One World Initiative

One World Initiative Events

The 2013-14 One World Initiative theme is "Global Perspectives on Migration." 

The success of the One World Initiative depends on the contributions of campus departments and organizations hosting a range of activities (lectures, films, performances etc.). The One World Initiative will help promote your activity across the campus and beyond. Funds to help support campus activities are also available. To submit your event to the One World calendar and request funding, please email us at oneworld@csus.edu.

One World Initiative and Your Event

If you, your program, club, or center, is organizing an event linked to the One World Initiative's 2013-14 theme of Global Perspectives on Migration. Please email a description of the event, the date and location to oneworld@csus.edu. We will be happy to include your event on our website and assist with promoting it across the campus.

Spring 2014: Upcoming events

  • Tuesday April 15 - Thursday May 15th. The Anthropology Museum presents Sentiment & Science: The GF and AW Beardsley Collection as 19th - Century Traveloguean exhibit. 1000 Mendocino Hall, exhibit hours: Tues -Fri, 12-3pm.
  • Wednesday, April 23. The Asian Studies Program presents "Colonial Cities as European migration to Southeast Asia" by Michael Vann, Department of History. Amador 250. 3:00-5:50 p.m.
  • Thursday April 24-Saturday April 26. The Center for African Peace & Conflict Resolution presents The 23rd annual Africa/Diaspora Conference: Rethinking & Managing Ethnic & Religious Relations in Contemporary Africa/Diaspora.
  • Saturday April 26. Hima Mesopotamia and the Environmental Studies Department present a special event for One World and Earth Week. "Water and Environmental Refugees: Rejuvenation of the Uprootedincludes the following talks: "Environmental Refugees and Environmental Desiccation in the Middle East" by Dr. Michelle Stevens, Environmental Studies Department, "Environmental Refugees and Human Population" by Dr. Tom Krabacher, Geography Department, "Environmental Refugees and Conflict" by Dr. Kevin Wehr, Department of Sociology. There will also be a World Music performance by Catherine Madella and Sanbhanda. Hinde Auditorium, 6:00 - 8:00 p.m. Followed by coffee and conversation in the Orchard Suite from 8:00 - 9:00 p.m. For more information contact Dr. Michelle Stevens at michelle@himamesopotamia.org.  

Spring 2014: Past events

  • Wednesday, February 5. The Asian Studies Program presents "The Global Migration of Asians: Filipinos and Chinese" by James Sobredo, Department of Ethnic Studies. Amador 250. 3:00 to 5:50 p.m.
  • Wednesday, February 12. The Asian Studies Program presents "Gendered Diaspora: Japanese women leaving Japan" by Cindi Sturtz Sreetharan, Department of Anthropology. Amador 250. 3:00 - 5:50 p.m.
  • Wednesday, February 19. The Asian Studies Program presents "Ideas of Corruption and Images of Backwardnes: Japanese Colonialism and Korean Modernity" by George Baca, Department of Global Studies, Dong-a University, and "Imaginaries of Transnational Migration: The Case of Korean-Chinese Between China and South Korea" by Gowoon Noh, Department of Anthropology. Amador 250. First talk 3:00 - 4:15 p.m., second talk 4:30 - 5:50 p.m.
  • Thursday, February 20. The Center for STEM excellence, as part of its STEM Scholars Lecture series, presents "Forest Migration in a Warming World" by Dr. James Wanket, Associate Professor of Geography, California State University, Sacramento. University Union, Redwood Room, 6 p.m. This is a free community lecture; parking is free.
  • Wednesday February 26. The Asian Studies Program presents "Southeast Asia in the Age of Commerce (15th - 17th centuries)" by Pat Chirapravati, Asian Studies Program, and "Chinese migration to Southeast Asia since the 15th century" by Richard Shek, Department of Humanities and Religious Studies. Amador 250. First talk 3:00 - 4:15 p.m., second talk 4:30 - 5:50 p.m.
  • Tuesday, March 4. The Geology-Ecology-Environmental Science Colloquium Series presents "Expanding ice and shrinking seas: Pleistocene migrations" by Dr. Dale Russell. The Geology-Ecology-Environmental Science Colloquium Series is sponsored by the departments of Geology, Biological Science, and Environmental Studies, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the California Landscape Conservation Coopertative, and the U.S. Geological Survey. Riverside 1015, 4:20 p.m.
  • Wednesday, March 5. The Asian Studies Program presents "The Kingdom of Siam at the Age of Commerce (Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries)" by Pat Chirapravati, Asian Studies Program, and "Vasco da Gama and the end of the Indian Ocean Cosmopolitanism" by Raghuraman Trichur, Department of Anthropology.  Amador 250. First talk 3:00 - 4:15 p.m., second talk 4:30 - 5:50 p.m.
  • Wednesday, March 12. The Asian Studies Program presents "Creating, Integrating, and Harmonizing Ethnicity: China's 56 Nationalities" by James Rae, Department of Government. Amador 250. 3:00-5:50 p.m.
  • Wednesday, March 19. The Asian Studies Program presents "North Korea" by Jeffrey Dym, Department of History. Amador 250. 3:00-5:50 p.m.
  • Wednesday, April 2. The Asian Studies Program presents "Walking over women: Parting and making the Nation in South Asia" by Sujatha Moni, Department of Women's Studies. Amador 250. 3:00-5:50 p.m.
  • Wednesday, April 9. The Asian Studies Program presents "Korean Diaspora" by Greg Kim-Ju, Department of Psychology and "Jewish migrations to and from Inida" by Mitch Numark, Department of History. Amador 250.  First talk 3:00 - 4:15 p.m., second talk 4:30 - 5:50 p.m.
  • Wednesday, April 16. The Asian Studies Program presents "South Korea's politics towards North Korean defectors" by Inhje Heo, Visiting Scholar, Asian Studies Program, and "The Aryan Migration Debate" by Joel Dubois, Department of Humanities and Religious Studies. Amador 250.  First talk 3:00 - 4:15 p.m., second talk 4:30 - 5:50 p.m.
  • Monday April 21. Sacramento State's One World Initiative presents The Second Annual One World End-of-Year Celebration. This half-day event will feature a Student Symposium on Migration, a Faculty Panel Discussion, and a Keynote Speaker. Click here for details.

