Festival of the Arts 2018

The Festival of the Arts is six days of creative performances, lectures and master classes, showcasing the region's creative and cultural excellence. The following dropdown menus detail the specific events that will be occuring on each of the Festival dates.

A Midsummer Night's Dream
University Theatre, Shasta Hall
April 11-22
Written by William Shakespeare. Directed by Christine Nicholson
Tickets may be purchased through Hornet Ticket Office or in person at the box office.
Sponsored by the Department of Theatre & Dance

Annual Student Awards Exhibition
Robert Else Gallery, Kadema Hall
Mondays - Fridays, Noon-4:30 p.m.

"Concurrent/Conventions: A Spectrum of Contemporary Ceramics"
Library Gallery, University Library
Feb. 1 - May 18, 2018, Tuesdays - Saturdays, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Ceramics have from the earliest historical artifacts, spanned a wide spectrum of cultural needs. Clay is an amazing material that has such a breadth of use and function that it has stayed relevant to our culture today. This show, "Concurrent/Conventions: A Spectrum of Contemporary Ceramics", highlights a few of those ceramic artists who are notable and relevant in the ceramic community today.
Sponsored by the Library Gallery

Sacramento Dance Sampler
Dancespace (Solano Hall 1010)
April 14-15, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.

Join us for the eighth annual Sacramento Dance SamplerThis dynamic concert features a diverse group of professional dance companies from across the Sacramento area. 
Tickets: $12 general admission. Tickets may be purchased through Hornet Ticket Office or in person at the box office.
Sponsored by the Department of Theatre & Dance

Nammour Symposium Part I: The Moral & Social Implications of Our Bias for the Beautiful
9-11:30 a.m. | University Ballroom
Society places great emphasis on our appearance and even treats people differently depending on whether they conform to certain norms of beauty or exemplify a certain conception of the beautiful. This bias for the beautiful sometimes has negative consequences for those who do not conform to society’s norms of beauty or those who are perceived as ugly or deformed. This year’s Nammour Symposium will give students an opportunity to delve more deeply into our conceptions of beauty, what contributes to these social standards, and their consequences on those who are deemed beautiful or ugly or deformed. As a university community that aims to be more inclusive and less superficial, we hope to promote conversations that examine our norms of beauty and their role in shaping our perspectives and attitudes. 
Sponsored by the Department of Philosophy

Tea Gathering
1:30 p.m. | Sokiku Nakatani Tea Room and Garden, University Library (Lower Level)
In addition to serving as a classroom, the Tea Room and Garden acts as a perfect setting for cultural programs, lectures and special events. The eight tatami chashitsu (tea room) is complete with mizuya (preparation room) and roji (pathway or entrance) and provides an ideal interactive learning environment. An exhibit area and seating for up to 40 participants form part of the interior space. Reserve your space by contacting Sally at hitchcoc@saclink.csus.edu or (916) 278-5954.
Sponsored by the University Library

"Unlikely Journey: Filmmaker Geoff Schaaf"
2-3:30 p.m. | Hinde Auditorium, University Union
Geoff Schaaf learned photography as a boy in France. He now lives in the Hollywood Hills creating social justice films, music videos and documentaries. In between, one opportunity led to the next and defined his professional trajectory. Join us for a presentation of this dynamic “career path” that began in Sacramento, picked up speed in Europe, clawed through Hollywood, and resulted in a life fulfilled. Screening and discussion to follow.
Sponsored by the Department of Communication Studies

Guest Author: Marcelo Hernandez Castillo 
3-4 p.m. | Library Gallery
Marcelo Hernandez Castillo is a poet, essayist, translator, and immigration advocate. He is the author of Cenzontle, which was chosen by Brenda Shaughnessy as the winner of the 2017 A. Poulin, Jr. prize and will be published by BOA editions in 2018. His first chapbook, DULCE, was chosen by Chris Abani as the winner of the Drinking Gourd Poetry Prize and will be published by Northwestern University press in the fall of 2018. His memoir, Children of the Land is forthcoming from Harper Collins.
Sponsored by the Department of English

"Photographing Disaster: History and Images of Violence"
5:30-7:30 p.m. | Riverside Hall 1015
This session will include three thirty-minute talks and a thirty-minute discussion moderated by Professor Michael G. Vann, Department of History.

  1. “Circulation, Spectacle, and Lynching Postcards” with Alison Dean, Ph.D.
    Photographic postcards of lynchings were circulated through the U.S. Mail system throughout the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. By studying both the images themselves and the way these material documents moved across communities, through the postal system, and into family photo albums, this paper demonstrates the ways in which images of atrocity function pedagogically to actively consolidate white identity and reinforce white supremacy by normalizing the spectacle of harm to black bodies. Images of atrocity, like lynching postcards—and later, photographs like those made in Abu Ghraib prison—teach viewers about the meaning of race, family, community, and citizenship as they make their way from one set of hands, or one screen, to the next.

