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UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE PROGRAM CHANGE PROPOSALS
LIST #3– 2005/2006

IMPORTANT NOTICE:

There will be one more list for review in the month of October. Due to the volume of Course and Program Proposals, List #3 will be posted next week. All items on List #3 will be included in the 06-08 Catalog. Course and Program Proposals that were submitted by the Septemeber 23 deadline and do not appear on List #2 will be included on List #3



The Curriculum Subcommittee will meet on
Tuesday, October 25, 2005, at 1:30 in SAC 275
to review the Program Change Proposals contained in this list.
(Response due to Academic Affairs by noon on October 25, 2005)



Program Proposals

Past Program Proposal Lists:

College of Engineering & Computer Science
College of Health & Human Services
College of Natural Sciences and Math

Program List #1
Program List #2

 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

NON SUBSTATIVE CHANGE

EEE MASTERS PROGRAM

Description:
EEE 212 (Microwave Engineering II) will be deleted from the catalog because there was an existing overlap of course content with EEE 211 (Microwave Engineering I).
EEE 212 was an elective course in the EEE Master's Curriculum and its deletion will not have a substantive impact.

 

Department of Mechanical Engineering

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Mechanical Engineering Technology

Description:
Remove MET 101 from the MET curriculum.
Justification: This course is no longer needed as all elements of this course are now covered in other required courses under the MET curriculum.
Attached documents to support this justification:
1. How the Elements of ME101 are Covered in Other Courses
2. A memo sent to the MET curriculum committee by Thinh Ngo who is a former MET coordinator as well as a former ME chair.
How the Elements of ME101 are Covered in Other Courses
1. Course description of MET 101 from the current CSUS catalog
MET 101. Graphics and Communications in Engineering Design. Interrelation and application of knowledge and skills from previous courses to the solution of realistic problems. Emphasis on problems involving machine elements and systems of machine elements. Practice in the techniques of descriptive writing and the methods of preparing and presenting technical data; a variety of problems will be introduced to provide opportunities for the student to develop precision in statements and in graphic presentation. Lecture three hours. Prerequisite: MET 164. Spring only. 3 units.
2. MET 101 course contents covered in other required courses under the MET curriculum
The chart below describes how the all elements of the MET 101 course described above are covered in other required MET courses.

MET 101 elements

The required MET courses in which the corresponding elements are covered

Interrelation and application of knowledge and skills from previous courses to the solution of realistic problems.

MET 164 Product Design and Engineering Graphics

ENGR 6 Engineering Graphics and CADD

ENGR 7 3-D CAD Solid Modeling

Emphasis on problems involving machine elements and systems of machine elements.

MET 166 Machinery Design

Practice in the techniques of descriptive writing and the methods of preparing and presenting technical data; a variety of problems will be introduced to provide opportunities for the student to develop precision in statements and in graphic presentation.

ENGL 20 Expository Writing

MET 190 Senior Project I

MET 191 Senior Project II

ENGR 6 Engineering Graphics and CADD

ENGR 7 3-D CAD Solid Modeling

 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

Division of Criminal Justice

NON SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Criminal Justice Masters Program
Description: Add CrJ 240, 251, 266, 289 to list of electives listed in the Requirements for Masters Program. These are new offerings for graduate students.

Division of Nursing

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Entry Level Master's Program (ELM)
Description: An Entry Level Master's (ELM) is proposed for students who already possess a BA/BS in another field. Students will be enrolled in the identical coursework completed by students in the current generic baccalaureate program and the current generic master's program. The only changes will involve acceleration of the pre-licensure portion and overlap of coursework between the undergraduate and graduate programs. Students must meet the current pre-requisites for the BS in Nursing, take the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS), and complete a written essay on the expectations of the ELM and their desired career goals. Upon acceptance they will begin the existing pre-licensure courses in June 2006 and complete the 6 semesters of the current pre-licensure program August 2007 (14 months). They will be eligible to take the national licensure examination. The BS in Nursing is not required to take the licensing examination because these students already possess a BA or BS in another field. Students will then continue beginning Fall 2007 full time in the MS in Nursing. An 18 month sequence is proposed as required by the funding legislation, however, students may opt to complete the MS as a part-time student over a longer period of time.
Justification: In response to the ongoing critical nursing shortage, the California State Legislature has made available funding for initiation of entry-level master's (ELM) programs, to be offered by California State Universities (SB 73). CSUS has applied for and is awaiting notification of funding to begin such a program on this campus. If CSU funding is not received, the program will be offered through the College of Continuing Education as self-support; approximately $350 per unit for the 61 pre-licensure units. Graduate units are proposed to be at the general fund rate. ELM programs accept non-nurses with baccalaureate degrees in other fields. The undergraduate portion of such programs are accelerated, enabling students to become licensed nurses after only 14-18 months in the program and to complete their graduate coursework in an additional 18 months—a total of no more than 36 months. Currently nearly 20% of the undergraduate clinical nursing majors at Sac State already possess a degree in another field. An ELM offers these students licensure and a MS degree—opening up additional seats in the undergraduate program for individuals pursuing their first degree. ELM programs are also intended to address the shortfall of master's prepared nurses, which are needed to increase the pipeline to faculty positions. There is a profound nursing shortage, and it is most critical at the master's level. Facing a severe shortage in nursing faculty, nursing programs are unable to significantly increase enrollments, thereby limiting the ability of the educational systems to respond to the nursing shortage overall.
The Division of Nursing intends to offer NURS 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18 during summer of 2006; NURS 123, 129, and 150 in the Fall 2006 with students in both the current generic program and the ELM in the same lectures; NURS 136, 137, 138, 139 and 169 in Spring 2007, again combining the lecture classes; and NURS 143, 144, 155, 156, and 191 during the Summer 2007. The use of summers is particularly desirable as clinical placements are readily available since other area education programs are not in session during the summer. A minimum of 40 students will be admitted to the ELM every summer. Current nursing faculty may choose to teach during the summer for additional pay, and area hospitals have given support to this program to provide qualified clinical faculty also.

