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UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE
PROGRAM CHANGE PROPOSALS

LIST #2– 2005/2006

IMPORTANT NOTICE:

There will be one more list for review in the month of October. Due to the volume of Course and Program Proposals, List #3 will be posted next week. All items on List #3 will be included in the 06-08 Catalog. Course and Program Proposals that were submitted by the Septemeber 23 deadline and do not appear on List #2 will be included on List #3



The Curriculum Subcommittee will meet on
Tuesday, October 11, 2005, at 1:30 in SAC 275
to review the Program Change Proposals contained in this list.
(Response due to Academic Affairs by noon on October 11, 2005)


 List #2 of Course Change Proposals is located at
http://www.csus.edu/acaf/policies/crslst.stm for your review.


List #2 of Program Proposals to be reviewed by CPSP
(Council on the Preparation of School Personnel) is
located at
http://www.csus.edu/acaf/policies/cpsplst.stm

Program Proposals

Past Program Proposal Lists:

College of Arts & Letter
College of Education
College of Social Sciences and Interdisciplinary Studies

Program List #1

COLLEGE OF ARTS & LETTERS

Department of Art

NON SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

BA, Art Studio
Description:
An intermediate level course is being added to the small metals set of courses. Previously, students took a beginning course and proceeded directly to an advanced level. After one beginning course, students have not developed the skills nor explored the medium and its historical underpinnings enough to be accurately considered advanced students in the area. An intermediate course (ART 174) would acknowledge students’ actual level of learning while preparing them for an advanced level status. In general, what is now described as the advanced level course content will become the content for the intermediate level. A new course with distinct content will be submitted for the advanced level course (ART 176). This course will also have appeal to other majors that work with design and metal such as Mechanical Engineering.
In addition, the word “design” is deleted from all course titles. The inclusion of the word suggests that an emphasis is placed on designing jewelry when in fact the emphasis is on the creation of the work. Designing the work is simply part of the process.
In sequence, the new set of courses will be: ART 74 Beginning Jewelry, ART 174 Intermediate Jewelry, ART 176 Advanced Jewelry, and ART 179 Small Metals Studio.

Old Program

REQUIREMENTS · BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE - CONCENTRATION IN ART STUDIO

Units required for Concentration: 48

Minimum total units required for BA: 120

Courses applied to the Art Studio Concentration must be completed with a grade of "C" or higher.

Courses in parenthesis are prerequisites.

It is strongly recommended that entering students contact the Art Department prior to entrance for advisement and portfolio review.

A. Required Lower Division Core Courses (24 units)

(3) ART 001A Art in the Western World: From Stone Age to End of Middle Ages

(3) ART 001B Art in the Western World: From Renaissance to Present

(3) ART 020A Beginning Drawing

(3) ART 020B ntermediate Drawing ( ART 020A or equivalent)

(6)Select two of the following:

ART 027 Beginning Color

ART 060 Two-Dimensional Composition

ART 070 Form, Space and Vision

ART 080 Materials and Methods

ART 097 Beginning Electronic Art

(3)Select one of the following:

ART 021 Painting ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 024 Watercolor ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 040A Basic Printmaking: Survey

ART 040B Basic Printmaking: Etching

ART 040C Basic Printmaking: Lithography

ART 040D Basic Printmaking: Relief

ART 040E Basic Printmaking: Silkscreen

ART 040H Beginning Printmaking/Portfolio (Portfolio Review)

(3)Select one of the following:

ART 050 Beginning Ceramics

ART 053 Beginning Hand-Built Ceramics

ART 074 Beginning Jewelry Design

ART 075 Beginning Metalsmithing

ART 086 Clay Sculpture

ART 087 Wood Sculpture and Experimental Furniture

ART 088 Sculpture

 

B. Required Upper Division Core Courses (18 units)

(6)Select 6 units of upper division art history courses. Independent study courses, such as ART 119 , ART 195 and ART 199 , are not applicable.

(3) ART 120 Advanced Drawing ( ART 020B or equivalent)

(3) ART 192A Senior Seminar in Studio Art (Senior Status)

(6)Select two upper division art studio courses from the following:

ART 121 Advanced Painting ( ART 021 or equivalent)

ART 123 Figure Drawing ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 124 Advanced Watercolor ( ART 024 or equivalent)

ART 125 Life Studio ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 126 Life Painting ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 127 Collage and Assemblage

ART 141 Advanced Silkscreen ( ART 040E or equivalent)

ART 145 Advanced Printmaking

ART 150 Advanced Ceramics ( ART 050 or equivalent, or instructor permission)

ART 153 Hand-Built Ceramic Techniques ( ART 053 or instructor permission)

ART 160 Photography in the Arts (one semester of basic photography or instructor permission)

ART 161 Photography in the Field ( PHOT 040 or equivalent)

ART 162 Alternative Photographic Processes ( PHOT 040 or equivalent)

ART 174 Advanced Jewelry Design ( ART 074 or equivalent, or instructor permission)


ART 180 Figure Sculpture ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 183 Advanced Sculpture ( ART 088 or equivalent)

ART 197 Intermediate Electronic Art ( ART 097 or equivalent experience, such as

PHOT 100 , Introduction to Digital Imaging)

ART 198 Advanced Electronic Art ( ART 197 or equivalent experience, evidenced in portfolio)

C. Upper Division Elective Courses (6 units)

(6) Select two of the following:

ART 100 Origins of American Indian Art

ART 101 Art and Photography

ART 103 Greco-Roman Art ( ART 001A or equivalent)

ART 105 Medieval Art ( ART 001A or equivalent)

ART 106 Renaissance Art ( ART 001A or ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 107 Baroque and Rococo Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 108 19th Century Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 109 20th Century Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 110 American Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 111 Latin American and Latino Art History

ART 112 Contemporary Art ( ART 001B , ART 109 , or instructor permission)

ART 113A Primitive Art and Mythology

ART 113B Asian Art and Mythology

ART 113C Occidental Art and Mythology

ART 113D Creative Art and Mythology

ART 114 Visual Form and the African Diaspora

ART 117A Art of India and Southeast Asia

ART 117B Art of China and Japan

ART 118A Modern Architecture

ART 118B California Architecture and Urban History (Cross-listed as HIST 184 )

ART 119 *Directed Research in Art History (instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition form)

ART 121 Advanced Painting ( ART 021 or equivalent)

ART 123 Figure Drawing ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 124 Advanced Watercolor ( ART 024 or equivalent)

ART 125 Life Studio ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 126 Life Painting ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 127 Collage and Assemblage

ART 128 Art and Artist in the Marketplace

ART 129 *Painting/Drawing Studio (instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition form)

ART 130 Aesthetics and Art Criticism (upper division or graduate status; declared major in Art)

ART 133 Understanding and Creating Art (upper division status; declared major in Art, Child Development or Liberal Studies, or a minor in Art Education)

ART 135 Secondary School Art Education ( ART 133 or instructor permission)

ART 137 Art for Exceptional Children

ART 139 *Directed Research in Art Education (instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition form)

ART 141 Advanced Silkscreen ( ART 040E or equivalent)

ART 145 Advanced Printmaking

ART 148 Barrio Art for Ethnic Groups

ART 149 *Graphics/Printmaking Studio (instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition form)

ART 150 Advanced Ceramics ( ART 050 or equivalent, or instructor permission)

ART 153 Hand-Build Ceramic Techniques ( ART 053 or instructor permission)

ART 159 *Ceramics Studio (instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition form)

ART 160 Photography in the Arts (one semester of basic photography or instructor permission)

ART 161 Photography in the Field ( PHOT 040 or equivalent)

ART 162 Alternative Photographic Processes ( PHOT 040 or other basic photography`)

ART 169 Photography Studio (instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition form)

ART 174 Advanced Jewelry Design ( ART 074 or equivalent, or instructor permission)

ART 179 *Crafts/Art Metal Studio (instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition form)

ART 180 Figure Sculpture ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 183 Advanced Sculpture ( ART 088 or equivalent)

ART 189 *Sculpture Studio (instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition form)

ART 191 Film as an Art Form

ART 193 Art Gallery Management

ART 195 *Fieldwork

ART 196 Experimental Offerings in Art

ART 197 Intermediate Electronic Art ( ART 097 or equivalent experience such as PHOT 100 , Introduction Digital Imaging)

ART 198 Advanced Electronic Art ( ART 197 or equivalent experience, evidenced in portfolio)

ART 199 *Special Problems

C
*Independent study and supervisory courses in the major are limited to two (no more than 6 units) and may be applied only to the elective category.

Note: Students may, with permission of the instructor, enroll in graduate (200 level) classes.

REQUIREMENTS · SUBJECT MATTER PROGRAM

(pre-credential preparation)

Units required for the Subject Matter Program: 48

Art majors wishing to pursue a teaching credential should contact a credential advisor in the Art Department .

Students seeking a teaching credential must complete the Professional Education Program in the College of Education in addition to other requirements.

Note: ART 305 (Art in the Public School) is the required learning methods course for students seeking the Preliminary Teaching Credential.

A. Core Courses (33 units)

(3) ART 001A Art in the Western World: From Stone Age to End of Middle Ages

(3) ART 001B Art in the Western World: From Renaissance to Present

(3) ART 020A Beginning Drawing

(3) ART 021

Painting ( ART 020A or equivalent)

(3) Select one of the following:

ART 040A Basis Printmaking: Survey

ART 040D Basic Printmaking: Relief

ART 040E Basic Printmaking: Silk-screen

(3) ART 050 Beginning Ceramics

(3) ART 097 Beginning Electronic Art

(3) ART 130 Aesthetics and Art Criticism (upper division or graduate status; declared major in Art)

(3) ART 133 Understanding and Creating Art (upper division status; declared major in Art, Child Development or Liberal Studies, or a minor in Art Education)

(3) ART 135 Secondary School Art Education ( ART 133 or instructor permission)

(3) ART 137 Art for Exceptional Children

B. Breadth and Perspective Courses (15 units)

(3) Select one of the following:

ART 020B Intermediate Drawing ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 024 Watercolor ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 027 Beginning Color

ART 053 Beginning Hand-built Ceramics

ART 060 Two-Dimensional Composition

ART 070 Form, Space and Vision

ART 074 Beginning Jewelry Design

ART 080 Materials and Methods

ART 088 Sculpture

(3) Select one of the following:

ART 120

Advanced Drawing ( ART 020B or equivalent)

ART 121 Advanced Painting ( ART 021 or equivalent)

ART 124 Advanced Watercolor ( ART 024 or equivalent)

ART 125 Life Studio ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 145 Advanced Printmaking

ART 148 Barrio Art for Ethnic Groups

ART 160 Photography in the Arts (One semester of basic photography or instructor permission)

 

(3) Select one of the following:

ART 150 Advanced Ceramics ( ART 050 or equivalent, or instructor permission)

ART 153 Hand-Built Ceramic Techniques ( ART 053 or instructor permission)

ART 174 Advanced Jewelry Design

ART 180 Figure Sculpture ( ART 020A or equivalent)

(6) Select two of the following:

ART 100 Origins of American Indian Art

ART 101 Art and Photography

ART 103 Greco-Roman Art ( ART 001A or equivalent)

ART 105 Medieval Art ( ART 001A or equivalent)

ART 106 Renaissance Art ( ART 001A or ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 107 Baroque and Rococo Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 108 19th Century Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 109 20th Century Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 110 American Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 111 Latin American and Latino Art History

ART 112 Contemporary Art (Modern Art History: ART 001B or ART 109 (or equivalent) or instructor permission)

ART 117A Art of India and Southeast Asia

ART 117B Art of China and Japan

ART 118A Modern Architecture

ART 118B California Architecture and Urban History

Note: The program is currently under review by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing and students are strongly encouraged to consult an advisor.

 

New Program

REQUIREMENTS · BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE - CONCENTRATION IN ART STUDIO

Units required for Concentration: 48

Minimum total units required for BA: 120

Courses applied to the Art Studio Concentration must be completed with a grade of "C" or higher.

Courses in parenthesis are prerequisites.

It is strongly recommended that entering students contact the Art Department prior to entrance for advisement and portfolio review.

A. Required Lower Division Core Courses (24 units)

(3) ART 001A Art in the Western World: From Stone Age to End of Middle Ages

(3) ART 001B Art in the Western World: From Renaissance to Present

(3) ART 020A Beginning Drawing

(3) ART 020B ntermediate Drawing ( ART 020A or equivalent)

(6)Select two of the following:

ART 027 Beginning Color

ART 060 Two-Dimensional Composition

ART 070 Form, Space and Vision

ART 080 Materials and Methods

ART 097 Beginning Electronic Art

(3)Select one of the following:

ART 021 Painting ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 024 Watercolor ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 040A Basic Printmaking: Survey

ART 040B Basic Printmaking: Etching

ART 040C Basic Printmaking: Lithography

ART 040D Basic Printmaking: Relief

ART 040E Basic Printmaking: Silkscreen

ART 040H Beginning Printmaking/Portfolio (Portfolio Review)

(3)Select one of the following:

ART 050 Beginning Ceramics

ART 053 Beginning Hand-Built Ceramics

ART 074 Beginning Jewelry

ART 075 Beginning Metalsmithing

ART 086 Clay Sculpture

ART 087 Wood Sculpture and Experimental Furniture

ART 088 Sculpture

 

B. Required Upper Division Core Courses (18 units)

(6)Select 6 units of upper division art history courses. Independent study courses, such as ART 119 , ART 195 and ART 199 , are not applicable.

(3) ART 120 Advanced Drawing ( ART 020B or equivalent)

(3) ART 192A Senior Seminar in Studio Art (Senior Status)

(6)Select two upper division art studio courses from the following:

ART 121 Advanced Painting ( ART 021 or equivalent)

ART 123 Figure Drawing ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 124 Advanced Watercolor ( ART 024 or equivalent)

ART 125 Life Studio ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 126 Life Painting ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 127 Collage and Assemblage

ART 141 Advanced Silkscreen ( ART 040E or equivalent)

ART 145 Advanced Printmaking

ART 150 Advanced Ceramics ( ART 050 or equivalent, or instructor permission)

ART 153 Hand-Built Ceramic Techniques ( ART 053 or instructor permission)

ART 160 Photography in the Arts (one semester of basic photography or instructor permission)

ART 161 Photography in the Field ( PHOT 040 or equivalent)

ART 162 Alternative Photographic Processes ( PHOT 040 or equivalent)

ART 174 Intermediate Jewelry ( ART 074 or equivalent, or instructor permission)ART 176 Advanced Jewelry (Art 174 or equivalent, or instructor permission)
ART 180 Figure Sculpture ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 183 Advanced Sculpture ( ART 088 or equivalent)

ART 197 Intermediate Electronic Art ( ART 097 or equivalent experience, such as

PHOT 100 , Introduction to Digital Imaging)

ART 198 Advanced Electronic Art ( ART 197 or equivalent experience, evidenced in portfolio)

C. Upper Division Elective Courses (6 units)

(6) Select two of the following:

ART 100 Origins of American Indian Art

ART 101 Art and Photography

ART 103 Greco-Roman Art ( ART 001A or equivalent)

ART 105 Medieval Art ( ART 001A or equivalent)

ART 106 Renaissance Art ( ART 001A or ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 107 Baroque and Rococo Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 108 19th Century Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 109 20th Century Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 110 American Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 111 Latin American and Latino Art History

ART 112 Contemporary Art ( ART 001B , ART 109 , or instructor permission)

ART 113A Primitive Art and Mythology

ART 113B Asian Art and Mythology

ART 113C Occidental Art and Mythology

ART 113D Creative Art and Mythology

ART 114 Visual Form and the African Diaspora

ART 117A Art of India and Southeast Asia

ART 117B Art of China and Japan

ART 118A Modern Architecture

ART 118B California Architecture and Urban History (Cross-listed as HIST 184 )

ART 119 *Directed Research in Art History (instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition form)

ART 121 Advanced Painting ( ART 021 or equivalent)

ART 123 Figure Drawing ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 124 Advanced Watercolor ( ART 024 or equivalent)

ART 125 Life Studio ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 126 Life Painting ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 127 Collage and Assemblage

ART 128 Art and Artist in the Marketplace

ART 129 *Painting/Drawing Studio (instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition form)

ART 130 Aesthetics and Art Criticism (upper division or graduate status; declared major in Art)

ART 133 Understanding and Creating Art (upper division status; declared major in Art, Child Development or Liberal Studies, or a minor in Art Education)

ART 135 Secondary School Art Education ( ART 133 or instructor permission)

ART 137 Art for Exceptional Children

ART 139 *Directed Research in Art Education (instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition form)

ART 141 Advanced Silkscreen ( ART 040E or equivalent)

ART 145 Advanced Printmaking

ART 148 Barrio Art for Ethnic Groups

ART 149 *Graphics/Printmaking Studio (instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition form)

ART 150 Advanced Ceramics ( ART 050 or equivalent, or instructor permission)

ART 153 Hand-Build Ceramic Techniques ( ART 053 or instructor permission)

ART 159 *Ceramics Studio (instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition form)

ART 160 Photography in the Arts (one semester of basic photography or instructor permission)

ART 161 Photography in the Field ( PHOT 040 or equivalent)

ART 162 Alternative Photographic Processes ( PHOT 040 or other basic photography`)

ART 169 Photography Studio (instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition form)
ART 174 Advanced Jewelry ( ART 074 or equivalent, or instructor permission)
ART 176 Advanced Jewelry (Art 174 or equivalent, or instructor permission)

ART 179 Small Metals Studio (instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition form)


ART 180 Figure Sculpture ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 183 Advanced Sculpture ( ART 088 or equivalent)

ART 189 *Sculpture Studio (instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition form)

ART 191 Film as an Art Form

ART 193 Art Gallery Management

ART 195 *Fieldwork

ART 196 Experimental Offerings in Art

ART 197 Intermediate Electronic Art ( ART 097 or equivalent experience such as PHOT 100 , Introduction Digital Imaging)

ART 198 Advanced Electronic Art ( ART 197 or equivalent experience, evidenced in portfolio)

ART 199 *Special Problems

C
*Independent study and supervisory courses in the major are limited to two (no more than 6 units) and may be applied only to the elective category.

