Snapshot: The art of family

In keeping with the theme of this issue of Sac State Magazine, we asked some of our alumni artists to share their works that represent family.

Saturday Fun at the Marina 

Saturday Fun at the Marina

Artist: Eileen Downes ’03 (Art Studio)
“The piece shows a family from the knees down, having a good time together. The style of shoes worn says a lot about people, lifestyles and values, and the positioning of their feet and legs in relation to the others says a lot about the familial relationships.”

© Eileen Downes, Title: Saturday Fun at the Marina, (Diptych)
Size: 30” x 72”,
Medium: Collage, 2014, Collection of Kaiser Hospital San Leandro, Calif.
www.eileendownes.com

Baubles and Beads

Baubles and Beads

Artist: Shirley Hazlett ’07 (Art History and Art Studio), adjunct professor, Sac State Department of Art
“My personal family history is that I come from a long line of makers—people who created things with needle and thread. Italian seamstresses, shoemakers and milliners, and German embroiderers and quilters are part of my lineage. I have always made things by hand; it just seemed natural. I now believe a genetic component could be at play. Baubles and Beads is one of my favorite works—made of paper I sculpted (formed over a large oval embroidery hoop) then painted—referencing embroidering, beading and sewing, some of the earliest textile arts introduced to me by my family.”

Shirley Hazlett, Title: Baubles and Beads, Size: 22” x 30” x 1”,
Medium: Watercolor on Paper, 2015,
www.shirleyhazlett.com

To get to know more Hornet artists, join the Art Alumni Chapter at SacStateAlumni.com

Humanity: It Takes All Kinds

Humanity: It Takes All Kinds

Artist: Sue Anne Foster, MA ’79 (Art),
lecturer, Sac State Department of Art
“I have done a series on families starting with my own and moving to our world family. I started out by creating my brother’s family and curved them into a circle. I then made a circle of my women artists, a circle group that walked the labyrinth. I later created my drum group in a circle. Each person could identify who they were. Then I put a lot of different pieces together to create a long one I called Humanity: It Takes All Kinds with the message that we are one with individual unique differences. I started this several years ago and it has been evolving. This year I have been incorporating them into paintings.”

 

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