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LIST #2 - 2007/2008

PROGRAM CHANGE PROPOSALS
UNDERGRADUATE & GRADUATE


The Curriculum Subcommittee will meet on
Tuesday, November 13, 2007, at 1:30 in SAC 275
to review the Program Change Proposals contained in this list.
(Response due to Academic Affairs by noon on November 13, 2007)


 

Program Proposals

Past Program Proposal Lists:

 






 





 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Accountancy

NEW PROGRAM

International Accounting Information Analyst (IAIA) Certificate Program

Justification:

Please see the attached document.


SUBSTANTIVE CHANGES

Master of Science in Business Administration, Taxation (MSBA/Taxation)

Justification:

With globalization of business organizations around the world, there is a significant increase in demand for accounting and taxation professionals to possess knowledge and skills in International Accounting to fulfill the needs of their clients. In response to this new development, the College of Business Administration wishes to incorporate the most important body of knowledge in International Accounting into the MSBA/Taxation curriculum. The curriculum will include three new elective courses (ACCY 251, ACCY 277, and ACCY 281) and one revised elective course (ACCY 275) in the MSBA/Taxation curriculum. Students who successfully complete these four courses will also receive a Certificate of Academic Achievement in International Accounting Information Analyst (IAIA).

Additionally, we propose to revise ACCY 276 to accurately reflect the course content. We also propose that students can take either ACCY 276 or ACCY 500B to fulfill the Culminating Experience requirement for this program. Comprehensive Exam (ACCY 500C) will not be an option to fulfill the Culminating Experience requirement.

Master of Science in Accountancy (MS/Accountancy)

Justification:

With globalization of business organizations around the world, there is a significant increase in demand for accounting and taxation professionals to possess knowledge and skills in International Accounting to fulfill the needs of their clients. In response to this new development, the College of Business Administration wishes to incorporate the most important body of knowledge in International Accounting into the MS/Accountancy curriculum. The curriculum will include three new elective courses (ACCY 251, ACCY 277, and ACCY 281) and one revised elective course (ACCY 275) in the MS/Accountancy curriculum. Students who successfully complete these four courses will also receive a Certificate of Academic Achievement in International Accounting Information Analyst (IAIA).

A new course, ACCY 240, is proposed as a new elective course for the program. The primary purpose of this course is to help students prepare for the course work in the program, especially for students who do not have an undergraduate degree in Accountancy.

We also propose that students can take either ACCY 281 or ACCY 500B to fulfill the Culminating Experience requirement for this program. Thesis (ACCY 500A) and Comprehensive Exam (ACCY 500C) will not be options to fulfill the Culminating Experience requirement.

 

 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Counselor Education

NON-SUBSTANTIVE CHANGES

Master of Science in Counseling Program (All Specializations)

Justification:

M.S. in Counseling Program (Core Changes)

The Department seeks to make several changes to the M.S. in Counseling program based on a comprehensive curriculum review and feedback from students, faculty, community partners and especially, the following National and State accrediting/governing/credentialing bodies: the American Counseling Association (ACA), the Counsel for the Accreditation for Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), the American School Counseling Association (ASCA), the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) and the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS). Items 1 – 5 reflect changes that apply to all specializations in the program. Comparisons of the “old and new” Admissions Process and the “old and new” M.S. in Counseling program are attached to this Form B. All relevant forms (Forms A) for changes to Core courses (items 2 – 5), MFCC Specialization course (item 6), and School specialization courses (7-11) are also attached to this Form B.