Fall 2013: Past events

  • Wednesday, September 18. The Community Engagement Center presents "Human Trafficking in the U.S.: Realities of Modern Day Slavery." A panel discussion exploring the U.S. Constitution as a contemporary guiding document through examination of human trafficking and the 13th Amendment: "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude...shall exist within the United States.". This event is part of Constitution Week (http://www.csus.edu/cec/constitutionweek/index.stm). University Union, Hinde Auditorium, 11am-12 p.m.
  • Tuesday September 24. The Fall 2013 Ecology-Geology Colloquium series presents "Accumulation of pesticides in Sierra Nevada Frogs" by Kelly Smalling of the U.S. Geological Survey. This talk examines how pesticides migrate from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada, where they affect frogs. The Ecology-Geology Colloquium series is co-sponsored by the departments of Biological Sciences and Geology, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative, and the U.S. Geological Survey. Mendocino 1015, 4:30 p.m.
  • Wednesday September 25. The movie Maria Full of Grace will be screened as part of Government 162: Film and Culture in a Globalized World. This movie features the transport of drugs across the border. Members of the campus community are invited to join the GOVT 162 students for this screening. Enrolled students will have priority for seating. Alpine 122. 6 p.m.
  • Monday, September 30. The College of Continuing Education's English Language Institute presents "From My Country to Yours: International Perspectives on Migration" a symposium on world views on migration. ELI students, who come to Sacramento State from around the world, will present their points of view on migration through muti-media presentations, posters, and a panel discussion. This event is open to all members of the campus community and beyond. For more information contact Niccole Scrogins (niccolescrogins@gmail.com). Alumni Center, 12-4 p.m.
  • Tuesday October 1. The Fall 2013 Ecology-Geology Colloquium series presents "Historic shifts in hardwoods and conifers along the Sierra Nevada, and methods to assess conversion risk to forested sites from fire and climate change" by Jim Thorne of UC Davis. This talk explores the migration of plant species in response to climate change. The Ecology-Geology Colloquium series is co-sponsored by the departments of Biological Sciences and Geology, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative, and the U.S. Geological Survey. Mendocino 1015, 4:30 p.m.
  • Monday October 21. The President's Committee to Build Campus Unity presents "The Changing Face of California: Dynamics of our changing demographics and implications for education, healthcare, civic participation, and entrepreneurship" a symposium to offer insight into how to engage and collaborate with diverse communities. University Union, Ballroom. 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday October 29. The Fall 2013 Ecology-Geology Colloquium series presents "Drought, dispersal, and invertebrate community changes in arid-land streams" by Michael Bogan of UC Berkeley. The theme of this talk is climate change and ecology migration. The Ecology-Geology Colloquium series is co-sponsored by the departments of Biological Sciences and Geology, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative, and the U.S. Geological Survey. Mendocino 1015, 4:30 p.m.
  • Wednesday, November 6. The movie Lord of War will be screened as part of Government 162: Film and Culture in a Globalized World. This movie features international trafficking of arms. Members of the campus community are invited to join the GOVT 162 students for this screening. Enrolled students will have priority for seating. Alpine 122. 6 p.m.
  • Tuesday November 12. The Fall 2013 Ecology-Geology Colloquium series presents a presentation on migratory birds and the migration of the flu virus by John Takewawa of the U.S. Geological Survey. The Ecology-Geology Colloquium series is co-sponsored by the departments of Biological Sciences and Geology, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative, and the U.S. Geological Survey. Mendocino 1015, 4:30 p.m.
  • Sunday November 17. Sac State Dance Exchange. Hosted by Romi Sunga, Nou Vang, and Salsa Loca, this multi-club gathering will allow different dance clubs to teach each other their dance styles. The clubs involved include Sac Modern (a hip hop company), Salsa Loca (a social dance club focusing on Latin dance), Ballroom Social (a social dance clube focusing on ballroom), the Scottish Dance Club, the Black Dance Collective (focusing on Black Concert Dance), and Dance Alliance (the dance club associated with the Theater and Dance Department). Dance styles are heavily influenced by the merging of cultures due to migration, whether forced or voluntary. Dance has always been on the of the first places that cross cultural influences can be seen. Yosemite 183, 2:00 - 6:00 p.m. Workshops start at 2, followed by a dance jam event.