Current Program

Proposed Changes

Undergraduate

A. Required Pre-Clinical Courses (29 units)

(3) An oral communication course such as:
COMS 004

(3) An introductory college composition course such as:

ENGL 001A

(3) A critical thinking course such as:

COMS 002 or ENGL 001C

(3) A quantitative reasoning course such as:

STAT 001

(5) An organic chemistry course with a lab such as:

CHEM 006B

(4) An anatomy course with a lab such as:

BIO 022 or BIO 025

(4) A physiology course with a lab such as:

BIO 131 or BIO 026

(4) A microbiology course with a lab such as:

BIO 139

 

 

 











B. Required Clinical Nursing Courses (70 units)

1. First Semester Corequisites and Nursing Courses*
(13 units)

(3) An introductory psychology course such as:

PSYC 001 or PSYC 005

(3) A "life span" human development course such as:

CHDV 030

(3) NURS 011 : Intro to Prof Nursing

(2) NURS 014: Pharmacology

(2) NURS 017: Gerontology

2. Required Lower Division

Clinical Nursing Courses** (12 units)

(5) NURS 012: Nursing care of adults

(2) NURS 015: Into clinical Practice

(1) NURS 016: Physical Exam/ Adult

(1) NURS 18: Therapeutic Communication

(3) A nutrition course such as:

FACS 113 or FACS 010

3. Required Upper Division Courses for Generic

Students (45 units)

(6) NURS 123: Nursing Complex Illness

(5) NURS 129: Mental Health Nursing

(1) NURS 136: OB Skills

(5) NURS 137: OB

(5) NURS 138: Pediatrics

(1) NURS 139: Pediatric skills

(6) NURS 143: Leadership

(5) NURS 144: Community Health

(2) NURS 191: Service Learning

(2) NURS 150: Research in Nursing

(1) NURS 155: Senior Forum

(3) NURS 156: Senior Practicum

(3) NURS 169: Clinical Reasoning

Graduate Program

Units required for the MS: 39
The program is normally completed in six semesters of part-time study. Longer programs of study may be arranged but must follow an approved pattern.

A. Core Courses (15 units)

(2) NURS 120A

(2) NURS 210B

(3) NURS 211

(3) NURS 212

(2) NURS 215

(3) SWRK 268


B. Functional Role Preparation (students complete at least one area)

(9) Educational Program Development::

NURS 214B

NURS 214C

NURS 294 C

(9) School-Based Mental Health Services:

NURS 213E

NURS 292

(6) Individualized Functional Role

(15-18) Clinical Nurse Specialist:

NURS 230

NURS 231

NURS 232A

NURS 292

NURS 213E

NURS 213F

NURS 214B

C. Clinical Role Preparation

Students complete at least one area to meet program requirements.

(6) Family-Community-Mental Health

NURS 213A

NURS 293A

(6) Adult Nursing

NURS 213B

NURS 293B

D. Electives (6-9 units)

 

E. Culminating Requirement (3 units)

NURS 500

Entry Level Master's Program

BS or BA in major other than nursing to include courses in the following (41units)
(3) An oral communication course such as:
COMS 004

(3) An introductory college composition course such as:

ENGL 001A

(3) A critical thinking course such as:

COMS 002 or ENGL 001C

(3) A quantitative reasoning course such as:

STAT 001

(5) An organic chemistry course with a lab such as:

CHEM 006B

(4) An anatomy course with a lab such as:

BIO 022 or BIO 025

(4) A physiology course with a lab such as:

BIO 131 or BIO 026

(4) A microbiology course with a lab such as:

BIO 139

(3) An introductory psychology course such as:

PSYC 001 or PSYC 005

(3) A "life span" human development course such as:

CHDV 030

(3) A nutrition course such as:

FACS 113 or FACS 010

(3) A socio-cultural course such as SOC 1 or ANTH 2

B. Required Nursing Courses (61 units)

Semester 1 (16 units) Summer

(3) NURS 011 : Intro to Prof Nursing

(5) NURS 012: Nursing care of adults

(2) NURS 014: Pharmacology

(2) NURS 015: Into clinical Practice

(1) NURS 016: Physical Exam/ Adult

(2) NURS 017: Gerontology

(1) NURS 18: Therapeutic Communication

 

Semester 2 (14 Units) Fall

 (6) NURS 123: Nursing Complex Illness

(5) NURS 129: Mental Health Nursing

(2) NURS 150: Research in Nursing

Semester 3 (16 Units) Spring

(1) NURS 136: OB Skills

(5) NURS 137: OB

(5) NURS 138: Pediatrics

(1) NURS 139: Pediatric skills

(3) NURS 169: Clinical Reasoning

Semester 4 (17 Units) Summer

(6) NURS 143: Leadership

(5) NURS 144: Community Health

(2) NURS 191: Service Learning

(1) NURS 155: Senior Forum

(3) NURS 156: Senior Practicum

Graduate Program: ( 39 Units)

