digital camera show
The Digital Photography Seminar's Show
symposium
An Off-Campus One-Day Symposium
Photos by Jeff Hendy

Off-Campus Seminars

These seminars take place on different days of the week and in many locations around town, some of them members' homes.

This semester, there are three different kinds of off-campus seminars. Many are the traditional kind that run for the entire semester, or beyond. Others are one-day events; signup requirements vary! Read the descriptions carefully! They are:

You can also register for the symposia or the traditional seminars at the Rendezvous on Jan. 29 in the CSUS University Union.

You can sign up for as many of these semesters as fit your desires and schedules. Some of them have waiting lists and are not adding new members. If you are interested in one of these closed seminars, consider being a leader or co-leader for a new section! In order to start a new group you will need to identify a meeting place, days and times for the sessions and work on recruiting potential participants.


Each seminar has a Style immediately following its name, defined as follows:


One-Day Seminars

Fifteen One-Day Symposia

These are single-day events held at the time and place indicated. Each of these sessions is limited to 50 participants and registration is required! You may register online for as many of these sessions as you desire.

To register online, use this link. You will be asked your Renaissance membership number (on your membership card, but add RS before the six-digit number, i.e., RS777777); you also will be able to look it up on that site. Once you have registered, you will get a confirmation email. You can go back and register for more of these seminars (or even cancel if you need to).

Alternatively, you may email Ed Sherman.

The Religions of Ancient Greece (L)
Wednesday, Feb. 10 (Note: Schedule Change!), 2:30 to 3:45 p.m.
River's Edge Residential Community, 601 Feature Dr (Off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Boulevard)

Ed Sherman, presenter

A fully illustrated look at the gods, temples, rituals and beliefs of the Ancient Hellenes. This is not the story of mythology, but instead a look at how the Hellenes undertook to stay in harmony with the immortals.

Asian Arts and Crafts (L)
Thursday, Feb. 18, 2 to 3:45 p.m.
Campus Commons Residential Community, 22 Cadillac Drive (Off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Blvd.)

Chris Budwine, presenter

Asian countries have produced many different types of arts and crafts, depending upon readily available material from jade to bamboo. This fully illustrated symposium is divided into two parts: 1) Southeast Asian crafts; 2) Asian jewelry.

The Art Game (L)
Monday, Feb 22, 1 to 3 p.m.
Eskaton Monroe Lodge, 3225 Freeport Blvd.

Ed Sherman, presenter

Collecting art can be fun and sometimes rewarding. It can also be an expensive and risky hobby. Using an abundance of art photos, we will explore the joys and pitfalls of playing The Art Game.

Celebration of Women I: Women Aviators (L)
Thursday, Feb. 25, 2 to 3:30 p.m.
Oakmont of Carmichael, 4717 Engle Rd, Carmichael (near the corner of Engle and Mission Avenue)

Doris Keller, presenter

The Wright brothers first controlled flight in 1903. Almost immediately, women were in air: barnstorming, flying exhibitions, flying the mail, participating in contests and organizing women aviators' groups. They helped build planes during WW II and flew planes to where they were needed for the war efforts. Some women became test pilots and passed all the tests to become astronauts, but were denied, despite taking their case to the U.S. Congress. Now it is not uncommon for women to fly jets, have commanded the space shuttle and walk in space.

California Air Quality (L)
Wednesday, March 2, 2:30 to 3:45 p.m.
River's Edge Residential Community, 601 Feature Dr (Off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Boulevard)

David Abelson, presenter

California's Leadership Role in Addressing Air Pollution (from the 1940s to the present.) It is widely known that California has some of the most severe air pollution problems in the United States. What is far less known is the tremendous success and leadership California has provided in addressing this world-wide problem. This symposium will highlight many of the key discoveries and innovations California has pioneered, and will also examine the big air quality challenges still ahead.

Celebration of Women II: Women Athletes (L)
Thursday, March 10, 2 to 3:45 p.m.
Campus Commons Residential Community, 22 Cadillac Dr (Off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Blvd.)

Carolyn Martin, presenter

Learn about the transition from "too fragile and not competitive" to winning Olympic medals. Be ready for surprises. The first pro women's baseball team played in 1875. Women were initially banned from the Olympics. Opponents to college women's teams in the 1930s included the Women's Division of the AAU because competition was not "ladylike." Profiles of some pioneering women athletes will help illustrate the presentation.