Note: Students may, with permission of the instructor, enroll in graduate (200 level) classes.

REQUIREMENTS · SUBJECT MATTER PROGRAM

(pre-credential preparation)

Units required for the Subject Matter Program: 48

Art majors wishing to pursue a teaching credential should contact a credential advisor in the Art Department .

Students seeking a teaching credential must complete the Professional Education Program in the College of Education in addition to other requirements.

Note: ART 305 (Art in the Public School) is the required learning methods course for students seeking the Preliminary Teaching Credential.

A. Core Courses (33 units)

(3) ART 001A Art in the Western World: From Stone Age to End of Middle Ages

(3) ART 001B Art in the Western World: From Renaissance to Present

(3) ART 020A Beginning Drawing

(3) ART 021

Painting ( ART 020A or equivalent)

(3) Select one of the following:

ART 040A Basis Printmaking: Survey

ART 040D Basic Printmaking: Relief

ART 040E Basic Printmaking: Silk-screen

(3) ART 050 Beginning Ceramics

(3) ART 097 Beginning Electronic Art

(3) ART 130 Aesthetics and Art Criticism (upper division or graduate status; declared major in Art)

(3) ART 133 Understanding and Creating Art (upper division status; declared major in Art, Child Development or Liberal Studies, or a minor in Art Education)

(3) ART 135 Secondary School Art Education ( ART 133 or instructor permission)

(3) ART 137 Art for Exceptional Children

B. Breadth and Perspective Courses (15 units)

(3) Select one of the following:

ART 020B Intermediate Drawing ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 024 Watercolor ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 027 Beginning Color

ART 053 Beginning Hand-built Ceramics

ART 060 Two-Dimensional Composition

ART 070 Form, Space and Vision

ART 074 Beginning Jewelry

ART 080 Materials and Methods

ART 088 Sculpture

(3) Select one of the following:

ART 120

Advanced Drawing ( ART 020B or equivalent)

ART 121 Advanced Painting ( ART 021 or equivalent)

ART 124 Advanced Watercolor ( ART 024 or equivalent)

ART 125 Life Studio ( ART 020A or equivalent)

ART 145 Advanced Printmaking

ART 148 Barrio Art for Ethnic Groups

ART 160 Photography in the Arts (One semester of basic photography or instructor permission)

 

(3) Select one of the following:

ART 150 Advanced Ceramics ( ART 050 or equivalent, or instructor permission)

ART 153 Hand-Built Ceramic Techniques ( ART 053 or instructor permission)

ART 174 Intermediate Jewelry

ART 180 Figure Sculpture ( ART 020A or equivalent)

(6) Select two of the following:

ART 100 Origins of American Indian Art

ART 101 Art and Photography

ART 103 Greco-Roman Art ( ART 001A or equivalent)

ART 105 Medieval Art ( ART 001A or equivalent)

ART 106 Renaissance Art ( ART 001A or ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 107 Baroque and Rococo Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 108 19th Century Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 109 20th Century Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 110 American Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 111 Latin American and Latino Art History

ART 112 Contemporary Art (Modern Art History: ART 001B or ART 109 (or equivalent) or instructor permission)

ART 117A Art of India and Southeast Asia

ART 117B Art of China and Japan

ART 118A Modern Architecture

ART 118B California Architecture and Urban History

Note: The program is currently under review by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing and students are strongly encouraged to consult an advisor.

NON SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Photography Major; Art major (Studio Art Concentration and MA program)
Description:
ART 196A, Pinhole Photography, has now been offered twice as an experimental course (the maximum permitted). We wish to assign it a permanent number, ART 163. It will be an upper-division elective in the Photo Major (Appendix 1), part of the upper division core (Appendix 2) and the upper division electives (Appendix 3) in the undergraduate Art Studio concentration, and a studio elective in the Art Studio graduate program (Appendix 4.)
Note: We would like this change to go into effect this Fall so that ART 163 will appear in the on-line version of the CSUS Spring 2006 class schedule prior to advance registration.

Comparisons of the structure of the major in Photography

C. Studies in Photography Electives (9 units)

BEFORE ADDITION OF ART 163

PHOT 135

Introduction to Photojournalism ( PHOT 040 or equivalent)

PHOT 143A

Intermediate Photography, Color ( PHOT 040 )

PHOT 155

Advanced Photography ( PHOT 141 )

PHOT 160

Documentary Photography ( PHOT 141 )

PHOT 195

Internship in Photography (A minimum of two upper division photography courses)

PHOT 199

Special Problems

ART 108

19th Century Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 109

20th Century Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)

 

 

ART 169

Photography Studio (Instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition form)

COMS 151

Visual Communication

GPHD 103A

Typography I - Theory ( ART 020A , GHPD 010 , GHPD025 , GHPD 030 , PHOT 040 , and acceptance into upper division course work through the program's portfolio review; Corequisite: GPHD 101 ) OR

HRS 180

The Film

JOUR 197A

Journalism Laboratory ( JOUR 030 )

MGMT 120

Principles of Marketing

C. Studies in Photography Electives (9 units)

AFTER ADDITION OF ART 163

PHOT 135

Introduction to Photojournalism ( PHOT 040 or equivalent)

PHOT 143A

Intermediate Photography, Color ( PHOT 040 )

PHOT 155

Advanced Photography ( PHOT 141 )

PHOT 160

Documentary Photography ( PHOT 141 )

PHOT 195

Internship in Photography (A minimum of two upper division photography courses)

PHOT 199

Special Problems

ART 108

19th Century Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)

ART 109

20th Century Art ( ART 001B or equivalent)


ART 163 Pinhole Photography
( PHOT 040 or equivalent)

ART 169

Photography Studio (Instructor permission and Department Chair via signed petition form)

COMS 151

Visual Communication

GPHD 103A

Typography I - Theory ( ART 020A , GHPD 010 , GHPD025 , GHPD 030 , PHOT 040 , and acceptance into upper division course work through the program's portfolio review; Corequisite: GPHD 101 ) OR

HRS 180

The Film

JOUR 197A

Journalism Laboratory ( JOUR 030 )

MGMT 120

Principles of Marketing

Department of Communication Studies

NON SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Communication Studies
Description:
We have added a bullet under general requirements to stipulate that courses may only be repeated once unless specifically provided for in the course description. Students who fail to achieve a C- or better in two attempts in a core course will need to find another major. The department passed its policy limiting students to one repeat (in all classes) in 1991 to respond to excess demand for classes. The demand persists, but the policy was never included in catalog copy.

OLD PROGRAM 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

Units required for Major: 39-48
Minimum total units required for the BA: 120
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.

General Requirements

  • All Communication Studies majors except those in Media Communication and Digital Media are required to complete at least one three-unit public speaking course such as COMS 004 , COMS 104 , or transfer equivalent. Public speaking courses taken to fulfill the GE oral communication requirement also fulfill this Department requirement.
  • Majors must complete each core course and each option core course with a grade of "C-" or better.
  • Not more than 6 units of debate, internship and/or individual study ( COMS 110 , COMS 111 , COMS 195 , COMS 199 ) can be applied to the major requirements.
  • Majors are required to compile and maintain an assessment portfolio, which must be submitted to the Department office prior to graduation. Specific portfolio requirements vary by concentration or concentration option and are available in the Department office.
  • Majors are urged to take COMS 002 , Argumentation (or transfer equivalent) to fulfill their critical thinking requirement.

 

Pre-Major Requirements

Prior to acceptance as a Communication Studies major, students must complete a pre-major consisting of all required lower division courses plus the upper division survey course ( COMS 100A ). Students must successfully complete each pre-major course with a grade of "C-" or better. Students with a CSUS grade point average of 2.3 or better may request early admission to the major.

NEW PROGRAM

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

Units required for Major: 39-48
Minimum total units required for the BA: 120
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.

General Requirements

  • All Communication Studies majors except those in Media Communication and Digital Media are required to complete at least one three-unit public speaking course such as COMS 004 , COMS 104 , or transfer equivalent. Public speaking courses taken to fulfill the GE oral communication requirement also fulfill this Department requirement.
  • Majors must complete each core course and each option core course with a grade of "C-" or better.
  • Not more than 6 units of debate, internship and/or individual study ( COMS 110 , COMS 111 , COMS 195 , COMS 199 ) can be applied to the major requirements.
  • Majors are required to compile and maintain an assessment portfolio, which must be submitted to the Department office prior to graduation. Specific portfolio requirements vary by concentration or concentration option and are available in the Department office.
  • Majors are urged to take COMS 002 , Argumentation (or transfer equivalent) to fulfill their critical thinking requirement.
  • Communication Studies courses may only be repeated once for a grade change. Students who fail to achieve at least a C- in two attempts in a core course will be disqualified in majoring in Communication Studies.

Pre-Major Requirements

Prior to acceptance as a Communication Studies major, students must complete a pre-major consisting of all required lower division courses plus the upper division survey course ( COMS 100A ). Students must successfully complete each pre-major course with a grade of "C-" or better. Students with a CSUS grade point average of 2.3 or better may request early admission to the major.

 

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Communication Studies Public Relations Concentration
Description:
We are adding ComS 170 as a substitute for the ComS 171 requirement—They will be able to take either 170 or 171 in our Public Relations concentration.
Demand on ComS 171 is too great to be able to handle all PR majors and other areas of our department that list it as a requirement.

OLD PROGRAM

REQUIREMENTS - BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE - CONCENTRATION IN PUBLIC RELATIONS

Units required: 48

This concentration, developed from the Commission on Public Relations Education recommendations, is designed to:

•  prepare students to assume professional entry level roles in the practice of public relations;

•  help students understand the integration of public relations and marketing;

•  prepare students to compose, develop and analyze print and broadcast messages;

•  help students to develop demonstrable competencies in writing, analyzing, problem-solving and critical thinking;

•  provide opportunities for testing public relations theory and practice, not only in the classroom, but in the field as well; and

•  develop relationships with local public relations professionals as well as with community organizations.

A. Required Lower Division Core Courses (12 units)

(3) COMS 002 Argumentation
(3) COMS 008 Interpersonal Communication Skills
(3) COMS 055 Media Communication and Society

(3) JOUR 030 Basic News Writing ( ENGL 001A or equivalent, may be taken concurrently; keyboarding proficiency required))

B. Required Upper Division Core Courses (9 units)

(3) COMS 100A Survey of Communication Studies

(3) COMS 100B Critical Analysis of Messages ( COMS 002 and COMS 004 or transfer equivalents; COMS 100A , may be taken concurrently; ENGL 020 ; passing score on the WPE)

(3) COMS 100C Introduction to Scientific Methods in Communication Research
( COMS 100A ; may be taken concurrently)

C. Concentration Requirements (21 units)

(3) COMS 118 Survey of Public Relations (At least one college writing course in ENGL or JOUR with a grade of "C-" or better.)

(3) COMS 123 Writing For Public Information ( JOUR 030 with a grade of "C-"
or better, passing score on the WPE)

(3) COMS 158 Public Relations Planning and Management ( COMS 123 or JOUR 123 )

-

-
(3) COMS 171 Survey Methods in Communication Research ( COMS 100C or equivalent with a grade of "C-" or better;
or instructor permission)

(3) COMS 187 Issue Management and Case Studies in Public Relations ( COMS 158 or JOUR 158 ; completion of 12 units of upper
division COMS courses)

(3) MGMT 120 Principles of Marketing

(3) MGMT 125 Advertising ( MGMT 120 )

D. Electives (6 units)

(6) Six units of upper division Communication Studies courses selected in consultation with major advisor.

Notes :

  • Students in the Public Relations Concentration would be encouraged to minor in the social sciences or business.
  • Not more than 3 units of Internship ( COMS 195 ) can be applied to the Public Relations Concentration.

NEW PROGRAM

REQUIREMENTS - BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE - CONCENTRATION IN PUBLIC RELATIONS

Units required: 48

This concentration, developed from the Commission on Public Relations Education recommendations, is designed to:

•  prepare students to assume professional entry level roles in the practice of public relations;

•  help students understand the integration of public relations and marketing;

•  prepare students to compose, develop and analyze print and broadcast messages;

•  help students to develop demonstrable competencies in writing, analyzing, problem-solving and critical thinking;

•  provide opportunities for testing public relations theory and practice, not only in the classroom, but in the field as well; and

•  develop relationships with local public relations professionals as well as with community organizations.

A. Required Lower Division Core Courses (12 units)

(3) COMS 002 Argumentation
(3) COMS 008 Interpersonal Communication Skills|
(3) COMS 055 Media Communication and Society
(3) JOUR 030 Basic News Writing ( ENGL 001A or equivalent, may be taken concurrently; keyboarding proficiency required))


B. Required Upper Division Core Courses (9 units)

(3) COMS 100A Survey of Communication Studies

(3) COMS 100B Critical Analysis of Messages ( COMS 002 and COMS 004 or transfer equivalents; COMS 100A , may be taken concurrently; ENGL 020 ; passing score on the WPE)

(3) COMS 100C Introduction to Scientific Methods in Communication Research
( COMS 100A ; may be taken concurrently)

C. Concentration Requirements (21 units)

(3) COMS 118 Survey of Public Relations (At least one college writing course in ENGL or JOUR with a grade of "C-" or better.)

(3) COMS 123 Writing For Public Information ( JOUR 030 with a grade of "C-"
or better, passing score on the WPE)

(3) COMS 158 Public Relations Planning and Management ( COMS 123 or JOUR 123 )

(3) COMS 17 0 Data Analysis in Communication Research ( COMS 100C with a grade of "C-" or better) OR

COMS 171 Survey Methods in Communication Research ( COMS 100C or equivalent with a grade of "C-" or better;
or instructor permission)

(3) COMS 187 Issue Management and Case Studies in Public Relations ( COMS 158 or JOUR 158 ; completion of 12 units of upper
division COMS courses)

(3) MGMT 120 Principles of Marketing

(3) MGMT 125 Advertising ( MGMT 120 )

D. Electives (6 units)

(6) Six units of upper division Communication Studies courses selected in consultation with major advisor.