Semester 5 (9 units) Fall

 NURS 211

NURS 212

NURS 214B

Semester 6 (11 units) Spring

NURS 268

NURS 210A

NURS 230

NURS 213

Semester 7 (11 units) Summer

NURS 231

NURS 232 A or B

NURS 293 A or B

NURS 215

Semester 8 (8-11 units) Fall

NURS 210 B

NURS 500

 

 

 

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Master of Science in Nursing
Description: The Division of Nursing proposes to revise the MS in Nursing to add Education (NURS 214B) to the required graduate core totaling 18 units; redefine the tracks to include 1) Advanced Clinical Role (15 units); 2) Nursing Administration Role (Special Master’s Option); 3) School Nursing Role (19 units); and 4) Family Nurse Practitioner Option. Students then can continue on to take additional units for Clinical Nurse Specialist Titling (6 units); Faculty/Special Teaching Authorization for Health (STAH) Role Preparation (6 units); or School based Mental Health Services (9 units). Ending with the culminating requirement of 3 units. The total units for the MS range from a minimum of 36 units to 49 depending on the track and optional preparations the student takes. The changes do not involve additional cost or workload, as these courses are already offered in the MS program.

Old Program Sequence

REQUIREMENTS - MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE

Units required for the MS: 39
The program is normally completed in six semesters of part-time study. Longer programs of study may be arranged but must follow an approved pattern. Students pursuing the school nurse credential clinical role preparation will complete 43-57 units of study.
See nursing course descriptions for prerequisites.

A. Core Courses (15 units)

(2)

NURS 210A

Research Methods and Techniques in Nursing I

(2)

NURS 210B

Research Methods and Techniques in Nursing II

(3)

NURS 211

Ethics and Issues

(3)

NURS 212

Concepts and Theory Development in Nursing

(2)

NURS 215

Community and Health

(3)

SWRK 268

Health Policy and Services or a comparable transferable course


B. Functional Role Preparation (students complete at least one area)

(9) Educational Program Development:

 

NURS 214B

Educational Program Development in Nursing I

 

NURS 214C

Educational Program Development in Nursing II

 

NURS 294C

Practicum in Educational Program Development in Nursing

(9) School-Based Mental Health Services:

 

NURS 213E

Child-Adolescent Mental Health Nursing

 

A course in the area of counseling or mental health

 

NURS 292

Practicum in Specialized Nursing Process: Clinical Consultant

(6) Individualized Functional Role as approved (see Graduate Coordinator)

(15-18) Clinical Nurse Specialist:

(3)

NURS 230

Advanced Concepts in Pathophysiology

(3)

NURS 231

Pharmacology for Advanced Practice

(3)

NURS 232A

Advanced Physical Assessment: Infant, Child, Adolescent OR

 

NURS 232B

Advanced Physical Assessment: Adult

(3-6)

NURS 292

Practicum in Specialized Nursing Process: Clinical Consultant

(3)

NURS 213E *

Child-Adolescent Mental Health Nursing AND/OR

 

NURS 213F

Adult Mental Health Nursing

(3)

NURS 214B

Educational Program Development in Nursing I


Note: CNS students may also take NURS 214C and NURS 294C but not required for CNS


Family Nurse Practitioner
(Contact Graduate Coordinator for Program of Study)


C. Clinical Role Preparation

Students complete at least one area to meet program requirements.

(6) Family-Community-Mental Health Nursing

 

NURS 213A

Seminar in Specialized Nursing Processes:
Family-Community-Mental Health Nursing

 

NURS 293A

Practicum in Specialized Nursing Processes: Family-Community

-Mental Health Nursing

(6) Adult Nursing

 

NURS 213B

Seminar in Specialized Nursing Processes: Adult Nursing

 

NURS 293B

Practicum in Specialized Nursing Processes: Adult Nursing

(9) School Nursing

 

NURS 213C

Seminar in Specialized Nursing Processes: School Nursing I

 

NURS 213D

Seminar in Specialized Nursing Processes: School Nursing II

 

NURS 293D

Practicum in Specialized Nursing Processes:
School Nursing

D. Electives (6-9 units)* (Non-CNS MS students)

*15 total units required in functional areas


E. Culminating Requirement (3 units)

(3)

NURS 500

Culminating Experience

 

New Program Sequence

 
Units required for the MS: 36-49
The program is normally completed in six semesters of part-time study. Longer programs of study may be arranged but must follow an approved pattern. Variation in units are related to the role chosen by the student and optional preparations available in the MS program.
A. Core Courses (18 units)
(Same as Old Program with one addition):
(3) NURS 214B Educational Program Development (3 units)

 








B. Advanced Practice Role Preparations (student completes at least one area)

Advanced Clinical Role (15 units)
 NURS 231 Advanced Pharmacology (3 units)
NURS 230 Advanced Pathophysiology (3 units)
NURS 232 A or B Advanced Physical Assessment (3 units)
N213A or B Seminar in Specialized Nursing Processes (3)
N293A or B Practicum in Specialized Nursing Processes (3)

Nursing Administration Role
NURS 214A Leadership & Case Management (3 units)
NURS 294A Practicum in Leadership & Case Management (3 units)

Students may pursue a nursing administration or healthcare administration role through the Special Major degree option. See graduate degree requirements in the Catalog for Master of Science in Special Major.

