Building our Future

Campus Master Plan Process: FAQs

What is a master plan?

A master plan guides change to the campus over the long term and gives physical form to the University's strategic vision and values. It addresses all aspects of the campus's physical environment - existing and proposed buildings, open space, circulation - as well as connections to the surrounding city. A master planning process helps the University understand options for growth and its implications so that better decisions can be made about campus development. A campus master plan refers both to a document and the analytical and participatory process that gives rise to it.

Why are we creating a master plan now?

The completion of a new strategic plan, the recent acquisition of property, aging facilities and changing student demographics are among a constellation of factors that require a reevaluation of the campus to determine how best it can serve the University's academic mission.

How do you create a campus master plan?

The master planning process involves analysis of the current physical conditions of the campus and a review of how those conditions coincide with the University's strategic plan and academic goals. In identifying opportunities and priorities for change, the planning process draws on the opinions and expertise of many people - faculty, staff, students, alumni, neighbors and others - who have a stake in institution's future. Often a consultant team is hired to lend support, skills and wisdom to manage this process and to help develop and evaluate options.

How long does it take to produce a campus master plan, and when will it be completed?

Typically, a master plan for this scale of campus will take between 12 and 15 months to produce. The plan must be approved by the California State University Board of Trustees.

Who is in charge of leading the master planning process?

Facilities Services is coordinating the plan under the mantle of a steering committee chaired by the Vice President for Administration and Business Affairs.

Why is it important to the University to undertake a master plan?

The master planning process provides an opportunity to assess the campus, to anticipate changes and to adjust for unanticipated changes. The resulting plan enables the University to make informed decisions about how state dollars are spent and to ensure that changes to the campus will best serve its mission.

How will the master plan be coordinated with city, transit and other governmental entities that are involved in planning for areas around the campus?

The planning process involves both on- and off-campus constituencies. The consultant team will work with representatives of city and state agencies, such as City of Sacramento, Regional Transit and Caltrans, to ensure that plans for the campus and for the surrounding area are coordinated, with mutually beneficial results.

Will business owners, merchants, residents and other stakeholders in the surrounding neighborhoods have input to the campus planning process?

Yes. A series of open houses is open to all interested parties. Each set of forums will have at least one evening session for the greater convenience of the local community.

What is the outcome of a campus master planning process?

The master plan recommendations - conveyed in text and images - are compiled in a final document that will serve as a guide for campus change over the next decade. The campus master plan can be described as a living document, one that will outline a sequence of steps for implementation in both the short and long term, while also enabling the institution flexibility to shift priorities as needed.

Input from the Community

Forum 1 - Opportunities and Constraints

Sept. 17, 2013

View the Forum Presentation (23.3MB)

We want your input:
Online Questionnaire

Forum 2 - Campus Design Concepts

Oct. 30 & 31, 2013

View the Forum Presentation (23.3MB)

Forum 3 - Presentation of Draft Master Plan

Feb. 10, 2014

View the Forum Presentation (51.9MB)

 

Master Plan 2014: FAQs

Forum Schedule

Forum 1 - Opportunities and Constraints

Sept. 17, 2013

10 a.m.-noon
University Union Ballroom I

6-8 p.m.
WELL Terrace

Forum 2 - Campus Design Concepts

Oct. 30, 2013

10 a.m.-noon
University Ballroom III

6-8 p.m.
The WELL Terrace

Oct. 31, 2013

2-4 p.m.
Redwood Room

Forum 3 - Presentation of Draft Master Plan

Feb. 10, 2014

1-3 p.m.
University Union Ballroom III

6-8 p.m.
University Union Ballroom III

 

Redefine the Possible

What is a master plan?

A master plan guides change to the campus over the long term and gives physical form to the University's strategic vision and values. It addresses all aspects of the campus's physical environment - existing and proposed buildings, open space, circulation - as well as connections to the surrounding city. A master planning process helps the University understand options for growth and its implications so that better decisions can be made about campus development. A campus master plan refers both to a document and the analytical and participatory process that gives rise to it.

Why are we creating a master plan now?

The completion of a new strategic plan, the recent acquisition of property, aging facilities and changing student demographics are among a constellation of factors that require a reevaluation of the campus to determine how best it can serve the University's academic mission.

How do you create a campus master plan?

The master planning process involves analysis of the current physical conditions of the campus and a review of how those conditions coincide with the University's strategic plan and academic goals. In identifying opportunities and priorities for change, the planning process draws on the opinions and expertise of many people - faculty, staff, students, alumni, neighbors and others - who have a stake in institution's future. Often a consultant team is hired to lend support, skills and wisdom to manage this process and to help develop and evaluate options.

