduction to Historical Skills

Justification: This is a proposal to change the course classification from C3 to C4. Hist 100 is an introductory research and writing seminar designed for 2 nd semester sophomores and 1 st semester juniors. It is a course that requires a substantial amount of intensive research and writing as a means to prepare students for upper-division History coursework. In particular, it is a prerequisite for our required upper-division senior seminars: Hist 192 (series) and Hist 197 (series). Faculty who teach this course have a heavy burden of carefully grading a large number of intensive writing and bibliography projects, so we are requesting that the course enrollment cap be lowered from 30 (C3) to 25 (C4). This will insure that faculty will be able to devote the time necessary to carefully grade and evaluate on a more individual basis the students' work. The Department voted unanimously to make this change due to the heavy workload of this course. This course is also the only writing seminar required for History Major/Precredential students and Art History majors are also required to take this course, so it is vital that faculty have the time to give full attention to student writing. 3 units.

Liberal Arts

Course Change

LIBA 205 - Space and Time

Justification:
The Department would like more flexibility in offering this course. In particular we would like the option of offering an historically-oriented course or a problems-oriented course. To do this, we'd like to delete these words from the previous course description: PHIL 192D Space and Time : Plato to Einstein. Introduction to philosophical issues involving space, tim e, and matter. The historical development of the issues from Antiquity (Zeno, Plato, and Euclid) through the Early Modern Period ( Newton , Leibniz, Berkeley and Kant) to contemporary treatments (Einstein, Thorne, and Hawking). An investigation into current state of these issues. No background or work in mathematics or physics is required. Prerequisite: 6 units in philosophy or instructor permission. 3 units.

Description: Introduction to significant philosophical issues involving space and tim e. An investigation into the current state of these issues. No background or work in mathematics or physics is required. Prerequisite: 6 units in philosophy or instructor permission. 3 units.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation & School Psyhology

New Courses

EDS 239 - Education Specialist Seminar

Justification:
This course has been developed as part of the Education Specialist (Ed.S) degree program being proposed. The purpose of the course is to provide a seminar fostering the development of leadership skills among school psychologist candidates. As the roles of school psychologists expand in response to ever increasing demands in the schools it is important for them to be prepared to assume leadership roles at the school and district level.

Description: Seminar course to explore leadership roles of school psychologists. Prerequisite: Approval as a candidate in the Education Specialist program, completion of courses required for the School Psychology Internship credential, approval of advisor, and department petition. Graded Credit/No Credit. 3 units.

EDS 542 - Education Specialist Project: School Psychology

Justification:
This course is one of two culminating experience options for an Education Specialist degree in School Psychology. The course will require students to develop and implement a research based project relevant to school psychology. The Education Specialist Project culminating experience is designed to demonstrate that students have the ability to gather scientifically based research and information relevant to a topic and develop a related project. Such skills are considered an important component of the Ed.S. degree.

Description: Credit given upon successful completion of a project approved for the Education Specialist degree. Note: Open only to the graduate student who has been advanced to candidacy. Department petition is required. Number of units of credit is determined by the candidate's advisor. Graded Credit/No Credit. 4-6 units.

Course Change

EDS 540 - Education Specialist Thesis: School Psychology

Justification:
The M.A. degree for which this course was provided is being replaced with an M.A. that does not have a thesis option. A new degree Education Specialist (Ed.S.) has been developed. This course is part of that program and will be the thesis option for the Ed.S. culminating experience. The course will require independent work in the development of a thesis addressing the field of school psychology. Completion of this course will demonstrate that those receiving the Ed.S. degree have the skills to complete a research based project.

Description: Credit given upon successful completion of a thesis approved for the education specialist degree. Note: Open only to the graduate student who has been advanced to candidacy for the education specialist degree. Number of units of credit is determined by the candidate's education specialist advisory committee. Graded Credit/No Credit. 4-6 units.




COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING & COMPUTER SCIENCE

Department of Civil Engineering

New Change

ENGR 105 - Sustainable Design and Construction

Justification:
This is a new class that is being introduced due to the relevancy of the topic and the interest of students . In their roles as future professionals, students in Civil Engineering and Construction Management are uniquely positioned to prevent and/or solve many problems related to sustainability in the built environment (cities, infrastructure, buildings, products, landscapes, and public spaces.) In addition, as citizens and future users of engineered facilities, the general student body has an interest in sustainability issues and deserves an opportunity to learn more about them. Consequently, this class will be proposed as a General Education course. No other courses at Sacramento State specifically address this topic.

