Sac State University Policy Manual

General Education Program

Policy Administrator: Vice President for Academic Affairs
Authority:
Effective Date: Summer 2006
Updated:
Index Cross-References:
Policy File Number: FSG00020.htm


I

The General Education Program

A. CSU Systemwide Provisions on General Education.
B. Rationale and Objectives of the University's General Education Program
C.
Standard Program
2. Program Variations
b.
Engineering
2) Liberal Studies , Child Development
3) Nursing
4) Kinesiology
5) Computer Science
6) Social Science
D. G.E. Program Criteria Statements
1. Program Category Criteria
a. Character and Scope
b. Writing Requirements
2. Area Criteria

II.


Course/Proficiency Requirements for Graduation with the Baccalaureate Degree


A. American Institutions Requirements
B. Course/Proficiency Requirements in Writing
1. First Semester Composition Requirement
2. Second Semester Composition Requirement
C. Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement
D. Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement Policy
E. Foreign Language Requirements
F. Race and Ethnicity in American Society
G. Writing Intensive
III.

Regulations Pertaining to the G.E. Program and Course/Proficiency Requirements for Graduation with the Baccalaureate Degree

A. G.E. Program Regulations
B. Sequencing Regulations
C. Writing Intensive Regulations
D. Transfer Regulations

IV.


University Committee Responsibilities Related to the G.E. Program and Other University Wide Degree Requirements


A. General Education Committee--Membership and Charge
B. General Education Course Review Committee
C. Policy on Selection and Review of G.E. Courses
D. Procedures for Listing Courses in the G.E. Program
E. Procedures for Periodic Review of General Education Courses

SECTION I . THE GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM

A. CSU Systemwide Provisions on General Education

Title 5, Part V, Chapter 1, Subchapter 2, Article 5, Sections 40400 through 40410, of the California Administrative Code specify "General Requirements for Graduation." Sections of the referenced article govern general education and other requirements for the baccalaureate degree. While some latitude is provided to the CSU, and, in turn, campuses (to the degree permitted by Executive Orders issued by the CSU Chancellor) to determine specific requirements and procedures for implementation of requirements, referenced provisions of the California Administrative Code and several Executive Orders limit substantially campus autonomy in determining general education and other baccalaureate degree requirements. Hence, the policies contained herein derive from and conform to requirements of the referenced provisions of the California Administrative Code and relevant Executive Orders (primarily Executive Orders 405 and 595).

B. Rationale and Objectives of the University's General Education Program

The University's General Education program is a vital element in the overall mission of the University. It is no less important than the major programs in providing the kind of education university graduates should have. The broad range of subject matters and skills encompassed by a good general education program will help prepare a university's graduates to live internally rewarding lives, to live lives of service to others as well as themselves, and to be able to come to terms with the personal, moral and social problems that life in any society inevitably presents to each person. The University is an institution of people dedicated to the ideal of providing for a truly educated citizenry. The G.E. program has been thoughtfully designed and implemented with the intention of providing specific skills, information and insights which will enable students to make connections among disciplines and will expand their capacity to take part in the wider range of human interests and activities that must ultimately confront each of us.

 THE UNIVERSITY'S GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

The G.E. program has some specific educational objectives. The major programs in the various academic disciplines may define the person who is educated in a specific field of study, but the G.E. program objectives are directed toward the molding of the educated person in general.

