Sac State University Policy Manual

Chemical Hygiene Plan
Policy Administrator: Vice President for Administration
Authority:
Effective Date: December 19, 1995
Updated:
Index Cross-References:
Policy File Number: UMC02075.htm

CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

I . REGULATORY AUTHORITY Title 8, California Code of Regulations (CCR), Section 5191; CSU Environmental Health and Safety Program Development and Administrative Guide, Section 4.0.

II. ADMINISTERING AGENCY California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, Department of Industrial Relations (Cal/OSHA).

III. POLICY The President of California State University, Sacramento directs that all chemicals and hazardous wastes shall be handled in accordance with the provisions of the California State University, Sacramento Chemical Hygiene Plan (hereafter referred to as the University Chemical Hygiene Plan). The University Chemical Hygiene Plan presents University policy, standards, and procedures for compliance with the requirements of applicable regulatory agencies and good laboratory practices. California State University, Sacramento concurs with and supports the requirements of these regulatory agencies. The University Chemical Hygiene Plan has been developed for the sole purpose of protecting faculty, staff, students, visitors, and the environment from the hazards associated with the receipt, storage, use, and disposal of chemicals. It is essential that all faculty, staff, and students who use chemicals become familiar with the Plan and that pertinent information be disseminated to all persons who might be exposed to chemicals.

The President or his/her designee(s) is(are) responsible for implementing the University Chemical Hygiene Plan.

IV. SCOPE This Plan applies to all personnel who work in laboratory-type environments or who use chemicals in the course of their work. Chemical use for academic or research purposes is also covered by the Plan. Organizational units should employ the structure already in place for compliance with the provisions of the University Injury and Illness Prevention Plan (IIPP) to comply with the provision of the University Chemical Hygiene Plan. Organizational units will have latitude in formulating unit-specific policies and practices for chemical handling, as long as the total objectives of the University Chemical Hygiene Plan are not compromised. This Plan does not apply to areas where the University leases its facilities or contracts for service. Lessor/contractor is solely responsible for chemical safety associated with these situations. Only California State University, Sacramento faculty, staff, students, and only those visitors with the documented approval of a Dean of the School, Department Chair, or Responsible Individual, are permitted in laboratories/chemical handling areas.

V. CHEMICAL HYGIENE COMMITTEE The University Environmental Health and Safety Committee shall act as the University Chemical Hygiene Committee. This Committee is responsible for recommending policies relating to the use of hazardous chemicals and their disposal, prudent chemical laboratory practices, and other University Chemical Hygiene Plan requirements to the President. When required, the University Chemical Hygiene Committee has the authority to form task forces of subject experts to recommend policy or actions to the Committee.

VI. RESPONSIBILITIES While the overall responsibility for University health and safety rests with the President, the immediate responsibility for laboratory/workplace health and safety belongs to each University employee who performs a supervisory role. In addition, individual employees are responsible for preventing laboratory accidents and carrying out their duties in a professional, safe manner. Accordingly, all faculty and staff are to ensure that safe and healthful conditions are provided and safe and healthful practices are followed within the areas under their control.

Specific Responsibilities:

A) University Chemical Hygiene Committee: The University Chemical Hygiene Committee shall:

1. Meet quarterly. 2. Develop and recommend policy to the President relating to the use of hazardous chemicals and other University Chemical Hygiene Plan requirements.

3. Review efforts of the University to minimize hazardous waste.

4. Review the annual report of the Chemical Hygiene Officer relating to the effectiveness of the University Chemical Hygiene Plan.

5. Review investigation reports of laboratory/chemical accidents, causes of accidents, and steps taken to ensure that accidents/incidents do not recur.

B) The Office of Environmental Health and Safety is responsible for advising the University community and administrators regarding chemical safety and/or the need for corrective action. The responsibilities of this office include, but are not limited to, the following:

1. Provide pro-active support on issues of hazard identification and evaluation; procedures for correcting unsafe conditions, control measure determination, and implementation; employee information; and training programs.

2. Maintain centralized environmental monitoring records (employee medical monitoring records shall be maintained under the direction of the Office of Faculty and Staff Affairs), allowing employee access as required by law.

3. Serve as the principal point of contact with regulatory agencies on matters of chemical hygiene at the University.

4. Arrange for general safety inspections and safety equipment testing required under the University Chemical Hygiene Plan to include, but not limited to: showers, eyewashes, ventilation, and fume hoods.

C) Chemical Hygiene Officer (CHO): Under the direction of the Director of Environmental Health and Safety, the Chemical Hygiene Officer:

1. Advises and assists administrators and other employees in implementation of chemical hygiene policies and practices.

2. Facilitates, in consultation with the Office of Faculty and Staff Affairs and in accordance with the University Employee Medical Monitoring Program, medical assessment of employee exposure to hazardous chemicals.

3. Maintains currency on legal requirements concerning hazardous materials and advises the University Chemical Hygiene Committee and organizational units of changes in regulatory requirements.

4. Conducts audits of all organizational units to ensure compliance with the Plan.

5. Provides safety training when requested.

6. Inspects each University laboratory/chemical handling area at least annually, coordinating with the organizational unit or school administrator or designees.

7. Investigates laboratory/chemical handling area accidents, incidents, spills/releases, or upset conditions, determines causes of accidents, and recommends corrective action.

8. Reviews and evaluates the effectiveness of the University Chemical Hygiene Plan, at least annually, and prepares recommendations to the University Chemical Hygiene Committee if necessary.

9. Reports to the University Chemical Hygiene Committee on the efficacy of hazardous waste minimization efforts by the University at least every two (2) years.

10. Works closely with organizational unit safety committees to facilitate the approval procedures as described in Section X.