Game Changers: 12 Elections that Transformed California (L)
Monday, March 21, 1 to 3 p.m.
Eskaton Monroe Lodge, 3225 Freeport Blvd.

Kathleen Beasley, presenter

California's Constitution offers broader free-speech protection than the U.S. Constitution. Theodore Roosevelt felt Los Angeles needed Owens Valley water much more than Owens Valley did. And Hiram Johnson became governor and created the initiative process only because of a would-be assassin's bullet. These are just a few of the interesting anecdotes in Game Changers: 12 Elections that Transformed California, a new book written by four people (including former TV newsman Steve Swatt) with a combined 150 years' experience in California politics and government.

Impressionists, Radicals of the Art World (L)
Thursday, March 24, 2 to 3:30 p.m.
Oakmont of Carmichael, 4717 Engle Rd, Carmichael (near the corner of Engle and Mission Avenue)

Sherry Rhodes and Mary Elliott-Klemm, presenters

A little bit of old art, a whole bunch of new art and the repercussions that Impression wrought upon the Art world. At this seminar discover how Impressionism challenged the artistic status quo and set it on a new tangent.

The Second Amendment: What It Says and What It Means (L)
Wednesday, April 6 (Note: Schedule Change!), 2:30 to 3:45 p.m.
River's Edge Residential Community, 601 Feature Dr. (Off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Boulevard)

Eric McElwain, presenter

The right to keep and bear arms was not controversial for this country's first 200 years. Why is it now in the headlines almost every day? We will try to shed some light on what is really behind this issue.

Gertrude Bell, Queen of the Desert (L)
Thursday, April 14, 2 to 3:45 p.m.
Campus Commons Residential Community, 22 Cadillac Dr Drive (Off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Blvd.)

Elly Thomas, presenter

Gertrude Bell, the female Lawrence of Arabia! Gertrude crisscrossed the Arabian desert, meeting sheiks and spying for the English government. She traveled in typical Victorian style with frills and fancy hats, but had one of the most brilliant minds of her time. She helped, to a great extent, form the current Middle East as we know it. Lawrence got the movie, Gertrude should get the credit.

Back in The Day: Hoover's FBI (L)
Monday, April 18, 1 to 3 p.m.
Eskaton Monroe Lodge, 3225 Freeport Blvd.

Bill Olmsted, presenter

Relying on his over 11 years as an FBI Special Agent—the first four under Hoover—Bill Olmsted will describe the Bureau's traditional investigations from the early days such as Kidnapping, Extortion, Bank Robbery and a myriad of other crimes. These were the cornerstone of the Bureau's early reputation before its current involvement with computer hackers and terrorists.

History as Mystery (L)
Thursday, April 21, 2 to 3:30 p.m.
Oakmont of Carmichael, 4717 Engle Rd, Carmichael (near the corner of Engle and Mission Avenue)

Ed Sherman, presenter

History as Mystery will compare the research and methods of Historians to those of Detectives as they go about their business of solving mysteries. So we will observe both the Historian and Detective as they exercise their analytical powers of deduction to identify perpetrators of crimes against individuals and whole societies. Each one will be dealing with the proverbial questions: Who, What, When, Where, How and, most importantly, Why?

Celebration of Women III: Women in Politics (D)
Wednesday, May 4, 2:30 to 3:45 p.m.
River's Edge Residential Community, 601 Feature Dr (Off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Boulevard)

Panel presentation

A panel of Renaissance Society women will share some of their Wild and Crazy experiences in the world of politics. Capital Capers and National Nuttiness will be the theme of this fun and entertaining discussion.

Frank Gehry, Genius Architect (L)
Thursday, May 12, 2 to 3:30 p.m.
Oakmont of Carmichael, 4717 Engle Rd, Carmichael (near the corner of Engle and Mission Avenue)

Peter Kosar, presenter

Frank Gehry is one of the most innovative architects today. His Guggenheim Bilbao Museum and Walt Disney Concert Hall demonstrate that great buildings don't have to be built using simple shapes with square corners. We'll explore these and a few other of his buildings using videos and photos. We'll also show you how he designs buildings that defy conventional blueprints. As a special treat, you'll see a short clip from The Simpsons TV Show featuring Frank Gehry playing himself poking fun of his own designs.

