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Off-Campus Seminars

These seminars take place on different days of the week and in many locations around town, some of them members' homes. The topics are as varied as the inspirations of the members who have created them!

This semester, there are three different kinds of off-campus seminars. Many are the traditional kind that run for the entire semester, or beyond. Others are one-day events; signup requirements vary! Read the descriptions carefully! They are:

You can sign up for as many of these semesters as fit your desires and schedules. Many of them have waiting lists and are not adding new members. If you are interested in one of these closed seminars, consider being a leader or co-leader for a new section! In order to start a new group you will need to identify a meeting place, days and times for the sessions and work on recruiting potential participants. The Seminar Committee will help you!


Each seminar has a Style immediately following its name, defined as follows:


One-Day Seminars

Eighteen One-Day Symposia

These are single-day events held at the time and place indicated. Each of these sessions is limited to 60 participants and registration is required! You may register for as many of these sessions as you desire. (You can also go back and cancel if your plans change later.)

You can sign up with Online Seminar Registration.

Online Registration only
  • Human Migration and Language, Marty Keale, presenter, Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2:30 to 3:45 p.m., River's Edge Residential Community, 601 Cadillac Dr. (off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Blvd.)
    Highlights from an upcoming seminar on the Relationship Between Human Migrations and the Development of Human Languages. The discussion begins with the first humans and explores the major migrations and language groups of the Eurasian land mass, with brief glances into other areas of the globe.
  • Ancient Pompeii, Ed Sherman, presenter, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2 to 3:45 p.m., Campus Common Residential Community, 22 Cadillac Dr. (off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Blvd.)
    The eruption of Vesuvius (79 AD) has left us a wealth of historical evidence about that city's material culture. What does that evidence tell us about life in Pompeii?
  • DNA Testing, Marian Kile, presenter, Monday, Feb. 12, 1 to 2:45 p.m., Eskaton, Monroe Manor, 3225 Freeport Blvd.
    Wondering about your genetic heritage? Thinking about taking a DNA test?  Trying to decide which test to take? Want to know more about the different testing companies?  This is the symposium that can help you make a more informed decision.
  • Eros: Love and Lust in Antiquity, Ed Sherman, presenter, Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2:30 to 3:45 p.m., River's Edge Residential Community, 601 Cadillac Dr. (off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Blvd.)
    For Valentine's Day, a good-humored appraisal of the role of Eros in Greco-Roman culture. Artfully illustrated.
  • American Intelligence Gathering, late 20th Century, Jerry Glasser, presenter, Monday, Feb. 26, 10 to 11:45 a.m., Eskaton Village, 3939 Walnut Ave., Carmichael
    Over-Flights: United States Intelligence gathering efforts during the Cold War from 1945 through 1962 (the Cuban Missile crisis).
  • Women Who Dared, Carolyn Martin, presenter, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2 to 3:45 p.m., Campus Common Residential Community, 22 Cadillac Dr. (off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Blvd.)
    Women Who Dared: from piracy to politics, to espionage plus other tales of courageous American women whom our history books usually ignore.
  • Human Origins, Allan Keown, presenter, Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2:30 to 3:45 p.m., Campus Common Residential Community, 22 Cadillac Dr. (off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Blvd.)