A Sac State graduate should have the following knowledge, skills, experiences or perspectives:

  1. The ability to clearly write and orally express ideas in English. The ability to read, write and understand relatively complex and sophisticated English prose.
  2. The ability to construct a non-fallacious verbal argument and to follow the verbal arguments of others. These skills should include the ability to identify the stated and tacit premises and assumptions composing arguments and to distinguish these from the conclusions. In addition, the student should be able to recognize fallacious arguments and to distinguish them from non-fallacious arguments. These skills should be applicable to both written and oral arguments in any subject matter with which one is familiar.
  3. The ability to use the tools of research appropriate to a given level or type of activity requiring information one does not already possess, including the ability to find and use common references in libraries, to engage in library research in more specialized areas, to use computers, insofar as these are appropriate and useful to the task at hand, and to seek out appropriate expert opinion and advice.
  4. The ability to use mathematical ideas to accomplish a variety of tasks where their use is helpful or essential.
  5. A general understanding of current theory, concepts and knowledge about the nature of the physical universe; a first-hand acquaintance with the methods of science, including a general understanding of the role of hypothesis formation and testing in the development of theories; and the enhancement of conceptual and problem-solving skills in the sciences.
  6. A general understanding of current theory and knowledge concerning the origins and varieties of life on this planet, the basic principles of life processes, the interdependencies among living creatures in ecological systems, and the effects on life of changes in the environment. One should have first hand acquaintance with the kinds of empirical techniques and methods by which knowledge in these matters is attained.
  7. An acquaintance with and understanding of the historical and cultural influences that have played a role in the evolution of the values, principles, beliefs, and ideals commonly encountered both in Western and non-Western cultures including, in particular, (1) significant events, cultural developments, and persons who played central roles in these; and (2) significant works in literature, philosophy and the arts with which an educated person may be expected to be familiar.
  8. An acquaintance with and general understanding of the major dynamic social institutions which affect one's life, and the role individuals and groups play in shaping those institutions. Since the explanations of these matters may be the subject of ongoing discussion and dispute, not only in the university but in all of society, an understanding of these matters must include a substantive grasp of the theories and methods of the social sciences.
  9. A significant and useful understanding of the perspectives and contributions to human activities and experiences of peoples from a diversity of cultures and backgrounds, including the contributions and perspectives of non-Western cultures, and of women and ethnic and other minority groups who have been the objects of prejudice and adverse discrimination within our society.
  10. A general understanding of the currently-held views and methods for expanding our knowledge of the process of mental and physical development through the human life cycle. This knowledge may help individuals appreciate and deal with personal potential and limitations.

    The courses which are listed under the various G.E. area headings serve one or more of these educational objectives. While one course may serve only one of these objectives or do so in a limited way, the program structure of the G.E. requirements assures that each student will have had the opportunity to achieve all of the objectives. Each student should take an active role in seeking the objectives stated above by trying to make course selections from the various G.E. areas with these objectives in mind. Students may be in the best position to judge as to the gaps which need to be filled in their own progress toward achieving these goals.

C. General Education Program Structure: 1992-93 and Subsequent G.E. Pattern
1. Standard Program

Program Total:

51 units


Note:

At least nine (9) units must be in upper division courses (100-199). At least nine (9) units of G.E. must be taken in residence at Sac State.


Area A: Basic Subjects

(9 units)


A-1 Oral Communication


(3 units)

A-2 Written Communication

(3 units)

A-3 Critical Thinking

(3 units)

Note:
In addition to completion of G.E. requirements in Area A, students must complete a second semester composition course to satisfy Sac State graduation requirements (see section on Course/Proficiency Requirements for Graduation with the Baccalaureate Degree).

Area B: The Physical Universe and Its Life Forms

(12 units)


B-1 Physical Science


(3 units minimum)

B-2 Life Forms

(3 units minimum)

B-3 Laboratory Component with B-1 or B-2

B-4 Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative Reasoning

(3 units minimum)

B-5 Further Studies in Physical Science, Life Forms, or Quantitative Reasoning

(as needed for 12 units total)


To satisfy the 12 unit requirement for Area B, students may take additional courses listed in B-l, B-2, or B-4, or may take courses listed separately in category B-5.

Note:
At least one course from B-1 or B-2 must include a laboratory component (B-3).