1. Admissions Process (change): The Admissions process has been changed to reflect an interview phase that will be held prior to admission and that will take place before enrolling in what was known as “pre-requisite courses”: PSYC 168, EDC 170 & EDC 171. (Previously, students were interviewed while they were in the pre-requisites.) In the revised Admission’s process, students will be admitted to the Counselor Education program after passing a paper screen and an In-person Admission Evaluation. Then, they will take the previously mentioned courses as “co-requisites” with the following stipulations:

Upon admission as a Conditionally Classified student in the program, students will be required to take the following co-requisite courses under probationary status during their first semester in the program:
•  PSYC 168: Abnormal Psychology (minimum grade of C is required).
•  EDC 170: Introduction to Counseling and EDC 171 Power, Privilege and Self Identity
    in Counseling (a minimum 3.4 overall average in these two EDC courses)
Failure to meet the above-stated grade requirements during the probationary period is grounds for automatic dismissal from the Master of Science in Counseling program.

2. Form A - EDC 212: Gender Roles in Counseling (change): Change course title from “Gender Roles and Sexuality” and change course description to be in line with California Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) requirements.

3. Form A - EDC 296X: Law & Ethics in Counseling (change): Change from “experimental” to “permanent” course, EDC 252.

4. Form A - EDC 475: Practicum in Counseling (change): Change course description and prerequisite requirements.

5. Form A - EDC 480: Field Study in Counseling (change): Change course description and prerequisite requirements.

Changes Specific to only MFCC Specialization

6. Form A – EDC 296E: A Systems Approach to Psychotropic Medicine (change): Change from “experimental” to “permanent” status. Name it EDC 254: Counseling and Psychotropic Medicine. (Note: Previous proposal to create the experimental course is attached.)

Changes Specific to only School Specialization

7. Form A - EDC 276: Consultation and Supervision (delete): Delete course and transfer pertinent competencies to existing EDC 274. Some of the objectives of EDC 276 are irrelevant to school counseling and several objectives overlap with EDC 274. Any pertinent objectives from EDC 276 will continue to be included in EDC 274.

8. Form A - EDC 274: Seminar: Implementation of Guidance Curricula in School Counseling (change): Revise catalog description and change title to reflect what is actually being covered in the course.

9. Form A - EDC 242: Play and Art Therapy with Children (change): Make this existing course a required course for the School Counseling Specialization. Update catalog description and add prerequisite requirements. The clinical skills developed in EDC 242 are essential for students to master before they start their clinical practicum in elementary schools where they will be counseling young children.

10. Form A - EDC 272: Seminar: Counseling Children and Youth (change): Update title, catalog description, and prerequisites to accurately reflect course content and program changes.

11. Form A - EDC 481: Pupil Personnel Services Internship Seminar (delete): Delete course from program requirements and from catalog. Require all Pupil Personnel Services Internship Credential program students to take EDC 480: Field Study in Counseling Seminar along with regular Pupil Personnel Services students.

 

 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

Civil Engineering

NEW PROGRAM

Wastewater Treatment Plant Operation Specialist Certificate Program - Certificate of Academic Achievement

Justification:

U.S. society has made significant investments in wastewater infrastructure with the objectives of protecting public health and protecting aquatic environments. The people responsible for operating and maintaining that infrastructure system and consistently meeting those public health and environmental objectives are the operators of wastewater treatment plants and wastewater collection systems. Wastewater treatment plant operators must be licensed by their state, which tests operators for competence and verifies their work experience prior to licensing them to treat wastewater for reuse and for discharge to the environment. Educating prospective wastewater treatment plant operators and providing continuing education for experienced operators is a critically important responsibility to help assure public health and protection of the environment. The proposed Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator Certificate program is designed to provide students with the technical, scientific, and application background to obtain licensure and the knowledge, skills, and abilities to competently work in the wastewater treatment industry. Specific objectives of the proposed certificate program are to provide students with the skills and knowledge to:

  • effectively and safely operate and maintain wastewater treatment plants
  • provide the public with consistently safe recycled water
  • protect aquatic environments by producing clean, safe treated wastewater
  • prevent public health hazards from water-borne pathogens
  • consistently provide needed recycled water volumes for water conservation purposes.

The College of Continuing Education currently offers Certificate Programs in a variety of subject areas. As the need to increase the competency and number of qualified wastewater treatment operators increases with increasing population and increasing sophistication of wastewater treatment technology, there is an urgent demand to develop this certificate program to serve those who work to provide the public and the environment with safe water.