    The South African Cape in general and Pinnacle Point Caves 13B and 5A/B, near Mossel Bay, 200 miles east of Cape Town in particular, are now the internationally accepted origin of human beings thanks to the remarkable work of Curtis W. Marean.  As a result, they are slated to become a World Heritage site in the next few years.  Six Renaissance Society members traveled there during the first two weeks of November 2017.  This presentation will report on that journey.
  • Greco-Roman Civilization, Ed Sherman, presenter, Thursday, March 8, 2 to 3:45 p.m., Campus Common Residential Community, 22 Cadillac Dr. (off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Blvd.)
    Greco-Roman culture is the foundation of our Western Civilization. It is a synthesis of the very best that the Greeks and Romans had to offer. Created in the first century BC, it disintegrated four centuries later. How did that happen?
  • America in the 1930s and '40s, Ed Speegle, presenter, Monday, March 12, 1 to 2:45 p.m., Eskaton, Monroe Manor, 3225 Freeport Blvd.
    The story of the United States home front during the Great Depression and World War II.
  • Behavioral Economics, Kathleen Beasley, presenter, Wednesday, March 14, 2:30 to 3:45 p.m., River's Edge Residential Community, 601 Cadillac Dr. (off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Blvd.)
    Steven Levitt (Freakonomics) and Malcolm Gladwell (Tipping Point, Outliers, and Blink) have taught us to look at data deeply to identify cause-and-effect instead of just presuming we know what is going on in the world around us. This lecture will summarize some of the more interesting work by Levitt and Gladwell.
  • Ancient Maps, Ed Sherman, presenter, Monday, March 19, 10 to 11:45 a.m., Eskaton Village, 3939 Walnut Ave., Carmichael
    Clocks orient us in time; maps orient us in space. When did maps originate? How were they constructed? How were they used? What role have they played in charting the course of Western Civilization?
  • Walt Disney, Anne Rewell, presenter, Thursday, March 22, 2 to 3:45 p.m., Campus Common Residential Community, 22 Cadillac Dr. (off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Blvd.)
    Walt Disney, the man and his magic. A look at an American icon. His Life, his Art and his Vision.
  • Confucius, Chris Budwine, presenter, Wednesday, March 28, 2:30 ti 3:45 p.m., River's Edge Residential Community, 601 Cadillac Dr. (off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Blvd.)
    Who was Confucius? Why did he become a teacher?  What has caused his teaching to last two-and-a-half thousand years and make such an impact on the Chinese culture?
  • Italian Renaissance Painters, Ed Sherman, presenter, Monday, April 9, 1 to 2:45 p.m., Eskaton, Monroe Manor, 3225 Freeport Blvd.
    Study of the artistic innovations and paintings of a select group of Italian artists of the Renaissance.
  • Time Travel at the Movies, Chip Zempel, presenter, Thursday, April 12, 2 to 3:45 p.m., Campus Common Residential Community, 22 Cadillac Dr. (off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Blvd.)
    We'll look at how Time Travel is handled in the movies—from love stories to comedies and hardcore science fiction—to see how Time Travel might work and some of the problems that might be involved.
  • The Story of English, Marty Keale, presenter, Monday, April 16, 10 to 11:45 a.m., Eskaton Village, 3939 Walnut Ave., Carmichael
    The English Language, from its earliest days as a dialect of Old German, used by only a few tens of thousands of people, to its current status as the Lingua Franca for most of the world.
  • Death in Antiquity, Ed Sherman, presenter, Wednesday, April 18, 2:30 to 3:45 p.m., River's Edge Residential Community, 601 Cadillac Dr. (off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Blvd.)
    How did ancient Greeks and Romans deal with death? What burial methods and rituals did they use to usher the deceased into the Netherworld?
  • The First Fleet, Anne Rewell, presenter, Thursday, April 26, 2 to 3:45 p.m., Campus Common Residential Community, 22 Cadillac Dr. (off Howe, north of Fair Oaks Blvd.)
    We will explore the voyage of 1,400 individuals who set sail from England in 1787 to Botany Bay: the convicts (men, women and children) and sailors who established the first European settlement in Australia, and the beginning of the nation.