Socrates and Jesus, the Conscience of Western Civilization (L)
Thursday, May 19, 2 to 3:45 p.m.
Campus Commons Residential Community, 22 Cadillac Dr. (Off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Blvd.)

Ed Sherman, presenter

Socrates and Jesus. Each of these men in his own unique way contributed to our contemporary sense of morality. By examining the mission and message of each we will discover how together they became the conscience of Western Civilization.


Thirteen Thursdays at ACC

These off-campus seminars from 9 to 11 a.m. on Thursdays have a different topic each week. These are drop-in seminars; no registration is required. They are all at the Asian Community Center, 7334 Park City Dr., Sacramento (phone 393-9026). Directions: From Interstate 5, take the Pocket Road west exit and go south on Greenhaven about five blocks to Park City Drive. Be sure to wear your Renaissance nametag.

Feb. 4: Ai Wei Wei: Never Sorry documentary
Allan Keown
This 2013 film is the inside story of a dissident for the digital age who inspires global audiences and blurs the boundaries of art and politics. It is based upon unprecedented access to Ai and provides a nuanced exploration of contemporary China and one of its most compelling public figures.
Feb. 11: Vietnam
Terry Moss
On Terry's journey to Vietnam, he was touched by the friendliness and hospitality of the people. The biggest highlight was an overnight sailing trip on Ha Long Bay, which is dotted with 3,000 jagged peaked islands—with spectacular scenery and a phenomenal sunset.
Feb. 18: TED Talks
George and Claire Roper
TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) talks are brief (less than 18 minutes) presentations that anyone can watch online for free. The 2000-plus TED Talks, wrapped up in personal stories, are mostly from people you have never heard of before and cover almost every subject that you can imagine. We present several each session and show participants how and where to locate and enjoy them.
Feb. 25: Haven in the East, My Shanghai
Angie Rooney
This presentation is a personal history of a little-known chapter of World War II. When Hitler came to power and the Nazis began to sweep through Europe, more than 20,000 Jewish refugees fled to Shanghai, China. Shanghai was an unlikely refuge, but it was the only city in the world just prior to the Second World War that did not require a visa for entry. It was an open port and became a haven for Jews fleeing the Holocaust. Under the Japanese occupation, these refugees were forced into the only ghetto outside of Europe.
March 3: Alive Inside documentary
Allan Keown with Renaissance Society member Beth Mann, Retired State Long-Term Care Ombudsman
This 2014 film follows social worker Dan Cohen, founder of the nonprofit organization Music and Memory, as he fights against a broken health-care system to demonstrate music's ability to combat memory loss and restore a deep sense of self to those suffering from it.
March 10: Malaysia (Borneo)
Terry Moss
Jungle hikes, sailing the South China Sea, photographing airborn orangutans and visiting the Niah Caves where man settled 40,000 years ago, were highlights of Malaysia (Borneo). In addition, meeting the Ibans, a native tribe of people who used to be headhunters, was unforgettable.
March 17: TED Talks
George and Claire Roper
A continuation of the seminar discussed above under Feb. 18.
March 24: Water Rights in California
David Abelson
"Just Whose Water Is It Anyway?" As battles rage over limited water supplies throughout the state (e.g. the "twin-tunnels" controversy; the regulation of over-drafted groundwater basins; etc.), we often hear phrases like these: "They're trying to steal our water!" or "No one can tell me what to do with my water!" This presentation will provide you with a layman's guide to the complex, contradictory and downright confusing laws pertaining to water rights in California. It will help you better understand "just whose water is it anyway?" Mr. Abelson has worked in the field of water resources and the environment for 35 years.
March 31: In the Footsteps of Alexander the Great through Asia (335-324 BC)
David Warren
This seminar will cover Alexander the Great's travels through Asia in 334-324 BC, covering the current countries of Turkey, Lebanon, Israel, Egypt, Iraq and Iran. He returned to his new capital home in Baghdad, Iraq, after encountering the monsoon season in India and died there in June 323 BC.
April 7: Last Days in Vietnam documentary
Allan Keown
This 2014 film documents the final chaotic final days of the Vietnam War, as the North Vietnamese Army closed in on Saigon as the panicked South Vietnamese people desperately attempts to escape. On the ground, American soldiers and diplomats confronted a moral quandary: whether to obey White House orders to evacuate only U.S. citizens or risk being charged with treason and save the lives of as many South Vietnamese citizens as they could.
April 14: Travel subject TBD
Terry Moss
April 21: TED Talks
George and Claire Roper
A continuation of the seminar discussed above under Feb. 18.
April 28: Asian Arts & Crafts
Chris Budwine
Asian countries have produced many different types of arts and crafts depending upon readily available material from jade to bamboo. This illustrated seminar will focus on Southeast Asian crafts.