 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Criminal Justice

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGES

BS, Criminal Justice

Justification

Currently pre-majors must complete CrJ 1, CrJ 2 and CrJ 4 with a grade of C or better to be reclassified as CrJ majors. We propose adding CrJ 5, the only other lower division required course, to the courses that must be completed with a grade of C or better to advance from pre-major to major status.

In addition we propose that a minimum grade of C or better in all four courses be specified as a graduation requirement. This will reduce confusion, as them current requirement applies only for admission to the major. Although this creates a graduation requirement in effect, it is not so specified in the catalog. The only practical effect this proposal will generate is the requirement to obtain a grade of C or better in CrJ 5, Community and the Justice System.

Remove CrJ 163, Leadership, from the core, place it on the elective list and require 24 units of upper division elective for degree completion.

Past reviews have recommended incorporating leadership in CrJ 164, Managing CJ Organizations, and removing CrJ 163 from the required core. The faculty have reviewed this suggestion and concur that it should be implemented.

NON-SUBSTANTIVE CHANGES

BS, Criminal Justice

Justification

This is an update of approved electives reflecting new available courses and deleting one course at request of the department offering that course.

 

 

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES & INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Gerontology

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGES

Gerontology

Justification:

This modification to the existing Gerontology major/minor programs is threefold.
1.) it proposes to add two additional elective courses offerings. These two courses are to be paired with two graduate courses and offered once/year. This change positively impacts students, Programs, and Departments at Sacramento State. For Gerontology Majors and Minors, it allows for two (2) additional elective choices in areas in which there are no similar courses currently offered at Sacramento State. For students in other Programs and Departments across campus, adding these two courses creates access to two (2) content areas that will positively enhance their primary majors or minors. No negative impacts to any other Programs or Departments have been identified;
2.) the Program would also like to add the research course options of: ETHN 194 & PSYC 122 to better address student interest in multiple disciplines; and
3.) the Program seeks to eliminate the requirement that “only 6 units may be taken in either of the elective areas” of focus to better assist students in meeting their educational and career goals.

Gerontology Graduate Certificate Program

Justification:

This Program was approved by CSUS and implemented through CCE in Fall of 2000 as the Graduate Certificate Program. Four (4) cohort groups completed the Program through CCE; many of whom went on to develop and successfully complete a Special Masters in (Gerontology) degree at CSUS. The goal is to now bring this program to the main campus. This encourages students from multiple disciplines to access the courses as well as now be eligible for scholarships.

The approved six (6) course program included four (4) graduate level courses and two (2) undergraduate level courses. The courses were (respectively) 1.) GERO 200 - Adaptation to Age Related Changes, Illnesses & Caregiving, 2.) GERO 221 - Models for Successful Longevity, 3.) GERO 222 - Physiological and Emotional Disorders in Older Adults, 4.) GERO 295 - Internship/Project, 5.) GERO 101 - Services for Older Adults, and 6.) GERO 102 - Social Policy and Aging. This proposal modifies the original six (6) course pattern to include the alternatives of GERO 103 - Applied Care Management in Gerontology Practice and GERO 299 – Special Problems to better assist students in accessing courses that most closely fit with their education and career goals.

Updated course titles and minor changes addressing currency were made; otherwise there are no substantive changes to the original graduate (or undergraduate) courses. Course change proposals for the two (2) paired courses are included delineating undergraduate and graduate assignments and assessment outcomes as is one for the added GERO 299. Pairing with two (2) undergraduate courses provide opportunities for undergraduates to access the courses and use them as electives in their majors. Adding the opportunity for graduate level independent study will facilitate graduate students’ ability to explore areas unique to their interests and receive graduate credit.

Courses in this Program are the only available ones on campus addressing these areas and would be beneficial for graduate students and selective undergraduate students in all disciplines to take and apply toward their individual areas of study.

 


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