Wednesday Mini-Seminars at Franklin Library
Wednesdays, 12:30 to 2 p.m., Franklin Library, 10055 Franklin High Rd., Elk Grove
Drop-In; No Registration Required

Ginger Mack, Jeff Rubin

This series of seminars is led by a different speaker each week. It is lecture format with some class discussion/questions/answers. Here is a map to find the Franklin Library.

  • Feb. 7: David Abelson, The California Delta. The twin tunnels and the effect on the Delta are topics of interest for all of us who live in the area.
  • Feb. 14: Chris Budwine, Asian Arts and Crafts. Asian Countries have had a long history of producing beautiful art and crafts. In this talk, the emphasis is on Chinese arts and crafts from woods, paper, fabrics, to stone, in particular, bamboo objects.
  • Feb. 21: Arianne Laidlaw, Mark Twain. Why the world has Sacramento to thank for Mark Twain's career.
  • Feb. 28: Ken Cross, Transitions: What will I do with the rest of my life? Whether retired or approaching retirement, help design the Next Chapter of your life. Reconnect with your talents, skills and aptitudes for your new life’s path of fun, meaning, and purpose.
  • March 7: Ellen Osborne, Indian Hattie. Indian Hattie was a Native American woman of the Nisenan people of El Dorado County, born before the arrival of the 49ers, and orphaned by the El Dorado Indian Wars of 1850-51.  Her story is a story of survival and adaptation within two cultures.
  • March 14: Paul Helman, Old Time Radio. Learn about the origins of radio, both the technology and the beginnings of broadcasting.  Reminisce about favorite shows and performers and know more about the ultimate transition to television.  How did broadcast radio come about, who were the individuals involved and what eventually became of our favorite programs?
  • March 21: Teven Laxer, Documenting Your Family Heirlooms. Many of us have family heirlooms.  This program will deal with how we can document our heirlooms, our family treasures.  He will discuss making an inventory, stabilizing our treasures, photographing our heirlooms, and cataloguing them.  He will also discuss who knows what heirlooms we have, where they are, the stories behind the heirlooms and how we wish to pass them on.
  • March 28: Maryellen Burns, We Are Where We Eat. A discussion of Elk Grove's foods, wines and agriculture.
  • April 4: Sandra Carter and Ruth McElhinney, The Nicaraguan Pottery Project.
  • April 11: Jim Lerner, China and Climate Change. What China is doing to reduce pollution in line with the Paris Accord.
  • April 18: Allan Keown, Go Blue;  Live Longer, Be Happier. This presentation will review Dan Beuttner's five Blue Zones and suggests a sixth.  It will discuss his nine power practices/lessons and suggests a 10th.  It is based upon an outline supplementing Beuttner's research and will include several relevant TED talks. 
  • April 25: Marty Keale, Human Migration and Diversity.  Highlights from an upcoming seminar on the Relationship Between Human Migrations and the Development of Human Languages. The discussion begins with the first humans and explores the major migrations and language groups of the Eurasian land mass, with brief glances into other areas of the globe.

All-Semester Seminars

These all-semester Off-Campus Seminars meet regularly through the semester or year-round, as noted in each seminar description. You must register for these, except for Great Books at Hart, which is a drop-in. They have different procedures: online, at Rendezvous, or by contacting one of the seminar leaders. Read the listings carefully! Some of them have waiting lists. NOTE: Because of privacy and security concerns, leaders' contact information is not listed here; you can find it by going to online registration or calling the office.

Book Group: Monday (P)
1st Monday, 1 to 2:30 p.m., East Ranch Clubhouse, 150 East Ranch Rd. at American River Dr. and Munroe
Contact leader; no online registration

Carol Hayes, Ann Blazina

Books of all genres are read and discussed at the relaxed monthly meeting of this group. Members take turns selecting a book for the group to read. That member opens the meeting's discussion with a short bio of the author, his/her review of the book and perhaps a synopsis of outside reviews and/or background information. Then each member gives his/her brief opinion/review. Lively discussions are frequent. The group meets each month year-round. Registration is required; maximum size is 16 and a waiting list is maintained. Contact the leader by email or phone for specific date(s) or more information.

Book Group: Tuesday (D)
3rd Tuesday, 9:30 to 11 a.m., Eskaton Monroe Lodge, 3325 Freeport Blvd.
Contact leader; no online registration

Marian Kile, Suzanne Armer

The different book hosts choose a wide variety of books, both fiction and non-fiction. The host makes the book selection but the book must be available in the Sacramento Public Library system. Members engage in intelligent yet comfortable discussions about writing, the author and sometimes the topic. Group size is limited to 16. Registration is required and a waiting list is maintained if needed.

Book Group: Wednesday, Fantasy/Science Fiction (D)
1st Wednesday, 10 to 11:30 a.m., Arcade Library Meeting Room, 2443 Marconi Ave.; Location may vary
Online Registration only

Gayle Greene

Members alternate selecting a book in the fantasy/science fiction genre for the group to read. The person suggesting the book opens the discussion with a brief biography of the author, a short synopsis of the book, and his/her review, followed by an open discussion with all members. This is a year-round group, meeting monthly on the first Wednesday of each month. Registration is required, and there is a maximum of 12 members. A waiting list will be maintained. Location will be at the Arcade Library, subject to availability.

Book Group: Thursday, Partners In Crime (D/P)
4th Thursday, 1:30 to 2:30 p.m., Arden-Dimick Library, 891 Watt Ave.
Contact leader; no online registration

Lynda Cassady, Pat Stokes

Discover new mystery writers. Each month a member selects an author and participants may read any of that author's books. At the monthly meeting, everyone shares their personal opinion in a friendly roundtable discussion. Some past authors include: Louise Penny, Jussi Adler Olsen, Mark Krueger, Elizabeth George, Aenalour Indridason.