Area C: The Arts and Humanities

(12 units)


C-1 World Civilization


(3 units )

C-2 Introduction to the Arts

(3 units minimum)

C-3 Introduction to the Humanities

(3 units minimum)

C-4 Further Studies in the Arts and Humanities

(as needed for 12 units total)

To satisfy the 12 unit requirement for Area C, students may take additional courses listed in C-1, C-2, or C-3, or courses listed separately in category C-4.

Notes:

  • In addition to completion of G.E. requirements in Area C, students must satisfy graduation requirements in Foreign Languages (see section on Course/Proficiency Requirements for Graduation with the Baccalaureate Degree).

Area D: The Individual and Society

(15 units)


D-1 Foundations in Social and Behavioral Sciences/
World Cultures


(6 units minimum)

D-1a Foundations in Social and Behavioral Science

(3 - 6 units)

D-1b World Cultures

(0 - 3 units)

D-2 Major Social Issues of the Contemporary Era

(3 units minimum)

D-3 American Institutions

(6 units)*

*If a student passes a challenge examination in U.S. History or challenge examinations in U. S. Constitution and California State and Local Government the student need not take a course in the area of the examination or an additional course in another part of Area D. However, since all students must have a minimum of twelve units in Area D (and 51 units total in General Education), any student who passes both challenge examinations must complete an additional course in category D-1 or D-2 for a minimum of 12 units in Area D (and 51 units total in General Education).

Area E: Understanding Personal Development

(3 units)

Note: No more than one unit of activity/skills course work may be used to satisfy the Area E requirement.

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
(3 units which may overlap with one of the above categories)

At least three (3) units of coursework dealing with race and ethnicity in American society must be taken. These courses may also be used to satisfy a category requirement

Writing Intensive
(3 units of upper division course work must be designated as Writing Intensive)

Departments/programs may specify that the Writing Intensive requirement may or must be met in the major. Some departments may not allow students to take the Writing Intensive course in the major. In cases where the requirement is not satisfied with a course in the major, the requirement must be satisfied by taking a Writing Intensive course in the General Education Program.

2. Program Variations

a.

Policy on Program Variations

In majors granted variations (i.e., double counting and/or exceptions) from the standard G.E. Program, courses taken in lieu of courses approved for the standard program must meet G.E. Program objectives and area criteria as determined by the G.E. Course Review Subcommittee. Variations are subject to review by the G.E. Policies/Graduation Requirements Committee. The review process shall include consultations with the departments/programs that have been granted the exceptions and the dean and school-level faculty committee, if any, of the school in which the departments/programs are housed.

b.

Currently Approved Variations

1)

Engineering (For Civil, Electrical and Electronic, and Mechanical Engineering Majors)

Except for the variations noted below, Engineering majors must satisfy all requirements of the 1992 standard program and all other University course/ proficiency requirements for graduation with the baccalaureate degree.

a)

A series of courses in the major may substitute for the three-unit requirement in A-3 (Critical Thinking), reducing the G.E. program total to 48 units.

b)

Fifteen units (rather than twelve) are specified as required in the Physical Universe and Its Life Forms (Area B). At least three of the fifteen units must be in Life Forms (B-2) and at least three of the units must be in Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative Reasoning (B-4). The remainder may be satisfied by courses in math and physical science required in the engineering major.

c)

Twelve (rather than fifteen) units are specified as required in the Individual and Society (Area D). Specifically, the requirement in D-1 (Foundations in Social and Behavioral Sciences/World Cultures) is reduced from six to three units, with the three units being required in D-1a (Foundations in Social and Behavioral Science). An approved course in the major may satisfy the D-1a requirement.

d)

Three units of approved capstone courses in the engineering major may be used to satisfy the requirement in Area E (Understanding Personal Development). These courses may be senior level project and/or design courses.

2)

Liberal Studies and Child Development "B"

For Liberal Studies and Child Development "B" majors, G.E. requirements are incorporated into the major and students in this major are not held to the area unit distribution requirements. However, students must take coursework that satisfies the Race and Ethnicity in American Society and Critical Thinking (A-3) requirements and all other University course/proficiency requirements for graduation with the baccalaureate degree.

