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Fall 2002 l Capital University Journal
Across Campus

Wanted: leaders for higher ed
More alumni are giving back
Getting to know you
Hitting the record books
At your service
Sobering trend
FYI
Early start on ethnic studies
Presidential search underway
Aces for high achievers

New AD steps up to the plate
Dogged pursuit


Wanted: leaders for higher ed

Sac State will launch a new master's degree in higher education leadership next fall, becoming one of the few public universities in the state to offer such a program.

The goal is to educate a new cadre of leaders for the state's community colleges and universities. They're needed to fill vacancies being left by a growing number of retirees.

"We're looking for people who really love the atmosphere at colleges and universities, people who enjoy the intellectual and organizational challenges," says Carlos Navarez, a Sac State professor of educational leadership and policy studies who is coordinating the program.


The master's degree initially will have a student affairs concentration. In following years it will expand to offer concentrations in community college leadership and in policy studies in higher education. It will prepare leaders at all levels of campus administration.

Students will take classes as a group for two years, with classes scheduled in evenings and on Saturdays. Classes will be on such topics as staff leadership, diversity, accountability, ethics, facilities and grants.

Details: (916) 278-5388.


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More alumni are giving back

Increasing numbers of Sac State graduates and employees provided private support to the University last year, highlighting a year that saw an estimated $8.9 million in gifts and special revenues.

Gifts from alumni increased 30 percent. Gifts from the campus community increased 60 percent, with 270 faculty, retired faculty and staff providing support to academic departments, scholarships and general University programs. Sac State generated $71 million in grants and contracts.

Outside funding is increasingly important to Sac State. The $80 million in total external support represents about one-quarter of the institutional resource base for 2001-02, which was about $322 million.

About $194 million–including about $42 million in student fees–was from the state's general fund.


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Getting to know you

Photo Sacramento by Tom MyersPolicymakers and others are getting to know "Joe and Jane Sacramento" a little better, thanks to a new survey from Sac State's Institute for Social Research.

The first "Annual Survey of Public Opinion and Life Quality in the Sacramento Region" was carried out in March by sociology professor Amy Liu and 20 students. They asked residents of Sacramento, Yolo, Placer and El Dorado counties about government, traffic, housing, taxes, immigration and more.

Some tidbits: More Sacramento Region residents said traffic is a major problem than residents of the Bay Area or Los Angeles. And with the events of September 11, 2001 still fresh on their minds, more than half said government should be able to monitor e-mails and telephone calls of resident non-citizens.

Many of the survey questions were based on statewide surveys by the Public Policy Institute of California. That allows results to be compared with the rest of the state. The new survey, however, focuses on the Sacramento Region on its own rather than as part of the Central Valley.

"The Sacramento Region is often looked at simply as part of the Central Valley, but it is really much different," Liu says. "This is a major metropolitan area, a place much more like Los Angeles, the Bay Area and San Diego than other parts of the Central Valley."


Full report: www.csus.edu/ssis.


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Hitting the record books

Those new faces on campus are not all new students.

Many are new professors. In fact, 110 of them are new tenure-track professors, the largest class of new faculty in Sac State's history.

They've arrived just in time to fill big gaps left by retirements and take on a growing number of classes for this year's record student enrollment of more than 28,000 students.

The latest hiring blitz has been compared to the early 1960s, when the University was growing rapidly and hiring many new faculty. That group created and shaped the academic program for decades.

Faculty hiring is expected to continue at about the same rate in coming years, with about 110 searches set for next year.


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At your service

Photo of  women at the Life Center by Sherry MarksSac State offers many community service programs that allow students to get professional experience. They're supervised by experienced professors.

Among them is the Life Center, which provides wellness programs for older adults. Classes include meditation and fall prevention, such as the one Frances Sakai (pictured above) takes. There are also individual and group fitness sessions, talks on health and computer classes.

The center is run by the College of Health and Human Services. It is located at the Julia Morgan House and Gardens at 3731 T Street.


Details: (916) 227-5518.



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Sobering trend

Sac State students drink less alcohol than their counterparts nationwide and are much less likely to engage in high-risk drinking, according to an ongoing, nationwide study of college students.

The survey by the Core Institute at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, shows Sac State students on average consume 2.6 drinks per week, compared to 5.2 for students nationwide. And 28.9 percent of Sac State students had "binged" (drank five drinks at a sitting) within the previous two weeks compared to 42 percent nationwide. Illegal drug use among Sac State students was also a little lower than the national average.

The spring 2002 survey included responses from 1,627 students at Sac State, as well as students at 159 other universities.

The survey also gathered opinions about the campus environment. Among the key findings was that 92.3 percent of Sac State students felt safe on campus.

Recent years have seen increased efforts at Sac State to encourage responsible use of alcohol and discourage illegal drug use.

Incoming students and their parents are given presentations on alcohol and drug abuse, and students living on campus are offered educational programs. Health fairs and events are held throughout the year. More than 1,000 members of fraternities and sororities attend presentations on alcohol abuse and related issues each year. Beer sales at football games are strictly controlled. Professional staff have been assigned to coordinate and develop alcohol and drug information programs.

Despite the survey's positive news, the University remains intent to do even more. Among the new efforts this year will be a "social norms" campaign aimed at reducing drug use and alcohol abuse by clearing up student misperceptions.

