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Spring 2005 l Capital University Journal
Across Campus

Pageantry and optimism at inauguration
Wanted: New campus name
Voice of MLK
William Sullivan—‘Dean of Deans’
CSU’s big impact
Space Center boost
Staff pitch in for rec center
Surveys say…
CAMP stakes out another five years

So many grads…
…and more jobs
Ed leaders wanted

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Pageantry and optimism at inauguration

Photo: InIn a day of academic tradition, touching moments and a surprise gift announcement, Alexander Gonzalez was officially inaugurated as Sac State’s 11th president on Oct. 4.

The event at the Outdoor Theatre drew university representatives
from throughout the state, including CSU presidents, Trustees and Chancellor Charles Reed. Gonzalez told the crowd of hundreds of visitors and members of the campus community that he was committed to improving Sac State by helping its people achieve their potential–to pursue “self-actualization.”

“The people here need to be encouraged to and allowed to thrive if this University hopes to be its best,” Gonzalez said, adding later, “A clear sense of purpose, a clear sense of identity and a rising tide of excellence and creativity will indeed lift us all.”

Gonzalez tied his dedication to helping students, faculty and st aff achieve their potential to the University ’s Destination 2010 initiative. He said Sac State was already a great re gional institution, but that it would becom e a premier metropolitan un ive r sit y with planned improvements such as a recreation center and new residence halls, and a commitment to improving academic programs and the University’s overall reputation.

Gonzalez announced that Alex G. Spanos and his wife Faye, had committed $10 million to renovate the stadium and to serve as the corners tone gift for a landmark Recreation, Wellness and Events Center.

More: www.csus.edu/inauguration

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Wanted: New campus name
President Alexander Gonzalez announced in January that he will ask the CSU Board of Trustees to change the campus name from “California State University, Sacramento” to “Sacramento State University. “ The proposal will go before the Board in March.

The name proposal has historic roots and precedent in the current naming of CSU campuses. The University was known as Sacramento State College when it was founded in 1947, and five other CSUs have similar formal names, including Humboldt State University and San Diego State University.

The request follows a series of opportunities for public and campus input, prompted by broad confusion over which of the University’s widely used names was correct—CSUS, Sacramento State University, CSU Sacramento, Sac State or others. Students, alumni, faculty, staff and friends of the campus had the opportunity to vote both online and through paper ballots. Stories appeared in The Sacramento Bee, other Sacramento media and the campus newsletter. The name question was also discussed with a series of focus groups representing various segments of the campus and the community, and a sample of students was polled during the fall semester’s online registration. The proposal decision made by Gonzalez affirms the recommendation of a campus committee.


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Voice of MLK

Drawing: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

One of the earliest known recorded interviews with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., obtained by the late Wilson C. Riles, is part of a substantial collection of materials donated to Sac State last year by the Riles family.

The collection spans nearly 50 years, from 1947 to 1995. It adds an important dimension to Sac State’s resources on African American history and the history of public education in California, says archivist Sheila O’Neill.

Wilson C. Riles was one of the first African Americans elected to statewide offce in California, serving as the superintendent of public instruction for three terms beginning in 1970. His papers document a period of social change for educational institutions, including school integration and busing.Voice of MLK

The King recording is from a Feb. 28, 1956 interview, three months into King’s support for the Montgomery, Ala. bus boycott. In the recording, King details his rationale for the boycott and the use of nonviolence. The recording was obtained by Riles as a member of the Fellowship for Reconciliation.

More: (916) 278-6144.


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William Sullivan—‘Dean of Deans’

Photo: William J. Sullivan Jr.
William J. Sullivan Jr.— Sac State’s longest serving dean—died Dec. 10 from complications of a stroke. He was 63.

Dr. Sullivan arrived at the University in 1970 as an instructor of German. He rose through the academic ranks as a professor and became dean of the School of Arts and Sciences in 1984. As Sac State grew and the School reorganized, he became dean of the newly established School of Arts and Letters, then the new College of Arts and Letters, for which he was dean from 1998 until his retirement in 2004.

In recognition of Dr. Sullivan’s seniority and 20 years as a dean, he was fondly referred to on campus as the “Dean of Deans.” Contributions in his memory may be made to the Discretionary Fund for the College of Arts & Letters, 6000 J Street, Sacramento, CA 95819-6049.