School Nursing Role (19 units)
NURS 213C Seminar in Specialized Nursing Process: School Nursing I (3 units)
NURS 213D Seminar in Specialized Nursing Process: School Nursing II (3 units)
NURS 293D Practicum in Specialized Nursing Processes: School Nursing (3 units)
NURS 232A Advanced Physical Assessment: Infant, Child Adolescent (3 units)
NURS 216 Vision and Scoliosis (1 units)
A Special Education course (3 units)
An Audiology course (3 units)

 Family Nurse Practitioner
(See Requirements—Family Nurse Practitioner Option; Contact Graduate Coordinator for program of study)

 C. Optional Role Preparations (Not required for MS in Nursing)

 Clinical Nurse Specialist Titling (6 units)

 Additional courses required for CNS titling by the California Board of Registered Nursing:

 NURS 292 A Practicum in Specialized Nursing Process: Clinical Consultant in the Advanced Practice Role (3 units)
NURS 292B Practicum in Specialized Nursing Process: Clinical Leadership in the Advanced Practice Role (3 units)

 Faculty Preparation or Special Teaching Authorization for Health (STAH) (6 units)

 NURS 214C Educational Program Development II (3 Units)
NURS 294C Practicum in Educational Program Development (3 units)

 School Based Mental Health Services (9 units)

 NURS 213E Child-Adolescent Mental Health Nursing (3 units)
NURS 293E Practicum in Child-Adolescent Mental Health Nursing (3 units)
A counseling or mental health course (3 units)

 D. Culminating Requirement (3 units)

 

 

Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies

NON SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Master of Science: Recreation Administration
Description: When our graduate program was last revised, RLS 200 was required for those without an undergraduate degree in our field. Since then we have determined that this material is beneficial even for those with related degrees, especially given the variety of curricula and the time away from the classroom (for many of our students).
We are also trying to better sequence our program with a view towards efficiency and redundancy reduction and we are now requiring RLS 200 and RLS 202 as pre-requisites for RLS 204 (see Form A submitted also).
Please refer to side by side program listings

New Program

Old Program

Units required for the MS: 30

A. Required Courses (12 units)

(3)

RLS 200

Foundation of Leisure Concepts
and Application

(3)

RLS 202

Policies, Issues and Problems in
Leisure Services

(3)

RLS 203

Advanced Administration of
Leisure Services

(3)

RLS 204

Advanced Research Methods in
Recreation and Leisure Studies
(updated info/pre-requisites: Form A)

B. Electives (15 units)

Elective course work is selected with the prior consent of the
student's academic advisor to satisfy the following:

  • No more than 6 units of any combination of RLS 295 and
    RLS 299 may be counted towards the degree.
  • No more than 6 units of course work may be taken outside
    of RLS (students who have not previously completed an
    undergraduate major in Recreation and Leisure Studies
    must have the prior consent of the Graduate Coordinator
    before taking course work outside RLS).
  • At least 6 units of elective coursework must be at
    the 200 level (for a total of at least 18 units of 200 level
    coursework in the degree program).





C. Culminating Requirement (3 units)

(3) RLS 500 Culminating Experience

 

Units required for the MS: 30

A. Required Courses (9-12 units)*

(3)

RLS 200 **

Foundation of Leisure Concepts
and Application

(3)

RLS 202

Policies, Issues and Problems in
Leisure Services

(3)

RLS 203

Advanced Administration of
Leisure Services

(3)

RLS 204

Research and Evaluation in
Recreation and Leisure Studies


B. Electives (15-18 units)*

Elective course work is selected with the prior consent of the
student's academic advisor to satisfy the following:

  • No more than 6 units of any combination of RLS 295 and
    RLS 299 may be counted towards the degree.
  • No more than 6 units of course work may be taken outside
    of RLS (students who have not previously completed an
    undergraduate major in Recreation and Leisure Studies
    must have the prior consent of the Graduate Coordinator
    before taking course work outside RLS).




*Requirement A and B units must total 27, with at least 18 at the 200 level.
** RLS 200 is required of students who have not previously completed an undergraduate major in Recreation and Leisure Studies.

C. Culminating Requirement (3 units)

(3) RLS 500 Culminating Experience

 

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Minor
Description: When our minor was last updated, there was confusion across campus about the role of minors and their potential to overlap with general education coursework. In the current catalog description the number of units ordinarily required for the minor is 21, but students can seek an exemption from 3 units of work if they have completed either RLS 100 or RLS 122 prior to enrolling in the RLS minor. Since then, the Faculty Senate and President have approved a policy allowing for the overlapping of minor and general education coursework. We therefore need to clarify the language used to describe our minor program. We wish to make it clear that the minor requires 21 units and RLS 100 or RLS 122 may be counted in this total. We are not adding any extra unit requirements to the minor.
At the same time, we are trying to add greater definition to the program in terms of required and elective course work. Completing the combination of classes we have placed in the “required” section will allow students to graduate with a broad understanding of the field of recreation and leisure studies. In addition, we have given students some choice within this “required” block and retained 9 units of elective course work to give them a degree of flexibility in choosing classes that align with their particular interests in the field.

PROPOSED PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

CURRENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Units required for the Minor: 21, all of which must be taken in Recreation and Leisure Studies. At least 12 units must be upper division with at least 9 upper division units taken in residence. A grade of C- or better is required in all upper division courses applied to the minor.
A. Required Courses (12 units)

1. (3) RLS 030 Recreation and Leisure Studies in

Contemporary Society OR

RLS 100 Recreation and Leisure Lifestyle Development OR

RLS 122 Perspectives on Leisure

2. (9) Any three of the following:

RLS 032 Recreation Activity Leadership

RLS 042 Recreational Use of Natural Resources

RLS 105 Management in Leisure Services

RLS 106 Leisure Services and Persons with Disabilities

RLS 136 Leisure Program Planning

RLS 166 Workshop in Leisure Service Administration

 

B. Electives (9 units)

(9) Minor electives in Recreation and Leisure Studies chosen in

conjunction with a minor advisor. Minor electives may include

additional course work from classes listed in A.1 and A.2, but only

one of RLS 100 and RLS 122 (not both) may be counted toward the

minor. Minor electives may not include RLS 001, RLS 101, RLS 109 ,

RLS 110 , RLS 194 , RLS 195 ( B , C , D , or E ), RLS 198 . With minor

advisor approval, up to 3 units of RLS 199 may be applied to the

minor.