All-Semester Seminars

Antiques: Looking Through Vintage Treasures (A/S)
1st and 3rd Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Various Locations

Shirley Hines

Members who sign up for this class will range from those who always wanted to know more about antiques and where to find them to people who own antiques and would like to share them with the class. In addition, we will be visiting several antique stores. Discussion will be held at each meeting.

Big History Media Club (D)
1st and 3rd Mondays, 1 to 3 p.m., United Methodist Church 2101 Zinfandel Dr., Rancho Cordova 95670

John McCorkell

How did humans get to where we are today and what may be in our future? These and other issues of human life will be discussed in the seminar using media (books, videos, articles, etc). Participants will read a book/article or view videos on a selected topic prior to the monthly discussion. Resource lists will be provided. Resources may be PBS documentaries, TED talks, or from Here is The Big History website for Lifelong Learners. Participants will take turns choosing and leading discussion on topics of their choice. Registration is required, maximum is 30, and a waiting list will be maintained.

Book Group—Monday (P)
1st Mondays, 1 to 2:30 p.m., East Ranch Clubhouse, 150 East Ranch Rd., at American River Dr. and Munroe

Carol Hayes, Ann Blazina

Books of all genres are read and discussed at the relaxed monthly meeting of this group. Members take turns selecting a book for the group to read. That member opens the meeting's discussion with a short bio of the author, his/her review of the book, and perhaps a synopsis of outside reviews and/or background information. Then each member gives his/her brief review. Lively discussions are frequent. The group meets year-round. Registration is required, maximum size is 20, and a waiting list is maintained. Contact leader for specific date(s) or more information.

Book Group—Tuesday (D)
3rd Tuesdays, 9:30 to 11 a.m., Eskaton Monroe Lodge at 3225 Freeport Blvd.

Marian Kile, Suzanne Armer

The different book hosts choose a wide variety of books, both fiction and non-fiction. It is up to the host to make the selection, but the books must be in the Sacramento Public Library system so they are available for our readers. Members engage in intelligent yet comfortable discussion about the writing, the topic, and the author. Group size is limited to 16. We usually meet in the community room listed above unless the book host wants us to meet in his/her home or a park. Registration is required and a waiting list is maintained.

Bridge Land Park/Greenhaven/Pocket Area (A)
1st and 3rd Tuesdays, 1 p.m., Members' Homes

Phyllis Mills, Ellen Nathan

We have two tables of party bridge and take turns meeting in members' homes. We are friendly and willing to assist members, as needed, to improve their skills in playing the game. We need one or two additional members who would like to join us on a regular basis, and share hosting the group. Also, we need people who would like to occasionally substitute in the group. Contact Phyllis Mills if you are interested in being a regular member or a substitute.

Camping And More (A) This seminar has been cancelled!!
Meeting Places, Dates, and Times Vary

Susan Rubinstein, John Szabo

Gather with new friends and travel to interesting and scenic locations on a day trip or overnight at a campground or hotel. Camping trips are to the mountains, seashore and desert. Join as an experienced or beginning camper. Visit national, state, and county parks, gardens, museums, wineries, ethnic restaurants, local attractions, kayaking, festivals, and community walks or day trips. Eat healthy food prepared by your fellow travelers at picnics, potlucks, or around the campfire. This seminar is suitable for all activity levels. Members assist in planning activities and preparing potluck meals. This is done in small groups with the leaders. Call leaders for more details and to enroll.

Le Cercle Français (Conversational French) (P)
Wednesdays, 1 to 3 p.m., Campus Commons Clubhouse, 650 Commons Dr.

Helen Hanna

This seminar is for French speakers at an intermediate or higher level, requiring a working acquaintance with the language through high school or college classes, or from living in a French-speaking country. Members participate through presentations, readings, and conversations in French Registration is required, class size is limited to 15, and a waiting list is maintained.