D) Deans, Directors, and Department Chairs Deans, Directors, and Department Chairs are to work with their organizational units to ensure that each unit is aware of the University Chemical Hygiene Plan and is taking action to comply with its requirements. These individuals should:

1. Identify all laboratories and chemical handling areas in their organizational unit.

2. Identify Responsible Individuals (RI) for each laboratory/chemical handling area.

3. Assure that safety training is provided as needed.

E) Organizational Unit Safety Committees Each organizational unit using chemicals shall have a safety committee to recommend local safety policies and to monitor safety practices within the organizational unit. The structure of the organizational unit safety committee depends upon the structure of the organizational unit and the types and quantities of chemicals used by the organizational unit. Organizational unit safety committees should:

1. Review or develop general operating procedures for non-routine chemical handling tasks.

2. If necessary, develop policies describing particular laboratory operations or procedures which require prior approval and approve/disapprove requests to perform such operations or procedures not referenced in Section IX.

3. Perform additional responsibilities described in Section XIV.

F) Responsible Individuals (RI) Responsible Individuals (RI) are administrators/faculty/staff who supervise chemical use or handling. A principal investigator of a research project is considered to be the Responsible Individual for that project. Responsible Individuals are to take measures that protect the health and safety of the workers under their supervision. They should:

1. Identify potential chemical hazards and remedy them (if the RI is unable to remove the potential hazard, then the RI shall report these situations through their supervisor to the HEERA manager).

2. Provide and document employee training at initial assignments and prior to new exposure situations.

3. Identify materials considered particularly hazardous and communicate warnings to workers as appropriate.

4. Conduct inspections, at least annually, of the laboratory/chemical handling areas which they supervise.

5. Conduct annual physical inventories of chemicals stored in the aboratory/chemical handling areas which they use. The results of these inventories shall be filed with the appropriate supervisor or administrator in the organizational unit.

G) Workers (see definition of "worker") Individuals who work in laboratories/chemical handling areas are responsible for following the requirements of the University Chemical Hygiene Plan, following prudent chemical laboratory safety practices, and reporting--through their supervisor or appropriate administrator--unsafe situations and accidents. Definition: faculty, administrator, staff, student assistants, and students who use or handle chemicals under supervision.

H) Organizational Unit Chemical Hygiene Coordinator Each organizational unit using chemicals is to have a chemical hygiene coordinator. The Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) coordinator of an organizational unit, or his/her designee, is the chemical hygiene coordinator. This individual will serve as liaison with the Office of Environmental Health and Safety and other appropriate University organizational units and also make recommendations to the organizational unit safety committee or appropriate administrator of the organizational unit on matters relating to the use of chemicals.

VII. CONTROL MEASURES AND EQUIPMENT

Recognition of Potential Hazards: Chemical safety is achieved by being continually aware of chemical hazards and by keeping chemicals under control using safe work practices, engineering safeguards (such as hoods), and other protective measures. All chemical laboratory workers should be alert to recognize the malfunction of engineering and other safeguards and shall report through their supervisor to the HEERA manager unsafe conditions and accidents. All chemical laboratory workers shall report to their immediate supervisor potential hazards that they cannot remedy. All chemical laboratory workers should also be alert to recognize the malfunction of engineering and other safeguards and report malfunctions immediately to the appropriate office. Exposure Control:

A) Organizational units will either implement procedures to reduce employee exposure to hazardous chemicals or identify necessary changes to implement control measures and then request the appropriate university office to remedy the problem. Control measures shall be established to ensure that no worker is exposed to levels of hazardous materials equal to or greater than the permissible exposure levels (PEL). [See Appendix B for a list of Cal/OSHA PELs and a definition of health effects to determine if a chemical is a health hazard.]

B) Organizational units shall take steps necessary to eliminate, or reduce to the lowest practical level, worker exposure to contaminants by inhalation, ingestion, absorption, etc.

C) Workers, RI, or heads of organizational units may request monitoring of suspected contaminated work areas from the Office of Environmental Health and Safety or the Chemical Hygiene Officer. Types of Control Measures: The organizational unit shall always design safety into a potentially hazardous process. Only when engineering controls, such as fume hoods and glove boxes, are determined to be insufficient will personal protective equipment, administrative controls, and other corrective measures be considered to achieve permissible levels of exposure. Review and Updating: Because hazards may change over time, organizational units shall continually review and update health hazard control measures as necessary. Equipment:

A) Ventilation and Fume Hoods

1. Laboratory/chemical handling area ventilation shall not be less than eight (8) air changes per hour (calculated). (At least 15 cubic feet per minute per person, 5 cubic feet per minute of which shall be fresh air.) This flow is not necessarily sufficient to prevent accumulation of chemical vapors. Work with volatile toxic chemicals should always be performed in a hood, exhausted to the outside.

2. Fume hoods will provide a face velocity of a minimum of seventy (70) to not exceed one hundred twenty (120) linear feet per minute of air flow and comply with Title 8, CCR, Section 5154.

3. Fume hood windows (sashes) should be closed (lowered) at all times, except when necessary to adjust the apparatus inside the hood or to conduct a chemical procedure.

4. The hood fan shall be kept in operation whenever a chemical is inside the hood, whether or not any work is being performed in the hood.

5. In general, fume hoods should not be used as storage areas for chemicals, apparatus, or other materials.

6. Fume hoods shall be inspected and certified for air flow at least annually. Ventilation systems shall be inspected for proper number of air exchanges annually. Inspections will be conducted by Facilities Management, aided by the Chemical Hygiene Officer. Problems found during these inspections should be corrected within two (2) weeks.

B) The University shall alter the ventilation system only after thorough testing has indi- cated that worker protection from airborne toxic substances will continue to be adequate.

C) No person is to modify ventilation systems to any laboratory/chemical handling area, unless under the direction of Facilities Management or authorized by Facilities Management. Emergency Eyewashes and Safety Showers:

A) Location

1. Emergency eyewashes and safety showers shall be installed in accessible locations that require no more than ten (10) seconds for the injured person to reach, in accordance with ANSI Z358.1 - 1981 and Title 8, CCR, Section 5162 specifications.

2. If both an eyewash and safety shower are needed, they shall be located so that both can be used at the same time.

3. The eyewash and safety shower areas shall be free of items which obstruct their use.

B) Performance

1. The control valve shall be designed so that the water flow remains on without requiring the use of the operator's hands, until intentionally shut off.

2. Personal eyewash units shall deliver potable water or other appropriate eye-flushing solution.

C) Maintenance

1. Plumbed eyewash and shower equipment shall be activated at least monthly for at least one (1) minute to flush the line and to verify proper operation.