    Alison Dean is a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Postdoctoral Fellow and a Research Associate with the History of Art & Visual Culture Department and the Center for Creative Ecologies at the University of California Santa Cruz. Her current research focuses on photography of forced displacement and migration. Alison is an alumna of the School for Criticism and Theory at Cornell University and was Helena Rubinstein Critical Studies Fellow with the Whitney Independent Study Program. She holds a Ph.D. in English from Simon Fraser University.

  2. “Stateless - The Plight of the Rohingya: A Photographer’s Account” with Andrew Stanbridge
    Andrew Standbridge will discuss his experiences documenting the ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya people in Mynammar. He will be presenting images from his recent 2017 trip.

    Andrew Stanbridge is a Portland, Oregon-based photographer who concentrates on global humanitarian, conflict and environmental stories. He has made photographs of the Syrian civil war, Burma's road to democracy, Rohingya issues, the post colonial culture and delicate biodiversity of Sao Tome and Principe, Ethiopia and the aftermath of war in Laos and Cambodia in addition to many others. His work has been exhibited internationally has been published in many venues.

  3. “Near and Distant: A study in the experience of war through the work of August Sander and Alexander Gardner” with Benjamin Donaldson
    The practice of photography is often separated into genres, which are most often dictated by the eventual use of the resultant images. But what was the intent of the practitioners that either took on projects in a self-directed fashion (Sander), or those that set out to make the definitive record of a conflict (Gardner)? Furthermore, what was the work of these photographers in the years that followed their respective experiences with the brutality of war? The lecture will be partially comparative, with a few contemporary and historical sources drawn upon in order to illustrate both the similarities and the differences in the bodies of work made under disparate pretenses.

    Benjamin Donaldson is a Critic in the Photography Department and the Photography Department Coordinator at Yale University School of Art. Benjamin Donaldson, artist and photographer. His photographs are in the collection of the Yale University Libraries, Yale University Art Gallery as well as private collections. Donaldson lives in New Haven, CT.

Sponsored by the Department of History 

School of Music's Grad Student Gala
7:30 p.m. | Capistrano Concert Hall
The School of Music kicks off their Festival of the Arts festivities with a graduate student gala, featuring a variety of performances. Admission is free!
Sponsored by the School of Music

Nammour Symposium Part II: The Moral & Social Implications of Our Bias for the Beautiful
9 a.m.-Noon | University Ballroom
Society places great emphasis on our appearance and even treats people differently depending on whether they conform to certain norms of beauty or exemplify a certain conception of the beautiful. This bias for the beautiful sometimes has negative consequences for those who do not conform to society’s norms of beauty or those who are perceived as ugly or deformed. This year’s Nammour Symposium will give students an opportunity to delve more deeply into our conceptions of beauty, what contributes to these social standards, and their consequences on those who are deemed beautiful or ugly or deformed. As a university community that aims to be more inclusive and less superficial, we hope to promote conversations that examine our norms of beauty and their role in shaping our perspectives and attitudes. 
Sponsored by the Department of Philosophy

Guest Author: Rob Davidson
3-4 p.m. | Library Gallery
Rob Davidson was born in Duluth, Minnesota and was educated at Beloit College and Purdue University. He is the author of Spectators: Flash Fictions (Five Oaks Press, 2017), The Farther Shore: Stories (Bear Star, 2012), The Master and the Dean: The Literary Criticism of Henry James and William Dean Howells (University of Missouri Press, 2005), and Field Observations: Stories (University of Missouri Press, 2001).
Sponsored by the Department of English

Race, Sex, and Rock and Roll: Silenced Histories of Rockers of Color
5-8 p.m. | Amador Hall 150

  1. Guest Author: "The Spitboy Rule: Tales of a Xicana in a Female Punk Band"
    Michelle Cruz Gonzales is a Chicano writer, artist, and musician. Gonzales was born in East Los Angeles in 1969 and played drums and wrote lyrics for three punk bands during the 1980s and 1990s. Gonzales’ most notable band came in the form of Spitboy, which toured extensively in the United States and abroad and released several albums. Gonzales will recite verses from The Spitboy Rule: Tales of a Xicana in a Female Punk Band and tell her experience of being a woman of color in punk during the 1990s.
  2. Film Screening: Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked the World. Through innovative reenactments, rare concert footage and archival studio recordings, and interviews with musicians and artists, this feature-length documentary re-locates indigenous peoples’ previously overlooked influence on modern American musical history.