How long does it take to produce a campus master plan, and when will it be completed?

Typically, a master plan for this scale of campus will take between 12 and 15 months to produce. Our goal is for the plan to be approved by the California State University Board of Trustees in May 2014.

Who is in charge of leading the master planning process?

Facilities Services is coordinating the plan under the mantle of a steering committee chaired by the Vice President for Administration and Business Affairs.

Why is it important to the University to undertake a master plan?

The master planning process provides an opportunity to assess the campus, to anticipate changes and to adjust for unanticipated changes. The resulting plan enables the University to make informed decisions about how state dollars are spent and to ensure that changes to the campus will best serve its mission.

How will the master plan be coordinated with city, transit and other governmental entities that are involved in planning for areas around the campus?

The planning process involves both on- and off-campus constituencies. The consultant team will work with representatives of city and state agencies, such as City of Sacramento, Regional Transit and Caltrans, to ensure that plans for the campus and for the surrounding area are coordinated, with mutually beneficial results.

Will business owners, merchants, residents and other stakeholders in the surrounding neighborhoods have input to the campus planning process?

Yes. A series of open houses is open to all interested parties. Each set of forums will have at least one evening session for the greater convenience of the local community.

What is the outcome of a campus master planning process?

The master plan recommendations - conveyed in text and images - are compiled in a final document that will serve as a guide for campus change over the next decade. The campus master plan can be described as a living document, one that will outline a sequence of steps for implementation in both the short and long term, while also enabling the institution flexibility to shift priorities as needed.

Forum Schedule

Forum 1 - Opportunities and Constraints

Sept. 17, 2013

10 a.m.-noon
University Union Ballroom I

6-8 p.m.
WELL Terrace

Forum 2 - Campus Design Concepts

Oct. 30, 2013

10 a.m.-noon
University Ballroom III

6-8 p.m.
The WELL Terrace

Oct. 31, 2013

2-4 p.m.
Redwood Room

Forum 3 - Presentation of Draft Master Plan

Feb. 10, 2014

1-3 p.m.
University Union Ballroom III

6-8 p.m.
University Union Ballroom III

 

Redefine the Possible

Master Plan 2014: FAQs

What is a master plan?

A master plan guides change to the campus over the long term and gives physical form to the University's strategic vision and values. It addresses all aspects of the campus's physical environment - existing and proposed buildings, open space, circulation - as well as connections to the surrounding city. A master planning process helps the University understand options for growth and its implications so that better decisions can be made about campus development. A campus master plan refers both to a document and the analytical and participatory process that gives rise to it.

Why are we creating a master plan now?

The completion of a new strategic plan, the recent acquisition of property, aging facilities and changing student demographics are among a constellation of factors that require a reevaluation of the campus to determine how best it can serve the University's academic mission.

How do you create a campus master plan?

The master planning process involves analysis of the current physical conditions of the campus and a review of how those conditions coincide with the University's strategic plan and academic goals. In identifying opportunities and priorities for change, the planning process draws on the opinions and expertise of many people - faculty, staff, students, alumni, neighbors and others - who have a stake in institution's future. Often a consultant team is hired to lend support, skills and wisdom to manage this process and to help develop and evaluate options.

How long does it take to produce a campus master plan, and when will it be completed?

Typically, a master plan for this scale of campus will take between 12 and 15 months to produce. Our goal is for the plan to be approved by the California State University Board of Trustees in May 2014.

Who is in charge of leading the master planning process?

Facilities Services is coordinating the plan under the mantle of a steering committee chaired by the Vice President for Administration and Business Affairs.

Why is it important to the University to undertake a master plan?

The master planning process provides an opportunity to assess the campus, to anticipate changes and to adjust for unanticipated changes. The resulting plan enables the University to make informed decisions about how state dollars are spent and to ensure that changes to the campus will best serve its mission.

How will the master plan be coordinated with city, transit and other governmental entities that are involved in planning for areas around the campus?

The planning process involves both on- and off-campus constituencies. The consultant team will work with representatives of city and state agencies, such as City of Sacramento, Regional Transit and Caltrans, to ensure that plans for the campus and for the surrounding area are coordinated, with mutually beneficial results.

Will business owners, merchants, residents and other stakeholders in the surrounding neighborhoods have input to the campus planning process?

Yes. A series of open houses is open to all interested parties. Each set of forums will have at least one evening session for the greater convenience of the local community.

What is the outcome of a campus master planning process?

The master plan recommendations - conveyed in text and images - are compiled in a final document that will serve as a guide for campus change over the next decade. The campus master plan can be described as a living document, one that will outline a sequence of steps for implementation in both the short and long term, while also enabling the institution flexibility to shift priorities as needed.