3) Nursing

Nursing 169, Reasoning Development in Health Care Sciences, is used to satisfy three units of upper division G.E. and Area E.

4) Kinesiology (Blended Credential Program)

Kinesiology 152 (Physiology of Sport), Kinesiology 137 (Sociology of Sport), and Kinesiology 160 (Sport and Exercise Psychology) can be used to satisfy Areas B-5, D-2, and E respectively. These classes may also be used to satisfy upper division G.E. requirements.

5) Computer Science

Philosophy 103, Business and Computer Ethics, may overlap with G.E. Area D-2 and also count as an upper division G.E. course.

6) Social Science

Upper division GE courses used in the major may overlap with GE courses. No more than a total of 9 units may be counted in GE from the History department.

D.

General Education Program Criteria Statements

1. Program Criteria

a.

Character and Scope

General Education courses can be either lower or upper division courses and usually have no prerequisites.* They are broad in character and scope in the following ways:

1)

They are designed for the general student with no specialized knowledge or methodological preparation.

2)

They are designed to convey general knowledge or skills applicable to numerous fields of study rather than more specialized subjects and complex approaches.

3)

Upper division courses may be somewhat narrower in scope than lower division courses and they may require more specialized preparation, but they must nevertheless convey knowledge or skills of broad applicability to one or more fields of study.

*All upper division courses approved for G.E. listing must require at least second year standing and completion of all Area A requirements as prerequisites for enrollment.

b.

Writing Requirements

1)

Writing Component in Lower Division G.E. Courses

a)

All lower division courses listed in the G.E. Program, unless granted an exception as provided in paragraph c) below, shall include writing which encourages students to think through concepts of the course. This may be accomplished in a variety of ways, including use of laboratory reports, essay examinations, formal writing assignments, and/or informal assignments. Writing in lower division courses need not be graded, but must, at a minimum, be evaluated for clarity and proper handling of terms, phrases, and concepts related to the course.

b)

Whenever possible, an early writing sample should be obtained to assess whether any students in the course should be advised concerning appropriate tutoring or ancillary courses for students with writing difficulties.

c)

The course syllabus submitted to the G.E. Course Review Committee for initial G.E. listing of the course and periodic course review shall indicate how the writing objectives for lower division G.E. courses are met by the course. Requests for exception to the writing requirement shall also be submitted to the G.E. Course Review Committee which shall determine whether the justification provided warrants an exception.

2)

Writing Component in Upper Division G.E. Courses

a)

Upper division G.E. courses, unless granted an exception as provided in paragraph c) below, shall include substantial writing assignments (a minimum of 1500 words of formal, graded writing assignments. The writing in these assignments, as well as mastery of content, shall be evaluated and shall enter into the determination of the grade for the assignment and the final grade in the course. Criteria for evaluation of the writing shall, at a minimum, include: clarity of focus, organization and sentence structure; adequacy of idea development; and pertinence of the response to the specific assignment. Preferably there should be more than one formal writing assignment and each writing assignment should be due in stages throughout the semester to allow the writer to revise after receiving feedback from the instructor. In addition, informal writing assignments ideally should be included to move the student forward toward completion of the formal writing assignments.

b)

Whenever possible, an early writing sample should be obtained to assess whether any students in the course should be advised concerning appropriate available tutoring or ancillary courses for students with writing difficulties.

c)

The course syllabus submitted to the G.E. Course Review Committee for initial G.E. listing of the course and periodic course review shall indicate how the upper division writing objectives are met. Requests for exception to the writing requirement shall also be submitted to the G.E. Course Review Committee which shall determine whether the justification provided warrants an exception.

2.

Area Criteria

AREA A. BASIC SUBJECTS (9 units)

Note: In addition to completion of G.E. requirements in Area A, students must complete a second semester composition course to satisfy graduation requirements (see Section II B.2).