Description: Strategies, analysis methods, and processes of environmentally conscious planning, design, construction, operation, deconstruction, and assessment of engineered facilities. Course presents a systematic framework for problem solving, decision making, design, and construction using the principles of sustainability as guiding objectives. Tools, and techniques for gathering information, generating, analyzing, and evaluating alternatives, and developing implementation strategies are presented and demonstrated. 3 units.


Department of Computer Science

Course Changes

CSC 010 - Introduction to Programming Logic

Justification:
Changes are necessary to reflect current practice and clarify the prerequisite to facilitate entry into the course for newly arriving students. (Former prerequisite was “Passing score on the ELM.”)

Description: Introduction to computer science with an emphasis on programming concepts and methodology. Intended to assist students with little or no programming experience to understand the basic principles of programming logic. Topics include computer hardware and software, problem solving and algorithm development, flow of control, modular design using techniques that can be applied to common programming languages. Lecture two hours, technical activity and laboratory, two hours. 3 units.

CSC 154 - Computer Systems Attacks and Countermeasures

Justification:
With the rise in identity theft, corporate espionage, and cyberterrorism, the security industry has grown into billions of dollars in business and commerce. Military, federal, state and local governments and both large and small companies are interested in it. Computer Science plays an integral part of this growing area and it is important that the computer science student understands security issues in networks and computing devices. Specifically, this course is bout how hackers attack systems and what countermeasures are used to mitigate those attacks. Also, this is one of the courses used to meet the Information Assurance (IA) curriculum based on CNSS security standards, a prerequisite for designation as a Center of Academic Excellence in IA. In order to meet those requirements, this course should be converted to a permanent course.

Description: Introduction to network and computer security with a focus on how intruders gain access to systems, how they escalate privileges, and what steps can be taken to secure a system against such attacks. Topics include: Perimeter defenses, intrusion detection systems, social engineering, distributed denial of service attacks, buffer overflows, race conditions, trojans and viruses. 3 units.

CSC 165 - Computer Game Architecture and Implementation

Justification:
Computer games are one of the fastest growing segments of the computer field, and comprise complex hardware/software systems incorporating detailed mathematical and physics simulation models, real-time interactive graphics rendering and animation components, advanced data structures and algorithms, networking and distributed processing interfaces, artificial intelligence components, and optimization techniques, all of which are recognized topics in computer science. Many universities already offer courses identical or similar to the proposed course, and some have entire technical degree programs in this area. In addition, computer games have been recognized by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM, the oldest and largest professional organization for computer scientists) as an important field having a significant impact on the design and implementation of a wide variety of non-gaming applications. Offering this as a permanent course is an important step toward keeping our Computer Science curriculum current, relevant and competitive.

Description: Architecture and implementation of computer game systems. Topics include game engine architecture; screen management and rendering control; geometric models; algorithms and data structures for spatial partitioning, occlusion and collision detection; real-time interactive 3D graphics and animation techniques; behavioral control for autonomous characters; simulation of physical phenomena; sound and music in games; optimization techniques; multi-player games and networking; game development tools and environments. Substantial programming and project work. 3 units.

CSC 244 - Database System Design

Justification:
CSC 244 covers theories, design, and implementation of database management systems, rather than design of databases. The proposed title better reflects the content of the course.

Description: Topics in the design and implementation of database management systems. Database system concepts and architectures; query compiler, query processing algorithms, logical and physical query plans, query optimization; recovery, concurrency control; transaction management in centralized database management systems and distributed database management systems. Also exploration of current research directions, issues, and results related to databases and data management. 3 units.


Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering

Course Change

EEE 286 - Microcomputer System Design II

Justification:
Topics are updated due to technological changes in the computer industry.

Description: Includes PCI and PCI express bus specifications/architecture, PCI bridges transaction ordering, PCI express transactions and handshaking protocols, electromagnetic interference, methods of eliminating interference, shielding grounding, balancing, filtering, isolation, separation, orientation, cancellation techniques and cable design. Class involves design projects and research presentations on PCI and PCI Express Bridge. 3 units.

Department of Mechanical Engineering

New Course

ME 236 - Computer Controlled Manufacturing Processes

Justification:
The course was offered once as the experimental course number of ME 296H with 25 students. Manufacturing engineers must be able to produce products knowing the capabilities of modern computer controlled machines. In this course along with lectures, CNC milling machine, CNC lathe, robot, PLC and other computer controlled machines will be used to pursue this objective of the course. This course is a graduate extension of undergraduate classes with more theory and more sophisticated schemes.

