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LIST #1 - 2007/2008

PROGRAM CHANGE PROPOSALS

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE
PROGRAM CHANGE PROPOSALS
(for CPSP Review only)

The Council on the Preparation of School Personnel will meet on Wednesday, October 10, 2007, at 1:00 p.m. in the SAC 275 to review the Program Proposals contained in this list. Response due to Academic Affairs by Wednesday, October 10, 2007, 12 noon

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Bilingual/Multicultural Education

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGES

Single Subject Teacher Preparation Program and Single Subject BCLAD Emphasis Teacher Preparation Program

Justification:

In Fall 2004, our department implemented a new program designed in response to SB2042. After three years of implementation, we have identified areas where the program could be improved. One significant area is the unit load for the second semester course that addresses educational equity, multicultural education and working with English Learners. The proposed increase in unit load for this course will allow instructors to better meet the SB2042 standards and departmental program objectives. The increase in units for this course will not result in excess units for the program.

Multiple Subject Teacher Preparation Program and Multiple Subject BCLAD Emphasis Teacher Preparation Program

Justification:

In Fall 2004, our department implemented a new program designed in response to SB2042. After three years of implementation, we have found several shortcomings in the program as designed. Most of the shortcomings relate to inadequate unit loads for courses thus limiting instructors’ ability to fully cover content specified by the standards in SB2042 and related to other Departmental program objectives. In addition, a new assessment of pre-service teachers (a component of SB2042 which had been suspended until recently) will be implemented in July 2008. Without increases to unit loads for specific courses, instructors will not have adequate opportunity to fully support candidates as they prepare for this assessment. These factors have resulted in the proposed modifications to our program which will provide for more contact hours for specific courses in order to fully meet the SB2042 standards, departmental program objectives, and the imminent implementation of the candidate assessment system. In addition, unit loads for student teaching have been adjusted to better align with actual field work activities.

Cross-Cultural Academic Development (CLAD) Certificate Program

Justification:

The Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) has asked that universities stop offering the “Cross-Cultural Academic Development (CLAD) Certificate Program” by the end of fall 2007, and instead offer the “California Teachers of English Learners (CTEL) Certificate Program.” BMED’s proposal is to change the name of its certificate program for K-12 teachers working with English Learners, formerly called the “CLAD Certificate Program,” to its new title, the “CTEL Certificate Program.” The change in program title will align BMED’s certificate program with CCTC requirements regarding authorization for teachers to serve English Learners. There are no changes to the list of courses that comprise the certificate program.

 


Child Development

NEW PROGRAMS

Child Development - Concentration in Elementary Pre-credential

Justification:

The proposed program modification is within the context of a major overall program revision in which we propose a move from a broad and unbounded choice of electives to a more formal set of concentrations within the major. First, we propose the addition of a new research-based course in observation and assessment to be included in the program requirements (new course is proposed and in the process of approval). This new course fulfills a programmatic need for many students going into child-related work settings. Second, we propose modifying the current biology foundation requirement from a program requirement to program prerequisite. While we feel strongly that Child Development majors must have a course in biology, most students already fulfill the Biology requirement as part of General Education. Third, we propose to change our fieldwork course (CHDV 132) from 2 units to 3 units. Fourth, we propose the creation of a new concentration – “Child Development – Concentration in Elementary Pre-credential.” Currently, Child Development offers two majors: Major B, which is a subject matter “pre-credential” major, and Major A, which is the general Child Development major. Major B has been considered to be the major for students who intend to pursue a multiple subjects teaching credential, as it provides opportunity for mastery of subject matter areas in education, as well as for preparation for the CSET. Major A has been a more general major from which students go into a number of fields, including education, either K- 12 or Pre-school, graduate school in counseling and education, or into areas of public policy, law and medicine, just to name a few. There is a common misconception that to be a teacher, the student must major in “Major B” or in Liberal Studies. However, for students not following the course pattern from the beginning of their academic career, this often requires the student to take far more course units than is necessary to graduate. However, because the major is so proscriptive with few opportunities for course substitutions, a large proportion of major transfers from community colleges are required to exceed the 120 units to graduation, sometimes by as much as 15 to 20 units. In this case, they sometimes either a) switch to Major A without formalized guidelines for preparation for entry to a credential program, or b) they enter Major B or Liberal studies, and take far more units than needed for graduation. The proposed Concentration in Elementary Pre-credential combines some of the pre-credential coursework of the subject matter program with the flexibility of Major A. It will further help to dispel the common misconception that to be a teacher, one must declare Major B.

The creation of concentrations is needed because CHDV currently has a very long list (~ 70 classes) of electives. While they are organized in “emphases,” students still report being confused by the many options.

Creation of formal concentrations would:

  1. Reduce the confusion for students as to the purposes of our programs, and
  2. Decrease the advising burden on faculty advisors, as the programs would be much more clearly delineated for students and faculty.
  3. Make a better program of study, more effectively guiding students to career or further educational goals, rather than just choosing an assortment of classes that will count whether or not it has anything to do with these goals.