A-1. Oral Communication (3 units)

Overview:

Courses specifically designated to fulfill the oral communication requirement must emphasize the content as well as the form of communication and must include active participation in the human symbolic interaction known as oral communication. Courses should also provide an understanding of the psychological bases and social significance of the communication studied.

Specific criteria are as follows:

  • analyses of oral communication will focus on the rhetorical perspective, including reasoning and advocacy, organization and accuracy, style and structure of oral expression;
  • students will receive evaluation and instruction in effective listening techniques as well as the discovery and selection, critical evaluation, and oral report of specific content; and
  • assignments must emphasize both theoretical and practical aspects of public speaking or group discussion, involving each student in a minimum of three in-class presentations, totaling 22 minutes or more. Each presentation is to be followed by classroom feedback evaluating the speaker's performance in relation to applicable theories of oral communication. Class size in these courses will be limited to thirty. Oral presentation may include public speaking, such as advocacy, information and expressive presentations, or student participation in debate or group discussions. Courses will include instruction and practice in effective listening techniques.

A-2. Written Communications (3 units)

Courses specifically designated to meet this requirement offer instruction in the composition of expository essays. Students are instructed in the fundamentals of usage, sentence structure, and essay structure. These courses develop, by suitable exercises and essay assignments, a general skill, applicable to any subject matter. Students may satisfy the requirement in this category by passing English 1A or an approved equivalent.

A-3. Critical Thinking (3 units)

In academic courses, students commonly engage in critical thinking. In courses meeting the criteria for inclusion in the Critical Thinking category, students not only engage in, but study about and consciously develop skill in critical thinking. Courses in this category shall be devoted to the pursuit of knowledge through logical analysis and the construction of argument. Instruction shall develop an understanding of logical relationships between premises and conclusion, and the ability to recognize the more common formal and informal fallacies. Throughout such courses, attention to logical processes and skills shall exceed attention, if any, to other content. Grading shall reflect this emphasis. The courses shall foster basic skills, applicable to a variety of academic subjects and to the intelligent fulfillment of such roles as citizen, consumer, leader, and moral agent. Such courses shall develop the following: 1) skill in evaluating the validity, strength, and relevance of arguments; 2) a sense of logical structure, of both inductive and deductive forms; 3) an awareness of uses and abuses of argument language, including connotation, ambiguity, and definition; 4) skill at handling a variety of arguments in a variety of contexts; 5) ability to argue fairly and to handle bias, emotion, and propaganda.

AREA B. THE PHYSICAL UNIVERSE AND ITS LIFE FORMS (12 units)

Note: At least one course from B-1 or B-2 must include a laboratory component (B-3).

B-1. Physical Science (3 units minimum)

Courses in this category shall be introductory or survey courses, and shall have no college level prerequisites (i.e., no prerequisites the student would not have been able to complete in high school, whether or not the student has actually done so). The courses are designed to transmit a knowledge and understanding of natural phenomena.

B-2. Life Forms (3 units minimum)

Courses in this category shall be introductory or survey courses, and shall have no college level prerequisites (i.e., no prerequisites the student would not have been able to complete in high school, whether or not the student has actually done so). The courses are designed to transmit a knowledge and understanding of natural phenomena.

B-3. Laboratory Component with B-1 or B-2

Laboratory components of B-1 and B-2 courses shall emphasize the learning of laboratory techniques and verification of facts and principles in the relevant physical science or life forms discipline; it shall involve at least two hours per week spent in the laboratory. The laboratory requirement may be satisfied by taking an approved course with an integrated laboratory requirement or by taking an approved combination of lecture and separate enrollment laboratory course. In the latter case the laboratory must be taken concurrently with or subsequent to the lecture course.