Party Bridge: Land Park/Greenhaven/Pocket Area (A)
1st And 3rd Tuesdays, 12:30 to 4 p.m., Members' Homes, usually in Land Park/Greenhaven/Pocket are
Contact leader; no online registration

Phyllis Mills, Ellen Nathan

We have two tables of party bridge, taking turns to host in members' homes. Although we have eight regular members at the present time, we often need substitutes. We are a friendly group, with players meeting at 11:30 to share lunches and chat. Please call Phyllis Mills for more information.

Le Cercle Français (Conversational French) (D)
Wednesdays, 1 to 3 p.m., Campus Commons Clubhouse, 650 Commons Dr.
Online Registration only

Rosalind Becker

This seminar is for French speakers at an intermediate or higher level, requiring a working acquaintance with the language through high school or college classes, or from living in a French-speaking country. Members share common interests through presentations, readings, and conversations. Registration is required, seminar size is limited to 15, and a waiting list is maintained.

El Círculo Español (Conversational Spanish) (D)
Thursdays, 10 a.m. to Noon, Campus Commons Clubhouse, 650 Commons Dr.
Online Registration required, but please contact leader first

JoAnn Peter

This seminar is for Spanish speakers at a high intermediate or advanced level. The emphasis is on conversation. The ability to use the imperfect and preterite tenses is necessary. We also read literature selections, watch a video or review grammar as desired by the group. Registration is required, maximum size is 14 and a waiting list is maintained.

La Conversation En Français Intermediate Level (D)
1st and 3rd Tuesdays, 1 to 3 p.m., Locations TBA
Online Registration only
Meetings begin Feb. 13 and end April 14

Irene Sadler

This seminar is for French speakers at an intermediate or advanced level, requiring a working acquaintance with the language through high school or college classes or from living in a French-speaking country. Members participate through presentations and conversations to share common interests. Class conducted in French. Registration is required, seminar size is limited to 15, and a waiting list will be maintained.

A Cook's Tour of Sacramento (A/S)
Various dates/times
Online Registration only

Maryellen Burns-Dabaghian, Lawrence Fox

A Cook's Tour continues from the fall seminar with significant changes.  We will visit only 6 to 8 venues, and the times and days of the week will vary; i.e., they will not be held solely on Monday evenings.  A complete list of our venues will be available at the Rendezvous, and will also be provided through eblasts to those who sign up. Each event will continue to cover a historic or contemporary food issue, and we shall continue fund raising to assist the CSUS/ASI food pantry. Proposed venues include: Bogle Winery, A Talking Tour of R Street, Bella Bru, Sarom's Kitchen, Taylor's Market, SacTown Union Brewery, and Soil Born Farm.

Creating a Healthy Kitchen
10 a.m. to 12 noon, 2/6, 2/20, 3/6, 3/20, 4/10, 4/24, Arden-Dimick Library, 891 Watt Ave.
Online Registration only

Anne Evans

Nutrition scientists tell us that many chronic illnesses can be halted or reversed with lifestyle
 changes. The latest research is even showing improvement in Alzheimer's disease. You tell yourself that you want to eat healthier. Yet with all the choices at the grocery store and so many half-truths in the media, how can anyone know what to trust? Come learn some research-based information that supports better sleep, improved energy, reduced pain, clearer thinking, weight control, and more. There will be foods to sample, recipes to try, cookware and kitchen tips to consider. No presentations required.

Digital Photography Group (L)
Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to Noon, Arden-Dimick Library, 891 Watt Ave.
Online Registration only

Jane Steele

The Digital Camera Group is an ongoing seminar that welcomes new participants every semester. Last semester we explored camera settings such as aperture, shutter speed, dawn and sunset photography. The group will continue learning to use the various settings on their cameras and work on new challenges to become better photographers. Join us as we expand our photographic knowledge. The seminar will alternate between classroom instruction and field trips.

Dining Together (A)
2nd Wednesday, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Locations TBA; 12 noon Feb. 2 planning meeting, Alpine 218
Online Registration only

Cheryl Nelson, Karen Nemetz

An opportunity to socialize with your fellow Renaissance members in an informal setting. Members volunteer to arrange dinners at local restaurants. We try to choose reasonably priced, interesting restaurants, hopefully, from different cultures. Locations and details are posted in The Recorder each month there is a dinner. It is necessary to RSVP for each dinner in order to attend, and preference is given to registered Dining Together members. Online registration is required for membership. An orientation meeting will be held on Friday, Feb. 2, at noon in Alpine 218.

Franklin Library Mini-Seminars

Listed above. Jump to them.