2. Other units shall be maintained in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. Flammable Liquid Hazard Control:

A) Organizational units shall provide for safe handling of flammable liquids, regardless of the quantities involved. Problems associated with each flammable liquid shall be ana- lyzed to determine the extent of flammability and health hazards so that appropriate control measures can be taken.

B) To control these hazards, organizational units shall consider the characteristics of the specific liquid, the amounts of vapor involved, potential ignition sources, the kinds of operations, unsafe temperatures, ventilation, and types of building construction.

C) Environmental Health & Safety staff or designated competent individuals shall determine the necessity of safeguarding electrical equipment; ventilation requirements; the need for eliminating sparks, open flames, and other sources of ignition; safe material handling procedures; proper grounding procedures; and other factors promoting the maintenance of a safe environment (see National Electrical Code, NFPA 70, Chapter 5, Article 500).

D) Organizational units shall obtain and use proper safety devices to protect workers from the hazards associated with flammable liquids.

Hazard Identification:

A) Labels: Whenever possible, chemicals shall be stored in their original container and label integrity maintained. Labels shall be marked with the date of receipt. Re-containering chemicals is discouraged. If chemicals are to be re-containered, the label on the new container should include hazards and safety information, the date the chemical was received on campus, and the date the chemical was re-containered.

B) Chemical Inventory and Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS): Each laboratory/chemical handling area shall maintain a current chemical inventory and pro- vide workers access to MSDS for all chemicals.

C) Hazardous Chemicals Produced in the Laboratory:

1. If the chemical composition is known and the chemical is produced exclusively for the laboratory of origin, the RI will determine if it is a hazardous chemical comparable to those in Appendix A or B. If it is a hazardous chemical and its characteristics are not covered under the University General Operating Procedures, the RI will provide and document training.

2. If the chemical produced is transferred to a user outside this University, the RI will comply with the University Hazard Communication Program, including labeling and preparation of the MSDS.

3. Solutions of known hazardous chemicals produced in a laboratory/chemical handling area must be labeled with the name(s) and formula(s) of the chemical(s) in English and dated. If the identity of the contents of a solution is unknown, then words describing the properties of the solution should be used. Medical Consultation: An opportunity to receive medical consultation at the employer's expense shall be provided to workers under the following circumstances:

A) An employee develops any signs or symptoms thought to arise from chemical exposure.

B) After a major chemical release, accident, or incident which may have resulted in an employee being exposed to a chemical.

C) The supervisor, RI, organizational unit chemical hygiene plan coordinator, or Chemical Hygiene Officer has determined that a chemical has exceeded the permissible exposure limit and the worker has been exposed. Requests for medical consultation and/or monitoring should be made to the Office of Faculty and Staff Affairs. Worker medical monitoring shall be conducted under the direction of the Office of Faculty and Staff Affairs and in accordance with the University Employee Medical Monitoring Program. EH&S and/or the Chemical Hygiene Officer will facilitate medical monitoring as necessary. Medical monitoring records shall be maintained under the direction of the Office of Faculty and Staff Affairs and in accordance with the University Employee Medical Monitoring Program, allowing employee access as required by law.

VIII. TRAINING

The overall goal of the training program is to ensure that all individuals potentially at risk are adequately informed about the work in the laboratory/chemical handling area, its risks, and what to do if an accident occurs. Every worker should know the location and proper use of personal protective equipment and basic emergency response procedures. Cal/OSHA does not mandate the details of the instructional method(s) to be used. Cal/OSHA requires that, if asked by an Cal/OSHA inspector, the workers must be able to answer questions about chemical safety topics pertaining to their work area. A formal session in a classroom setting, informal group, or individual discussions with a RI, posted notices, or handouts can be effective. Safety training shall be documented.

Requirements:

A) The organizational unit shall provide information and training concerning the hazards of chemicals in the organizational unit laboratory/chemical handling areas.

B) The organizational unit will also provide such information and training when a worker is initially assigned to a laboratory/chemical handling area and prior to any assignment involving new hazards and/or new chemical work procedures.

C) Safety training programs should ensure that workers are informed of:

1. The content and requirements of the Laboratory Standard (Appendix C).

2. The PELs, action levels, and other recommended exposure limits for hazardous chemicals used by the laboratory/chemical handling area.

3. Signs and symptoms associated with exposures to the hazardous chemicals used in the laboratory/chemical handling area.

4. The location and availability of MSDS and other reference materials.

D) Worker training shall include, but not be limited to:

1. The methods and observations that may be used to detect the presence or release of a hazardous chemical.

2. The hazards associated with the chemicals used in the laboratory/chemical handling area.

3. The measures workers can use to protect themselves from these hazards, including specific procedures such as appropriate work practices, personal protective equipment used, and emergency procedures.

4. The pertinent laboratory/chemical handling area general operating procedures and the University Chemical Hygiene Plan.

IX. GENERAL OPERATING PROCEDURES

The University will provide guidelines for using chemicals and carrying out processes that involve chemicals. These will be called "general operating procedures."

The Chemical Hygiene Officer will provide general operating procedures to the University Chemical Hygiene Committee for its review and approval. Approved general operating procedures will be disseminated to the University.

X. APPROVAL PROCEDURES

A particular laboratory operation or use of a particular chemical requires prior approval from the organizational unit safety committee whenever:

A) A chemical listed in Appendix A is used.

B) The RI believes it is likely that the toxic limit concentration of a chemical as listed in Appendix B may be exceeded or when the probability for injury is high.

C) A process is known to involve explosion hazards (highly reactive or flammable chemicals, high pressure, high temperatures, etc.) and is not covered by a general operating procedure.

D) At other times or for other laboratory/chemical handling tasks deemed necessary by the individual organizational unit.

Approvals for using chemicals listed in Appendix A are for one (1) year. Renewal of approval must be requested by the RI from the organizational unit chemical safety committee. A simple statement requesting such renewal and assuring that no changes affecting safety have been made in the procedure is sufficient. A copy of the renewal approval (on the EH&S Chemical Procedure Notification Form) shall be forwarded to the Chemical Hygiene Officer (for the University Chemical Hygiene Committee) for inclusion in the files.