 Sponsored by the Department of History

THURSDAY, APRIL 12

Artist Demonstrations
9 a.m. - 1 p.m. | Kadema Hall 131
Artist demonstrations continue in conjunction with Library Gallery's exhibition, "Concurrent/Conventions: A Spectrum of Contemporary Ceramics".
Sponsored by the Department of ArtLibrary Gallery and Associated Students, Inc.

Artist Panel Discussion: "The State of Clay"
3-5 p.m. | Library Gallery
Moderated by Nancy Service, panelists will be "Concurrent/Conventions: A Spectrum of Contemporary Ceramics" exhibiting artists, Adam Shiverdecker, Jason Walker, Sandy Simon, and Bob Brady. They will give short presentations, and moderator Nancy Service will guide a discussion regarding directions in contemporary ceramics.
Sponsored by the Department of ArtLibrary Gallery and Associated Students, Inc.

U-Create! 
5-9 p.m. | Downtown Sacramento (7th & S)
The fourth annual U-Create! street faire in downtown Sacramento will return, filling selected art galleries and side streets with terrific artworks, interactive experiences and plenty of music. The free soiree will run 5 to 9 p.m. Thursday, April 12, in the area of Seventh and S streets. Full details are available here.
Sponsored by the College of Arts & Letters

"How Prayer Changes You: What an Anthropologist Can See"
1:15 p.m. | Riverside Hall 1012
M. Luhrmann’s work focuses on the edge of experience: on voices, visions, and the world of the supernatural and the world of psychosis. Among many other publications, she is the author of When God Talks Back: Understanding the American Evangelical Relationship with God (Knopf, 2012). Professor Luhrmann will discuss the rich opportunities and challenges of studying of religious phenomena.
Sponsored by the Department of Humanities & Religious Studies

Guest Author: Indigo Moor
3-4 p.m. | Library Gallery
Current Poet Laureate of Sacramento, Indigo Moor is also a playwright and author. His most recent book of poetry is In the Room of Thirsts and Hungers. His second book of poetry, Through the Stonecutter’s Window, won Northwestern University Press’s Cave Canem prize. His first book, Tap-Root, was published as part of Main Street Rag’s Editor’s Select Poetry Series.
Sponsored by the Department of English

"Why Presentations Matter" - Ryan Orcutt, Associate Creative Director at Duarte Design
6:30 p.m. | Terrace Suite, The WELL
Presentations have become the default way that businesses communicate with each other and their customers. As a result, presentations hold some of the most critical ideas, concepts, and messages in the world. Yet they’re trapped—hidden inside horribly designed slides and buried beneath a poorly told story because, to a lot of people, presentation design is an afterthought instead of an essential skill for communicating great ideas. And that needs to change.

Ryan’s talk is both a call to arms and a shot in the arm. He reframes the power of a presentation, elevating it from basic to business critical. By the end of Ryan’s talk, which will showcase several real project examples and the transformations they underwent, you’ll agree with his unique perspective: If you want to make a difference in the world, great presentations pave the way. 

Ryan Orcutt joined Duarte as a graduate of Chico State’s School of Communication Design and serves clients as an Associate Creative Director. During his 13-year tenure with Duarte, he’s been helping some of the world's most influential speakers craft, visualize, and deliver some of today's most compelling and persuasive stories.

As a Duarte ambassador, Ryan speaks on the power and importance of presentations and is a master of the Duarte principles. He invites his audiences to realize their true influence, imagine bigger possibilities, and to design with purpose. His extensive client list includes thought leaders like former Vice President Al Gore, Senator Elizabeth Warren, and Productivity Guru David Allen, and he’s built presentations for some of the biggest brands in the world, including GE, Dolby, Lufthansa, Procter & Gamble, and The World Bank.
Sponsored by the Department of Design

Film Screening: Baraka
7 p.m. | Mendocino Hall 1030
Originally shot in 25 countries on six continents, Baraka brought together a series of stunningly photographed scenes to capture what director Ron Fricke calls "a guided mediation on humanity." It was a shoot of unprecedented technical, logistical and bureaucratic scope that would take 30 months to complete, including 14 months on location, with a custom-built computerized 65mm camera. "The goal of the film," says producer Mark Magidson, "was to reach past language, nationality, religion and politics and speak to the inner viewer."
Sponsored by the Department of Humanities & Religious Studies