El Círculo Español (Conversational Spanish) (D)
Every Thursday, 10:00 a.m. to Noon, Campus Commons Clubhouse, 650 Commons Dr.

JoAnn Peter

This seminar is for Spanish speakers at an intermediate or advanced level. The emphasis is on conversation. We sometimes read literature selections, watch a video, or review grammar, as desired by the group. Registration is required, maximum size is 15, and a waiting list will be maintained.

La Conversation En Français, Niveau Intermediate (D)
2nd and 4th Tuesdays, 1 to 3 p.m., Campus Commons Clubhouse, 650 Commons Drive,

Irene Sadler

This seminar is for French speakers at an intermediate or higher level, requiring a working acquaintance with the language through high school or college classes or from living in a French-speaking country. Members participate through presentations and conversations to share common interests. A solid grasp of imperfect, future, and subjunctive tenses is required. Class conducted entirely in French. Registration is required, class size is limited to 15, and a waiting list will be maintained.

Creative Writing (P)
Every Wednesday, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Members' Homes

Judy Broussard, Pat Teeters

This group welcomes all types of writing: fiction, memoirs, biographical sketches, poetry, history, and fantasy. Members share their creative writings in a warm and friendly environment. Copies of the work to be read are distributed so attendees can follow along as the author reads aloud. The group then gives its feedback. The emphasis is on clear communication, positive reinforcement, sharing of ideas, and helping each other. Laughter is a must. Group meets year-round. Registration is required, maximum size is 10, and a waiting list is maintained.

Dining Together (A)
2nd Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m., Locations TBA (Feb. 5 planning meeting: Alpine 218)

Noel Hinde, Frances Stroud

Join our dinner group and try different cuisines in the Sacramento area. We will have fun meeting new friends as we dine together once a month during the school year. Members take turns selecting and hosting the restaurants. A planning meeting will be held in Alpine 218 on Friday, Feb. 5, from 12 to 12:45 for new and returning members.

Diversity: Sacramento And Beyond, Part II (L)
2nd and 4th Thursdays, 1 to 3 p.m., Locations TBA

Warren Bonta, Ron Lopez

This bi-weekly seminar is a continuation of the seminar that was held in Fall 2015. It is designed for those who want to learn more about Sacramento's diverse communities and also to explore ways in which the Renaissance Society can reach out to those communities. The seminar will feature speakers and films as organized by members of the Membership, Diversity, and Community Engagement Committee. Specific speakers, topics, and locations will be available at Rendezvous on Jan. 29. This is a drop-in seminar.

Duplicate Bridge (A/S)
2nd and 4th Thursdays, 1 to 4:30 p.m., Selby Ranch Clubhouse, 750 Selby Ranch Road (488-1630), American River Drive west of Watt Avenue

Robert Houghton

This seminar is a bi-weekly game of duplicate bridge. We have three tables of duplicate bridge and currently have 14 regular members signed up, as well as 12 alternates. The skill level is intermediate, and the game is for fun and learning; it is not ACBL-sanctioned. If you would like to add your name to the list or if you would like more information, please contact Bob Houghton by phone or email. We often need to call some of the alternates, so chances of playing are not too remote.

Friends Of The New Yorker Magazine (D)
Every Monday, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., KOH Library, 2300 Sierra Blvd.

Ron Meyer, Harriette Work

This seminar is for those who enjoy reading the New Yorker magazine. Participants read and review each week's issue in advance. Members freely discuss articles in the recent issue, share opinions and gain insights. We meet every Monday throughout the year. Registration is required, maximum size is 20, and a waiting list is maintained.

Games For Entertainment (A/S)
Thursdays, 1 to 3 p.m., Member's Homes

Roberta (Bobby) Frieze, Judy Keaton

Card games, word games, dominoes, and team games are played, and we are open to learning new games. A basic knowledge of cards and trump is helpful. This group has a good time; we spend a few minutes socializing at each meeting before settling down to play. Enjoy the opportunity to learn and socialize with people who have similar interests. Our members host and provide refreshments on a rotation basis depending upon their own calendars. You may use leader's home if your space does not allow. Registration is required, and our group is at its maximum of 12, and a waiting list is maintained.