Courses in B-1, B-2 and B-3 shall:

  • emphasize general principles and concepts having a broad range of application, and not be restricted to specialized topics;
  • develop an understanding of the principles underlying and interrelating natural phenomena, including the foundations of our knowledge of living and non-living systems;
  • introduce students to one or more of the disciplines whose primary purpose is to acquire knowledge of the physical universe and its life forms rather than to apply existing knowledge; and
  • develop an appreciation of the methodologies of science, the requisite features of scientific endeavors, and the limitations of scientific inquiry.

B-4. Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative Reasoning (3 units minimum)

"The Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative Reasoning requirement shall be fulfilled by completion of a one-semester course in mathematics or statistics above the level of intermediate algebra, with a stated course prerequisite of intermediate algebra. Courses on the application of statistics to a single discipline may not be used to fulfill this requirement. An appropriate course in statistics must emphasize the mathematical bases of statistics, probability theory and estimation, application and interpretation, uses and misuses, and the analyses and criticism of statistical arguments in public discourse." (Intersegmental G.E. Transfer Curriculum, 7/30/90).

Courses in this category shall be introductory courses with no college level prerequisites (i.e., no prerequisites the student would not have been able to complete in high school, whether or not the student has actually done so).

These courses provide instruction in basic mathematical or logical concepts and the development of quantitative reasoning skills, and shall have general applicability in solving problems. They shall include the development of useful computational skills or some degree of competence in the analysis of arguments.

B-5. Further Studies in the Physical Sciences and Life Forms or Quantitative Reasoning

To satisfy the 12 unit requirement for Area B, students may take additional courses already listed in B-1, B-2, or B-4, or courses listed separately in this category (B-5) only.

Courses listed in this category need not be introductory courses and need not be as broad in scope as courses included in B-1, B-2, B-3, or B-4 (i.e., they may deal with a specialized topic). Courses in this category may have as prerequisites courses listed in B-1, B-2 or B-4 (or similar courses), and may build on or apply concepts and knowledge covered in those courses. Except as provided above, physical science and life forms courses in this category shall comply with the general course criteria specified for categories B-1, B-2 or B-3. Courses in quantitative reasoning shall not be limited to courses in mathematics and statistics, but shall comply with the general course criteria for category B-4, third paragraph.

AREA C. THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES (12 units)

  1. All courses in Area C, unless granted an exception as provided in paragraph 3 below, shall be infused with content, materials, readings, examples or assignments intended to develop an understanding and appreciation of the diversity of the human community and of the contributions and perspectives of women and of ethnic, religious, and other minorities.
  2. The course syllabus and/or justification submitted to the G.E. Course Review Committee for initial G.E. listing of the course, or, in the case of periodic review, continued G.E. listing, shall indicate how this requirement is met. Specifically, the course syllabus/justification shall identify how the diversity of the human community and the perspectives of women and of ethnic, religious or other minorities are included in the course, provide a rationale for the appropriateness of the methods/means of inclusion and specify the methods/means for evaluating the achievement of the objective of developing an understanding and appreciation for the contributions and perspectives of diverse human groups and of women, ethnic and religious or other minorities.
  3. Requests for exception to the requirement specified in paragraph 1 shall also be submitted to the G.E. Course Review Subcommittee which shall determine whether the justification provided warrants an exception.

C-1. World Civilizations (3 units)

Courses in this category shall deal with one or more of the major Western or non-Western civilizations that have had a significant direct influence on the modern world. They shall have an extensive historical perspective, covering a period of at least 500 years. Subject matter shall be broad in scope and develop a comprehensive understanding of the distinguishing characteristics of the civilizations studied. Courses shall not be restricted to a single aspect of a civilization's culture.

C-2. Introduction to the Arts (3 units minimum)

Courses in this category are to be introductory and shall have no prerequisites. They shall be broad in scope or survey in nature and shall have as a primary goal the development of a comprehensive understanding and appreciation of the heritage being studied. These courses are designed to transmit a knowledge of the Western and non-Western cultural heritage in the arts. Courses in this category shall be in the history or analysis of the art and will seek to enhance aesthetic appreciation and to give an understanding of the nature of a particular art form, or to study the principles on which aesthetic judgments are made.