Whenever there is a change in the location of a chemical procedure, process, or test requiring prior approval or whenever there is a change in personnel for a chemical process requiring prior approval, the RI should carefully evaluate the safety conditions. If the RI has concerns, s/he should contact the organizational unit safety committee and seek its approval for the new environment.

Prior approval from an organizational unit chemical safety committee is required to restart a laboratory/chemical handling procedure whenever:

A) A worker requests professional medical attention as a result of injury or illness resulting from exposure to chemicals.

B) A RI believes that there is a failure of any safeguard which may result in endangerment to persons in the area. (Approval for restarting a chemical process is not required when safeguards are repaired or replaced and the RI judges that the safety of individuals is not compromised.)

C) The RI becomes aware of a new chemical or toxicological hazard for a chemical being used in the work area and this increased hazard may endanger workers if there are insufficient or inappropriate safeguards present in the work area.

D) There is a major release of chemicals (see Section XIII for a definition of major release).

The following procedure should be used whenever a RI is requesting approval for use of chemicals or to restart a chemical process or procedure:

A) The RI is to submit a proposal for use or restart to the organizational unit safety committee.

B) The proposal should include all the following information:

1. A description of the project, process, or test. If the approval request is to restart an experimental procedure, then the reason the procedure was stopped shall be included.

2. A list of the chemicals, or class of chemicals, that will be used and the estimated quantity (if applicable) needed for the required task.

3. A description of the safety precautions or training required for particularly hazardous chemical handling tasks.

4. A description of potential chemical exposure hazards to workers.

5. The control measures to be used (engineering, personal protective equipment, and/or administrative).

6. The handling procedure for the products, by-products, and waste.

7. A plan for closure at the conclusion of the project (disposition of products, by-products, waste, excess chemicals, and equipment). 8. Location of the project, process, or test.

C) The organizational unit chemical safety committee shall review and approve/disapprove proposals in a timely manner. The committee will complete the EH&S Chemical Procedure Notification Form for each proposal request and forward the completed form to the Chemical Hygiene Officer who will act on behalf of the University Chemical Hygiene Committee. The organizational unit chemical safety committee should keep a copy of the form for its own records.

D) Upon review of the completed EH&S Chemical Procedure Notification Form, the Chemical Hygiene Officer may ask the University Chemical Hygiene Committee to reassess the proposal request.

Appeal Process:

If a proposal is not approved by the organizational unit chemical safety committee, the RI may appeal the decision to the University Chemical Hygiene Committee. Such appeal shall be made in writing and include documentation provided to the organizational unit chemical safety committee.

XI. NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

Organizational units shall notify the Chemical Hygiene Officer whenever a chemical in Appendix B is ordered. Organizational unit safety committees should review on a regular basis the purchase of chemicals in Appendix B within the organizational unit and when necessary make recommendations concerning their use to the head of the organizational units. The organizational unit shall also inform whoever is requesting the purchase of chemicals from Appendix B of their toxic limit concentrations.

XII. PROCUREMENT AND GIFTS

Any purchase, loan, or gift of a chemical listed in Appendix A requires the prior approval of the organizational unit chemical safety committee with notification (Procurement Notification Form) made to the Chemical Hygiene Officer (acting for the University Chemical Hygiene Committee).

Transfer of chemicals listed in Appendix A between organizational units shall require prior approval of each organizational unit's safety committee or be covered by specific policies of the organizational units involved.

Special Cases:

A) Radioactive Chemicals and Radionuclides

All radioactive chemicals and radionuclides subject to licensing requirements shall be procured, handled, stored, and disposed in accordance with the University Radiation Safety Manual. Copies of the University Radiation Safety Manual are available from the Office of Environmental Health and Safety upon request.

B) Controlled Substances and Controlled Precursors

All controlled substances and controlled precursors shall be procured, handled, stored, and disposed in accordance with all federal, state, and local laws. Contact the Director of Public Safety for guidance on compliance with the applicable laws.

C) Pesticides

Pesticide use by Facilities Management personnel (i.e., groundskeepers) shall be handled and stored in accordance with the Pesticide Safety Program. Pesticide use for academic purposes is covered by the provisions of the Pesticide Safety Program. Copies of the Pesticide Safety Program are available from the Office of Environmental Health and Safety upon request.

D) Explosives, Propellants, and Pyrotechnics (see Section XVII, Definitions)

In the planning phase before starting any work involving explosives, the Chemical Hygiene Officer and the University Chemical Hygiene Committee will be informed. Work shall not go forward until written approval has been obtained from the Dean, Department Chair, Chemical Hygiene Officer, and Chief of Police. It should be noted that the Federal Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms Agency; Department of Defense; Department of Energy; Department of Transportation; and state and local fire codes may regulate the use of some explosive materials. Organizational unit safety committees will review the chemical inventory for potentially explosive materials and explicitly address the safe storage, handling, and use of these materials in the organizational unit's Injury and Illness Prevention Program.

XIII. UPSET CONDITIONS/SPILLS, RELEASES AND ACCIDENTS

Spills or releases of toxic substances or accidents involving any hazardous chemical will be managed in accordance with the University Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) Procedures. (The University HAZWOPER plan is available from the Office of Environmental Health and Safety upon request.) Organizational units will develop, in cooperation with the Chemical Hygiene Officer, a chemical release policy to manage small and major releases.

Only persons who have been properly trained are authorized to contain and clean up major releases involving hazardous materials. A list of properly trained individuals will be published by the Office of Environmental Health and Safety.

Releases of toxic chemicals:

A) A small release is a release which a RI has determined can be contained and removed safely with the resources locally available and where no suspected injury or overexposure has occurred.

B) A major release is a release where a RI has determined that outside assistance is required for safe containment and/or removal. A major release requires notification of the appropriate university officials and the Chemical Hygiene Officer. The process must be halted and an incident report submitted to the organizational unit chemical safety committee, the University Chemical Hygiene Committee, and the Office of Environmental Health and Safety, in accordance with the University Injury and Illness Prevention Program. A RI must request approval to restart the process from the organizational unit safety committee.