Games For Fun (A)
Thursdays, 12:30 to 2:30 p.m., Rec Center at Ladi Senior Apartments, 2300 Auburn Blvd.

Jackie Irene

You're never too old to have a happy childhood, at least for an afternoon each week. This group plays cards, dominoes, board games, word games, etc.—the games we played before TV and computers. We play for two hours every Thursday. All are welcome. The group meets year-round. Contact leader for specific date(s) or more information.

Genealogy (P)
2nd and 4th Thursdays, 1 to 3 p.m., Family History Center, 2745 Eastern Ave., Sac 95821

Elaine Duxbury, Marian Kile, Cheryl Nelson, Karen Roseland

This is a special interest group that studies genealogy. We formed in the spring of 2015. We meet twice each month to provide support to genealogists at all levels. Our goal is to share ideas, discuss research progress, share knowledge of other organizations and information sources, and provide mutual aid as we research our family histories. The members will determine topics and format of the meetings, which may include field trips. To register, send an email. Maximum members: 50.

Great Books At Hart (D)
4th Mondays, 10 a.m. to Noon, Ethel Hart Senior Center, Midtown at 27th and J Sts., 915 27th St

Brigid O'Malley, Karen Roseland

Once a month our group meets to discuss a selection we have read from a Great Books anthology. We use the shared inquiry method developed by Great Books Foundation. We will read from the Third Series, Volume II-III: Dewey, Mill, Shakespeare, Bible, Thucydides, Clausewitz, Chekhov, Maimonides, Homer, Montesquieu, Chaucer, Aeschylus, James, Machiavelli, Tolstoy. Newcomers to the "nature of knowledge" are welcome. Curiosity and willingness to read, discuss, and listen are all you need. Participants are expected to read selections from the books that they purchase (about $33), which are used in both semesters. Registration is required and there is no maximum for the class. Contact leaders for specific dates and more information.

Mah Jongg
Mondays, 1:30 p.m., Members' Homes

Carol Camponovo

Our new Mah Jongg group has room for growth. We play every Monday at 1:30 in members' homes and invite those interested in learning Mah Jongg, beginners and experienced players, to join us. Contact leader for more information.

Memoirs (D)
1st and 3rd Mondays, 1 to 3 p.m., Raley's Event Center, 4840 San Juan Ave. at Sunset, Fair Oaks

Alice Ainsworth

Have you been thinking about writing your memoirs? Now is the time. This is the year. Come join us. We are a supportive group, and have lots of fun. We write at home, and read our stories to the group at every meeting. We are motivated and inspired by hearing one another’s stories. Come share your memories with us. Contact Alice for specific date(s) or more information.

Partners In Crime Book Club (P)
4th Thursdays, 1:30-3 p.m., Arcade Library 2443 Marconi Ave.

Marian Lininger

We discover new and exciting mystery writers and discuss their works, which are chosen each meeting by the members. Registration is required, maximum size is 15, and a waiting list is maintained.

Photography As Art (P)
Wednesdays 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Location TBA

Roger Klemm, Mary-Elliott-Klemm, Sherry Rhodes

This seminar will explore varied avenues of photography as a means of expanding our perceptions and challenging our assumptions. A portion of the semester will be devoted to learning about new, current photographic art forms. We continue to work toward seeing and extracting images in evocative and creative ways for visual interest and emotive qualities. Participants must be advanced photographers who are computer literate. Registration is required, the class size is limited to 16 persons, and a waiting list is maintained. Contact leaders for further information.

Photography: Digital Camera Group (L)
Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to Noon, Carmichael Library, 5605 Marconi Ave., Carmichael

Jeff Hendy, Mary Henwood

This seminar is intended for those of you who know how to operate your digital camera, and would like to take better pictures. The meetings are held on Tuesdays, one week at the Carmichael Library and the following week a photographic field trip. The classroom sessions include videos by professional photographers, talks by class members, and discussions of photos that members have posted to the seminar website from the previous week's field trip. In addition, a photo challenge is set each two weeks and photos are discussed. The goal of both the classroom and field trip is to encourage different thinking to help take better photographs. Registration is required, the maximum size is 50, and a waiting list is maintained. You may register online for this seminar. Use this link. You will be asked your Renaissance membership number (on your membership card, but add RS before the six-digit number, i.e., RS777777), but you also will be able to look it up on that site. Once you have registered, you will get a confirmation email. You can go back and cancel if you need to.