Child Development - Concentration in Social and Community Settings

Justification:

This proposal is made within the context of a major overall program revision in which we propose a move from a broad and unbounded choice of electives to a more formal set of concentrations within the major. First, we propose the addition of a new research-based course in observation and assessment to be included in the program requirements (new course is proposed and in the process of approval). This new course fulfills a programmatic need for many students going into child-related work settings. Second, we propose modifying the current biology foundation requirement from a program requirement to program prerequisite. While we feel strongly that Child Development majors must have a course in biology, most students already fulfill the Biology requirement as part of General Education. Third, we propose to change our fieldwork course (CHDV 132) from 2 units to 3 units. Fourth, we propose the creation of a new concentration – “Child Development – Concentration in Social and Community Settings.” As indicated in a recent CHDV student survey, and as is evident to many faculty in our program, a large portion of CHDV students are interested in careers in applied settings (e.g. counseling, public policy, etc.) This option would focus students’ courses into one of these areas, and provide a list of electives to allow for the selection of prerequisites for graduate study (e.g. PSYC 168, EDC 170, etc.) Furthermore, with a formal child development option in this area, we may increase our visibility to students thinking of future careers in counseling, public policy, or child welfare.

The creation of concentrations is needed because CHDV currently has a very long list (~ 70 classes) of electives. While they are organized in “emphases,” students still report being confused by the many options.

Creation of formal concentrations would:

  1. Reduce the confusion for students as to the purposes of our programs, and
  2. Decrease the advising burden on faculty advisors, as the programs would be much more clearly delineated for students and faculty.
  3. Make a better program of study, more effectively guiding students to career or further educational goals, rather than just choosing an assortment of classes that will count whether or not it has anything to do with these goals.

Child Development - Concentration in Early Development, Care, and Education (EDCE)

Justification:

The proposed program modification makes a significant change to the existing Child Development Major A. This proposal is within the context of a major overall program revision in which we propose a move from a broad and unbounded choice of electives to a more formal set of concentrations within the major. First, we propose the addition of a new research-based course in observation and assessment to be included in the program requirements (new course is proposed and in the process of approval). This new course fulfills a programmatic need for many students going into child-related work settings. Second, we propose modifying the current biology foundation requirement from a program requirement to program prerequisite. While we feel strongly that Child Development majors must have a course in biology, most students already fulfill the Biology requirement as part of General Education. Third, we propose to change our fieldwork course (CHDV 132) from 2 units to 3 units. Fourth, we propose the creation of a new concentration – “Child Development – Concentration in Early Development, Care and Education (EDCE).” We have recently developed the CCE -based EDCE (Early Development Care and Education) program for working professionals. One of the new options within the major would replicate this option for our campus CSUS students. Community and campus sources have indicated a need for a structured program such as this, and providing it as a formal option will give our program greater visibility to those seeking this program, and better guidance to those who might seek the new “early learning credential” that is currently under development in California. The creation of such concentrations is needed because CHDV currently has a very long list (~ 70 classes) of electives. While they are organized in “emphases,” students still report being confused by the many options.

Creation of formal concentrations would:

  1. Reduce the confusion for students as to the purposes of our programs, and
  2. Decrease the advising burden on faculty advisors, as the programs would be much more clearly delineated for students and faculty.
  3. Make a better program of study, more effectively guiding students to career or further educational goals, rather than just choosing an assortment of classes that will count whether or not it has anything to do with these goals.

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGES

Child Development - Integrated Pre-credential Subject Matter Program

Justification:

The proposed program modification makes a significant change to the existing Child Development Major B. This proposal is within the context of a major overall program revision in which we propose a move from two different majors (Major A and Major B), to one major with numerous concentrations. The purpose of this specific proposal is to modify the current “Major B” to become one of the five concentrations in the Child Development program. Furthermore, other program changes are being proposed to make the program as effective as possible. First, we propose the addition of a new research-based course in observation and assessment to be included in the program requirements (new course is proposed and in the process of approval). This new course fulfills a programmatic need for many students going into educational and child-related work settings. Second, we propose changing our fieldwork course (CHDV 132) from 2 units to 3 units. Third, we propose changing the name of our major “Child Development Major B” to “Child Development – Integrated Pre-credential Subject Matter Program.” This changes the current CHSM (Major B) major to a concentration within the overall Child Development major, and will help to reduce confusion for students in the major. “Integrated” refers to the notion that the students will be working on pre-credential courses, and preparing for application and admission (possibly early) to credential programs, in coordination with their academic advisor.

Child Development – Individualized Concentration

Justification:

The proposed program modification makes a significant change to the existing Child Development Major A. This proposal is within the context of a major overall program revision in which we propose a move from a broad and unbounded choice of electives to a more formal set of concentrations within the major. First, we propose the addition of a new research-based course in observation and assessment to be included in the program requirements (new course is proposed and in the process of approval). This new course fulfills a programmatic need for many students going into child-related work settings. Second, we propose modifying the current biology foundation requirement from a program requirement to program prerequisite. While we feel strongly that Child Development majors must have a course in biology, most students already fulfill the Biology requirement as part of General Education. Third, we propose to change our fieldwork course (CHDV 132) from 2 units to 3 units. Fourth, we propose changing the name of the current “Child Development—Major A” to be one concentration – “Child Development – Individualized Concentration” as one of the five concentrations within the major.

The creation of such concentrations is needed because some current and future CHDV students are not clear on which concentration they should choose and wish to explore many areas of the field of study. Furthermore, many students who have transferred to CSUS bring with them many units of electives that would be counted toward the major in this “individualized” concentration.