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LIST #3 - 2009/2010

PROGRAM CHANGE PROPOSALS
UNDERGRADUATE & GRADUATE


The Curriculum Subcommittee will meet on
Tuesday, November 10, 2009, at 1:30 in SAC 275
to review the Program Change Proposals contained in this list.
(Response due to Academic Affairs by noon on November 10 , 2009)


 

Program Proposals

Past Program Proposal Lists:

 






 

 

 

 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING & COMPUTER SCIENCE

Electrical and Electronic Engineering

NEW PROGRAM

Certificate Program in Mixed-Signal Integrated Circuit Design (graduate level)

Justification:

Graduate students studying mixed-signal integrated circuit (IC) design take several courses focused in this area to become knowledgable and proficient in the different skills this demanding field requires.  This requires studying multiple subjects such as amplifier design, device physics and matching, analog layout techniques, and key mixed-signal building blocks.  In addition, they need to learn the methods and tools used to design and layout ICs.  This new certificate in mixed-signal integrated circuit design will recognize the commitment and accomplishments of graduate students studying in this area, and provide potential employers with evidence of the skills these students have developed.  No additional fiscal or space resources are required.

 

 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

Kinesiology and Health Science

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Personal Trainer/Strength and Conditioning Certificate

Description:
The catalog description will be changed to indicate that a minimum of C grade in all classes will be required.  A suggested sequence of classes is given, and KINS 160 OR KINS 137 will replace KINS 139 which is no longer offered.
Justification:
The purpose of the change is to provide guidance to the student taking courses to complete the certificate.  This would provide students a suggested order to take the courses in and what would be an appropriate minimum grade for courses listed to complete the certificate.

 

Nursing

NON-SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE

Master of Science in Nursing

Justification:

The Division of Nursing is requesting the elimination of the statistics requirement for graduation/acceptance to the graduate program in nursing.  The curriculum was revised last academic year to meet the Essentials for Graduate Education in Nursing as adopted by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and the accrediting body, the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.  These revisions included a shift to evidence-based practice rather than research.   The default culminating experience was moved to a comprehensive examination in lieu of a thesis.  These changes support the removal of statistics as graduation/acceptance criteria to the program.

 

 

COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES & MATHEMATICS

Physics and Astronomy

NEW PROGRAM

Scientific Computing and Simulation

I. BRIEF DESCRIPTION. This is a proposal for establishing a certificate program in Scientific Computing & Simulation (SCS).  It requires 8 units of lower-division courses as basic science background, currently required of nearly all science and engineering majors, and two upper-division courses dealing with the basics of computing, simulation, and modeling.  It is open to all students, and specifically intended for students in the Colleges of Natural Sciences & Mathematics and Engineering & Computer Science.  This program may be characterized as providing the basics of electronic calculation, simulation, and modeling which supplement our traditional lower-division physics and mathematics education in the two colleges.

II. JUSTIFICATION. Electronic simulation, modeling, and computing today encompass a broad range of applications, from the problems of production engineering to the simulation of new chemical compounds and materials, mapping genetic codes to models of self-producing molecules and life, the subatomic world of high energy to the cosmic realm of galaxies, intricate details of financial engineering to the abstract problems of mathematics and computer science, and in short, any question susceptible to quantitative formulation.  As such, these skills lie at the core of STEM disciplines, and this proposal addresses a much needed programmatic focus that will prepare our students for today's industrial and academic careers by a combination of basic principles and practical training.

 


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