 

Units required for the Minor: 18-21, all of which must be taken in Recreation and Leisure Studies. At least 12 units must be upper division, with at least 9 upper division units taken in residence.



(3) RLS 030* Recreation and Leisure Studies in

Contemporary Society

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(18) Minor electives chosen in conjunction with a minor advisor in

one of the four areas associated with the Recreation and Park

Management Concentration: Commercial Recreation, Tourism

and Hospitality Management, Community Recreation

Management, Park and Recreation Resources Management, or

the Therapeutic Recreation Concentration (see notes).

*Notes:

  • The minor typically requires 21 units of course work. A minor may be completed with 18 units of course work, only if RLS 030 is waived under the specific conditions described below.
  • RLS 030 requirement: Upon petition to the minor advisor, this requirement may be waived if a student has previously completed RLS 100 or RLS 122 .
  • Minor electives may not include RLS 109 , RLS 110 , RLS 194 , RLS 195 ( B , C , D , or E ), RLS 198 . With minor advisor approval, up to 3 units of RLS 199 may be applied to the minor. All upper division classes require a "C-" or better grade to be applied to the minor.


SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Bachelor of Science: Recreation Administration, Concentration: Recreation and Park Management, Concentration: Therapeutic Recreation
Description: The RLS faculty has determined a need to revise our major orientation, portfolio advising, and internship procedures. This has resulted in the development of a new, expanded internship manual and the need to expand and restructure our RLS 001 and RLS 101 courses (as supported by Forms A submitted also). Both of these classes increase from 0.5 to 1 unit.
Several additional Forms A also revise the pre-requisites and course descriptions for our various internship courses.
Also, we are revising our undergraduate research course with an increase from 2 to 3 units (as supported by Form A submitted also).
There is actually a decrease in total units to graduate (by 1) accommodated by reducing to major elective coursework from 9 to 6 units in the Recreation and Park Management Concentration and by removing one previously required course in the Therapeutic Recreation concentration.

New Program

Old Program

Units required for Recreation and Park Management Concentration: 65-70
Units required for Therapeutic Recreation Concentration: 68-73
Minimum total units for the BS: 120
Grade of "C-" or better required in all upper division courses applied to the major. No more than 6 units of RLS 198 and RLS 199 in combination may be used to meet major requirements. No more than 3 units of RLS 198 may be used to meet major requirements.
Note: Additional units may be required to meet the CSUS foreign language requirement.
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.

A. Required Lower Division Courses (10 units)

(1)

RLS 001

Orientation to Recreation and
Leisure Studies

(3)

RLS 030

Recreation and Leisure Studies
in Contemporary Society

(3)

RLS 032

Recreation Activity Leadership

(3)

RLS 042

Recreational Use of Natural Resources



B. Required Upper Division Courses (15 units)

(1)

RLS 101

Senior Seminar

(3)

RLS 105

Management in Leisure Services

(3)

RLS 106

Leisure Services and Persons with
Disabilities

(2)

RLS 109

Computer Applications in Leisure
Services

(3)

RLS 110

Research & Evaluation in Recreation
and Leisure Studies

(3)

RLS 136

Leisure Program Planning ( RLS 032 )

C. Concentration Requirement

Select one of the following two concentrations:

Recreation and Park Management (40-45 units)


This option allows students flexibility in the selection of courses in the areas of:

  • Commercial Recreation, Tourism, and Hospitality Management. Students are prepared for positions in enterprises which offer leisure services and/or products for a profit. Examples include clubs and spas, resorts, ski areas, theme parks and the hospitality industry.
  • Community Recreation Management. Students are prepared for positions that involve planning, implementing, managing and evaluating comprehensive recreation programs in public, nonprofit, and private settings.
  • Park and Recreation Resources Management. Students are prepared for positions as park rangers and managers, interpreters of natural and cultural history, managers of visitors to parks, and outdoor recreation planners.




(3)

RLS 166

Workshop in Leisure Service
Administration ( RLS 105 )

(3)

RLS 183

Marketing Recreation Services ( MGMT 120 )

(10-15) Select one of the following:

 

RLS 195B *

Partial Internship: Recreation and Park Mgt.
(updated pre-requisites: see Form A) AND

 

RLS 195C *

Partial Internship: Recreation and Park Mgt.
(updated pre-requisites: Form A) OR

 

RLS 195E *

Internship: Recreation and Park
Management Internship
(updated pre-requisites: Form A)

(18)

Any upper division RLS courses approved by major advisor from one
of the three areas: commercial recreation, recreation program
management, or park and recreation resources management.

(6)

Electives, as approved in advance by major advisor, to reflect
student's area of concentration.

Therapeutic Recreation (43-48 units)

This concentration focuses on recreation services for individuals who are ill, disabled, elderly or incarcerated. It can be applied in clinical, transitional and community based settings. Emphasis is on therapeutic recreation as it applies to children and adults who are physically, mentally, socially and/or emotionally challenged.