  • Monday November 18 - Saturday November 23. Fall 2013 International Education Week at Sacramento State. The Office of Academic Affairs is inviting the campus community to join in the recognition and celebration of International Education Week. The schedule of activities will help highlight international awareness, enrich our campus life, and assist in graduating our students with the knowledge, skills, and values to be competitive global citizens. Members of the campus community are invited to come to campus during international education week wearing clothing that reflects cultural heritage. This will likely generate conversations acros the campus about the origin and significance of culture. Click here for the schedule of activities. 
  • Friday November 22. The Cambodian Student Association of CSUS presents a screening of the film Still I Strive, followed by a conversation with Adam Fleghaar, the cinematographer/director/writer of the film. Affected by social and economic issues related to the genocide that took place more than 30 years ago, children in Cambodia continue to struggle to find proper care and basic necessities. However, at one orphanage in Phnom Penh, the children use performing arts as a path to healing and transformation. "Still I Strive" is a story of transcendence through compassion, unity, and hope. University Union, Hinde Auditorium. 6:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. Contact Philip Rama (pr573@csus.edu) for more information.
  • Saturday November 23. The Cambodian Student Association of CSUS presents the 9th Annaul Khmer Student Coalition Conference. As we, Cambodian-Americans, transitioned into our adopted country, we not only left and lost loved ones but we also began to incorporate different cultures into our daily routines. As we continue to move forward, is it time to reassess? Questions such as Who are we? How did we get here? and How do we move forward? will continue to be in our conciousness. University Union Ballroom. 8am-8pm. Registration required: 2013kscc.eventbrite.com. For more information contact Phillip Rama (Phillip.Rama@gmail.com).
  • Saturday November 23. The Cambodian Student Association of CSUS presents Nurturing the Mind & Body: Performance be renowned composer Chinary Ung and dance master Charya Burt.  Composer Ung and Dance Master Charya Burt will speak on their experiences as Cambodian-Americans in the performing arts. As Cambodians migrated to different parts of the world due to social, economic, and political issues arising from the genocide in Cambodia, they began to incorporate different cultures into their own. Cambodian migration has inspired many different artists to create new art, music, and dance that fuse the Cambodian culture with others. University Ballroom. 5:30 - 6:30 p.m. Contact Philip Rama (pr573@csus.edu) for more details.
  • Monday December 2. A discussion of how migration affects gender will take place as part of WOMS 115: Introduction to Women's Studies and the campus community is invited to join. The discussion will focus on two essays: Lisa Lowe's "Heterogeneity, Hybridity and Multiplicity" and an excerpt from Gloria Ansaldua's "Borderlands/La Frontera". Humboldt 202. 12 - 1:15 p.m.
  • Wednesday, December 11. The movie Sleep Dealer will be screened as part of Government 162: Film and Culture in a Globalized World. Sleep Dealer depicts a dystopian future to explore ways in which technology both oppresses and connects migrants. Members of the campus community are invited to join the GOVT 162 students for this screening. Enrolled students will have priority for seating. Alpine 122. 6 p.m.
  • Wednesday December 11 - Saturday December 15. The Department of Theater and Dance presents its annual Faculty Dance Concert, an engaging evening showcasing a wide range of music and dance styles choreographed by faculty and guest artists, and performed by talented students and alumni. This year's concert features three pieces inspired by migration. Visiting scholar Raissa Simpson will present Stop Shrill, a sprited 11-minute dance that connects bodily movement to the ululating sounds inspired by rural migrants finding a source of water after fleeing the nartural disaster of drought. Visiting scholar Kim T. Davis presents The Passageway of Hope and Despair, a piece inspired by the plight of people displaced by the unrest in Syria, in particular, the women of Syria and their struggle, loss, and perserverence to survive. Faculty choreographer Osvaldo Ramirez presents a piece inspired by the development of Mexican Polkas as Eurpeans migrated to Mexico in the 1800s. Shasta Hall, University Theater. Visit http://www.csus.edu/dram/season.html for show times and ticket information.