Alternatively, please email Mary Henwood

Singing For Fun (A)
Tuesdays, 10 to 11:30 a.m. , Rancho Cordova Methodist Church, 2101 Zinfandel Dr. (at Hirschfeld), Rancho Cordova

Vick Vickland, Sara Zeigler, Jean Dean

Do you like to sing? Do you not read music? Do you not want to memorize? Join us. We provide words (not music), learn about 15 songs and perform for various assisted-living facilities after a couple of months of practice. Some go out for lunch following the sessions. Come and have some fun with us. "Sing, sing a song, sing out loud, sing out strong."—Kermit the Frog.

Travel Through Food I (P)
1st and 3rd Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Location TBD

Cheryl Nelson, Dick Tarble

If you enjoy new and exotic foods from around the world, this seminar is for you. Members present and discuss a country or region, focusing on its culture, history, and, of course, its food. Topics also included are types of foods and their values and uses, and members may organize field trips involving food production. Then, we eat lunch featuring foods from that country or food topic. Lunch can be at a restaurant or can be a potluck. Registration is required, and maximum size is 50. Contact one of the co-leaders to enroll or for more information.

Travel Through Food II (A/S)
2nd and 4th Wednesdays, Lunchtime-2:30 p.m., Arcade Library,  2443 Marconi Ave. and TBA

Sandra Winter, Marsha Littrell

If you enjoy new and exotic foods from around the world, this seminar is for you. Members help to plan presentations featuring the food of a country or region. Lunch can be at a restaurant or potluck. Speakers, field trips, DVDs, or PowerPoint presentations are also a part of the program. Our first meeting is Wednesday, Feb. 10. Meeting places will vary. Registration is required, maximum size is 30, and a waiting list is maintained. Contact Sandra or Marsha to enroll or for more information.

Walkabouts (A/S)
Wednesdays, 9:30 a.m., Sacramento and surrounding towns

Norma Markley, Chris Dreier, Tilly Fairman

There are two groups of walkers with a leader for each group. The leaders determine where the walk will be and prepare a description of the walk. They will walk the two walks beforehand to determine the distance as the Hares walk four miles and the Tortoises two miles, will look for adequate parking and for restroom facilities, and if a State park, how much the fee is. They will choose a restaurant for lunch, and verify that the restaurant has room for a large group and adequate parking. The leader will include directions to the walk in the description. Some leaders include interesting facts about the park or area of the walk. We also inform people that they are expected to stay with their group. We encourage carpooling and provide walkers with a zip code list of the walkers for that purpose. We give each leader a medical emergency packet, and if walkers forgot to wear their Renaissance name tag, we require them to provide their emergency information. Registration is required and there is no maximum size.

Writers' Group I (D)
Thursdays, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., Avalon Hearing Aid Center, 1260 Fulton Ave., Suite B

Peggy Marsh, Dan Keller

Our members come from a variety of backgrounds and write in a wide range of styles with their own choice of subjects: fiction, memoirs, poetry, travelogues, autobiography, biography, family history, emails to friends, letters to the editors, etc. Expert writing is not required. This is not a writing class. Help with style, mechanics, and presentation will be offered if requested. Each member is expected to have 6-8 copies of what they are working on no more than three pages each week. Feedback and critiques are provided if requested. We meet at members' homes year-round. Registration is required, maximum size is 10, and a waiting list is maintained. Those interested in joining should contact leader for exact location of next meeting. The meetings are open to all members.

Writers' Workshop II (P)
Every Tuesday, Noon to 2:00 p.m., Members' Homes

Roy Bishop, Lani Hahn

Our members come from a variety of backgrounds and write in a wide range of styles with their own choice of subjects: fiction, memoirs, poetry, travelogues, autobiography, biography, family history, emails to friends, letters to the editors, etc. Expert writing is not required. This is not a writing class. Help with style, mechanics, and presentation will be offered if requested. Each member is expected to have 6-8 copies of what they are working on no more than three pages each week. Feedback and critiques are provided if requested. We meet at members' homes year-round. Registration is required, maximum size is 10, and a waiting list is maintained. Those interested in joining should contact leader for exact location of next meeting.