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FYI
  • The CSUS Alumni Association is again hosting its popular breakfast talks. The free events–breakfast included–are in the Steven Lee Yamshon Alumni Center.

    Upcoming talks include Winnie Comstock, founder of
    Comstock's Business Magazine, on Dec. 10; Jill Kaiser, executive director of the Metro Chamber of Commerce Arts and Business Council, on April 8; and Martin Tuttle, executive director of the Sacramento Area Council of Governments, on May 13.

    Seating is limited. For reservations call (916) 278-6295.


  • Black Issues in Higher Education rates Sac State 25th in the nation for most bachelor's degrees to minority students 2000-01 and 16th in the nation in awarding bachelor's degrees to American Indians.

    Washington Monthly
    ranks Sac State 5th in the nation for using federal work-study funds to promote community service .

    Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education
    ranks Sac State 5th in the nation for awarding bachelor's degrees to Hispanic students and 55th in the nation for awarding master's degrees to Hispanic students.

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Early start on ethnic studies

Photo of Students at Hiram JohnsonStudents at Sacramento's Hiram Johnson High School are the first to take a new class in ethnic studies this fall. It's one of the few high school classes of its kind.

The course was developed by a team of Sac State students and faculty, along with Hiram Johnson faculty and administrators.

"It could have a statewide effect," says Gregory Mark, chair of the Sac State ethnic studies department. "It could become a
model curriculum for an ethnic studies component in all high schools."

Photo of Students at Hiram JohnsonHiram Johnson history teacher James Fabionar leads four sessions of the class for about 100 freshmen. On some days, the class is taught by Sac State ethnic studies students, while throughout the year Sac State faculty members serve as guest speakers. Seniors from Hiram Johnson act as teaching assistants.

Mark says one of the goals of the program is to head off violence by teaching tolerance. It's a message that Fabionar, who earned his teaching credential at Sac State, says is needed.

"There are significant cultural conflicts that occur within groups and between groups at the school," he says. The school's population is 30 percent Asian, 23 percent Hispanic and 14 percent black.


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Presidential search underway

Donald R. Gerth, Sac State's longest serving president, announced this fall that he plans to retire this summer.

President Gerth was appointed Sac State president in 1983 and took office July 1, 1984. When he retires, he will have spent 45 years within the California State University system. He joined the system in 1958 as a member of the department of government and associate dean at San Francisco State.

The CSU Board of Trustees is carrying out a nationwide recruitment for his successor. A decision is expected in March.

The Trustees' search committee will be assisted by an advisory group made up of a Sac State student, a Sac State alumnus, three Sac State professors, a Sac State staff member, a member of the Sac State Advisory Board, a vice president or academic dean from Sac State and the president of another CSU campus.

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Aces for high achievers

Photo of student in Aces programThe problem: bright students running out of challenging courses before they run out of high school. The solution: Sac State’s Accelerated College Entrance (ACE) program, which allows students to take university classes while completing high school.

“It’s not designed to replace high school,” explains Terry Thomas, the program’s director. “It’s a way to enrich their high school work.”

About 40 students are enrolled in ACE courses on campus, mostly in music, math and foreign languages, but also in lower-division psychology, sociology and anthropology. Another 400 are enrolled in college-level courses at 17 area high schools.

The students can use the credits they earn toward high school graduation requirements and for university credit.

ACE is open to qualifi ed high school students who meet the prerequisites, and have a 3.0 GPA, high test scores and the consent of their parents and teachers.

Details: (916) 278-7032 or http://edweb.csus.edu/Projects/ACE.

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New AD steps up to the plate

Photo of Terry Wanless by Sam ParsonsTerry Wanless, who helped make University of North Dakota athletics into one of the best Division II programs in the nation, was named Sac State's new athletics director in the spring.

He replaces Debby Colberg, who served in the position since 1999. Colberg will focus on coaching her highly successful volleyball team.

Wanless was athletics director at North Dakota from 1990 to 1999. During that time, North Dakota won four NCAA national championships and 36 conference championships. Wanless also guided the program to compliance with gender equity guidelines, and student-athlete grade point averages rose from 2.3 to 3.1.


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Dogged pursuit

Photo of Ebbie on Hollywood's Walk of Fame by Nick TrujilloFor Nick Trujillo and his dog, California’s coast was a bit more golden this summer. Trujillo, a Sac State communication studies professor, took a five-week trip up the
California coast, studying “dog culture” with his Golden Retriever “Ebbet” (or “Ebbie”).

Trujillo plans to write a book about it titled, The Golden Coast: Up the California Coast with a Golden Retriever.

The two traveled from mid-May through the end of June. Trujillo interviewed hundreds of dog owners, including border guards, police officers and firefighters, Hollywood celebrities, dog trainers, owners of dog businesses, animal shelter workers, fishermen and dozens of campers and residents. He talked with the manager of the Hotel Del Coronado in San Diego about famous dogs that have stayed there, and visited the war dog memorial at March Air Force Base in Riverside.

Trujillo and Ebbie also raised more than $3,000 for Homeward Bound, a golden retriever rescue society in Sacramento.

Their exploits were chronicled by numerous media outlets, including Bob Vella's "Pet Talk America," the
Sacramento Bee and Capital Public Radio.

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