C) In the case of a medical emergency, summon medical help immediately by contacting the Department of Public Safety, extension 911.

Preparing for Emergencies:

A) The RI shall inspect periodically safety and emergency equipment and shall report to the appropriate person or office any observed problems. If another organizational unit is responsible for maintaining or periodically inspecting safety and emergency equipment and the RI observes that there is a deficiency, the RI will, through the appropriate university channels, request that the observed problems be remedied.

B) Workers will know the location of the emergency eyewash station and safety shower before starting work in the laboratory/chemical handling area.

C) Laboratories shall be prepared for hazards resulting from loss of any utility service or severe weather. Loss of the water supply or electricity, for example, can render safety showers, eyewash stations, and safety override systems inoperative. In such cases, all hazardous laboratory/chemical handling activities will be secured and cease until service is restored.

D) All records of major releases and accidents will be kept by the Office of Environmental Health and Safety, in accordance with the University Injury and Illness Prevention Program, as well as in the organizational unit office.

XIV. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT

General Requirements:

A) Handle hazardous waste in accordance with the procedures outlined in the University Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) Procedures.

B) Deposit chemical waste into appropriately labeled receptacles and follow all other waste disposal guidelines as outlined by the standard operating procedure for the individual laboratory/chemical handling area.

C) NO HAZARDOUS LABORATORY/CHEMICAL WASTE SHALL BE PLACED IN THE SANITARY DRAIN OR TRASH CANS. NO HAZARDOUS LAB- ORATORY/CHEMICAL WASTE SHALL BE PLACED IN THE STORM DRAIN. Check with the RI for identification and appropriate disposal of hazardous waste.

Waste Reduction Requirements and Recommendations:

A) Organizational unit safety committees shall develop plans for minimizing the production of hazardous waste. The Chemical Hygiene Officer shall assist organizational units in developing these plans. All plans shall be reviewed every two (2) years by the Chemical Hygiene Officer and the organizational unit chemical hygiene plan coordinator.

B) Plan a procedure for waste disposal before starting a project. Label waste properly.

C) Order only the amount of chemical needed for the project or experiment. Even if the manufacturer provides twice as much for the same amount of money, the cost of excess chemical disposal far exceeds any money saved by buying bulk quantities.

D) Before disposing of unwanted, unopened, or uncontaminated chemicals, check with others in the organizational unit who may be able to use them.

E) Label all unused excess chemicals that are kept following the termination of a research project or completion of a thesis or project. Dispose of excess chemicals in accordance with the closure plan outlined in the original project description.

F) Make sure all samples and products scheduled for disposal are properly identified, containerized, and labeled. Do not leave them for others to clean up.

G) The Chemical Hygiene Officer will report annually to the University Chemical Hygiene Committee on the efforts of the University to reduce the production of hazardous waste.

XV. RECORDS AND RECORDKEEPING

General Requirements:

A) Worker medical monitoring records shall be maintained under the direction of the Office of Faculty and Staff Affairs in accordance with the California State University Employee Medical Monitoring Program Manual.

B) Accident/incident records shall be maintained in the organizational unit, as well as by the Office of Environmental Health and Safety.

C) Worker information and well-documented training records shall be maintained in the organizational unit.

XVI. CHANGES TO THE UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND APPENDICES

Chemical Hygiene Plan:

Procedures for changing the University Chemical Hygiene Plan:

1. Faculty, administrators, staff, or students can propose changes to the University Chemical Hygiene Plan. The proposed changes are submitted to the Chemical Hygiene Officer.

2. The Chemical Hygiene Officer will communicate the proposed changes, along with his/her recommendations, to the University Chemical Hygiene Committee and to all organizational units which might be affected by the proposed changes.

3. The University Chemical Hygiene Committee will consider the proposed changes. The Committee may approve/disapprove the changes by a majority vote of all eligible voters or it may refer the proposed changes to a subcommittee for further review.

4. All approved changes are forwarded as recommendations to the President of the University for his/her approval. If approved by the President, the changes are incorporated into the document.

Appendices:

The appendices to the University Chemical Hygiene Plan do not form a policy statement, but rather are working documents to enable faculty, staff, and students to achieve the goals and requirements of this Plan. All changes to the appendices, however, must be approved by the University Chemical Hygiene Committee.

The process for changing the appendices is:

1. Faculty, administrators, staff, or students can propose changes to the appendices. The proposed changes are submitted to the Chemical Hygiene Officer.

2. The Chemical Hygiene Officer will communicate the proposed changes, along with his/her recommendation, to the University Chemical Hygiene Committee and to all organizational units which might be affected by the proposed changes.

3. The University Chemical Hygiene Committee will consider the proposed changes. The Committee may approve/disapprove the changes by a majority vote of all eligible voters or it may refer the proposed changes to a subcommittee for further review.

4. Upon approval by the University Chemical Hygiene Committee, changes are incor- porated into the appendices and disseminated to the University.

XVII. DEFINITIONS

Action Levels - Action levels are described in Title 8 CCR for a limited number of chemicals (see Appendix B). Additionally, an action level can be assumed to occur when the exposure to a contaminant could reasonably exceed the permissible exposure limit (PEL) or short-term exposure limit (STEL), as described in Appendix B, and exposure monitoring and medical surveillance should be implemented.

Administrative Controls - Methods of controlling worker exposures to contaminants by job rotation, work assignment, or time away from the contaminant. Although administrative control measures can limit the duration of individual exposures, they are difficult to implement and maintain.

Cal/OSHA - California Occupational Safety and Health Administration (California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, Department of Industrial Relations)

CCR - California Code of Regulations

CFR - Code of Federal Regulations

Chemical - Includes hazardous materials, hazardous substances, hazardous waste, consumer commodities (cleaners, pesticides, etc.), and toxic chemicals.

Chemical Handling Area - An area, not a laboratory, where chemicals are stored, used, or transported. Examples include Central Plant, Central Receiving, Paint Shop, etc.

Engineering Controls - Methods of controlling worker exposures by reducing the quantity of contaminants (e.g., hoods, glove boxes) or modifying the source of contaminants released into the workroom environment.