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CSU’s big impact
A sweeping study of the impact of the 23-campus California State University shows how the system improves the economic, social, intellectual and cultural life of California.

The study, titled “Working for California: The Impact of the California State University,” was conducted by ICF Consulting. The study concludes that, when a multiplier effect is considered, for every $1 the state invests in the system ($3.09 billion in 2002-03) CSU-related expenditures generate $4.41 in spending. So the immediate impact of CSU-related spending creates $13.6 billion annually in economic activity and supports 207,000 jobs. In addition, it leads to some $760 million in state taxes.

The report also estimates that the 1.7 million CSU alumni living and working in California earn $89 billion in income, $25 billion of which is directly attributable to their degrees. In fact, when that additional income is included with CSU spending, the ripple effect of both has a $53 billion impact on the state and creates $3.11 billion in tax revenue for state and local governments—more than is provided to the CSU in direct annual state support. The CSU in effect pays for itself.

“Californians undervalue the vital importance of the CSU system and its campuses, so this report is a key way to identify the critical role of the California State University. The CSU directly or indirectly impacts everyone in the state, and we add value to everyone’s lives,” said CSU Chancellor Charles B. Reed.

“CSU’s welleducated graduates help to attract, retain and develop the companies that are leading California’s economy into the future. An investment in the CSU is an investment in California.”

More: CSU Impact Report.


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Space Center boost

Rendering of the proposed Space Science Center
Rendering of the proposed Space Science Center
Funding of $500,000 for a Space Science Center at Sac State is on the way as part of the Congressional Consolidated Appropriations Act passed at the end of November.

The facility will contain an observatory, planetarium, handson science exploration areas and laboratories. It’s part of the Destination 2010 initiative to transform Sac State into a premier metropolitan university and a flagship campus of the CSU system.

“We expect our Space Science Center to attract nearly 25,000 regional elementary, middle and high school students a year to its programs including planetarium shows, observation nights, exhibits and workshops,” says Sac State President Alexander Gonzalez. “We believe the facility will attract students to pursue degrees in various fields of science and further Sac State’s educational and research efforts in astronomy.”

The late Rep. Robert Matsui (D-Sacramento) was a strong supporter of the measure, as he was of many Sac State initiatives and programs over the years. When the funding was approved, he said, “Strong science and math education is essential to maintaining America’s place at the top of space research and exploration. Innovative approaches, like those offered at Sac State help students and experts alike realize the dreams and potential of our generation. California is a leader in our nation’s space industry and the integrated Space Science enter will help keep our state on the cutting edge of research and development.”

Spacerelated industry contributes an estimated $24 billion a year to the California economy.

The federal funds will allow the University to expand on partnerships with NASA and purchase a wide range of equipment including solar and astronomical telescopes, observatory domes and highvolume lab servers. Part of the project will house the Center for Mathematics and Science Education, which works to enhance the skills of more than 1,000 K-12 math and science teachers each year.

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Staff pitch in for rec center
Photo: Hard Hat and Hammer

Signaling their strong support for the signature building in President Alexander Gonzalez’ Destination 2010 plan, campus members of the State Employees Trades Council (SETC)—United have pledged to donate nearly $20,000 over the next two years to help build the Recreation, Wellness and Events Center.

They hope their commitment will inspire others, including those from the community, to help make the building a reality.

Mike Mullen, job steward, said the 58 campus members who represent the trades—including plumbers, electricians, painters and carpenters—see the campus situation on both a daily and longterm basis. He said the members were willing to “dig deep” because they feel the new Recreation Center will be a cornerstone for building the campus for the future.

More: www.csus.edu/union/rwec and www.csus.edu/president

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Surveys say…

Students
Sac State’s most recent Student Needs and Priorities Survey found students are fond of their professors, increasingly diverse and usually work part-time. They also picked Sac State as their First choice in a university.

And not surprisingly, their parking complaints continued. It was identied ed as the most important support service, but given one of the lowest ratings—with only 12 percent calling it excellent or good.

Fully 75 percent of students gave high marks (excellent or good) to the “quality of instruction,” while 79 percent gave that rating to faculty preparation and 74 percent to faculty enthusiasm for teaching.

About 40 percent of the responding students considered themselves multiethnic, up from 33 percent in 1999, while one-third spoke a language other than English while growing up. Nearly three-quarters of students work and they spend an average of 25 hours on the job each week. Another 13 percent said they were unemployed but looking for work.