Notes :

  • Students in the Public Relations Concentration would be encouraged to minor in the social sciences or business.
  • Not more than 3 units of Internship ( COMS 195 ) can be applied to the Public Relations Concentration.


SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Communication Studies, General Concentration, Criticism and Interpersonal areas
Description:
We are reconfiguring the option core requirements in the Criticism and Public Communication area of study within our General Communication concentration. We are adding a course to our option core requirements in the Interpersonal and Small Group area of study and lowering the units in its electives.
The changes to the option core requirements will require all students in these options to take the same “capstone” courses. This is needed as our revised assessment plan provides that assessment will occur in capstone courses.

OLD PROGRAM 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS · BA

Total units required for BA: 124

Total units required for Major: 39-48

Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.

Concentration Requirements (39-48 units)

Select one of the four following concentrations:

I. General Communication

II. Organizational Communication

III. Media Communication

IV. Digital Media

I. General Communication Concentration (39 units)

This concentration is designed to:

•  Improve student awareness, understanding and practice of communication in professional and social interactions,

•  Enhance the traditional citizenship role in the democratic process,

•  Train students in communication skills in preparation for professions such as law, ministry, business, industry, medicine, and government service.

A. Required Lower Division Core Courses (9 units)

(3) COMS 002 Argumentation

(3) COMS 008 Interpersonal Communication Skills

(3) COMS 055 Media Communication and Society

B. Required Upper Division Core Courses (9 units)

(3) COMS 100A Survey of Communication Studies

(3) COMS 100B Critical Analysis of Messages (COMS 002 and COMS 004 or transfer equivalents, ENGL 020; passing score on the WPE; COMS 100A; may be taken concurrently)

(3) COMS 100C Introduction to Scientific Methods in Communication Research (COMS 100A; may be taken concurrently)

Additional Requirements for Options

Four approved options currently comprise the General

Communication Concentration: Criticism and Public

Communication, Interpersonal and Small Group Communication, Intercultural and International Communication, and Self-Designed Study Option. Students choosing this concentration must either complete the requirements as listed below or work with a faculty advisor to create a Self-Designed Study Option as described below.

Select one of the following options

C. Option Requirements

Five approved options currently comprise the General Communication Concentration: Criticism and Public Communication, Interpersonal and Small Group Communication, Intercultural and International Communication, Public Relations, and Self-Designed

Option. Students choosing this concentration must either complete the requirements as listed below or work with a faculty advisor to create a Self-Designed Option as described in Item (e) below.

Select one of the following:

Criticism and Public Communication (21 units)
A. Option Requirements & Research Methods (9 units)


(9) Select 3 of the following:

COMS 166 Theories of Persuasion & Attitude Change

COMS 167 Systems & Theories of Rhetoric (COMS 100B with a grade of "C-" or better)

COMS 168 Approaches to Rhetorical Criticism (COMS 100B with a grade of "C-" or better)

COMS 169 Television Criticism (COMS 100B with a grade of "C-" or better)

B. Electives (12 units)

(12) Upper division Communication Studies courses selected in consultation with major advisor.
OLD PROGRAM

Interpersonal and Small Group (21 units)

A. Option Core Requirements (6 units)

(3) COMS 105 Communication in Small Groups

(3) Select one of the following:

COMS 143 Theories of Interpersonal Communication (COMS 008 or equivalent; and COMS 100A which may be taken concurrently)

COMS 163 Communication, Self and Society (COMS 008 or equivalent; and COMS 100A which may be taken concurrently)

COMS 182 Senior Seminar in Interpersonal Communication (COMS 008, completion of 12 units of upper division COMS courses including COMS 100A.)


 

B. Research Methods (3 units)

(3) Select one of the following:

COMS 168 Approaches to Rhetorical Criticism (COMS 100B or equivalent with a grade of “C-” or better)

COMS 169 Television Criticism (COMS 100B with a grade of “C-” or better)

COMS 170 Data Analysis in Communication Research (COMS 100C or equivalent with a grade of “C-” or better; or instructor permission)

COMS 171 Survey Methods in Communication Research (COMS 100C or equivalent with a grade of “C-” or better; or instructor permission)

COMS 172 Content Analysis (COMS 100C or equivalent with a grade of “C-” or better; or instructor permission)

C. Electives (12 units)

(12) Upper division Communication Studies courses selected in consultation with major advisor.

 


NEW PROGRAM No change

 MAJOR REQUIREMENTS · BA

 Total units required for BA: 124

Total units required for Major: 39-48

Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.

Concentration Requirements (39-48 units)

Select one of the four following concentrations:

I. General Communication

II. Organizational Communication

III. Media Communication

IV. Digital Media

I. General Communication Concentration (39 units)

This concentration is designed to:

•  Improve student awareness, understanding and practice of communication in professional and social interactions,

•  Enhance the traditional citizenship role in the democratic process,

•  Train students in communication skills in preparation for professions such as law, ministry, business, industry, medicine, and government service.

A. Required Lower Division Core Courses (9 units)

(3) COMS 002 Argumentation

(3) COMS 008 Interpersonal Communication Skills

(3) COMS 055 Media Communication and Society

B. Required Upper Division Core Courses (9 units)

(3) COMS 100A Survey of Communication Studies

(3) COMS 100B Critical Analysis of Messages (COMS 002 and COMS 004 or transfer equivalents, ENGL 020; passing score on the WPE; COMS 100A; may be taken concurrently)

(3) COMS 100C Introduction to Scientific Methods in Communication Research (COMS 100A; may be taken concurrently)

Additional Requirements for Options

Four approved options currently comprise the General

Communication Concentration: Criticism and Public

Communication, Interpersonal and Small Group Communication, Intercultural and International Communication, and Self-Designed Study Option. Students choosing this concentration must either complete the requirements as listed below or work with a faculty advisor to create a Self-Designed Study Option as described below.

Select one of the following options:

C. Option Requirements

Five approved options currently comprise the General Communication Concentration: Criticism and Public Communication, Interpersonal and Small Group Communication, Intercultural and International Communication, Public Relations, and Self-Designed

Option. Students choosing this concentration must either complete the requirements as listed below or work with a faculty advisor to create a Self-Designed Option as described in Item (e) below.

Select one of the following:

Criticism and Public Communication (21 units)
A. Option Requirements & Research Methods (9 units)

(3) COMS 167 Systems & Theories of Rhetoric (COMS 100B with a grade of "C-" or better)

(6) Select 2 of the following:

COMS 166 Theories of Persuasion & Attitude Change

COMS 168 Approaches to Rhetorical Criticism (COMS 100B with a grade of "C-" or better)

COMS 169 Television Criticism (COMS 100B with a grade of "C-" or better)

 


B. Electives (12 units)

(12) Upper division Communication Studies courses selected in consultation with major advisor.

Interpersonal and Small Group (21 units)

A. Option Core Requirements (9 units)

(3) COMS 105 Communication in Small Groups

(3) COMS 143 Theories of Interpersonal Communication (COMS 008 or equivalent; and COMS 100A which may be taken concurrently)

(3) COMS 163 Communication, Self and Society (COMS 008 or equivalent; and COMS 100A which may be taken concurrently)

(3) Select one of the following:

COMS 181 Senior Seminar in Small Group Communication Communication (COMS 105, completion of 12 units of upper division COMS courses including COMS 100A.)

COMS 182 Senior Seminar in Interpersonal Communication (COMS 008, completion of 12 units of upper division COMS courses including COMS 100A.)

B. Research Methods (3 units)

(3) Select one of the following:

COMS 168 Approaches to Rhetorical Criticism (COMS 100B or equivalent with a grade of “C-” or better)

COMS 169 Television Criticism (COMS 100B with a grade of “C-” or better)

COMS 170 Data Analysis in Communication Research (COMS 100C or equivalent with a grade of “C-” or better; or instructor permission)

COMS 171 Survey Methods in Communication Research (COMS 100C or equivalent with a grade of “C-” or better; or instructor permission)

COMS 172 Content Analysis (COMS 100C or equivalent with a grade of “C-” or better; or instructor permission)

C. Electives (9 units)

(9) Upper division Communication Studies courses selected in consultation with major advisor.


SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Journalism
Description:
Adding language to require a grade of C- or better for each required lower and upper division course.
This change is consistent with department policy for all areas of study. A grade of C- or better demonstrates minimum competence in the field.

OLD PROGRAM

JOUR MAJOR REQUIREMENTS - BA

Total units required for Major: 37 plus a required minor

Minimum units required for BA: 120

 

-

Courses in parentheses are prerequisites .

Special Program Requirements

Majors are required to compile and maintain an assessment portfolio, which must be submitted to the Department office prior to graduation. Specific portfolio requirements are available in the Department Office.

Pre-Major to Journalism

Prior to acceptance as a Journalism major, students must first complete a pre-major consisting of all required lower-division courses JOUR 130. Students must successfully complete each pre-major course with a grade of C- or better. Students with a CSUS grade point average of 2.3 or better may request early admission to the major.

A. Required Lower Division Courses (7 units)

(1) JOUR 20 Grammar for Media Writers

(3) JOUR 30 Basic News Reporting (JOUR 20, keyboarding proficiency required)

(3) JOUR 50 Mass Media and Critical Thinking OR

JOUR 55 Media Communication & Society

B. Required Upper Division Courses (18 units)

(3) JOUR 128 Copy Editing and Ethics (JOUR 20, 30)

(3) JOUR 130A News Reporting I (prerequisite JOUR 20, JOUR 30, corequisite JOUR 130B)

(3) JOUR 130B News Reporting II (prerequisite JOUR 20, JOUR 30, corequisite JOUR 130A)

(3) JOUR 135 Reporting Public Issues (JOUR 130A, 130B)

(3) JOUR 153 Mass Media Law

(3) Select one of the following:

JOUR 195 Fieldwork in Journalism (JOUR 130A, 130B)

JOUR 197A Journalism Laboratory (JOUR 30)

JOUR 197B Journalism Laboratory (JOUR 30, permission of instructor)

C. Electives (12 units)

12 elective units chosen in consultation with an advisor from among journalism faculty. At least 9 of the 12 units must be upper division. No more than a total of nine units in JOUR 195/197A/197B/198/ or JOUR 199 combined may be counted toward the Journalism or Government-Journalism majors, and no more than six units of any one of these courses is counted toward a major.

D. Required Minor

The Journalism major requires a minor. Consult advisor for selection of an appropriate minor.

Note : Up to 6 units of course work from photography or graphic design may be applied toward a major or minor in Journalism with approval of a journalism advisor.

•  Special Program Requirement

Majors are required to compile and maintain an assessment portfolio that must be submitted to the Department Office prior to graduation. Specific portfolio requirements are available in the Department Office.

GOVERNMENT/JOURNALISM
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS · BA

Units required for the Major: 51
Minimum total units required for the BA: 120
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.

A. Required Lower Division Courses (9 units)

(3) GOVT 001 * Essentials of Government

(3) JOUR 030 Basic News Reporting (JOUR 20, keyboarding proficiency required)

(3) JOUR 055 Media Communication and Society OR

JOUR 050 Mass Media and Critical Thinking

* If a student has not taken GOVT 001 or its equivalent, then G0VT 150 may count as the prerequisite for the major; however, students are cautioned that if they must direct GOVT 150 to fulfilling the GE requirement in American institutions, they may not also then count GOVT 150 toward the major.

B. Required Upper Division Courses (33 units)

1. Government

(3) GOVT 170 * Public Policy Development (Passing score on the WPE)

(3) GOVT 180 * California State and Local Government

(3) Select one of the following:

GOVT 151 * Bureaucracy

GOVT 153 * The American Presidency

GOVT 154 * Political Parties and Campaigning

GOVT 155 * The Legislative Process

GOVT 156 * Pressure Groups and Lobbying

GOVT 157 * Politics, Opinion and Participation

GOVT 184 * Introduction to Urban Politic s

GOVT 185 * Problems of Urbanization

(3) Select one of the following:

GOVT 120A * Constitutional Law

GOVT 120B * Constitutional Rights and Liberties

GOVT 125 * Politics of Justice

(3) Select one of the following:

GOVT 130 International Politics

GOVT 131 * International Organization

GOVT 135 * American Foreign Policy

2. Journalism

(3) JOUR 153 Mass Media Law and Regulation

(3) JOUR 130 A Reporting 1 (JOUR 020, JOUR 030 )

(3) JOUR 130 B Reporting 2 (JOUR 020, JOUR 030 )

(3) JOUR 135 Reporting Public Issues ( JOUR 130 A, JOUR 130B)

(3) JOUR 134 War, Peace and the Mass Media

3. Internship

3) GOVT 195 Government Internship ( GOVT 180 or GOVT 182 ) OR

JOUR 195 Journalism Internship ( JOUR 130 A, JOUR 130B)

C. Electives (9 units)

(6) Select 6 units of upper division courses in Government.

(The department particularly recommends at least one course in political theory.) GOVT 150 may not be used as an elective.

(3) Select one upper division course in Journalism

*Course prerequisite: GOVT 001 or equivalent.

Note: Government/Journalism majors should have both an advisor in the Government Department and a Journalism Advisor in the Communication Studies Department.

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

A minor in journalism consists of 21 units. JOUR 030 , JOUR 055 , and JOUR 128 are required classes with 12 additional upper division elective units required. No more than 3 units may be from JOUR 195 , JOUR 197A , JOUR 198 , JOUR 199 .

Note: Up to 6 units of coursework from Photography or Graphic Design may be applied toward a major or minor in Journalism with approval of a Journalism advisor.

NEW PROGRAM

JOUR MAJOR REQUIREMENTS - BA

Total units required for Major: 37 plus a required minor

Minimum units required for BA: 120

Majors must complete each required lower and upper division course with a grade of “C-” or better.

 
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites .

Special Program Requirements

Majors are required to compile and maintain an assessment portfolio, which must be submitted to the Department office prior to graduation. Specific portfolio requirements are available in the Department Office.

Pre-Major to Journalism

Prior to acceptance as a Journalism major, students must first complete a pre-major consisting of all required lower-division courses JOUR 130. Students must successfully complete each pre-major course with a grade of C- or better. Students with a CSUS grade point average of 2.3 or better may request early admission to the major.

A. Required Lower Division Courses (7 units)

(1) JOUR 20 Grammar for Media Writers

(3) JOUR 30 Basic News Reporting (JOUR 20, keyboarding proficiency required)

(3) JOUR 50 Mass Media and Critical Thinking OR

JOUR 55 Media Communication & Society

B. Required Upper Division Courses (18 units)

(3) JOUR 128 Copy Editing and Ethics (JOUR 20, 30)

(3) JOUR 130A News Reporting I (prerequisite JOUR 20, JOUR 30, corequisite JOUR 130B)

(3) JOUR 130B News Reporting II (prerequisite JOUR 20, JOUR 30, corequisite JOUR 130A)

(3) JOUR 135 Reporting Public Issues (JOUR 130A, 130B)

(3) JOUR 153 Mass Media Law

(3) Select one of the following:

JOUR 195 Fieldwork in Journalism (JOUR 130A, 130B)

JOUR 197A Journalism Laboratory (JOUR 30)

JOUR 197B Journalism Laboratory (JOUR 30, permission of instructor)

C. Electives (12 units)

12 elective units chosen in consultation with an advisor from among journalism faculty. At least 9 of the 12 units must be upper division. No more than a total of nine units in JOUR 195/197A/197B/198/ or JOUR 199 combined may be counted toward the Journalism or Government-Journalism majors, and no more than six units of any one of these courses is counted toward a major.

D. Required Minor

The Journalism major requires a minor. Consult advisor for selection of an appropriate minor.

Note : Up to 6 units of course work from photography or graphic design may be applied toward a major or minor in Journalism with approval of a journalism advisor.

•  Special Program Requirement

Majors are required to compile and maintain an assessment portfolio that must be submitted to the Department Office prior to graduation. Specific portfolio requirements are available in the Department Office.

GOVERNMENT/JOURNALISM
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS · BA

Units required for the Major: 51
Minimum total units required for the BA: 120
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.