Description: ME 236 Computer Controlled Manufacturing Processes: Applications of logic and motion controls in manufacturing. Computer controlled open and feedback systems. CNC machining processes, CNC programming. Applications of robots in manufacturing, programming for robots. PLC logic controls, sensors and output devices, creating ladder logic diagrams for PLCs. Design for Manufacturing (DFM) and Design for Assembly (DFA) of modern computer controlled machines. 3 units.

 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

Division of Criminal Justice

New Course

CRJ 172 - Juvenile Law

Justification:
This course will offer criminal justice majors interested in pursuing careers related to juvenile justice the opportunity to examine this unique legal area, not previously offered at this university.

Description: Course provides an overview of legal concepts and principles affecting the adjudication of delinquent children in juvenile and adult court systems, develops the ability to read and analyze difficult legal issues relating to juvenile law, and provides the information required to evaluate the effectiveness of the juvenile court system in the context of its stated rehabilitative goals and the potential impact of a shift in focus to a more retribution-oriented structure. 3 units.

Course Change

CRJ 005 - The Community and the Justice System

Justification: This is an updated course description developed by the faculty after experience teaching this course. It reflects more emphasis on the overall justice system(both criminal and civil) as well as the community and the respective agents vs. the previous focus on the criminal aspects of the justice system. It also covers more diverse groups. The addition of CrJ 1 as a prerequisite assures that students have a basic understanding of the components, organization and function of the justice system before attempting to pursue the relationship between the justice system and the larger communities.

Description: Course examines complex, dynamic relationship between communities and the justice system in addressing crime and conflict with emphasis on the challenges and prospects of administering justice within a diverse, multicultural population and the roles played by race, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, age, social class, culture and justice professionals in shaping relationships within the justice system.  Special topics include crime prevention, restorative justice, conflict resolution and pure justice. 3 units.

 

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES & INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Department of Anthropology

New Course

ANTH 176 - Museums, Culture and Society

Justification:
This course expands the Anthropology Department's offerings in Museum Anthropology. It fulfills a distributed elective requirement within the B.A. program and will contribute to a planned concentration in Museum Anthropology.

Description: Provides an introduction to museum anthropology. Surveys the emergence of modern anthropology from its origins in 17 th century natural history to its late 19 th century institutionalization in museums. Explores the role of collectors, curators and financial patrons in the development of museums and social theory. Examines the contemporary poetics and politics of museums and cultural interpretation, including cultural property rights, cultural self-representation, collaborative exhibit development, and the ethnography of museums. 3 units.

Gerontology Program and Center

New Course

GERO 102 - Social Policy for an Aging Society

Justification:
For the past two years Gerontology and Public Policy and Administration programs have partnered offering these two courses in an interdisciplinary fashion to enhance student learning from both disciplines. The two departments have determined that the ability to do this has significantly benefited all students because of the shared content and planned interdisciplinary approach. Cross listing the courses will facilitate the students scheduling of the course in their own majors.

Description: Explores context and process for policy making by national and California state governments including ethical dimensions. Applications are developed from students' and instructor's areas of interest including k-12 and higher education, land-use policy, and aging issues such as elder advocacy, Social Security, and Medicare/Medicaid. Provides background and skills for entry level positions in public or non-profit organizations. Cross-listed as PPA 100; only one may be counted for credit. Prerequisite: GOVT 001 or GOVT 150 or equivalent. 3 units.

 

Department of Public Policy & Administration

New Course

PPA 100 - Introduction to Public Policy and Administration

Justificaiton:
We need to change the official course description for two reasons. First, the present course description has an unintended focus on career learning. The course as taught has a much stronger survey character, exposing students to the context, design and implementation of public policy/administration. Students learn about career options but this is not the central purpose of the class. Second, f or the past couple years our department and the Gerontology Program have partnered in offering PPA 100 and GERO 102 in an interdisciplinary fashion to enhance student learning from both disciplines. We have determined that the ability to do this has significantly benefited all students because of the planned interdisciplinary approach. Cross listing the courses will facilitate students' scheduling of the course in their own majors.

Description: Explores context and process for policy making by national and California state governments, including ethical dimensions. Applications are developed from students' and instructor's areas of interest including K-12 and higher education, land-use policy, and aging issues such as elder advocacy, Social Security, and Medicaid. Provides background and skills for entry level positions in public or non-profit organizations. Cross-listed as GERO 102; only one may be counted for credit. Prerequisite: GOVT 001 or GOVT 150 or equivalent. 3 units.

 

 

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