Experimental Expertise - Hands-on experience working with a variety of chemicals in an industrial or research environment.

Explosives - Ref.: Department of Transportation definition from 49CFR173.50: "...means any substance or article, including a device, which is designed to function by explosion (i.e., an extremely rapid release of gas and heat), or which by reaction within itself, is able to function in a similar manner...". These include Division 1.1 through Division 1.6 explosives.

MSDS - Material Safety Data Sheet(s) Personal Protective Equipment - Personal protective equipment includes respirators and other protective equipment/devices. These are usually secondary to the use of engineering control methods.

Propellants and Pyrotechnics - These include blasting agents, fuel/oxidizer mixtures, detonator and primer compositions, incendiaries, hypergolic mixtures, and pyrophoric chemicals. Also included are the so-called DOT "forbidden explosives" (49CFR173.54):

"(b) A mixture containing a chlorate and

(1) an ammonium salt, including a substituted ammonium or quaternary ammonium salt; or

(2) an acidic substance, including a salt of a weak base and a strong acid.

(c) A leaking or damaged package of explosives.

(d) Propellants that are unstable, condemned, or deteriorated.

(e) Nitroglycerin, diethylene glycol dinatrate, or any other liquid explosives not specifically authorized.

(f) A loaded firearm ...

(g) Fireworks that combine an explosive and a detonator.

(h) Fireworks containing white or yellow phosphorus.

(i) A toy torpedo, ... containing a mixture of potassium chlorate, black antimony (antimony sulfide), and sulfur ...

(j) Explosives specifically forbidden in the 172.101 Table ..."

These sections of the DOT regulations are available from the Office of Environmental Health and Safety upon request.

Responsible Individual - Faculty and/or staff who supervise chemical use or handling. RI may also use or handle chemicals. Principal investigators are considered to be the Responsible Individual for the project.

Upset Conditions - Whenever there is a failure of any equipment used in a process that poses a safety hazard.

Worker - Faculty, staff, student assistants, and students who use or handle chemicals under supervision.

APPENDIX A

CHEMICALS REQUIRING PROCUREMENT APPROVAL

List includes: * = Appendix D

List of Carcinogens

Sixth Annual Report on Carcinogens (National Toxicology Program)

Summary 1992

US Department of Health and Human Services

and ** = IARC

Evaluations of Carcinogenicity to Humans

Supplement - 1987

Group 1(agents are carcinogenic to humans), Group 2A (probably carcinogenic to humans), Group 2B (possibly carcinogenic to humans)

and

+ = Cal/OSHA List of Regulated Carcinogens

75-07-0 Acetaldehyde *,**

60-35-5 Acetamide **

531-82-8 Acetamide, N-[4-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-2-thiazoly] **

53-96-3 Acetylaminofluorene, 2- *,+

79-06-1 Acrylamide *,** 3688-53-7 Acrylamide], AF-2 [2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl) **

107-13-1 Acrylonitrile *,**,+

23214-92-8 Adriamycin *.**

Aflatoxins *,**

Aluminum production **

117-79-3 Aminoanthraquinone, 2- *

60-09-3 Aminoazobenzene, 1,4- (para-) **

97-56-3 Aminoazotoluene, ortho- *,**

92-67-1 Aminobiphenyl, 4- *,**,+

61-82-5 Amitrole *,**

62-44-2 Analgesic mixtures containing phenacetin *

Androgenic (anabolic) steroids**

90-04-0 Anisidine, ortho- **

134-29-2 Anisidine hydrochloride, ortho- *

140-57-8 Aramite **

7440-39-3 Arsenic and certain arsenic compounds *,**

Arsenic, inorganic +

1332-21-4 Asbestos *,**,+

492-80-8 Auramine manufacture **

492-80-8 Auramine (technical grade) **

115-02-6 Azaserine **

446-86-6 Azathioprine *,**

71-43-2 Benzene *,**,+

Benzidine-based dyes **

92-87-5 Benzidine (and its salts) *,**,+

98-07-7 Benzotrichloride *

50-32-8 Benzo[a]pyrene *,**

205-99-2 Benzo[b]fluoranthene *,**

Benzo[f]fluoranthene **

205-82-3 Benzo[j]fluoranthene *

207-08-9 Benzo[k]fluoranthene *,**

1694-09-3 Benzyl Violet **

56-55-3 Benz[a]anthracene *,**

7440-41-7 Beryllium and certain beryllium compounds *,**

Betel Quid with tobacco **

494-03-1 Bis(2-chloroethyl)-2-naphthylamine, N,N- (Chlornaphazine) **

542-88-1 Bis(chloromethyl)ether *,+

542-88-1 Bis(Chloromethyl)ether and chloromethyl **

Bitsumens, extracts of steam-refined and air-refined **

Bleomycins **

Braken Fern **

75-27-4 Bromodichloromethane *

106-99-0 Butadiene, 1,3 *,**

55-98-1 Butanediol dimethanesulphonate, 1,4- (Myleran) *,**

64091-91-4 Butanone, 4-(N-nitrosomethylamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1- (NNK) *,**