C-3. Introduction to the Humanities (3 units minimum)

Courses in this category are to be introductory and shall have no prerequisites. They shall be broad in scope or survey in nature and shall have as a primary goal the development of a comprehensive understanding and appreciation of the heritage being studied. These courses are designed to transmit a knowledge of the Western or non-Western cultural heritage in the humanities. Courses in this category shall focus on ideas and values in the humanities and will aim to develop the ability to recognize the ideas and values of various cultures and traditions as expressed in their literature (whether in English or another language), philosophies or religions.

C-4. Further Studies in the Arts and Humanities

To satisfy the 12-unit requirement for Area C, students may take additional courses already listed in C-1, C-2, or C-3, or courses listed separately in this category (C-4).

Courses listed in this category need not be introductory courses and need not be as broad in scope as courses included in C-1, C-2, or C-3 (i.e., they may deal with a more specialized topic). Courses in this category may have as prerequisites courses listed in C-1, C-2, or C-3 (or similar courses), and may build on or apply concepts and knowledge covered in those courses. In other respects, courses in this category shall comply with the general criteria for courses in categories C-1, C-2, and C-3. Courses in the Arts and Humanities that have as their primary goal the development or application of skills (e.g., studio, performance, and creative writing courses) may be included in this category if they seek to develop aesthetic sensitivity through active participation in one of the arts or include a significant cultural component.

Foreign Languages

Foreign language courses may be included in Area C if they meet Area C subarea criteria.

In addition to completion of G.E. requirements in Area C, students must satisfy graduation requirements in foreign languages (see Section II E). Department/program requests for exceptions must be submitted to the G.E. Committee.

AREA D. THE INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIETY (15 units)

All courses in Area D, unless granted an exception as provided in paragraph three below, shall be infused with content, materials, readings, examples or assignments intended to develop an understanding and appreciation of the diversity of the human community and of the contributions and perspectives of women and of ethnic, religious, and other minorities.

The course syllabus and/or justification submitted to the G.E. Course Review Committee for initial G.E. listing of the course, or, in the case of periodic review, continued G.E. listing, shall indicate how this requirement is met. Specifically, the course syllabus/justification shall identify how the diversity of the human community and the perspectives of women and of ethnic, religious or other minorities are included in the course, provide a rationale for the appropriateness of the methods/means of inclusion and specify the methods/means for evaluating the achievement of the objective of developing an understanding and appreciation for the contributions and perspectives of diverse human groups and of women, ethnic and religious or other minorities.

Requests for exception to the requirement specified in paragraph one above shall be submitted to the G.E. Course Review Committee which shall determine whether the justification provided warrants an exception.

D-1. Foundations in Social and Behavioral Sciences/World Cultures (6 units minimum)

D-1a Foundations in Social and Behavioral Sciences (3-6 units)

Courses in this subcategory shall:

  • constitute an introduction to a social or behavioral science. The term "introduction" does not categorically exclude upper-division courses; however, if upper-division courses are accepted in this category, they may not require prerequisites nor consent of the instructor for enrollment, and shall be explicitly introductory in their course and catalog description;
  • communicate the unique perspective of one or more social or behavioral science disciplines in furthering our understanding of a broad range of human behavior;
  • develop an understanding of at least one of the methodologies of the social or behavioral sciences. Students should become aware of the ways in which source materials are used in the behavioral or social sciences and the sense in which objective knowledge may or may not be attained in these disciplines; and
  • be broad in that they focus on the larger context of society and/or human behavior rather than on an individual institution, social process, or segment of the population.

D-1b. World Cultures (0-3 units)

Courses in this subcategory should:

  • expose students to an analysis of political, social, and economic institutions of societies other than the United States. In the case of western or central Europe, a course should not be limited to a single country;
  • emphasize the "contemporary" nature of this category with significant attention to the post-1945 period;
  • be broad in scope and not limited to one institution or social process.