Friends Of The New Yorker Magazine (D)
Mondays, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., The Center, 2300 Sierra Blvd.
Contact leader; no online registration

Ron Meyer, Harriette Work

This seminar is for those who enjoy reading the New Yorker magazine. Participants read and review each week's issue in advance of the meeting. Members freely discuss articles in the recent issue, share opinions, and gain insights. We meet every Monday all year long.

Games For Entertainment (A/S)
Thursdays, 1 to 3 p.m., Members' Homes
Contact leader; no online registration

Roberta (Bobby) Frieze,  Judy Keaton

Card games, word games, dominoes, team games are played. We are open to learning new games. A basic knowledge of cards and trump is helpful. This group has a good time. We spend a few minutes socializing at each meeting before settling down to play. Enjoy the opportunity to learn and socialize with people who have similar interests. Our members host and provide refreshments on a rotation basis depending upon their own calendars. You may use the leader's home if your space does not allow. Currently, our group is at capacity, but a wait list is maintained.

Games For Fun (A/S)
Thursdays, 12:30 to 2:30 p.m., Rec Center at Ladi Senior Apartments, 2300 Auburn Blvd.
Online Registration only

Dottie Higbee, Judy Lewis

You're never too old to have a happy childhood, at least for an afternoon each week. We play cards, dominoes, board games, and word games, etc., the games we played before there were TV and electronic games. All levels of competency and experience are welcome; the object is to have fun, not necessarily to win. We play for two hours every Thursday afternoon and year-around. The room is available from noon to 12:30 p.m. for socializing before play starts.

Genealogy (D) 
2nd and 4th Thursdays, 1 to 3 p.m., Family History Center, 2745 Eastern Ave.
Contact leader; no online registration

Karen Roseland, Marian Kile, Cheryl Nelson

This is a special interest group that studies genealogy. We meet twice each month year-round to provide support to genealogists at all levels. Our goal is to share ideas, discuss research progress, share knowledge of other organizations and information sources, and provide mutual aid as we research family histories. The members determine topics and format of the meetings, which may include field trips. Registration is required; maximum membership is 60 and a waiting list is maintained.

Great Books At Hart (D)
4th Monday, 10 a.m. to Noon, Ethel Hart Senior Center, Midtown at 27th and J, 915 27th St.
Drop-in seminar; no registration required

Karen Roseland

Once a month our group meets to discuss an excerpted selection we have read from Great Books Reading and Discussion philosophy anthology. We use the shared inquiry method developed by Great Books Foundation. We will read from the Fifth Series, Volumes I-III: Bible, Sophocles, Freud, Kafka, Goethe, Kant, Flaubert, Hume, Nietzsche, Dante, Burke, H. Adams, Shakespeare, Aristotle, Plato. Newcomers are welcome. Curiosity and willingness to read and discuss are all you need. Participants are expected to read selections from the books they purchase (about $33), which are used in multiple semesters. Leaders will supply specific dates, selections, and book order information.

iPhone Photography Studio (A/S)
Six Thursdays beginning Feb. 8, 10 a.m. to Noon, McClatchy Library Community Room, 2112 22nd St. (between U and V streets>
Online Registration only

Melissa Green, Joan Greenfield

This seminar has evolved from leader-led demonstrations to participant-led demonstrations where experienced photographers use multiple iPhone apps to create print-ready multi-layered artwork. In-class demonstrations and online shared albums are our critique and learning platform. Visit our website for activities, demonstration videos, additional information and examples of our artwork. New photo artists should expect to purchase $25 in apps. Requirements: iPhone 6, 7, 8 or X; iOS 10 or 11. This is not a beginner photography seminar.

Mah Jongg (A/S)
Mondays, 1 p.m., Members' Homes
Contact leader; no online registration

Carol Camponovo

Mah Jongg originated in China and is still played there. It is a traditional family activity in many homes. Mah Jongg loosely translated means "clattering sparrows," which refers to the sound of the tiles when they are mixed or shuffled. We play the American version using a card and rules by the National Mah Jongg league. We invite those who are interested in learning to play to contact the leader and she will teach you the basics of the game. We also invite the experienced players and those who have played before. Contact the leader for more information.

Memoirs (P)
1st and 3rd Mondays, 1 to 2:30 p.m., Raley's Event Center, 4840 San Juan Ave. at Sunset, Fair Oaks
Contact leader; no online registration

Fran Clarke, Carole Gruber

Have you been thinking about writing your memoirs? Now is the time to get started or continue your story with our supportive group. Write your story at home and share it at every meeting. We motivate and inspire each other by hearing the stories of others. Come share your memories with us. Contact Fran for specific dates or more information.