(3)

RLS 116

Therapeutic Recreation Principles and
Practices ( RLS 106 or
instructor permission; RLS 106
may be taken concurrently )

(3)

RLS 117

Therapeutic Recreation Service
Systems ( RLS 106 or instructor
permission; RLS 106 may be taken
concurrently)

(3)

RLS 119

Introduction to Leisure Education

(3)

RLS 124

Therapeutic Recreation and Gerontology

(3)

RLS 125

Therapeutic Recreation and Persons
with Physical Disabilities ( RLS 106 or
instructor permission; RLS 106 may be
taken concurrently)

(3)

RLS 126

Therapeutic Recreation and Persons
with Emotional Cognitive Disabilities
( RLS 106 or instructor permission;
RLS 106 may be taken concurrently)

X

XXX

XXXXX

(10-15)

RLS 195D *

Internship: Therapeutic Recreation
(updated pre-requisites: Form A)



(15)

Elective units selected in consultation with a major advisor,
including at least 3 units each in 1) Abnormal Psychology,
2) Lifespan Human Development, and
3) Human Anatomy/Human Physiology.
Advisor approval required to assure compliance
with certification requirements.




* Prerequisites:
600 hours of approved field experience.

Note: Grade of "C-" or better required in all upper division courses applied to the major. No more than 6 units of RLS 197 , RLS 198 and RLS 199 in combination may be used to meet major requirements. No more than 3 units of RLS 197 may be used to meet major requirements. No more than 3 units of RLS 198 may be used to meet major requirements.

D. Additional Graduation Requirement

Majors are required to compile and consistently maintain an assessment portfolio. The portfolio is a cumulative collection of individual assignments designed to demonstrate competency in specific areas such as written communication, oral communication, group interaction, research and analysis, and computer literacy. Each competency may be assessed at more than one level (e.g., beginning, advanced) and adequate opportunities for completion of all required demonstrations of competency are available within the required major course work (as listed in requirements A, B and C above). Additionally, opportunities for specific competency level demonstrations may be made available in elective course work within the major (e.g., RLS 103 , RLS 153 , RLS 182 ). In individual course-based assignments, learning outcomes and competencies are assessed based upon specified criteria. Continuing instructor feedback and self-assessment exercises are intended to create a process that improves learning outcomes, as well as facilitating the student's ability to demonstrate those outcomes and competencies both before and after graduation.

It is the responsibility of the student, in consultation with their portfolio advisor, to maintain the portfolio and to insure that all requirements have been successfully completed prior to graduation. The completed portfolio is presented in RLS 101 .

(note: last sentence removed)

Units required for Recreation and Park Management Concentration: 66-71
Units required for Therapeutic Recreation Concentration: 69-74
Minimum total units for the BS: 120
Grade of "C-" or better required in all upper division courses applied to the major. No more than 6 units of RLS 198 and RLS 199 in combination may be used to meet major requirements. No more than 3 units of RLS 198 may be used to meet major requirements.
Note: Additional units may be required to meet the CSUS foreign language requirement.
Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.

A. Required Lower Division Courses (9.5 units)

(.5)

RLS 001

Orientation to Recreation and

Leisure Studies

(3)

RLS 030

Recreation and Leisure Studies
in Contemporary Society

(3)

RLS 032

Recreation Activity Leadership

(3)

RLS 042

Recreational Use of Natural Resources


B. Required Upper Division Courses (13.5 units)

(.5)

RLS 101

Senior Portfolio Seminar

(3)

RLS 105

Management in Leisure Services

(3)

RLS 106

Leisure Services and Persons with
Disabilities

(2)

RLS 109

Computer Applications in Leisure
Services

(2)

RLS 110

Research Applications to Leisure
Behaviors

(3)

RLS 136

Leisure Program Planning ( RLS 032 )

C. Concentration Requirement

Select one of the following two concentrations:

Recreation and Park Management (43-48 units)


This option allows students flexibility in the selection of courses in the areas of:

  • Commercial Recreation, Tourism, and Hospitality Management. Students are prepared for positions in enterprises which offer leisure services and/or products for a profit. Examples include clubs and spas, resorts, ski areas, theme parks and the hospitality industry.
  • Community Recreation Management. Students are prepared for positions that involve planning, implementing, managing and evaluating comprehensive recreation programs in public, nonprofit, and private settings.
  • Park and Recreation Resources Management. Students are prepared for positions as park rangers and managers, interpreters of natural and cultural history, managers of visitors to parks, and outdoor recreation planners.




(3)

RLS 166

Workshop in Leisure Service
Administration ( RLS 105 )

(3)

RLS 183

Marketing Recreation Services ( MGMT 120 )

(10-15) Select one of the following:

 

RLS 195B *

Directed Field Experience
( RLS 030 , approval of major advisor) AND

 

RLS 195C *

Directed Field Experience
( RLS 030 , RLS 105 ,
approval of major advisor) OR

 

RLS 195E *

Recreation and Park Management
Internship (approval of major advisor)

(18)

Any upper division RLS courses approved by major advisor from one
of the three areas: commercial recreation, recreation program
management, or park and recreation resources management.

(9)

Electives, as approved in advance by major advisor, to reflect
student's area of concentration.

Therapeutic Recreation (46-51 units)

This concentration focuses on recreation services for individuals who are ill, disabled, elderly or incarcerated. It can be applied in clinical, transitional and community based settings. Emphasis is on therapeutic recreation as it applies to children and adults who are physically, mentally, socially and/or emotionally challenged.