A. Required Lower Division Courses (9 units)

(3) GOVT 001 * Essentials of Government

(3) JOUR 030 Basic News Reporting (JOUR 20, keyboarding proficiency required)

(3) JOUR 055 Media Communication and Society OR

JOUR 050 Mass Media and Critical Thinking

* If a student has not taken GOVT 001 or its equivalent, then G0VT 150 may count as the prerequisite for the major; however, students are cautioned that if they must direct GOVT 150 to fulfilling the GE requirement in American institutions, they may not also then count GOVT 150 toward the major.

B. Required Upper Division Courses (33 units)

1. Government

(3) GOVT 170 * Public Policy Development (Passing score on the WPE)

(3) GOVT 180 * California State and Local Government

(3) Select one of the following:

GOVT 151 * Bureaucracy

GOVT 153 * The American Presidency

GOVT 154 * Political Parties and Campaigning

GOVT 155 * The Legislative Process

GOVT 156 * Pressure Groups and Lobbying

GOVT 157 * Politics, Opinion and Participation

GOVT 184 * Introduction to Urban Politic s

GOVT 185 * Problems of Urbanization

(3) Select one of the following:

GOVT 120A * Constitutional Law

GOVT 120B * Constitutional Rights and Liberties

GOVT 125 * Politics of Justice

(3) Select one of the following:

GOVT 130 International Politics

GOVT 131 * International Organization

GOVT 135 * American Foreign Policy

2. Journalism

(3) JOUR 153 Mass Media Law and Regulation

(3) JOUR 130 A Reporting 1 (JOUR 020, JOUR 030 )

(3) JOUR 130 B Reporting 2 (JOUR 020, JOUR 030 )

(3) JOUR 135 Reporting Public Issues ( JOUR 130 A, JOUR 130B)

(3) JOUR 134 War, Peace and the Mass Media

3. Internship

3) GOVT 195 Government Internship ( GOVT 180 or GOVT 182 ) OR

JOUR 195 Journalism Internship ( JOUR 130 A, JOUR 130B)

C. Electives (9 units)

(6) Select 6 units of upper division courses in Government.

(The department particularly recommends at least one course in political theory.) GOVT 150 may not be used as an elective.

(3) Select one upper division course in Journalism

*Course prerequisite: GOVT 001 or equivalent.

Note: Government/Journalism majors should have both an advisor in the Government Department and a Journalism Advisor in the Communication Studies Department.

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

A minor in journalism consists of 21 units. JOUR 030 , JOUR 055 , and JOUR 128 are required classes with 12 additional upper division elective units required. No more than 3 units may be from JOUR 195 , JOUR 197A , JOUR 198 , JOUR 199 .

Note: Up to 6 units of coursework from Photography or Graphic Design may be applied toward a major or minor in Journalism with approval of a Journalism advisor.

 

Design Department

Graphic Design Program

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Graphic Design
Description:
The following program change and course proposals for the program of graphic design are motivated by long standing goals within the program. The timing and justification of these proposed changes are a product of both internal and external direction.
The graphic design program has recently participated in a university wide review by NASAD ( National Association of Schools of Art and Design). NASAD, founded in 1944, is an organization of schools, colleges, and universities. It has approximately 248 accredited institutional members. It establishes national standards for undergraduate and graduate degrees and other credentials. It is currently the only accrediting body associated with the graphic design profession in the U.S. The departments of Art and Design are currently writing a response to a report compiled by a team of NASAD visitors. This response is to reflect our intentions of addressing any shortfalls in meeting the accrediting body’s minimum standards. This report along with its response will be reviewed this fall and accreditation will be decided at that point for the entire university not individual programs. The graphic design program was given specific curricular areas to improve in order to meet minimum standards. These required changes are reflected in the various proposals and summarized in the following list.
• The graphic design program does not currently require enough Art/Design History.
A minimum of 10% of the required major classes must be in Art/Design History. This would require the addition of one 3 credit-hour course in Art/Design History.
• The total number of credit hours required to meet NASAD standards in Art/Design and or related supportive courses ( which included Art/Design History) falls short of the NASAD threshold. The program must total 65% (78 credit hours) of a 120 credit hours degree. In order to meet the requirement, an additional three 3 credit-hours in Art/Design must be added in addition to the one additional Art/Design History course.
• The credit to contact hours ratio does not meet the NASAD threshold ( three credits normally equals six hours of studio time; five hours can be acceptable).
By requiring students to take ART 1A and ART 1B and increasing the total major units from 66 credits to 69 the additional Art/Design history requirement would be met. Students would be able to take these courses at CSUS or at the community college level before they transfer.
Students would be required to take specific courses from General Education. This would help satisfy the increase in Art/Design credit mandated by NASAD while not increasing the students’ graduation time or excessively increasing the total number of units in the major.
The proposal of three new required GPHD courses: GPHD 122, GPHD 142, and GPHD 152. These courses would replace COMS 136, ART 20B and one upper division major elective. This will increase the required UD classes to 33 units and decrease the required UD electives to 6 units. Both COMS 136 and ART 20B would be migrated to the GPHD electives list. These courses would help satisfy the increase in Art/Design credit mandated by NASAD and provide a final framework for a comprehensive undergraduate degree that will allow the faculty to focus on internal curriculum development without the need for expansion.
Increasing all upper division GPHD prefixed courses to 3.9 WTUs by reclassifying them as “13” activities with 5 hours of contact time. NASAD requires all art and design studios to adhere to a minimum of 5 hours contact time per week in the classroom. Currently all of our studios (except GPHD 125) fall below the needed 3.9 WTUs. Established courses affected include: GPHD 120, 130, 135, 140, 145, 150 and 155. Newly proposed courses affected include: GPHD 122, 142, 152. The change would increase our overall WTUs by 15.6 units.
The GPHD 145 and GPHD 140 course change proposals are to update the content of these courses to better serve GPHD students as they progress through the upper division curriculum.

*Changes in the proposed sequence are noted with asterisks in the right hand column.

Current Sequence

Total Units: 66

A. Required LD (30 units)

GPHD 05 (3)

GPHD 10 (3)

GPHD 20 (3)

GPHD 25 (3)

GPHD 30 (3)

INTD 20 (3)

PHOT 40 (3)

Select two from the following:

ART 20A (3)

ART 20B (3)

ART 60 (3)

Select one from the following two:

ART 1A (3)

ART 1B (3)

JURIED PORTFOLIO for admission into upper division .

B. Required UD (27 units)

COMS 136 (3)

GPHD 120 (3)

GPHD 125 (3)

GPHD 130 (3)

GPHD 135 (3)

GPHD 140 (3)

 

GPHD 145 (3)

COMS 150 (3)

 

GPHD 155 (3)

C. Required Electives (9 units) C. Required Electives (6 units)*

GPHD 195

GPHD 199

INTD 124C

ART 109

ART 110

ART 120

ART 128

ART 141

ART 160

ART 162

ART 197

ART 198

COMS 106

COMS 117

COMS 144

PHOT 100

PHOT 111

PHOT 143A

PHOT 148

THEA 122

THEA 123

 

Proposed Sequence

Total Units: 69

A. Required LD (30 units)*

GPHD 05 (3)

GPHD 10 (3)

GPHD 20 (3)

GPHD 25 (3)

GPHD 30 (3)

INTD 20 (3)

PHOT 40 (3)

 

ART 20A (3)*

 

 

 

ART 1A (3)

ART 1B (3)*

 

B. Required UD (33 units)*

GPHD 122 (3)*

GPHD 120 (3)

GPHD 125 (3)

GPHD 130 (3)

GPHD 135 (3)

GPHD 140 (3)

GPHD 142 (3)*

GPHD 145 (3)

COMS 150 (3)

GPHD 152 (3)*

GPHD 155 (3)

 

GPHD 195

GPHD 199

INTD 124C

ART 109

ART 110

ART 120

ART 128

ART 141

ART 160

ART 162

ART 197

ART 198

PHOT 100

PHOT 111

PHOT 143A

PHOT 148

ART 20B

COMS 136

INTD 25

 

 

D. Required General Education Areas C2 & C4 (6 units) *

Select two from the following

Area C2

ART 3

ART 5

ART 7

Area C4

ART 21

ART 24

ART 40A

ART 74

ART 75

ART 86

 

E Required General Education (3 units) *

Select one from the following

Area A3

JOUR 50

SOC 8

ENVS 11

Area D

ANTH 2

 

 

Interior Design Program

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Interior Design
Description:
The Interior Design Program is changing its course structure in order to provide our students with more professional-level studios. This change is in response to suggestions from our advisory board, and to requests the FIDER accreditation team stipulated in their report this fall. (FIDER, the Foundation for Interior Design Education and Research, is our professional accrediting agency. They visited our campus in the spring, 2004.) Specifically, the FIDER team asked us to create a sequence of upper division studios that provides a clear progression in the scale and complexity of projects. We have achieved this by enhancing a lower division studio and moving it into upper division, thus creating a four-studio upper division sequence.
Responding to the need for Interior Designers to have more sophisticated computer skills, we are also adding an upper division computer drawing class. We are also increasing two upper division studio classes from two to three units, further enhancing the quality of this critical part of our program.
Beginning in the fall 2006, Interior Design will be an impacted program and will institute a portfolio review for admission to the upper division major. For this reason, it is imperative that we provide students with the opportunity to develop their design skills in lower division studios. To achieve this, we are adding a new lower division studio (INTD 25) that will focus on spatial design.
In order to achieve these changes, we are dropping ART 20A, PHOT 40 and GPHD 30 from the program.

Summary of Changes:
Add new required classes to program: (+9)
(3) INTD 25
(3) INTD 171 (formerly INTD 130B); in the existing program, students take 130A (new # is INTD 161) or 130B; in the new program they will take both.
(3) INTD 183
Increase from 2 units to 3 units: (+2)
INTD 15 (formerly INTD 21)
INTD 129 (new course number: INTD 181)
Delete from program: (-11)
(3) ART 20A
(3) PHOT 40
(3) GPHD 30
(2) INTD 100
Move from upper division to lower division:
(3) PHOT 11 (formerly PHOT 100)
Move from lower division to upper division:
(3) INTD 153 (formerly INTD 27)

Existing Program

Lower division units 29

Upper division units 40

Total units 69

Existing Program

(3) INTD 20

(2) INTD 21 # and unit change only

(3) INTD 27 +++++++++

++++++++++

(3) INTD 30

(3) GPHD 10

(3) GPHD 25

(3) GPHD 30

++++++++++

(3) PHOT 40

(3) ART 1A

(3) ART 20A

 

(2) INTD 100

(3) INTD 123

(3) INTD 124A-E

(3) INTD 124A-E

 

(3) INTD 122 # change only

(3) INTD 130A # change only

or and

INTD 130B # change only

(2) INTD 129 # change only +1 unit

 

+++++++++++

(3) INTD 126A # change only

(3) INTD 126B # change only

+++++++++++

 

(3) INTD 127A # change only

(3) INTD 127B # change only

(3) INTD 127C # change only (

(3) INTD 195C # change only

 

(3) PHOT 100

 

Proposed Program

Lower division units 24

Upper division units 45

Total units 69

New Program

(3) INTD 20

(3) INTD 15

note: INTD 27= new INTD 153

(3) INTD 25

(3) INTD 30

(3) GPHD 10

(3) GPHD 25

++++++++++

(3) PHOT 11 note: PHOT 11= old PHOT 100

++++++++++

(3) ART 1A

++++++++++

 

+++++++++

(3) INTD 123

(3) INTD 124A-E

(3) INTD 124A-E

 

(3) INTD 151

(3) INTD 161

 

(3) INTD 171

(3) INTD 181

 

(3) INTD 153 note: INTD 153 = old INTD 27

(3) INTD 163

(3) INTD 173

(3) INTD 183

 

(3) INTD 155

(3) INTD 165

3) INTD 175

(3) INTD 195

 

+++++++++++ note: PHOT 100 = new PHOT 11

Interior Design Program
Log of Course Change Proposals (CCP) Submitted

(3) INTD 15 non-substantive CCP to change course number & increase units from 2 to 3, no content change
(3) INTD 25 CCP for new course
(3) INTD 30 non-substantive CCP to modify course description
(3) INTD 123 non-substantive CCP, name change only
(3) INTD 151 non-substantive CCP to change course number, no content change
(3) INTD 161 non-substantive CCP to change course number, no content change
(3) INTD 171 non-substantive CCP to change course number, no content change
(3) INTD 181 non-substantive CCP to change course number and increase units from 2 to 3, no content change
(3) INTD 153 CCP to change course from lower to upper division, no content change
(3) INTD 163 non-substantive CCP to change course number, no content change
(3) INTD 173 non-substantive CCP to change course number, no content change
(3) INTD 183 CCP for new course
(3) INTD 155 non-substantive CCP to change course number, no content change
(3) INTD 165 non-substantive CCP to change course number, no content change
(3) INTD 175 non-substantive CCP to change course number, no content change
(3) INTD 195 non-substantive CCP to change course number, no content change

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Bachelor of Arts in Photography
Description:
Remove Photo 100 from required upper division course requirements (3 units) and add Photo 11, required to lower division course requirements (3 units). There is not change in the number of units required for Photography degree candidates. Photo 100 is being converted to a lower division course (Photo 11) in order to meet requirements of new lower division transfer pattern. This will allow students to compete this course at a community college.

Current Curriculum

Upper Division 27 Units

Lower Division 12 Units

Electives 9 Units

Total 48 Units

Required Lower Division Courses (12 units)

 

ART 1B (3) Renaissance to Present

GPHD 10 (3) Introduction to Digital Design

INTD 20 (3) Design

PHOT 40 (3) Basic Tech. of Photography

 

Required Upper Division Courses (27 units)

 

ART 101 (3) Art and Photography

ART 161 (3) Photography in the Field

ART 162 (3) Photo Construction & Invention

Photo 100 (3) Digital Imaging

PHOT 102 (3) Photography, a Social History

PHOT 138 (3) Basic Color Photography

PHOT 141 (3) Intermediate Black and White

PHOT 148 (3) Studio Lighting

PHOT 150 (3) Senior Portfolio

Electives (9 units)

 

ART 108 (3) 19th Century Art

ART 109 (3) 20th Century Art

ART 169 (3) Photography Studio

ART 196A (3) Pinhole Photography

COMS 151 (3) Visual Communication

GPHD 101 (3) Communication Graphics

HRS 180 (3) The Film

JOUR 197A (3) The Hornet Newspaper

MGMT 120 (3) Principles of Marketing

PHOT 111 (3) Intermediate Digital

ART 196A (3) Pinhole Photography

COMS 151 (3) Visual Communication

GPHD 101 (3) Communication Graphics

HRS 180 (3) The Film

JOUR 197A (3) The Hornet Newspaper

MGMT 120 (3) Principles of Marketing

PHOT 111 (3) Intermediate Digital Imaging

PHOT 135 (3) Introduction to Photojournalism

PHOT 143A (3) Intermediate Color

PHOT 155 (3) Advanced Photography

PHOT 160 (3) Documentary Photography

PHOT 195 (3) Internship

PHOT 199 (3) Special Problems

Imaging

PHOT 135 (3) Introduction to Photojournalism

PHOT 143A (3) Intermediate Color

PHOT 155 (3) Advanced Photography

PHOT 160 (3) Documentary Photography

PHOT 195 (3) Internship

PHOT 199 (3) Special Problems


Proposed Curriculum

Upper Division 24 Units

Lower Division 15 Units

Electives 9 Units

Total 48 Units

Required Lower Division Courses (15 units)

 

ART 1B (3) Renaissance to Present

GPHD 10 (3) Introduction to Digital Design I NTD 20 (3) Design

PHOT 40 (3) Basic Tech. of Photography

Photo 11 (3) Digital Imaging


Required Upper Division Courses (24 units)

 

ART 101 (3) Art and Photography

ART 161 (3) Photography in the Field

ART 162 (3) Photo Construction & Invention



PHOT 102 (3) Photography, a Social History

PHOT 138 (3) Basic Color Photography

PHOT 141 (3) Intermediate Black and White

PHOT 148 (3) Studio Lighting

PHOT 150 (3) Senior Portfolio


Electives (9 units)

 

ART 108 (3) 19th Century Art

ART 109 (3) 20th Century Art

ART 169 (3) Photography Studio

 

Department of English

NON SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

English Undergraduate Major
Description:
The English Department wishes to change the word “concentration” to “area of interest” as part of the language of its new major (2004-) so as to prevent confusion with major degrees that offer different tracks for different concentrations. “Area of interest” maintains the original intent of the new major while bringing department major language more in line with overall university practice.

