- FAUNAL LAB -

 

 

 

 

 

::: Zooarchaeology, the study of animal remains from archaeological sites, represents a merging of anthropology with the biological sciences. It includes analysis of invertebrate remains, such as shellfish and insects, and vertebrate remains, fish, birds, and mammals, which usually are fragmented pieces of bone and shell. Questions regarding preservation or destruction of animal remains in the archaeological record (Taphonomy); the nature of past environments and ecological relationships (Paleobiology); and past patterns of animal utilization and exploitation (Paleoeconomy), are addressed through this work. Animal remains occur at many archaeological sites, ranging from nineteenth century city blocks and mining camps to prehistoric Native American village and task sites. The zooarchaeology laboratory at the Archaeological Research Center houses a comparative collection with specimens from all classes of animals.  The focus of the collection is native species from California and the western United States and includes more than 250 animal skeletons and shells from some 25 species of coastal and freshwater mollusks.  Students interested in faunal analysis can use these facilities to aide in the identification of animal bones from archaeological assemblages for thesis work, conference papers, or ARC reports :::

::: KEY PERSONNEL :::
Laurel Zickler-Martin (Analyst)


Department of Anthropology California State University, Sacramento 6000 J Street, Sacramento, CA 95819-6106
Phone: (916) 278-5330Fax: 278-4854 e-mail: arc@csus.edu

WEB SITE DESIGNED AND COMPILED //  BRIAN JAMES AND WILLIAM LARSON // 2010