(3)

RLS 116

Therapeutic Recreation Principles and
Practices ( RLS 106 or
instructor permission; RLS 106
may be taken concurrently )

(3)

RLS 117

Therapeutic Recreation Service
Systems ( RLS 106 or instructor
permission; RLS 106 may be taken
concurrently)

(3)

RLS 119

Introduction to Leisure Education

(3)

RLS 124

Therapeutic Recreation and Gerontology

(3)

RLS 125

Therapeutic Recreation and Persons
with Physical Disabilities ( RLS 106 or
instructor permission; RLS 106 may be
taken concurrently)

(3)

RLS 126

Therapeutic Recreation and Persons
with Emotional Cognitive Disabilities
( RLS 106 or instructor permission;
RLS 106 may be taken concurrently)

(3)

RLS 128

Leisure Services for At-Risk Populations

(10-15)

RLS 195D *

Therapeutic Recreation Internship
(The completion of all required classes
for the TR option. Completion of
required administrative paperwork in the
semester prior to internship, approval of
major advisor)

(15)

Elective units selected in consultation with a major advisor,
including at least 3 units each in 1) Abnormal Psychology,
2) Lifespan Human Development, and
3) Human Anatomy/Human Physiology.
Advisor approval required to assure compliance
with certification requirements.

* Prerequisites: 600 hours of approved field experience.

Note: Grade of "C-" or better required in all upper division courses applied to the major. No more than 6 units of RLS 197 , RLS 198 and RLS 199 in combination may be used to meet major requirements. No more than 3 units of RLS 197 may be used to meet major requirements. No more than 3 units of RLS 198 may be used to meet major requirements.

D. Additional Graduation Requirement

Majors are required to compile and consistently maintain an assessment portfolio. The portfolio is a cumulative collection of individual assignments designed to demonstrate competency in specific areas such as written communication, oral communication, group interaction, research and analysis, and computer literacy. Each competency may be assessed at more than one level (e.g., beginning, advanced) and adequate opportunities for completion of all required demonstrations of competency are available within the required major course work (as listed in requirements A, B and C above). Additionally, opportunities for specific competency level demonstrations may be made available in elective course work within the major (e.g., RLS 103 , RLS 153 , RLS 182 ). In individual course-based assignments, learning outcomes and competencies are assessed based upon specified criteria. Continuing instructor feedback and self-assessment exercises are intended to create a process that improves learning outcomes, as well as facilitating the student's ability to demonstrate those outcomes and competencies both before and after graduation.

It is the responsibility of the student, in consultation with their portfolio advisor, to maintain the portfolio and to insure that all requirements have been successfully completed prior to graduation. The completed portfolio is presented in RLS 101 . Full explanations and descriptions of these requirements appear in the Portfolio Manual for Recreation and Leisure Studies Students and Faculty .

 

Department of Speech Pathology & Audiology

DELETION OF PROGRAM

M S Program Audiology
Description: We have closed the audiology master’s program because the entry level degree for audiology will change to a clinical doctorate (AuD) beginning January 1, 2007. At the present time the California State University System cannot offer a stand alone clinical doctorate. A partner has not been found with whom CSUS can offer a joint degree at the present time.


COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES & MATH

Department of Geography

NON SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Geography Major (B.A. degree)
Description: The proposed changes are non-substantial. They consist of adding additional courses to the options in the various breadth requirement and concentration categories in the major. A total of five courses are involved, all of which are currently in the catalog. In one case, this has occurred as the result of restructuring and renaming of an existing course (GEOG 163), an event that took place a couple years back. In the case of the other four (GEOG 116,148,149,182), all are recently-approved new courses developed within the past year by junior faculty. The specific changes are as follows:
GEOG 116 – to be added to the list of courses meeting the Physical Geography requirement.
GEOG 148 – to be added to the list of courses satisfying the Human Geography requirement.
GEOG 149 – to be added to the list of courses satisfying the Human Geography requirement.
GEOG 163 – to be added to the list of courses satisfying the Geographic Techniques requirement.
GEOG 182 – to be added to the list of courses satisfying the Geographic Techniques requirement.
As an extension of the above, GEOG 116, 163, and 182 will be added to the list of courses satisfying requirements in the subject-matter concentration required of all majors. GEOG 148 and 149 will be added to list of courses fulfilling the Human Geography requirement in the General Geography concentration.
The change would require no additional resources, since all five courses are at present in the schedule. Currently, majors are regularly given permission to count these courses toward their major requirements. The proposed change will simply formalize for catalog purposes what is currently done on a case-by-case basis.

Current Pattern (45-unit requirement)
2004-2006 Catalog

A. Lower Division Core (all required)

GEOG 001 Physical Geography

GEOG 002 Cultural Geography

GEOG 011 Physical Geog. Lab

B. Upper Division Core (all required)

GEOG 102 Ideas & Skills Geography

GEOG 103 Map/Air Photo Interpretation

GEOG 118 Changing Earth Ecosystems

GEOG 190 Seminar in Geographic Thought

C. Geographic Techniques (select one)

GEOG 105 Computer Cartography

GEOG 107 Remote Sensing

GEOG 109 GIS (Intro.)

GEOG 110 Advanced GIS

GEOG 181 Spatial Analysis

GEOG 193A Field: Urban-Metropolitan

GEOG 193B Field: Suburban-Rural

GEOG 193C Field: Physical

 




D. Physical Geography (select one)

GEOG 111 Meteorology

GEOG 113 Climate

GEOG 115 Plants & Animals

GEOG 117 Land Forms

GEOG 161 Calif. Water Resources

 


E. Human Geography (select one)

GEOG 141 Economic Activity

GEOG 145 Population Geography

GEOG 147 Urban Geography

GEOG 163 Applied GIS

 




F. Regional Geography (select one)

GEOG 121 U. S. and Canada

GEOG 122A Middle America

GEOG 122B South America

GEOG 125 East Asia

GEOG 127 Africa

GEOG 128 Europe

GEOG 131 California

Current Concentration Requirements
(15 units)
2004-2006 Catalog
Students must complete one of the following 15-unit concentrations to complete the 45-unit major.