NON SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
Description:
Explicit mention is needed in the catalogue that English majors may NOT minor in TESOL. As is stands, not only is there no explicit mention of this (already existing) prohibition, rather there is even wording in the the catalogue (page 368 in the current catalogue) that infelicitously suggests that students majoring in English may indeed minor in TESOL.
We propose that the following changes be made:
1. Change the word “English” to “Spanish” in the following passage (see highlighted word)
Note: Courses being applied to other degree programs (e.g., to Spanish majors) cannot also be applied to the TESOL Minor. See the TESOL Coordinator for prior approval of substitute courses.
2. Immediately below this note, add the following:
“Students choosing to major in English may NOT minor in TESOL.”

Department of History

NON SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Bachelor of Arts Degree (History) – Minor Requirements
Description:
It is important that the History Major lower-division requirements conform to the History Minor lower-division requirements. This is not so much a change as a correction since it has been the Department’s intention for many years that the two programs correspond at the lower-division. The Department believes that students wishing to minor in history should have the option of taking either the World Civilization series or the Western Civilization series, just as History majors do.
These changes do not increase or decrease the required units in a program, and they do not carry a supplemental funding request. There will be no fiscal or programmatic impact on another academic unit’s offerings. These changes simply conform the lower-division requirements in the History Minor to those of the History Major. We do not expect a significant impact on any enrollments.

NEW MINOR PROGRAM

Units required for Minor: 24, all of which must be taken in History; a minimum of 12 upper division units is required. Grade “C-“or better required for courses applied to the minor. Specific course requirements are:

(3) Hist 017A United States History, 1607-1877

(3) Hist 017B United States History, 1877-Present

(6) Select one of the following sets:

Hist 004 Survey of Early Western Civilization, AND

Hist 005 Survey of Modern Western Civilization

OR

Hist 050 World Civilizations, Beginnings-1600, AND

Hist 051 World Civilizations,

1600-Present

(12) Upper Division History courses

OLD MINOR PROGRAM

Units required for Minor: 24, all of which must be taken in History; a minimum of 12 upper division units is required. Grade “C-“ or better required for courses applied to the minor. Specific course requirements are:

(3) Hist 004 Survey of Early Western Civilization

(3) Hist 005 Survey of Modern Western Civilization

(3) Hist 017A United States History, 1607-1877

(3) Hist 017B United States History, 1877-Present

NON SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Bachelor of Arts (History)
Description:
The Department of History requires all of its majors to take two different types of upper-division seminars. These include: 1) a seminar in “recent interpretations” of history based on region and 2) a research and writing seminar that results in a major research paper. The current course name/numbering system is not sufficient for students (in terms of course selection and also for their official transcripts) in identifying the specific topics covered in these courses. Also, there is a lack of coherence in the research seminar series with a Hist 197a, 197b and 194 listing. The proposed changes streamline the course name and numbering system for the required seminars. However, these changes are not substantive in that they do not represent new requirements, and they will be easily translatable from the current system.
These changes do not increase or decrease the required units in a program, and they do not carry a supplemental funding request. There will be no fiscal or programmatic impact on another academic unit’s offerings. These changes simply stream.

NEW PROGRAM

B. Required Seminars (9 units)

Students should take HIST 100 in the second semester of their sophomore year; transfer students should take it in the first semester of their junior year after completion of at least 6 units of required lower division course work. After completing the majority of their upper division electives and passing the Writing Proficiency Exam, history majors should take one HIST 192 series seminar followed by one HIST 197 series seminar. Typically, students take the HIST 197 seminar during their senior year.

(3) Hist 100 Introduction to Historical Skills

(3) Take one Hist 192 series seminar*:

Hist 192a Seminar in Recent Interpretations of U.S. History

Hist 192b Seminar in Recent Interpretations of European History

Hist 192c Seminar in Recent Interpretations of Asian History

Hist 192d Seminar in Recent Interpretations of Middle Eastern History

Hist 192e Seminar in Recent Interpretations of African History

Hist 192f Seminar in Recent Interpretations of Latin American History

Hist 192z Seminar in Recent Interpretations of a Special Topic

(3) Take one Hist 197 series seminar*

Hist 197a Senior Research Seminar: U.S. History

Hist 197b Senior Research Seminar: World History

Hist 197c Senior Research Seminar: Public History

*Prerequisite: Passing score on the WPE.

OLD PROGRAM

B. Required Seminars (9 units)

Students should take HIST 100 in the second semester of their sophomore year; transfer students the first semester of their junior year (after completion of at least 6 units of required lower division course work). They should take HIST 192 / HIST 193 and HIST 194 / HIST 197A / HIST 197B after completing the majority of their upper division electives and after having passed the Writing Proficiency Exam.

 

(3) Hist 100 Introduction to Historical Skills

(3) Hist 192* Seminar in Recent Interpretations of American History

Hist 193* Seminar in Recent Interpretations of European History

(3) Hist 194 Public History Research and Writing Seminar

Hist 197A Research and Writing Seminar in U.S. History

Hist 197B Research and Writing Seminar in World History

 

*Prerequisite: Passing score on the WPE.

Liberal Arts Program

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Master of Arts in Liberal Arts
Description:
There are two main components of the program proposal. First, in order further to nurture the structure and coherence of the Liberal Arts program, we are proposing to expand our current two-course core sequence (LIBA 200A and 200B) by adding LIBA 200C. Expanding the core sequence to 200A-200B-200C will help us more fully to meet the original objectives, and will respond to a recommendation of our Spring 2003 Program Review: “To further build on the success of the two existing core courses, LIBA 200A and LIBA 200B, the Program should consider expanding its core curriculum, including expansion to include more emphasis on non-Western cultures, perhaps by adding one or two more core courses.” The addition of a third course to the core sequence will increase the time devoted to non-Western cultures by at least twofold. Students and faculty alike have greeted the prospect of this expanded sequence with enthusiastic support. In order to maintain the overall 30-unit requirement, we propose reducing the current requirement of electives that include non-LIBA courses from 12 to 9 (with the current 9-unit LIBA electives requirement remaining the same). We are thus proposing requiring 9 units of specific coursework (200A , 200B, and 200C), and requiring 21 units of electives, of which 9 units must be Liberal Arts courses. The second main component has to do with the application procedure. We propose requiring a statement of purpose of at least 500 words, as opposed to the current “approximately 150 words”; we furthermore propose that this statement be a response to a specific question: How does the Liberal Arts Master’s Program fit with your talents, interests, and aspirations?

OLD PROGRAM

Requirements – Master of Arts Degree

Units required for MA: 30

•  Required Courses (6 units)

•  LIBA 200A Culture and Expression: Prehistory to the Middle Ages

(3) LIBA 200B Culture and Expression: Renaissance to the Present (LIBA 200A or instructor permission)

 

 

B. Electives (21 units)

At least 9 units must be earned through Liberal Arts courses. For the remaining 12 units, students are encouraged to take some courses from other departments, but such courses must be approved by the Program Coordinator. Up to 6 of these remaining 12 units may be earned through upper division undergraduate courses, also with the approval of the Program Coordinator.

•  Culminating Requirement (3 units)

(3) LIBA 500 Culminating Experience

Note: Before advancing to candidacy, the student must have an approved prospectus on file in the Program office.

NEW PROGRAM

Requirements – Master of Arts Degree

Units required for MA: 30

•  Required Courses (9 units)

(3) LIBA 200A Culture and Expression: Prehistory to Late Antiquity

(3) LIBA 200B Culture and Expression: Middle Ages and Renaissance (LIBA 200A or instructor permission)

(3) LIBA 200C Culture and Expression: The Modern Period (LIBA 200A and 200B, or instructor permission)

B. Electives (21 units)

At least 9 units must be earned through Liberal Arts courses. For the remaining 9 units, students are encouraged to take courses from other departments, but such courses must be approved by the Program Coordinator. Up to 6 of these remaining 9 units may be earned through upper division undergraduate courses, also with the approval of the Program Coordinator.

C. Culminating Requirement (3 units)

(3) LIBA 500 Culminating Experience

Note: Before advancing to candidacy, the student must have an approved prospectus on file in the Program office.

Department of Philosophy

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Minor in Philosophy
Change the requirements in the Philosophy Minor thus:

Requirements ? Minor
Total units required for Minor: 18
Specific course requirements are:

A. Lower Division Courses (9-12 units)

At least three of the following:

(3) PHIL 004 Critical Thinking OR

(3) PHIL 006 Introduction to Philosophy: Knowledge, World, and Self

(3) PHIL 060 Symbolic Logic I

(3) PHIL 020 History of Ancient Philosophy

(3) PHIL 021 History of Early Modern Philosophy

(3) PHIL 060 Symbolic Logic I

(9) Electives, select 9 units of upper division Philosophy courses

B. Upper Division Courses (6-9 units)

Select upper division courses in Philosophy to complete 18 units. These can include Philosophy courses taken for GE
Note: Students who minor in Philosophy are free to plan a sequence of courses suited to their individual needs and interests. However, for a given major, the Department offers certain courses that have particular relevance. Contact Department advisers for course recommendations.
Students taking GE courses in Philosophy could in the past come very near to satisfying the requirements for a minor in philosophy. These revisions, in particular allowing students to take only one of PHIL 020 PHIL 021 (both in Area C3), would make possible a minor entirely in GE. A choice of PHIL 020 or PHIL 021 is already available to Majors in the Applied Ethics and Law Concentration.

New Program 

Total units required for Minor: 18

Specific course requirements are:

A . Lower Division Courses (9-12 units)

At least three of the following:

(3) PHIL 006 Introduction to Philosophy: Knowledge, World, and Self

(3) PHIL 020 History of Ancient Philosophy

(3) PHIL 021 History of Early Modern Philosophy

(3) PHIL 060 Symbolic Logic I

B. Upper Division Courses (6-9 units)

Select upper division courses in Philosophy to complete 18 units. These can include Philosophy courses taken for GE.

Note: Students who minor in Philosophy are free to plan a sequence of courses suited to their individual needs and interests. However, for a given major, the Department offers certain courses that have particular relevance. Contact Department advisers for course recommendations.

 

Old Program

Total units required for Minor: 18

Specific course requirements are:

(3) PHIL 004 Critical Thinking OR

(3) PHIL 060 Symbolic Logic I

(3) PHIL 020 History of Ancient Philosophy

(3) PHIL 021 History of Early Modern Philosophy

(9) Electives, select 9 units of upper division Philosophy courses

 

Note: Students who minor in Philosophy are free to plan a sequence of courses suited to their individual needs and interests. However, for a given major, the Department offers certain courses that have particular relevance. Contact Department advisers for course recommendations.

 

 

Department of Theatre & Dance

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Dance
Description:
We have changed the total unit values for both upper and lower division to reflect the needs of the dance major program.
REQUIREMENTS – BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE – DANCE
Units required for Major: 52 Units Required for Major: 52

OLD PROGRAM

NEW PROGRAM

A. Required Lower Division Courses (16 units)

(2) DNCE 011 Intermediate Jazz (DNCE 001)

(2) DNCE 013 Intermediate Ballet

(3) THEA 009 Appreciation of Acting

(Passing score on the WPE.)

(3) THEA 011 Acting Study I

(Theatre and Dance majors with THEA 009)

(2) Select one of the following:

DNCE 012 Intermediate Modern Dance

DNCE 014 Intermediate Tap

(DNCE 004 or instructor permission)

(4) Select two of the following:

DNCE 040 Basic Dance Production A

DNCE 041 Basic Dance Production B

THEA 016 Technical Production I-Stagecraft

THEA 020 Technical Production II-Lighting

A. Required Lower Division Courses (15 units)

(2) DNCE 011 Intermediate Jazz (DNCE 001)

(2) DNCE 013 Intermediate Ballet

(3) THEA 009 Appreciation of Acting

(Passing score on the WPE.)

(3) THEA 011 Acting Study I

(Theatre and Dance majors with THEA 009)

(2) Select one of the following:

DNCE 012 Intermediate Modern Dance

DNCE 014 Intermediate Tap

(DNCE 004 or instructor permission)

(3) Select one of the following:

DNCE 040 Basic Dance Production A OR

THEA 016 Technical Production I-Stagecraft *

B. Required Upper Division Courses (36 units)

(2) DNCE 111 Advanced Jazz

(2) DNCE 112 Advanced Modern Dance

(2) DNCE 120 Principles of Choreography

(2) DNCE 121 Dance Improvisation

(2) DNCE 122 Choreographic Form and Style

(3) DNCE 130 Appreciation and History of Dance

(3) DNCE 131 Dance Cultures of America

(3) DNCE 132 African-Caribbean Dance

(1) DNCE 142 Dance Performance Skills

(2) DNCE 143 Dance Performance Practicum

(1 unit class, must be taken two times)

(3) DNCE 150 Dance Theory

(2) DNCE 151 Dance Criticism

(DNCE 130 or DNCE 131)

(2) DNCE 160 Creative Dance

(3) KINS 151C Dance Kinesiology

(BIO 022 or equivalent)

(1) THEA 120 Practicum in Technical

Production

(3) Select one of the following:

THEA 109A Acting Techniques in

Musical Theatre

THEA 114A Voice and Movement I

THEA 118 Children's Theatre

B. Required Upper Division Courses (37 units)

(2) DNCE 111 Advanced Jazz

(2) DNCE 112 Advanced Modern Dance

(2) DNCE 120 Principles of Choreography

(2) DNCE 121 Dance Improvisation

(2) DNCE 122 Choreographic Form and Style

(3) DNCE 130 Appreciation and History of Dance

(3) DNCE 131 Dance Cultures of America

(3) DNCE 132 African-Caribbean Dance

(1) DNCE 142 Dance Performance Skills

(2) DNCE 143 Dance Performance Practicum

(1 unit class, must be taken two times)

(3) DNCE 150 Dance Theory

(3) DNCE 151 Dance Criticism**

(DNCE 130 or DNCE 131)

(2) DNCE 160 Creative Dance

(3) KINS 151C Dance Kinesiology

(BIO 022 or equivalent)

(1) THEA 120 Practicum in Technical

Production

(3) Select one of the following:

THEA 109A Acting Techniques in

Musical Theatre

THEA 114A Voice and Movement I

THEA 118 Children's Theatre

 

 

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Theatre and Dance
Description: This proposal illustrates the change from the total number of Lower Division Units (previously 16 units) to 17 units with the addition of one unit to THEA 016 (THEA 016 is now 3 units). This also increases the overall unit requirement for this major to 48. A side-by-side illustration is provided herewith.