Jazz Ensembles with Dave Douglas, trumpet
8 p.m. | Capistrano Concert Hall
Our award-winning Jazz Ensembles welcome guest trumpeter Dave Douglas, a prolific trumpeter, composer, educator and entrepreneur from New York City known for the stylistic breadth of his work and for keeping a diverse set of ensembles and projects active simultaneously. His unique contributions to improvised music have garnered distinguished recognition, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, an Aaron Copland award and two Grammy nominations.
Tickets: $10 general, $7 senior, $5 student, free to Sac State music students. Tickets may be purchased through the Hornet Ticket Office or in person at the Capistrano Box Office.
Sponsored by the School of Music

 

Art History Symposium
1-5 p.m. | Mendocino Hall 1005
Twenty-first century art history, increasingly global, relies on mapping to explore transnational and pre-national connections among visual cultures, art objects, and artists. Guest speakers include:

  • Keynote speaker: John Lopez, assistant professor at UC Davis.
    Talk title "Mapping Aztec Territorial Consciousness"
  • Hillary Olcott, assistant curator of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
    Talk title: "Mapping Teotihuacan"
  • Jennifer Donnelly, Itinera project manager, History of Art and Architecture, University of Pittsburgh. 
    Talk title: "Itinera as Methodology: "Mapping Alexander von Humboldt’s South American Journey”

Free parking with parking permit.

Sponsored by the Department of ArtOneWorld Initiative, Visiting Scholars Program, and Associated Students, Inc.

Alumni Readings
3-4 p.m. | Library Gallery
The Department of English welcomes back alumni for special readings of their work:

  • Rebecca Woolston was named a semi-finalist in the Baltic Writing Residency for Scotland, is forthcoming in George Mason’s Graduate Journal, So to Speak, has appeared in New Urge Reader Vol. 3 and was named a semi-finalist in Gazing Grain’s 2015 Prose/Hybrid contest. She can also be found online at Lumenmag.net and enclave.entropymag.org, in print in Red Light Lit Volume 5, From Sac: Home, Myths, and Other Untruths and has written book reviews for The California Journal of Women Writers.
  • Lisa Dominguez Abraham is a native Californian who teaches at Cosumnes River College in Sacramento, CA. Her chapbook, Mata Hari Blows a Kiss, was released in 2017 from Swan Scythe Press. Her poems have appeared in publications such as The Southern Review and Poetry East and her full-length manuscript, Paper Maps, was a semifinalist for the Miller Williams Poetry Prize.
  • Heather Judy is a poet and artist living in Sacramento. She earned her MFA in Poetry from Mills College in 2009. Before attending Mills, she received her BA in English from Sac State where she won the 2005 Bazzanella Award for first place in poetry. Her poems have appeared in Clade Song, Tule Review, The California Quarterly, Flatmancrooked's Thin Volume of Contemporary Poetry, and others. She is a Sacramento Poetry Center board member and co-curates for the Sacramento Poetry Center art gallery.

Sponsored by the Department of English

Sunday Funday 
11 a.m. - 3 p.m. | Sacramento State Campus
The grand finale of the Festival of the Arts invites students, staff, faculty, alumni and their families to campus for a day of family events to experience the arts and the letters at Sac State. Campus will be filled with adventure, including games and activities from the countries of Japan, France and Italy. FULL SCHEDULE

Film Screening: LOOK & SEE: A Portrait of Wendell Berry
Noon | Mendocino Hall 4004
LOOK & SEE revolves around the divergent stories of several residents of Henry County, Kentucky who each face difficult choices that will dramatically reshape their relationship with the land and their community. Filmed across four seasons in the farming cycle, LOOK & SEE blends observational scenes of farming life, interviews with farmers and community members with evocative, carefully framed shots of the surrounding landscape. Thus, in the spirit of Berry’s agrarian philosophy, Henry County itself will emerge as a character in the film - a place and a landscape that is deeply interdependent with the people that inhabit it. 
Sponsored by the Department of Humanities & Religious Studies

Guest Author: Halifu Osumare
4:30-5:30 p.m. | Dancespace (Solano Hall 1010)
Dancing in Blackness is a professional female dancer’s personal journey over four decades, across three continents and 23 countries, and through defining moments in the story of black dance in America. In this memoir, Halifu Osumare reflects on what blackness and dance have meant to her life and international career.
Sponsored by the Department of Theatre & Dance

Latin Jazz Combo
7 p.m. | Capistrano Concert Hall
The student Latin Jazz Ensemble performs under the direction of Carlos McCoy. The ensemble performs a wide variety of Latin styles, including merengue, cha-cha-cha, mambo, Afro-Cuban, and rumba. They are a DownBeat award-winning group.
Tickets: $10 general, $7 senior, $5 student, free to Sac State music students. Tickets may be purchased through the Hornet Ticket Office or in person at the Capistrano Box Office.
Sponsored by the School of Music