924-16-3 Butylamine, N-nitrosodi-n- *,**

Butylated Hydroxyanisole (BHA) *,**

Butyrolactone, alpha- **

569-61-9 C.I. Basic Red 9 monohydrochloride *

7440-43-9 Cadmium and certain cadmium compounds *,**

194-59-2 Carbazole, 7H-dibenzo[c,g] *,**

56-23-5 Carbon tetrachloride *,**

7440-44-0 Carbon-black extracts **

9000-07-1 Carrageenan, degraded **

305-03-3 Chlorambucil *,**

143-50-0 Chlordecone (Kepone) *,**

115-28-6 Chlorendic acid *

Chlorinated paraffins (C12, 60% Chlorine) *

865-49-6 Chloroform *,**

107-30-2 Chloromethyl methyl ether (technical grade) *

Chlorophenols **

Chlorophenoxy herbicides **

96-12-8 Chloropropane, 1,2-dibromo-3- (DBCP) *,**,+

Chromium compounds (hexavalent) *,**

15663-27-1 Cisplatin *,**

6358-53-8 Citrus Red No. 2 **

8007-45-2 Coal-tars **

Coal gasification **

8007-45-2 Coal-tar pitches **

Coke production **

Coke oven emissions *,+

Creosotes **

120-71-8 Cresidine, para- *,**

135-20-6 Cupferron *

14901-08-7 Cycasin **

50-18-0 Cyclophosphamide *,**

4342-03-4 Dacarbazine *,**

20830-81-3 Daunomycin **

50-29-3 DDT *,**

613-35-4 Diacetylbenzidine, N,N'- **

Diaminoanisole, 2,4- **

39156-41-7 Diaminoanisole sulfate, 2,4- *

28434-86-8 Diaminodiphenyl ether, 3,3'-dichloro-4,4'- **

101-81-4 Diaminodiphenyl ether, 4,4'- **

95-80-7 Diaminotoluene, 2,4-

192-65-4 Dibenzo[a,e]pyrene *,**

189-64-0 Dibenzo[a,h]pyrene *,**

189-55-9 Dibenzo[a,i]pyrene *,**

Dibenzo[a,l]pyrene **

226-36-8 Dibenz[a,h]acridine *,**

53-70-3 Dibenz[a,h]anthracene *,**

224-42-0 Dibenz[a,j]acridine *,**

106-93-4 Dibromoethane, 1,2- (EDB) *

106-46-7 Dichlorobenzene, 1,4- (para-) *,**

Dichlorobenzidine hydrochloride, 3,3'- *

91-94-1 Dichlorobenzidine, 3,3'- (and its salts)*,**,+

107-06-2 Dichloroethane, 1,2- *,**

75-09-2 Dichloromethane (methylene chloride) *,**

547-75-6 Dichloropropene, 1,3- (technical grade) *,**

Diepoxylbutane *,**

64-67-5 Diethyl sulfate *,**

1615-80-1 Diethylhydrazine, 1,2- **

56-53-1 Diethylstilbestrol *

101-90-6 Diglycidyl Resorcinol Ether *,**

94-58-6 Dihydrosafrole **

119-90-4 Dimethoxybenzidine, 3,3'- (ortho-dianisidine) **

77-78-1 Dimethyl sulfate **

60-11-7 Dimethylaminoazobenzene, para- *,**

119-93-7 Dimethylbenzidine, 3,3'- (ortho-tolidine) *,**

79-44-7 Dimethylcarbamoyl chloride *,**

540-73-8 Dimethylhydrazine, 1,2- **

57-14-7 Dimethylhydrazine, 1,1- *,**

55-98-1 Dimethylsulfonate, 1,4-butanediol (Myleran) *

513-37-1 Dimethylvinyl chloride *

123-91-1 Dioxane, 1,4- *,**

1937-37-7 Direct Black 38 *,**

2602-46-2 Direct Blue 6 *

106-89-8 Epichlorohydrin *,**

Erionite *,**

53-16-7 Estrogens (not conjugated): Estrone *

Estrogens, conjugated *

57-63-6 Estrogens (not conjugated): Ethinylestradiol *

72-33-3 Estrogens (not conjugated): Mestranol *

50-28-2 Estrogens (not conjugated): Estradiol-17 *

62-50-0 Ethyl methanesulfonate *,**

140-88-5 Ethyl acrylate *,**

75-21-8 Ethylene oxide *,**,+

106-93-4 Ethylene dibromide **,+

96-45-7 Ethylene thiourea *,**

151-56-4 Ethyleneimine +

Formaldehyde (gas) *

50-00-0 Formaldehyde **,+

765-34-4 Glycidaldehyde **

126-07-8 Griseofulvin **

118-74-1 Hexachlorobenzene *,**

Hexachlrocyclohexanes (HCH) **

680-31-9 Hexamethylphosphoramide *,**

10034-93-2 Hydrazine sulfate *

312-01-2 Hydrazine *,**

233-66-7 Hydrazobenzene *

25013-16-5 Hydroxyanisole, butylated *

67730-11-4 Imidazole, Glu-P-1 (2-amino-6-methyldipyrido[1,2-a:3',2'-d] **

67730-10-3 Imidazole, Glu-P-2 (2-aminodipyrido[1,2-a:3',2'-d] **

555-84-0 Imidazolidinone, 1-[(5-nitrofurfurylidene)amino]-2- **

Indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene *,**

68006-83-7 Indole), MeA-~-C (2-amino-3-methyl-9H-pyrido[2,3-b] **

54-62-6 Indole), A-~-C(2-Amino-9H-pyrido[2,3-b] **

76180-96-6 IQ (2-Amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline) **

9004-66-4 Iron dextran complex *,**

Iron and steel founding **

67-63-0 Isopropyl alcohol manufacture (strong acid process) **

303-34-4 Lasiocarpine **

6080-56-4 Lead acetate *

7446-27-7 Lead phosphate *

Lead, inorganic **

58-89-9 Lindane and other hexachlorocyclohexane isomers *

531-76-0 Merphalan *,**

484-20-8 Methoxypsoralen, 5- **

298-81-7 Methoxypsoralen, 8- (Methoxsalen) plus ultra-violet radiation *,**

66-27-3 Methyl methanesulfonate *,**

82-28-0 Methylanthraquinone, 1-amino-2- *

75-55-8 Methylaziridine, 2- (propyleneimine) *,**

592-62-1 Methylazoxymethanol and its acetate **

3697-24-3 Methylchrysene, 5- **

101-14-4 Methylene bis(2-chloroaniline), 4,4'- (MOCA) *,**,+

101-61-1 Methylenebis (N,N-dimethyl)benzenamine, 4-4'- *

Methylenedianiline, 4,4'- and its dihydrochloride *,**

563-47-3 Methylpropene, 3-chloro-2- *

56-04-2 Methylthiouracil **

443-48-1 Metronidazole *,**

90-94-8 Michler's Ketone *

8020-83-5 Mineral oils (untreated and mildly treated) **

2385-85-5 Mirex *,**

50-07-7 Mitomycin C **

315-22-0 Monocrotaline **

MOPP (combined therapy with nitrogen mustard, vinchristine, procarbazine, and prednisone) **