Photography As Art (L)
Wednesdays 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Location TBA
Contact leader; no online registration

Roger Klemm, Mary Elliott-Klemm

"The first 10,000 photographs are your worst."—Henri Cartier-Bresson. This 10th seminar will work in depth on two art concepts: color theory and transactional theory.  This work's intention will be to perceive color in a new, sometimes uncomfortable paradigm, and establish a personal color signature for each person.  Concepts discussed during the Fall semester will be explored in more depth. Participants must be advanced photographers and computer literate. Required reading: Interaction of Color, by Josef Albers. Registration is required; seminar size is limited to 16 persons, a waiting list is maintained.

Singing For Fun (A/S)
Tuesdays, 10 to 11:30 a.m., Rancho Cordova Methodist Church, 2101 Zinfandel Dr. (at Hirschfeld)
Online Registration only

Vick Vickland, Sara Zeigler

Do you like to sing? Do you NOT read music? Do you NOT want to memorize? JOIN us. We provide words (not music), learn about a dozen songs and, after a couple of months of lighthearted practice, perform for various assisted-living facilities and sometimes at Renaissance events. Some go for lunch following the sessions. Come and have some fun with us. "Sing, sing a song, sing out loud, sing out strong."—Kermit the Frog.

Travel Through Food (A/S)
1st and 3rd Wednesdays, Lunchtime to 2:30 p.m., 1st meeting Feb. 7, Arcade Library, 2443 Marconi Ave.
Contact leader; no online registration

Sandra Winter

We are a lunch group that enjoys foods representing our world. The group plans potlucks, speaker presentations, and field trips to nearby locations. Meeting places and times will vary depending on the event. Registration is required; maximum size is 30 and a waiting list is maintained. Please contact Sandra to enroll or for more information.

Walkabouts (A/S)
Wednesdays, 9:30 a.m., Sacramento and surrounding areas
Online registration required at Walkabouts webpages (see below)

Donna Eash, Lance Muller

Each week there is a different Walkabout, location, and leader. Following stretches and announcements at 9:25 a.m., the "Tortoises”"walk two miles, and the "Hares" walk four miles, round-trip. Afterwards, there is a group lunch at a nearby restaurant, for those who wish to join in. For safety reasons, all participants must wear their Renaissance badges with the emergency contact information, and also pledge to walk on the left side of trails and bikeways. Sorry, no dogs are permitted.  There is no maximum size or waiting list. Register online at either the Renaissance Seminars Walkabout webpage or our own webpage.  (Please only do one—each gives the same results.)

Walking Meditation On A Labyrinth, Introduction (A/S)
Two dates only (same program each date!):
I: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesday, April 25
II: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Thursday, May 24
Unitarian Universalist Society, Room 7, 2425 Sierra Blvd.
Online Registration only

Christie Braziel

Looking for a simple but powerful technique to let go of everyday stress? Or simply to learn a new way to meditate using an ancient time-tested design known as a labyrinth? Join this new activity, including a one-hour lecture followed by walking a labyrinth. You will learn: what is a labyrinth? difference between a maze and a labyrinth; amazing variety of benefits from walking a labyrinth; guidelines for walking the labyrinth; the three stages of the labyrinth walk; how to find local labyrinths to walk wherever you travel; ideas for building your own labyrinth. Note: The same program will be presented on each of the two dates; sign up for ONE of them!

Writers' Group I (D)
Thursdays, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., Avalon Hearing Center, 1260 Fulton Ave., Suite B
Contact leader; no online registration

Dan Keller,  Marian Kile

Members write in a wide range of styles and subjects, whatever they are interested in. Expertise is not required. Members bring 8-10 copies of what they have written that week to distribute to the group, no more than three pages or 750 words. Writers read their material to the group and if requested the group will provide verbal feedback and notations on the distributed copies. All our members have welcomed the feedback and everyone gains in the discussions. Registration is required. Maximum group size is 12; a waiting list is maintained. One-time drop-ins to experience how the group works are welcome.

Writers' Workshop II (P)
Tuesdays, 12 to 2 p.m., Members' Homes
Contact leader; no online registration

Roy Bishop, Lani Hahn

Our members come from a variety of backgrounds and write in a wide range of styles with their own choice of subjects. They bring at least six copies of what they wish to share, limiting themselves to around three pages each week. Feedback is provided, if requested. Registration is required; there is a maximum number of 10 members; a waiting list is maintained.