Top header graphic with link to CSUS Home Page california state university, sacramento
Header Graphic
sac state homeuniversity affairspublic affairs
 
 Search Sacramento
 State website

  Sacramento State
  main news page


media resources graphic
   news releases
   news and events
     archive

   facts & stats
   experts guide
   image downloads
   news by e-mail
   contact news
     services staff

   submit news
     & events

   feedback

publications graphic
   Sac State Magazine
   Sacramento State
     Bulletin

   Newslink
   Sacramento State
     Catalog


calendars graphic
   events this month
   search events
   academic
   athletics
   commencement

additional news graphic
   Capital Public Radio
   alumni association
   crime alerts
   construction
   CSU Newsline

visitors resources graphic
   visitor relations
   commencement
   Sacramento State
     ticket office

   campus directory
   campus tours

July 29, 2003

Survey finds broad support
for ‘living wage’ among Californians

Full Report

Californians overwhelmingly support the idea of a “living wage,” though they’re divided on the idea of paying more to support it, according to a new statewide survey developed by California State University, Sacramento economics professor Suzanne O’Keefe and conducted by the Field Research Corporation.

The survey of 788 California adults provides a broad assessment of public opinion on living wage laws. It was conducted July 1-13.

According to the survey, 70 percent of Californians who either live in areas without living wage laws, or who aren’t sure if their community has such a law, support living wage laws. Support is even higher among those who currently live in parts of the state that have living wage laws, with 83 percent favoring them.

Living wage ordinances vary, but generally require employers contracting with the local government to pay their workers more than the federal or state minimum wage. They have been put in place by 109 local governments nationwide, according to ACORN (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now). Sacramento and San Diego are among a number of cities currently considering such an ordinance.

Asked whether they would be willing to pay $40 to $50 more in local taxes to support a living wage, Californians are more divided, with 49 percent saying they would and 44 percent saying they wouldn’t. Among Democrats, 61 percent say they would pay higher taxes to support a living wage law, compared to only 33 percent of Republicans who say this.

O’Keefe found the strongest support for new living wage ordinances in Southern California and the Bay Area, where levels of support were 70 and 80 percent respectively. In the Central Valley, 63 percent favored their community passing a living wage law.

The survey was conducted through the California State University - Field Faculty Fellowship program, and was sponsored by the CSU Social Science Research and Instructional Council.

The full report is available as a link from the press release at www.csus.edu/news. O’Keefe may be reached at (916) 278-6838. Media assistance is available from CSUS public affairs at (916) 278-6156.

Full Report

####

Bottom bar graphic back to top


California State University, Sacramento • Public Affairs
6000 J Street • Sacramento, CA 95819-6026 • (916) 278-6156 • infodesk@csus.edu