General Geography Concentration

Students must take two of the following—GEOG 105, 107, 109, 110, 181—plus one additional course from each of the Physical, Human, and Regional course listings.

 Cartography, GIS, & Planning Concentration

Students must take five of the following—GEOG 105, 107, 109, 110, 181 and the 193 series. Only one of these may be a field course (GEOG 193 series).

Physical Geography Concentration

Students must take four of the following—GEOG 111, 113, 115, 117, 161—plus one additional technique course chosen from the following: GEOG 105, 107, 109, 110, 181, and the 193 series. The technique cannot be a field course (193A, B, C) if a field course was taken for the core.

Proposed Pattern (45-unit requirement)
2006-2008 Catalog
(Changes italicized in boldface type)

A. Lower Division Core (all required)

-- Unchanged --

 



B. Upper Division Core (all required)

-- Unchanged --

 





C. Geographic Techniques (select one)

GEOG 105 Computer Cartography

GEOG 107 Remote Sensing

GEOG 109 GIS (Intro.)

GEOG 110 Advanced GIS

GEOG 163 Applied GIS

GEOG 181 Spatial Analysis

GEOG 182 Internet GIS

GEOG 193A Field: Urban-Metropolitan

GEOG 193B Field: Suburban-Rural

GEOG 193C Field: Physical

 D. Physical Geography (select one)

GEOG 111 Meteorology

GEOG 113 Climate

GEOG 116 Global Climate Change

GEOG 115 Plants & Animals

GEOG 117 Land Forms

GEOG 161 Calif. Water Resources

 
E. Human Geography (select one)

GEOG 141 Economic Activity

GEOG 145 Population Geography

GEOG 147 Urban Geography

GEOG 148 Urban & Regional Planning

GEOG 149 Transportation Geography

GEOG 163 Applied GIS


F. Regional Geography (select one)

-- Unchanged --

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed ConcentrationRequirements
(15 units)
2006-2008 Catalog
Students must complete one of the following 15-unit concentrations to complete the 45-unit major.

General Geography Concentration

Students must take two of the following—GEOG 105, 107, 109, 110, 163 , 181, 182 —plus one additional course from each of the Physical, Human, and Regional course listings.

 Cartography, GIS, & Planning Concentration

Students must take five of the following—GEOG 105, 107, 109, 110, 163 , 181, 182 and the 193 series. Only one of these may be a field course (GEOG 193 series).

Physical Geography Concentration

Students must take four of the following—GEOG 111, 113, 115, 116 , 117, 161—plus one additional technique course chosen from the following: GEOG 105, 107, 109, 110, 163 , 181, 182 , and the 193 series. The technique cannot be a field course (193A, B, C) if a field course was taken for the core.

 

NON SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Pre-Planning Certificate: Metropolitan Planning Concentration
Description:
The Metropolitan Planning Concentration in the Geography Department's Pre-Planning Certificate requires the student to complete five courses (15 units total) selected from a list of course options provided by the department. The only restriction on choice is that no more than two courses may be taken in any one department.
The Geography Department proposes two changes to Metropolitan Planning Concentration requirements:
1. Add two additional courses – GEOG 148 (Urban and Regional Planning) and GEOG 149 (Transportation Geography) – to the list of options.
2. Eliminate OBE 150 from the list of options.
Both changes are non-substantial.
1)Regarding the addition of GEOG 148 and 149: The courses were developed and approved during the past year as part of the department's goal of expanding its repertoire of courses in the areas of applied geography and planning and they are now in the schedule of class offerings. As such, no additional costs are incurred by including them in the list of course options.
2) Regarding the elimination of OBE 150 from the list of options: Repeated student feedback has indicated that the course is not particularly relevant to the purpose of the concentration. Relatively few students take the course as a concentration option (est. only 2-3 a year), so impact on OBE enrollments will be minimal.

Current Pattern (15-unit requirement)
2004-2006 Catalog


Metropolitan Planning Concentration

 (15 unts) Select five of the following:

HIST 163 The City in U.S. History

ECON 104 Introduction to the U.S. Economy

ECON 120 Economics and Environmental Degradation

GEOG 109 Geographic Information Systems

GEOG 145 Urban Geography

GEOG 161 California 's Water Resources

GOVT 170 Public Policy Development (requires GOVT 1 or equivalent and passing score on WPE)

GOVT 180 California State and Local Government

GOVT 185 Problems of Urbanization (requires GOVT 1 or equivalent)

OBE 150 Management of Contemporary Organizations

Proposed Pattern (15-unit requirement)
2006-2008 Catalog
(Additions underlined, deletions with strikethrough)

 Metropolitan Planning Concentration

 (15 unts) Select five of the following:

HIST 163 The City in U.S. History

ECON 104 Introduction to the U.S. Economy

ECON 120 Economics and Environmental Degradation

GEOG 109 Geographic Information Systems

GEOG 145 Urban Geography

GEOG 148 Urban & Regional Planning

GEOG 149 Transportation Geography

GEOG 161 California 's Water Resources

GOVT 170 Public Policy Development (requires GOVT 1 or equivalent and passing score on WPE)

GOVT 180 California State and Local Government

GOVT 185 Problems of Urbanization (requires GOVT 1 or equivalent)

OBE 150 Management of Contemporary Organizations


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