139-91-3 Morpholinomethyl)-3-[(5-nitrofurfurylidene)amino], 5-( **

505-60-2 Mustard gas (Sulphur Mustard) *,**

3771-19-5 Nafenopin **

494-03-1 Naphthylamine, N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)-2- (Chlornaphazine) **

91-59-8 Naphthylamine, 2- (beta-) *,**,+

134-32-7 Naphthylamine, alpha- +

7440-02-0 Nickel and certain nickel compounds *,**

61-57-4 Nitridazole **

139-13-9 Nitrilotriacetic acid *

602-87-9 Nitroacenaphthene, 5- **

129-15-7 Nitroanthraquinone, 2-methyl-1- **

92-93-3 Nitrobiphenyl, 4- +

1836-75-5 Nitrofen +

302-70-5 Nitrogen mustard N-oxide **

55-86-7 Nitrogen mustard hydrochloride *

51-75-2 Nitrogen mustard **

79-46-9 Nitropropane, 2- *.**

1116-54-7 Nitrosodiethanolamine, N- *,**

55-18-5 Nitrosodiethylamine, N- *,**

62-75-9 Nitrosodimethylamine, N- *,**,+

70-25-7 Nitrosoguanidine, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N- (MNNG) *,**

1059-595-6 Nitrosomethylethylamine, N- **

4549-40-0 Nitrosomethylvinylamine, N- *,**

59-89-2 Nitrosomorpholine, N- *,**

16543-55-8 Nitrosonornicotine, N- *,**

100-75-4 Nitrosopiperidine, N- *,**

930-55-2 Nitrosopyrrolidine, N- *,**

13256-22-9 Nitrososarcosine, N- *,**

154-93-8 Nitrosourea, bis (2-chloroethyl) (BCNU) *,**

684-93-5 Nitrosourea, N-methyl-N- **

759-73-9 Nitrosourea, N-ethyl-N- **

13010-47-4 Nitrosourea, 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-l- (CCNU) *,**

615-53-2 Nitrosourethane, N-methyl-N- **

13909-09-6 Nitrosurea, 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-(4-methylcyclohexyl)-1- (Methyl-CCNU) *,**

68-22-4 Norethisterone *

303-47-9 Ochratoxin A *

Oestrogens, steroidal **

Oestrogens, nonsteroidal **

2646-17-5 Oil Orange SS **

Oral Contraceptives, sequential **

Oral Contraceptives, combined **

55738-54-0 Oxadiazole, trans-2-[(dimethylamino)methylimino]-5-[2-(5-nitro-2-furyl)vinyl]-1,3,4- **

139-91-3 Oxazolidinone, 5-(morpholinomethyl)-3-[(5-nitrofurfurylidene)amino]-2- **

101-80-4 Oxydianiline, 4,4'- *

434-07-1 Oxymetholone *

794-93-4 Panfuran S (containing dihydroxymethylfuratrizine) **

Phenacetin, analgesic agents containing **

62-44-2 Phenacetin *,**

94-78-0 Phenazopyridine hydrochloride *,**

50-06-6 Phenobarbital **

63-92-3 Phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride *,**

95-83-0 Phenylenediamine, 4-chloro-ortho- *,**

57-41-0 Phenytoin *,** Phthalate, di(2-ethylhexyl) *,*

plus ultra-violet radiation Polybrominated biphenyls *,**

Polychlorinated biphenyls *,**

3761-53-3 Ponceau MX **

3564-09-8 Ponceau 3R **

7758-01-2 Potassium bromate **

366-70-1 Procarbazine hydrochloride *,**

57-83-0 Progesterone *

Progestins **

1120-71-4 Propane sultone, 1,3- *,**

57-57-8 Propiolactone, beta- *,+

Propiolactone, alpha- **

60153-49-3 Propionitrile, 3-(N-nitrosomethylamino) **

621-64-7 Propylamine, N-nitrosodi-n- *,**

75-56-9 Propylene oxide *,**

51-52-5 Propylthiouracil *,**

50-55-5 Reserpine *

Rubber industry **

81-07-2 Saccharin *,**

94-59-7 Safrole *,**

7446-34-6 Selenium sulfide *

Shale-oils **

14464-46-1 Silica, crystalline (respirable) (cristobalite, quartz, tridymite) *,**

132-27-4 Sodium ortho-phenylphenate **

Soots, tars, and mineral oils *,**

10048-13-2 Sterigmatocystin **

18883-66-4 Streptozocin *,**

100-42-5 Styrene **

96-09-3 Styrene oxide **

95-06-7 Sulfallate *,**

14807-96-6 Talc containing asbestiform fibres **

1746-01-6 Tetrachlorodibenzo-para-dioxin, 2,3,7,8- (TCDD) *

127-18-4 Tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene) *,**

712-68-5 Thiadiazole, 2-amino-5-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-1,3,4- **

3570-75-0 Thiazole, 2-(2-formylhydrazino)-4-(5-nitro-2-furyl) **

62-55-5 Thioacetamide *,**

139-65-1 Thiodianiline, 4,4'- **

62-56-6 Thiourea *,**

1314-20-1 Thorium dioxide *

Tobacco smoke **

Tobacco products, smokeless **

584-84-9 Toluene diisocyanate *,**

Toluenes, ~-Chlorinated **

Toluidine, para-chloro-ortho- **

95-53-4 Toluidine, ortho- *,**

636-21-5 Toluidine, o- hydrochloride *

8001-35-2 Toxaphene *

Toxaphene (polychlorinated camphenes) **

Treosulphan **

88-06-2 Trichlorophenol, 2,4,6- *

52-24-4 Tris(1-aziridinyl)phosphine sulphide (Thiotepa) *,**

126-72-7 Tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)phosphate *,**

62450-07-1 Trp-P-2 (3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole) **

62450-07-1 Trp-P-1 (3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole) **

72-57-1 Trypan Blue **

66-75-1 Uracil Mustard **

51-79-6 Urethane *,**

593-60-2 Vinyl bromide **

75-01-4 Vinyl chloride *,**,+

Wood industries (carpentry and joinery) **

Wood industries, furniture and cabinet making **