OLD PROGRAM

Units required for Major: 47

NEW PROGRAM

Units Required for Major: 48

A. Required Lower Division Courses ( 16 units )

(3) THEA 002 History of the Theatre: Ancient

To Renaissance

(3) THEA 003 Theatre History After 1660

(3) THEA 004 Script Analysis

(3) THEA 011 Acting Study I

(Theatre and Dance majors with THEA 009)

(2) THEA 016 Technical Production I-Stagecraft

(2) THEA 020 Technical Production II-Lighting

A. Required Lower Division Courses ( 17 units )

(3) THEA 002 History of the Theatre: Ancient

To Renaissance

(3) THEA 003 Theatre History After 1660

(3) THEA 004 Script Analysis

(3) THEA 011 Acting Study I

(Theatre and Dance majors with THEA 009)

(3) THEA 016 Technical Production I-Stagecraft

(2) THEA 020 Technical Production II-Lighting

B. Required Upper Division Courses (19 units)

(3) THEA 102 Modern Drama in Production

(3) THEA 107 Directing (THEA 002, THEA 003,

THEA 004, THEA 011, THEA 016, THEA

020, instructor permission)

(2) THEA 120 Practicum in Technical Production

(2) THEA 121 Rehearsal and Performance

(3) THEA 131 Styles in Costume

(6) Select two of the following courses-only one course

from a pair:

A. THEA 140 Black Drama in African Diaspora OR

DNCE 131 Dance Cultures of America

B. THEA 149 Playwright as Artist Series OR

THEA 144 Women and Theatre: Staging Diversity

C. THEA 170 African-American Theatre and Culture OR

DNCE 132 African-Caribbean Dance

D. THEA 172 Chicano/Latino Theatre: Drama, Art and

Life 1900 to 1975 OR

THEA 173 Contemporary Chicano/Latina

Theatre: Themes and Performance 1965-Present

E. THEA 174 Multicultural Perspectives in American

Theatre OR

DNCE 130 Appreciation and History of Dance

 

B. Required Upper Division Courses (19 units)

(3) THEA 102 Modern Drama in Production

(3) THEA 107 Directing (THEA 002, THEA 003,

THEA 004, THEA 011, THEA 016, THEA

020, instructor permission)

(2) THEA 120 Practicum in Technical Production

(2) THEA 121 Rehearsal and Performance

(3) THEA 131 Styles in Costume

(6) Select two of the following courses-only one course

from a pair:

A. THEA 140 Black Drama in African Diaspora OR

DNCE 131 Dance Cultures of America

B. THEA 149 Playwright as Artist Series OR

THEA 144 Women and Theatre: Staging Diversity

C. THEA 170 African-American Theatre and Culture OR

DNCE 132 African-Caribbean Dance

D. THEA 172 Chicano/Latino Theatre: Drama, Art and

Life 1900 to 1975 OR

THEA 173 Contemporary Chicano/Latina

Theatre: Themes and Performance 1965-Present

E. THEA 174 Multicultural Perspectives in American

Theatre OR

DNCE 130 Appreciation and History of Dance

 

C. Electives/Advising Sequences 12 units)

The Theatre Concentration requires twelve additional upper division units selected from the following emphases: Acting/Directing, Multi-Ethnic Theatre, Playwriting, Scenography, Theatre History/Literature, Youth Theatre/Puppetry and Film Studies. Areas of emphasis MUST be determined in consultation with a faculty advisor.

 

Note: The Actor Training Program is a comprehensive, pre-professional performance concentration designed to prepare the student for additional graduate training and a professional career in the Theatre. It is a rigorous program and is designed for the serious student. It is required that students in the program audition and perform in the department's production season.

The courses are listed in the recommended progression of training. The instructor's permission is necessary for all upper level acting courses.

THEA 011 Acting I

THEA 101 Acting II

THEA 114A Voice and Movement I (offered once per year)

THEA 114 A Voice and Movement II (offered once a year)

THEA 110 Acting Styles: Classic Realism (offered once a year)

THEA 113 Acting Styles: Classic Shakespeare (offered once a year)

THEA 126 Audition Techniques (offered once a year)

 

C. Electives/Advising Sequences 12 units)

The Theatre Concentration requires twelve additional upper division units selected from the following emphases: Acting/Directing, Multi-Ethnic Theatre, Playwriting, Scenography, Theatre History/Literature, Youth Theatre/Puppetry and Film Studies. Areas of emphasis MUST be determined in consultation with a faculty advisor.

 

Note: The Actor Training Program is a comprehensive, pre-professional performance concentration designed to prepare the student for additional graduate training and a professional career in the Theatre. It is a rigorous program and is designed for the serious student. It is required that students in the program audition and perform in the department's production season.

The courses are listed in the recommended progression of training. The instructor's permission is necessary for all upper level acting courses.

THEA 011 Acting I

THEA 101 Acting II

THEA 114A Voice and Movement I (offered once per year)

THEA 114 A Voice and Movement II (offered once a year)

THEA 110 Acting Styles: Classic Realism (offered once a year)

THEA 113 Acting Styles: Classic Shakespeare (offered once a year)

THEA 126 Audition Techniques (offered once a year)

 

 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Department of Child Development

NEW PROGRAM

Master of Arts in Child Development
Description:
The new degree program being proposed is a Master of Arts in Child Development. The program will consist of two currently approved MA tracks (emphases): MA, Child Development, Emphasis in Theory and Research, and MA, Child Development, Emphasis in Applied Settings. These programs as proposed have been approved by the university to be offered as MAs in Education. The new degree proposal is to change the degree awarded from MA, Education, to MA, Child Development. Because this MA title has not been approved, this change requires a new degree program proposal. The two MA, Child Development degrees are outlined in the following. Please note that the programs as listed have already been approved under a different name, and that this change will simply permit students to have a more appropriate title for the degrees they will receive in these programs.The justification for creating a MA in Child Development is to better serve the students who graduate from our program. The Child Development Department is relatively young, and since we have become our own department and made significant changes to the MA degree, it has evolved from a MA in Education to a focus primarily on Child Development (with educational classes required and optional). Further, students that graduate from our program have a variety of career interests, and the MA, Child Development will best serve their needs. Finally, we believe changing the name will assist in recruitment efforts, as the primary outlets for recruitment currently include our own undergraduate majors.The CSU currently offers MA, Child Development degrees on some campuses. However, no comparable degree is offered on the CSUS campus in any department.

MA, CHILD DEVELOPMENT, EMPHASIS OPTIONS IN APPLIED SETTINGS OR THEORY AND RESEARCH (currently approved as MA, Education, with same emphases)

APPLIED SETTINGS

THEORY AND RESEARCH

Foundation Courses ( 9 units)

Foundation Courses (12 units)

CHDV 200A Proseminar in Child Development (2)

CHDV 200A Proseminar in Child Development (2)

CHDV 200B Analytical Strategies (1)

CHDV 200B Analytical Strategies (1)

CHDV 242 Theoretical Approaches to Child Development (3)

CHDV 242 Theoretical Approaches to Child Development (3)

CHDV 247 Theoretical and Applied Perspectives on Cross Cultural Development (3)

CHDV 247 Theoretical and Applied Perspectives on Cross Cultural Development (3)

CHDV 250 Research Methods (3)

CHDV 250 Research Methods (3)

Core Course Requirements (9 units)

Select from the following

Core Course Requirements (9 units)

Select from the following:

CHDV 215 Selected Topics in Applied and Community Settings (3)

CHDV 210 Seminar in Social or Cognitive Development (3)

CHDV 246 Motivation and Learning in Children (3)

CHDV 245 Selected Topics in Developmental Theory (3)

CHDV 248 Curriculum and Instruction (3)

CHDV 246 Motivation and Learning in Children (3)

CHDV 295 Practicum in Child Development (1-3)

CHDV 249 Language Processes in Development (3)

EDS 290 Issues in Early Childhood Education for Children with Disabilities (3)

CHDV 299 Special Problems (1-3 Units)

 

Electives

Electives

Choose 6 units in consultation with an advisor

Choose 6 units in consultation with an advisor

Culminating Experience (6 units)

Culminating Experience (6 units)

CHDV 290 Seminar for Culminating Experience (3)

CHDV 290 Seminar for Culminating Experience (3)

CHDV 504 Culminating Experience: Child Development (3)

CHDV 504 Culminating Experience: Child Development (3)

 

NON SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Masters of Art in Education: Higher Education Leadership Option
Description: We are proposing to include EDLP 226, 227, 228 and 229 as electives to the Masters of Art in Education: Higher Ed Leadership Option, Community College Leadership Concentration/Track.

OLD PROGRAM
B.Electives 15 units

EDLP 223 Advanced Seminar: Student Affairs Leadership 3 units

EDLP 224 Advanced Seminar: Program Development /Evaluation 3 units

EDLP 225 Advanced Seminar: Higher Education Ethics 3 units

 

 

 

 

 

 



EDLP 273 Adv. Sem.: Grants, Proposals & Systemic Planning 3 units

EDLP 278 Adv. Sem.: Collaborative Leadership/Management 3 units

EDLP 282 Adv. Sem.: Analysis of Ed. Policy Development 3 units

EDLP 283 Adv. Sem.: Economic Analysis of Educational Policy 3 units

EDLP 292 Adv. Sem.: Current Topics in Educational Leadership 3 units

EDLP 294 Cooperative Education 3 units

EDLP 296 Experimental in Ed Leadership 3 units

EDLP 299 Special Problems—Educational Leadership 3 units

NEW PROGRAM
B. Electives 15 units

EDLP 223 Adv Sem.: Student Affairs Leadership 3 units

EDLP 224 Adv. Sem.: Program Development /Evaluation 3 units

EDLP 225 Adv. Sem. Higher Education Ethics 3 units

EDLP 226 Meeting the Leadership Challenge 3units

EDLP 227 Leading the Way for Student Success: Student

and Instructional Services 3 units

EDLP 228 Innovative Leadership for Troubled Times:

Budget/Finance and Human Resources 3units

EDLP 229 Community College Leadership Practicum 3units


EDLP 273 Adv. Sem.: Grants Proposals & System Planning 3 units

EDLP 278 Adv Sem.: Collaborative Leadership/Management 3 units

EDLP 282 Adv. Sem.: Analysis of Ed. Policy Development 3 units

EDLP 283 Adv. Sem.: Economic Analysis of Educational Policy 3 units

EDLP 292 Adv. Sem.: Current Topics in Educational Leadership 3 units

EDLP 294 Cooperative Education 3 units

EDLP 296 Experimental in Ed Leadership 3 units

EDLP 299 Special Problems—Educational Leadership 3 units

Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation & School Psychology

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Minor in American Sign Language/Deaf Studies
Description:
This proposal is for a revision to the approved Minor in ASL/Deaf Studies within the Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation & School Psychology. Numbering and titles have been changed to the EDS 150-level courses to maintain a consistency with offerings at other IHEs. Also, the current EDS 160 and 161 are renumbered to EDS 161 and 162 respectively. A revised three-unit course, EDS 160 Introduction to Deaf Studies, has been added to provide students with a broader foundation of knowledge in the field prior to taking the two upper-level courses, EDS 161 and 162. The total units for this minor will now be 23-units. It should be noted that all of the requirements for a Minor in ASL/Deaf Studies will be part of the program for a Major in ASL/Deaf Studies. A Minor in ASL/Deaf Studies may be of assistance to students as they compete for employment. Their acquired skills will help them to be more competitive for jobs. As employers strive for diversity in the workplace, students who complete the Certificate will be poised to communicate with colleagues, customers or clients who are Deaf.
To qualify for the Minor through CSUS, the following requirements must be met:
•  Completion of the coursework listed below or the equivalent courses taken at another approved institution (a minimum of 8 units must be taken at CSUS)
(3) EDS 151 American Sign Language 1
(3) EDS 152 American Sign Language 2
(4) EDS 153 American Sign Language 3
(4) EDS 154 American Sign Language 4
(3) EDS 160 Introduction to Deaf Studies
(3) EDS 161 Deaf History & Education
(3) EDS 162 Deaf Culture & Community
2) A minimum G.P.A. of 2.0 in all ASL/Deaf Studies coursework

CURRENT EDS PROGRAM
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE AND
DEAF STUDIES - MINOR

EDS 150 Beginning American Sign

EDS 151 Beginning American Sign Language 1B (3 Units)

EDS 152 Intermediate American Sign Language (4 Units)

EDS 153 Advanced American Sign Language: Instructing & Informing (4 Units)

*****

EDS 160 Deaf History & Education (3 units)

EDS 161 Deaf Culture & Community (3 units)

*****


Total units: 20-units

NEW EDS PROGRAM
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE AND DEAF STUDIES -MINOR

- deleted -

EDS 151 American Sign Language 1 (3 Units)

EDS 152 American Sign Language 2 (3 Units)

EDS 153 American Sign Language 3 (4 Units)

EDS 154 American Sign Language 4 (4 Units)


EDS 160 Introduction to Deaf Studies (3 units)

EDS 161 Deaf History & Education (3 units)

EDS 162 Deaf Culture & Community (3 units)

Total units: 23-units

Note: The EDS 150-level courses (i.e., 151-154) have pre-existing articulation agreements with many

NON SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Certificate of Advanced Study in American Sign Language
Description:
The currently approved Certificate of Advanced Study in ASL is received upon completion of four semesters of ASL plus passage of the American Sign Language Proficiency Interview. The proposed change retains this requirement, but allows students to have the Interview requirement waived upon satisfactory completion of an additional course in American Sign Language (EDS 155, in submission). Additionally, the course numbers have been modified to align with similar offerings at other IHEs. The following are simply some non-substantive modifications/updates to this certificate.
The purpose of the Certificate of Advanced Study in ASL is to recognize those students from across campus who complete a series of four courses in American Sign Language (Beginning to Advanced 1: Instructing and Informing). Students currently may use ASL courses to meet the Foreign Language Graduation Requirement as well as the California Commission on Teacher Credential language emphasis requirement. This Certificate is a further recognition of acquired skills and awareness of the culture of people who are Deaf.
A Certificate in ASL may be of assistance to students as they compete for employment. Their acquired skills in ASL will help them to be more competitive for jobs. As employers strive for diversity in the workplace, students who complete the Certificate will be poised to communicate with colleagues, customers or clients who are Deaf.
To qualify for the Certificate through CSUS, the following requirements must be met:

1) Completion of the coursework listed below or the equivalent courses taken at another approved institution (a minimum of 8 units must be taken at CSUS, with 4 of these being EDS 153):
(3) EDS 151 American Sign Language 1
(3) EDS 152 American Sign Language 2
(4) EDS 153 American Sign Language 3
(4) EDS 154 American Sign Language 4
2) A minimum G.P.A. of 2.0 in all ASL coursework
3) A passing score of 2+ or higher on the American Sign Language Proficiency Interview upon completion of EDS 154 (contact Program Coordinator for appointment)
OR
Completion of EDS 155 American Sign Language 5 with a grade of C or better

Programmatic and Fiscal Analysis of Change

The proposed changes will have no effect on any programs outside of the ASL and Deaf Studies Program. Accordingly, no other programs or departments have been consulted on this change.
With the exception of the EDS 155 option, the courses involved in this non-substantive change have already been offered under the existing program. The only modification is the alignment these course numbers to similar ASL offerings at other IHEs. These series of courses allows students to receive the Certificate upon satisfactory completion of an additional advanced course in ASL, thereby waiving the requirement for completion of the ASLPI interview, if they so choose
Proposed Changes:
Itemize Each Change:
•  Add option of taking EDS 155 in lieu of taking the American Sign Language proficiency Interview
•  Renaming and renumbering of EDS 150-153

OLD PROGRAM

(Minimum of 7 units taken at CSUS):

EDS 150 Beginning American Sign Language 1A (3 Units)

EDS 151 Beginning American Sign Language 1B (3 Units)

EDS 152 Intermediate American Sign Language (4 Units)

EDS 153 Advanced American Sign Language: Instructing & Informing (4 Units)

*******

Minimum rating of 2+ on American SignLanguage Proficiency Interview

Minimum 2.0 G.P.A in courses taken

 

NEW PROGRAM

(Minimum of 7 units taken at CSUS):

- deleted -

EDS 151 American Sign Language 1 (3 Units)

EDS 152 American Sign Language 2 (4 Units)

EDS 153 American Sign Language 3 (4 Units)

EDS 154 American Sign Language 4 (4 Units)


Minimum 2.0 G.P.A in courses taken

Minimum rating of 2+ on American SignLanguage Proficiency Interview

OR

Completion of EDS 155 American Sign Language 5 (4 Units) with a grade of C or better

 

 

COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES & MATH

Department of Biological Sciences

NON SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Molecular Biology
Description: In a separate course change form, we have proposed increasing the number of units for Bio 149A from 2 to 3 units. The program change proposed here incorporates the new 3 unit Bio 149A and, as a result of its incorporation, also includes a one unit decrease in units of electives required for the concentration.

New Program
Molecular Biology (27 units)

The concentration in Molecular Biology provides a foundation for research and teaching activity in recombinant DNA technology, cell biology, developmental biology, genetics, and immunology. There are no current professional certifications for most research technologists in molecular biology, so requirements for employment vary. In most cases, further laboratory and academic preparation is desirable for challenging employment opportunities in hospitals, universities and private industry.