The SNAPS survey is conducted every four years to help the University serve students better.

Related: www.oir.csus.edu

Community
Fully 84 percent of adults in the four counties surrounding Sac State think the campus offers an excellent education, according to a recent survey. In addition, three-quarters had been to campus, while 90 percent say the University is vital to the region’s prosperity.

Those are some of the findings of the most recent “Annual Survey of Public Opinion and Life Quality in the Sacramento Region,” conducted by Sac State sociology professor Amy Liu and more than 30 students. It included 1,003 randomly selected adults in El Dorado, Placer, Sacramento and Yolo counties. The survey included 1,003 randomly selected adults, and has a margin of error of 3 percent.

The series of questions on regional perceptions about Sac State was included along with questions about public policy, the war in Iraq and Gov. Schwarzenegger.

In addition to the large numbers who had visited campus at least once, 22 percent of respondents had taken classes here. Nearly 9 in 10 respondents agreed that the University improves the overall quality of life in the region, and about two-thirds said it helps shape public policy in the region and state. Sixty-one percent agree Sac State is an “exciting, vibrant university.”

More and full survey: www.csus.edu/news/090104surveyCampus.stm

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CAMP stakes out another five years

Sac State’s highly successful program for migrant workers and their children has a new federal grant guaranteeing its operation for the next five years. The College Assistance Migrant Program grant is for about $500,000 each year through the federal Department of Education.

CAMP is focused on helping students get into college and through their freshman year with help filling out forms, finding housing, adjusting to college life and more. All students from migrant or seasonal farm-worker backgrounds, or their dependents, are eligible.

Sac State’s CAMP project was created in 1981 and is now one of the largest in the nation, serving about 85 students each year. Nearly all of its students finish their freshman year, and more than 70 percent earn their bachelor’s degrees.

Now, with operations funded for the next five years, director Marcos Sanchez says the program is looking to expand through grants or other outside funding.

More: www.csus.edu/camp or (916) 278-7241.

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So many grads…

Photo: Winter Commencement 2004
Winter Commencement 2004. For more photos, visit www.csus.edu/news/commenceslideshow
A record number of students graduated from the California State University system in 2003-04 academic year, including Sac State’s largest-ever graduating class of 5,520. The nearly 8 percent increase was the largest in three decades.

At the system level, there were increases in both the numbers of bachelor’s and master’s degrees. The CSU system awarded 65,743 bachelor’s degrees, an increase of more than 4,000 students from the year before. The record 16,860 master’s degrees awarded represent an increase of 1,870.

Sac State’s numbers show a record 4,557 in bachelor’s degrees in 2003. The number of master’s degrees awarded was 963, down from the previous year’s 1,024 and short of the record 1,226 set in 1998.
The CSU Chancellor’s Office suggests the large number of graduates demonstrates that recent efforts to help students move quickly to graduation are beginning to take effect.

More: www.oir.csus.edu and www.calstate.edu/as/.

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…and more jobs

For many students who graduated from Sac State in December, their most welcome holiday gift may have been a job offer.

Like their counterparts nationwide, the graduates entered the best job market since the dotcom days, says Marilyn Albert, director of the Sac State Career Center. “Students are getting more offers and they are getting them sooner,” Albert says. “Usually students have to wait a while but this year many are finding out before graduation.”

And the opportunities are across the board, even in areas such as technology which had seen slowdowns as of late.

More: www.csus.edu/careercenter

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Ed leaders wanted

Sac State and two other Northern California universities have launched a new doctoral program to help meet the need for leadership in California’s schools and community colleges.

The program in educational leadership, geared to working professionals, is offered in conjunction with Sonoma State University and UC Davis. It comes as the state’s growing educational system is demanding more leaders and as fewer administrators have advanced training.

According to the California Department of Education, about 26,400 school administrators were needed to manage 8,900 schools statewide in 2002. But among those administrators, the number with a doctorate had declined to 8 percent. Program administrators say the need for the advanced education is especially critical in the northern region of the state.

“This partnership is a direct result of the demand for a program in this region that marries theory and practice in educational policy and leadership,” says Michael Lewis, dean of the College of Education at Sac State.

The first classes are set for August. Plans call for an initial class of 20, with 24 new students each subsequent year.

More: http://education.ucdavis.edu/academic/edd/delcra.html. Or call Sac State at (916) 278-4172.

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