(4) CHEM 031 Quantitative Analysis ( CHEM 001B )

(3) CHEM 162 General Biochemistry Laboratory
( CHEM 031 ; CHEM 160A or
CHEM 161 either may be taken concurrently; ENGL 020 or an equivalent second semester composition course)

(3) BIO 143 General Virology ( BIO 139 , CHEM 161 )

(3) BIO 149A Immunology and Serology Lecture
( BIO 139 )

(2) BIO 180 Molecular Biology Lecture ( BIO 184 )

(2) BIO 181 Molecular Biology Laboratory ( BIO 139 , BIO 184 )

(10) Upper division electives in Biological Sciences
or Chemistry. Select electives in consultation with an advisor.
Note:
CHEM 162 can be included in the 36 upper division unit requirement for this concentration

 

Old Program
Molecular Biology (27 units)

The concentration in Molecular Biology provides a foundation for research and teaching activity in recombinant DNA technology, cell biology, developmental biology, genetics, and immunology. There are no current professional certifications for most research technologists in molecular biology, so requirements for employment vary. In most cases, further laboratory and academic preparation is desirable for challenging employment opportunities in hospitals, universities and private industry.

(4) CHEM 031 Quantitative Analysis ( CHEM 001B )

(3) CHEM 162 General Biochemistry Laboratory
( CHEM 031 ; CHEM 160A or
CHEM 161 either may be taken concurrently; ENGL 020 or an equivalent second semester composition course)

(3) BIO 143 General Virology ( BIO 139 , CHEM 161 )

(2) BIO 149A Immunology and Serology Lecture
( BIO 139 )

(2) BIO 180 Molecular Biology Lecture ( BIO184 )

(2) BIO 181 Molecular Biology Laboratory ( BIO 139 , BIO 184 )

(11) Upper division electives in Biological Sciences or Chemistry. Select electives in consultation with an advisor.
Note:
CHEM 162 can be included in the 36 upper division unit requirement for this concentration

NON SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Microbiology
Description: In a separate course change form, we have proposed increasing the number of units for Bio 149A from 2 to 3 units. The program change proposed here incorporates the new 3 unit Bio 149A and, as a result of its incorporation, also includes a one unit decrease in units of electives required for the concentration.

New Program

Microbiology (28 units)
The concentration in Microbiology is designed to prepare students for entry level technical positions in industry and graduate programs in Microbiology leading to careers in research and teaching. By taking specified elective courses, the concentration will satisfy the course work requirements of the State for eligibility to take the California Public Health Microbiologist Certificate Examination. Eligibility to take the examination also requires six months as a trainee at an approved Public Health Laboratory. Completion of BS degree requirements does not guarantee admission to a trainee program. Possession of a Public Health Microbiologist Certificate is a requirement for employment in both California State and County Public Health Laboratories. Concentration includes a minor in Chemistry.


(1) CHEM 020L Introductory Organic Chemistry

Laboratory ( CHEM 020 may be taken concurrently )


(4) CHEM 031 Quantitative Analysis ( CHEM 001B )

(3) CHEM 162 General Biochemistry Laboratory
( CHEM 031 ; CHEM 160A or CHEM 161 either may be taken concurrently; ENGL 020 or an equivalent second semester composition course)

(3) BIO 149A Immunology and Serology Lecture ( BIO 139 )

(1) BIO 149B Immunology and Serology Laboratory ( BIO 139 )

Note:
CHEM 162 can be included in the 36 upper division unit requirements for this concentration.


(16) Elective courses selected from the following list: A

total of 36 upper division units is required for the

concentration. CHEM 161 is required but is not counted

in the 36 upper division unit requirements. Electives

should be selected in consultation with an advisor.

HLSC 148 * Epidemiology ( BIO 010 , CHEM 001A , STAT 001 or instructor permission)

BIO 134 * Medical Mycology ( BIO 139 )

BIO 144 * Pathogenic Bacteriology ( BIO 139 )

BIO 152 * Human Parasitology ( BIO 011 or instructor permission)

BIO 143 General Virology ( BIO 139 , CHEM 161 )

BIO 145 The Diversity of Microorganisms ( BIO 139 )

BIO 155 Immunobiology ( BIO 149A )

BIO 156 Food Microbiology ( BIO 139 )

BIO 180 Molecular Biology Lecture ( BIO 184 )

BIO 181 Molecular Biology Laboratory ( BIO 139 , BIO 184 )

BIO 185 Topics in Biology ( BIO 010 , BIO 011 , BIO 012 ,
CHEM 020 ; see instructor for other course
prerequisites)

BIO 186A Cell and Molecular Biology Seminar
( BIO 010 , BIO 011 , BIO 012 )

 

BIO 195 Biological Internship (Department chair and instructor (representing the appropriate biological discipline) permission)

BIO 199A Undergraduate Laboratory Field Research
Department Chair and instructor permission)

* Required to qualify for Public Health Microbiology Traineeship.

Old Program

Microbiology (28 units)
The concentration in Microbiology is designed to prepare students for entry level technical positions in industry and graduate programs in Microbiology leading to careers in research and teaching. By taking specified elective courses, the concentration will satisfy the course work requirements of the State for eligibility to take the California Public Health Microbiologist Certificate Examination. Eligibility to take the examination also requires six months as a trainee at an approved Public Health Laboratory. Completion of BS degree requirements does not guarantee admission to a trainee program. Possession of a Public Health Microbiologist Certificate is a requirement for employment in both California State and County Public Health Laboratories. Concentration includes a minor in Chemistry.


(1) CHEM 020L Introductory Organic Chemistry

Laboratory ( CHEM 020 may be taken concurrently )


(4) CHEM 031 Quantitative Analysis ( CHEM 001B )

(3) CHEM 162 General Biochemistry Laboratory
( CHEM 031 ; CHEM 160A or CHEM 161 either may be taken concurrently; ENGL 020 or an equivalent second semester composition course)

(2) BIO 149A Immunology and Serology Lecture ( BIO 139 )

(1) BIO 149B Immunology and Serology Laboratory ( BIO 139 )

Note: CHEM 162 can be included in the 36 upper division unit requirements for this concentration.

(17) Elective courses selected from the following list: A

total of 36 upper division units is required for the

concentration. CHEM 161 is required but is not counted

in the 36 upper division unit requirements. Electives

should be selected in consultation with an advisor.

HLSC 148 * Epidemiology ( BIO 010 , CHEM 001A , STAT 001 or instructor permission)

BIO 134 * Medical Mycology ( BIO 139 )

BIO 144 * Pathogenic Bacteriology ( BIO 139 )

BIO 152 * Human Parasitology ( BIO 011 or instructor permission)

BIO 143 General Virology ( BIO 139 , CHEM 161 )

BIO 145 The Diversity of Microorganisms ( BIO 139 )

BIO 155 Immunobiology ( BIO 149A )

BIO 156 Food Microbiology ( BIO 139 )

BIO 180 Molecular Biology Lecture ( BIO 184 )

BIO 181 Molecular Biology Laboratory ( BIO 139 , BIO 184 )

BIO 185 Topics in Biology ( BIO 010 , BIO 011 , BIO 012 ,
CHEM 020 ; see instructor for other course
prerequisites)

BIO 186A Cell and Molecular Biology Seminar
( BIO 010 , BIO 011 , BIO 012 )

BIO 195 Biological Internship (Department chair and instructor (representing the appropriate biological discipline) permission)

BIO 199A Undergraduate Laboratory Field Research
Department Chair and instructor permission)

* Required to qualify for Public Health Microbiology Traineeship.

 

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Bachelor of Arts in Biological Sciences
Description:
The Dept. of Biological Sciences has developed a new introductory series (BIO 1 and BIO 2; 10 units) that will replace or existing introductory series (BIO 10, 11 and 12; 11 units) for our majors. This program change incorporates this new series into our curriculum.

New Program

Old Program

REQUIREMENTS · BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE
Units required for Major: 63-64
Minimum total units required for the BA: 120
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.
A. Required Lower Division Core Courses (37-38 units)

(5) BIO 001 Biodiversity, Evolution and Ecology


(5) BIO 002 Cells, Molecules and Genes


+++++++++++

(5) CHEM 001A General Chemistry I (High school algebra [two years] and high school chemistry; or equivalent)


(5) CHEM 001B General Chemistry II ( CHEM 001A )


(3) CHEM 020 Organic Chemistry Lecture--Brief Course ( CHEM 001B )


(4) PHYS 005A General Physics: Mechanics, Heat, Sound (Recently completed three years of high school algebra and geometry; and a college course in algebra and trigonometry for those having an inadequate mathematics background)


(4) PHYS 005B General Physics: Light, Electricity and Magnetism, Modern Physics ( PHYS 005A or instructor permission)


(3) STAT 001 Introduction to Statistics ( MATH 009 or three years of high school mathematics which includes two years of algebra and one year of geometry; completion of ELM requirement and the Intermediate Algebra Diagnostic Test)


(3-4) Select one of the following:


MATH 026A Calculus I for the Social and Life Sciences


( MATH 011 or three years of high school mathematics which includes two years of algebra and one year of geometry; completion of ELM requirement and the Intermediate Algebra Diagnostic Test)

MATH 030 Calculus I ( MATH 029 or four years of high school mathematics which includes two years of algebra, one year of geometry, and one year of mathematical analysis; completion of ELM requirement and Pre-Calculus Diagnostic Test )

 

REQUIREMENTS · BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE
Units required for Major: 64-65
Minimum total units required for the BA: 120
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.
A. Required Lower Division Core Courses (38-39 units)

(3) BIO 010 Basic Biological Concepts

(4) BIO 011 Animal Biology ( BIO 010 )

(4) BIO 012 Plant Biology ( BIO 010 )

(
5) CHEM 001A General Chemistry I (High school algebra [two years] and high school chemistry; or equivalent)


(5) CHEM 001B General Chemistry II ( CHEM 001A )


(3) CHEM 020 Organic Chemistry Lecture--Brief Course ( CHEM 001B )


(4) PHYS 005A General Physics: Mechanics, Heat, Sound (Recently completed three years of high school algebra and geometry; and a college course in algebra and trigonometry for those having an inadequate mathematics background)

(
4) PHYS 005B General Physics: Light, Electricity and Magnetism, Modern Physics ( PHYS 005A or instructor permission)



(3) STAT 001 Introduction to Statistics ( MATH 009 or three years of high school mathematics which includes two years of algebra and one year of geometry; completion of ELM requirement and the Intermediate Algebra Diagnostic Test)


(3-4) Select one of the following:


MATH 026A
Calculus I for the Social and Life Sciences



( MATH 011 or three years of high school mathematics which includes two years of algebra and one year of geometry; completion of ELM requirement and the Intermediate Algebra Diagnostic Test)

MATH 030 Calculus I ( MATH 029 or four years of high school mathematics which includes two years of algebra, one year of geometry, and one year of mathematical analysis; completion of ELM requirement and Pre-Calculus Diagnostic Test )

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Bachelor ofScience in Biological Sciences
Description:
The Dept. of Biological Sciences has developed a new introductory series (BIO 1 and BIO 2; 10 units) that will replace or existing introductory series (BIO 10, 11 and 12; 11 units) for our majors. This program change incorporates this new series into our curriculum.

NEW REQUIREMENTS - BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE

Units required for Major: 76-83, includes units of study in chosen concentration (see below)

Minimum total units required for the BS: 120-122

Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.
Note: Additional units may be required to meet the CSUS foreign language requirement.

A. Required Lower Division Core Courses (37-38 units)

( 5) BIO 001 Biodiversity, Evolution and Ecology


(5) BIO 002 Cells, Molecules and Genes


+++++++++++


(5) CHEM 001A General Chemistry I (High school algebra [two years] and high school chemistry; or equivalent)


(5) CHEM 001B General Chemistry II ( CHEM 001A )


(3) CHEM 020 Organic Chemistry Lecture--Brief Course ( CHEM 001B )


(4) PHYS 005A General Physics: Mechanics, Heat, Sound (Recently completed three years of high school algebra and geometry; and a college course in algebra and trigonometry for those having an inadequate mathematics background)


(4) PHYS 005B General Physics: Light, Electricity and Magnetism, Modern Physics ( PHYS 005A or instructor permission)


(3) STAT 001 Introduction to Statistics ( MATH 009 or three years of high school mathematics which includes two years of algebra and one year of geometry; completion of ELM requirement and the Intermediate Algebra Diagnostic Test)


(3-4) Select one of the following:


MATH 026A Calculus I for the Social and Life Sciences
( MATH 011 or three years of high school mathematics which includes two years of algebra and one year of geometry; completion of ELM requirement and the Intermediate Algebra Diagnostic Test)

 

MATH 030 Calculus I ( MATH 029 or four years of high school mathematics which includes two years of algebra, one year of geometry, and one year of mathematical analysis; completion of ELM requirement and Pre-Calculus Diagnostic Test)

OLD REQUIREMENTS - BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE

Units required for Major: 77-84, includes units of study in chosen concentration (see below)

Minimum total units required for the BS: 121-123

Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.
Note: Additional units may be required to meet the CSUS foreign language requirement.

A. Required Lower Division Core Courses (38-39 units)

(3) BIO 010 Basic Biological Concepts

(4) BIO 011 Animal Biology ( BIO 010 )

(4) BIO 012 Plant Biology ( BIO 010 )




(5) CHEM 001A General Chemistry I (High school algebra [two years] and high school chemistry; or equivalent)

(5) CHEM 001B General Chemistry II ( CHEM 001A )



(3) CHEM 020 Organic Chemistry Lecture--Brief Course
( CHEM 001B )


(4) PHYS 005A General Physics: Mechanics, Heat, Sound (Recently completed three years of high school algebra and geometry; and a college course in algebra and trigonometry for those having an inadequate mathematics background)


(4) PHYS 005B General Physics: Light, Electricity and
Magnetism, Modern Physics ( PHYS 005A or instructor
permission)


(3) STAT 001 Introduction to Statistics ( MATH 009 or three
years of high school mathematics which includes two years of algebra and one year of geometry; completion of ELM
requirement and the Intermediate Algebra Diagnostic Test)

(3-4) Select one of the following:


MATH 026A
Calculus I for the Social and Life Sciences
( MATH 011 or three years of high school mathematics which includes two years of algebra and one year of geometry;
completion of ELM requirement and the Intermediate Algebra Diagnostic Test)


MATH 030
Calculus I ( MATH 029 or four years of high school mathematics which includes two years of algebra, one year of geometry, and one year of mathematical analysis; completion of ELM requirement and Pre-Calculus Diagnostic Test )

 

NON SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Clinical Laboratory Science
Description:
In a separate course change form, we have proposed increasing the number of units for Bio 149A from 2 to 3 units. The program change proposed here incorporates the new 3 unit Bio 149A and, as a result of its incorporation, also includes a one unit decrease in units of electives required for the concentration.

New Program

Clinical Laboratory Technology (30 units)

The curriculum in Clinical Laboratory Technology meets the course work requirements of the State for eligibility to take the California Laboratory Technologist Licensure Examination. Eligibility to take the examination also requires a one year traineeship at a state approved hospital laboratory. Completion of BS degree requirements in the Clinical Laboratory Technology concentration does not guarantee admission to a trainee program. Information on admission criteria and application procedures for the various medical technology trainee programs throughout the state is available through the California Association for Medical Laboratory Technology (CAMLT) at their web site, www.camlt.org/cls/ .


(4) CHEM 031 Quantitative Analysis ( CHEM 001B )

(3) CHEM 162 General Biochemistry Laboratory ( CHEM 031 ; CHEM 160A or CHEM 161 either may be taken concurrently; ENGL 020 or an equivalent second semester composition course)

(3) BIO 124 Clinical Hematology ( CHEM 162 ; CHEM 162 may be taken concurrently)

(4) BIO 144 Pathogenic Bacteriology ( BIO 139 )

(3) BIO 149A Immunology and Serology Lecture ( BIO139 )

(1) BIO 149B Immunology and Serology Laboratory( BIO139 )


(4) BIO 152 Human Parasitology ( BIO 011 or instructor permission )

(8) Eight additional upper division units selected in consultation with an advisor. Recommended electives are:

  BIO 125 Body Fluid Analysis ( CHEM 161 or instructor permission)

BIO 131 Systemic Physiology ( BIO 010 , BIO 020 , or BIO 022 , and one year of college chemistry)

BIO 134 Medical Mycology ( BIO 139 )

BIO 143 General Virology ( BIO 139 , CHEM 161 )

Notes:

  • CHEM 162 can be included in the 36 upper division unit requirement for this concentration.
A minor in Chemistry may be attained if either CHEM 020L or CHEM 025 is taken.

Old Program

Clinical Laboratory Technology (30 units)

The curriculum in Clinical Laboratory Technology meets
the course work requirements of the State for eligibility to take the California Laboratory Technologist Licensure Examination. Eligibility to take the examination also requires a one year traineeship at a state approved hospital laboratory. Completion of BS degree requirements in the Clinical Laboratory Technology concentration does not guarantee admission to a trainee program. Information on admission criteria and application procedures for the various medical technology trainee programs throughout the state is available through the California Association for Medical Laboratory Technology (CAMLT) at their web site, www.camlt.org/cls/ .

(4) CHEM 031 Quantitative Analysis ( CHEM 001B )

(3) CHEM 162 General Biochemistry Laboratory ( CHEM 031 ; CHEM 160A or CHEM 161 either may be taken concurrently; ENGL 020 or an equivalent second semester composition course)

(3) BIO 124 Clinical Hematology ( CHEM 162 ; CHEM 162 may be taken concurrently)

(4) BIO 144 Pathogenic Bacteriology ( BIO 139 )

(2) BIO 149A Immunology and Serology Lecture ( BIO 139 )

(1) BIO 149B Immunology and Serology Laboratory ( BIO 139 )

(4) BIO 152 Human Parasitology ( BIO 011 or instructor permission )

(9) Nine additional upper division units selected in consultation with an advisor. Recommended electives are:

BIO 125 Body Fluid Analysis ( CHEM 161 or instructor permission)

BIO 131 Systemic Physiology ( BIO 010 , BIO 020 , or BIO 022 , and one year of college chemistry)

BIO 134 Medical Mycology ( BIO 139 )

BIO 143 General Virology ( BIO 139 , CHEM 161 )

Notes:

  • CHEM 162 can be included in the 36 upper division unit requirement for this concentration.
A minor in Chemistry may be attained if either CHEM 020L or CHEM 025 is taken.

NON SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Clinical Laboratory Technology Concentration in Biological Sciences
Description:
The Department of Biological Sciences is requesting a name change for the Clinical Laboratory Technology concentration to Clinical Laboratory Science. The name will more closely reflect the professional title of Clinical Laboratory Scientist (CLS), which is the career path of the students who are majoring in this concentration. Following graduation from CSUS, our students must complete an additional 12-month clinical training program before sitting for the state examination to become a licensed CLS and work in California. The previous title for the profession was Medical Technologist but that was replaced statewide and nationally several years ago.
In addition, the concentration name Clinical Laboratory Science more accurately reflects the strong science background that our students must have instead of the “technology” emphasis that the Clinical Laboratory Technology name implies.

 

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
AND INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Department of Ethnic Studies

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

African Studies Minor & Certificate
Description: Request that Hist 142 -History of Women in Africa replace Soc 162 Middle Eastern Societies
and Culture as a required course, and the latter be moved to the elective area. At the time of the proposal for both the Minor and the Certificate the course was not yet designed and approved. Courses as they are structured now offer a fair representation that will enable students to acquire a well rounded view of Africa and people of African descent, the structure also strengthens the learning outcomes of the program and the department. Hist. 142 focuses on Women in Africa, previous courses did not have that focuses. There was no change in Govt. courses. Prof. Mosupyoe did consult with Sociology department and the
instructor of Soc. 162 approved and understood the change.

 

Old Program

New Program

(3) Hist 007 History of African Civilization

(3) Hist 007 History of African Civilization

(3) Hist 141 History of Africa Since 1800

(3) Hist 141 History of Africa Since 1800

(3) Ethn 010 Africa myths and Realities

(3) Ethn 010 Africa myths and Realities

(3) Govt 142 Government and Politics in Africa

(3) Govt 142 Government and Politics in Africa

(3) Soc 162 Middle Eastern Societies and Culture

(3) Hist 142 History of African Women

(6) Select two of the following

(6) Select two of the following

Ethn 171 African Religions and Philosophy

Ethn 001A Elementary Swahili

Ethn 175 African Thought and Culture

Ethn 001B Elementary Swahili

Ethn 177 Topics in African Studies

Ethn 070 Introduction to Pan African Studies

 

Ethn 171 African Religions and Philosophy

 

Ethn 175 African Thought and Culture

 

Ethn 177 Topics in African Studies

 

(3) Soc 162 Middle Eastern Societies and Culture

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Pan African Studies Certificate
Description: The removal of (3) required courses to electives and replacing those courses with courses that reflect the discipline.
Over the years new courses were developed by new faculty, and these courses offer broad views and exposures to current trends and topics. The curriculum lacked women/gender focus; the added courses provide that focus.
Request that Ethn 172 Black Women in America, Ethn 142 History of Women in Africa, and Ethn141/Govt 141 replace Ethn 195, Ethn 198 and 199 as required courses, and the latter moved to electives. The new courses offer a broad view and exposure to current reality of the discipline.

Old Program

New Program

(3) HIST 007 History of African Civilization or

(3) HIST 007 History of African Civilization or

HIST 141 History of Africa since 1800

HIST 141 History of Africa since 1800

(3) ETHN170 Pan African Studies

(3) ETHN 170 Pan African Studies

(3) HIST 177 The African American Experience

1603 - present

(3) ETHN 172 Black Women in America

(3) ETHN 195 Field Work in Ethnic Studies

(3) HIST 177 The African American Experience

1603 - present

(3) ETHN 198 C0-Curricular Activities

(3) ETHN 142 History of Women in Africa

(3) ETHN 199 Special Problems

(3) GOVT /ETHN 141 Politics African Diaspora

(3) Select a course in African Culture

(3) Select a course in African Culture

(3) Select a course in African Society

(3) Select a course in African Society

Labor Studies Program

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Labor Studies
Description: The Labor Studies program curriculum is being reorganized substantially due to course changes in participating departments since its inception and new faculty and course offerings being included in the program. The basic changes are the following:

1. The program will eliminate its “Certificate in Labor Studies;” originally designed to appeal to non-traditional students who might find this helpful in job placement or career advancement. This certificate course of study is more a complication than asset as the program seeks to attract students.

2. The program will now require 9 units of core courses (rather than 15) and 12 units of elective courses (rather than 6). This change is intended to help rebuild the program by making it easier for students to complete the core requirements (providing them more choice and requiring fewer courses). LBRS 100 will continue to be required for all students, but they will have a choice for their remaining 6 units of core courses.

3. Some new courses (Soc 122, Soc 175, Soc 164, Govt 136, Govt 139A, Hist 188) will be added to the program because of new faculty developing new courses over the past few years, and some courses (Comm 119, Hist 169) will be dropped because they are no longer taught.

Labor Studies (2004 - 2006)

REQUIREMENTS MINOR
Total units requires for Minor: 21
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites

a. Required Core Courses (21 units)

(3)

LBRS 100

Labor and American Social Structure

(Passing score on the WPE)

(3)

ECON 104

Introduction to the United States Economy OR

ECON 001A

Introduction to Macroeconomic Analysis

(3)

ECON 150

Labor Economics

(ECON 001A, ECON 001B)

(3)

OBE 157

Industrial Relations

(3)

ECON 184

Women and the Economy

(6)

Electives selected from the following with approval of the Labor Studies Coordinator: LBRS 195, LBRS 199; OBE 151, OBE 158; WOMS 138; COMS 119

Note: Electives may be substitutes for some required courses with approval of the Labor Studies Coordinator.

REQUIREMENTS CERTIFICATE
Total units required for Certificate: 18

(3)

LBRS 100

Labor and the American Social Structure

(Passing score on the WPE)

(3)

ECON 150

Labor Economics

(ECON 001A, ECON 001B)

(3)

OBE 157

Industrial Relations

(3)

COMS 119

Conflict Resolution

(6)

Electives selected from the following with approval of the Labor Studies Coordinator: LBRS 195, LBRS 199; OBE 151, OBE 158; WOMS 138; COMS 119

Note: Electives may be substitutes for some required courses with approval of the Labor Studies Coordinator.

 

Labor Studies (2006 - 2008)

REQUIREMENTS MINOR
Total units requires for Minor: 21
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites

A. Required Core Courses (9 units)

(3)

LBRS 100

Labor and the American Social Structure

(Passing score on the WPE)

(6)

ECON 150

Labor and Manpower Economics

(ECON 001A, ECON 001B)

WOMS 138

Women and Work

HIST 188

American Labor History

OBE 157

Industrial Relations

SOC 175

Work and Occupations

 

 

B. Electives (12 units)

ECON 104

Introduction to the United States Economy

GOVT 139A

The Politics of Globalization

PSYC 169

Industrial Psychology

OBE 158

Labor and Employment Laws, Policies and Practices

SOC 120

Ethnic and Race Relations

SOC 122

Immigration Studies

SOC 164

Sociology of Globalization

Public Policy and Administration Program

NEW CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

Certificate in Collaborative Governance
Description: The graduate level Certificate in Collaborative Governance is intended to provide specialized training in an emerging area of emphasis in a variety of public policy and administrative settings. More specifically, the Certificate aims to provide skills in managing complicated problem solving interactions among different government agencies at varying levels, as well as problem solving interactions between government agencies and interest/community groups. The Certificate is designed on behalf of PPA graduate students, PPA alumni, and selected others who have completed similar graduate level course work.

Justification: The Department recognizes that public policy problems increasingly involve complicated interactions among a variety of agencies at different levels of government, as well as interactions between government and various interest/community groups. Skill at managing such interactions has become highly valued.
Accordingly, working closely with Sacramento State’s Center for Collaborative Policy Making, the Department has been developing expertise in collaborative governance. The Department has offered two elective courses in this area (PPA 270 and PPA 271) that have proved very popular with students. Faculty members have monitored the classes closely and have been very positive about them as well.
After extensive consideration we are now planning to take an important further step. Reflecting on the evaluations of the courses, the quality of our interaction with the Center for Collaborative Policy Making, the continued national attention to collaborative methods, and positive input from students, the faculty is proposing establishment of a graduate certificate in collaborative policy and decision-making. The certificate would incorporate the two existing collaborative policy making courses as well as a new, intensive advanced practice class (PPA 296L). We believe this program will fill an important niche and further establish our program as innovative.
We wish to stress two sources of information that underscore student support for our plan to move our specialization in collaborative policy making to the next level. We surveyed students about several matters in fall 2004, in preparation for this self study (we also surveyed alumni and faculty). A total of 81 students responded to the survey, the results of which are referenced at several places in this report (see Appendix C for a complete summary of the results). The student survey indicated that while most were generally satisfied with the courses and instruction, they desired further elective options. We then decided to use a portion of an evening class to probe further about what students wanted. We found a surprisingly strong consensus about the desirability of a collaborative policy making certificate, even if this required students to take one additional, new elective class.
Fiscal Impact
We believe the fiscal impact of this new certificate will be minimal. The Center for Collaborative Policy has expressed willingness to fund the new course (PPA 296L) during the first year or two. During this period the PPA Department plans to conduct a thorough evaluation to ensure that the new certificate can be self supporting and will not have an adverse impact on other electives and course offerings; we will not continue the certificate if serious problems are identified. Furthermore, the certificate is designed specifically for current PPA students or for PPA alumni who wish to return to Sacramento State to obtain the new certificate.
Additionally, the one new course in the certificate program will be offered during off-peak hours, and should not create any additional need for classroom space.
Consultation
We have shared our plans with the other departments in the College and with the College of Business Administration. We will share the results of our consultation with the appropriate curriculum committees. Based on prior consultation about our collaborative policy making courses we do not expect any concerns.

Proposed Certificate in Collaborative Governance
Itemized changes :

  1. Establish Certificate in Collaborative Governance
  2. Add PPA 296L (to be third course in Certificate along with the existing PPA 270 and PPA 271)

    Admission requirements :
    Enrollment in the Sacramento State MPPA program OR
    Graduation from the Sacramento State MPPA program OR
    Application for the Certificate in Collaborative Governance AND The baccalaureate degree
    A written statement of purpose
    Three letters of recommendation
    Completion of PPA 200 and PPA 210, or their equivalent(s), with grades of B- or better in each

New Program
Certificate in Collaborative Governance
(3) PPA 270. Collaborative Policy
(3) PPA 271. Practice in Collaborative Policy
(3) PPA 296L. Collaborative Governance Advanced Practice

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Minor in Public Policy and Administration
Description:
The Department has offered a 24 unit minor for the past three academic years. The minor consists of two required lower division prerequisite courses and six upper division courses. Three of the upper division courses are offered by PPA faculty and within the Department; three others are offered by the Department of Economics, the Department of Government, and the College of Business Administration, respectively.

Unfortunately, the minor has not drawn many students while requiring a major commitment of PPA resources in terms of both instruction and advising. As of May 2005, and despite extensive efforts to publicize the program, only five students had graduated with the minor and seven current students had declared the minor, although significantly more had taken one or more PPA undergraduate courses. There are a number of reasons for our difficulties with the minor including the general lack of emphasis on minors at Sacramento State, the lack of room in their schedules for transfer students, the Department’s inability to control scheduling of required courses outside our department, and the fact that key courses have not been included in the general education program.

Accordingly, the Department proposes to replace the PPA minor with a two course undergraduate study sequence consisting of the existing “Introduction to Public Policy and Administration” (PPA 100) class and a new class entitled “Collaborative Policy Practicum” (PPA 150). This approach allows us to retain a course that is a true introduction to the field, has proved popular with students, and has drawn a substantial number of students from other departments and programs (notably, Gerontology). The plan also allows us to draw from our growing expertise in collaborative methods, offering a new practice oriented course that will complement undergraduate courses in other departments. We will seek general education status for both courses. Deletion of the minor also makes advising much easier and eliminates the need to coordinate with other departments to meet the needs of a very small number of students.

Fiscal Impact
We believe that the change will have minimal fiscal impact on other departments or the University as a whole. As noted previously, only a handful of students have completed the minor, and elimination of the program probably will not be noticed in the courses from other departments included in the program. Our faculty can absorb the costs of the new course, and elimination of low-subscribed courses and advising time will be efficient for our faculty.

Consultation
We have shared our plans with the other departments in the College, and specifically contacted the departments/units most affected by our plans: Economics, Government, and the College of Business Administration. No one has expressed concerns.

Proposed Change in PPA Undergraduate Course Wor
Itemized changes :

  1. Eliminate PPA minor
  2. Delete PPA 140
  3. Delete PPA 191
  4. Add PPA 150

New Program

 Study in Public Policy and Administration

(3) PPA 100. Introduction to Public Policy and Administration (GOVT 001 or GOVT 150)

(3) PPA 150. Collaborative Problem Solving Practicum (PPA 100, ENVS 171, OBE 155, CRJ 164, GOVT 170, COMS 116, SOC 130, or permission of instructor)

Old Program

 Minor in Public Policy and Administration

A. Required Lower Division Courses

(3) ECON 001B. Introduction to Microeconomic Analysis

(3) GOVT 001. Essentials of Government
OR
GOVT 150. American Governments

B. Required Upper Division Courses

(3) PPA 100. Introduction to Public Policy and Administration (GOVT 001 or GOVT 150)

(3)PPA 140. Effective Public Organization (GOVT 001 OR GOVT 150)

(3) ECON 110. Cost Benefit Analysis (ECON 001B)

(3) GOVT 170. Public Policy Development (GOVT 001 or Equivalent. Passing score on the WPE)

(3) Select one of the following:
OBE 151. Diversity and Management
OBE 153. Management of Human Resources
OBE 155. Conflict Management and Negotiation.

(3) PPA 191. Culminating Project in Public Policy and Administration (GOVT 001 or GOVT 150; PPA 100 may be taken concurrently with instructor permission.)


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