D-2. Major Social Issues of the Contemporary Era (3 units minimum)

Courses in this category are designed to transmit knowledge and understanding of one or two selected major issues confronting and dividing Americans today. Topics of world-wide concern may be included if their impact on domestic affairs is significant and extensive.

Courses in this category should:

  • impart knowledge of current information and materials as well as research methodology and techniques appropriate for the study of the issue in question;
  • examine various sides of the issue, critically study the strengths and weaknesses of supporting and refuting arguments, and present scholarly analyses of possible alternative solutions. A basic distinction is drawn between those courses which focus upon "issues" (and therefore may be appropriate for this category) and courses which focus upon the "individual"(and therefore may be considered more appropriate for the "Understanding Personal Development" category); and
  • address issues in the context of appropriate social science theories, methods, and concepts;
  • specifically identify topics within no more than two of the topic areas listed which will be considered in the course.

The selected topics will be reviewed every two years by the General Education Policies/Graduation Requirements Committee to determine their continued relevance to national concerns and priorities. Topics will be added or deleted (as appropriate) to maintain a list that reflects the major issues being debated in American society.

APPROVED TOPICS FOR CATEGORY D-2

Biomedical and health issues
Class
Crime
Discrimination
Education
Energy
Environment
Gender
Global Economy
Immigration
Military intervention abroad
Poverty
Race
Technology

D-3. American Institutions (Title 5, Section 40404 requirements) (6 units)*

Any course or examination which addresses the historical development of American institutions and ideals must include all of the subject matter elements identified in the following subparagraphs. Nothing contained herein is intended to prescribe the total content or structure of any course.

  • Significant events covering a minimum time span of approximately one hundred years occurring in the entire area now included in the United States of America, including the relationships of regions within that area and with external regions and powers as appropriate to the understanding of those events within the United States during the period under study.
  • The role of major ethnic and social groups in such events and the contexts in which the events have occurred.
  • The events presented within a framework which illustrates the continuity of the American experience and its derivation from other cultures including consideration of three or more of the following: politics, economics, social movements, and geography.

Any course or examination which addresses the Constitution of the United States, the operation of representative democratic government under that Constitution, and the process of California state and local government must address all of the subject matter elements identified in the following subparagraphs.

Nothing contained herein is intended to prescribe the total content or structure of any course.

  • The political philosophies of the framers of the Constitution and the nature and operation of United States political institutions and processes under that Constitution as amended and interpreted.
  • The rights and obligations of citizens in the political system established under the Constitution.
  • The Constitution of the State of California within the framework of the evolution of Federal-State relations and the nature and processes of State and local government under that Constitution.
  • Contemporary relationships of State and local government with the Federal government, the resolution of conflicts and the establishment of cooperative processes under the constitutions of both the State and nation, and the political processes involved.

*If a student passes a challenge examination in U.S. History or challenge examinations in U.S. Constitution and California State and Local Government, the student need not take a course in the area of the examination or an additional course in another part of Area D. However, since all students must have a minimum of 12 units in Area D (and 51 units total in General Education), any student who passes both challenge examinations must complete additional courses in Area D.

AREA E. UNDERSTANDING PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT (3 Units)

Courses in this category are designed to enhance the student's understanding of the development of the individual as an integrated physiological, psychological, and social being. Courses must include a study of how internal and external influences interact in human development and behavior within the context of the human life span. Three unit courses in this area may include an activity/skills component, but the activity/skills component is not to exceed one-third of the course content. No more than one unit of activity/skills coursework may be used to satisfy the Area E requirement.

Courses enhancing understanding of the self as a physiological, social, and psychological entity:

These courses are designed to promote critical self-understanding, and accordingly will involve consideration of such topics as individual behavior, the relation of the person to the social and natural environment, human sexuality, nutrition, health, stress, family, aging, and death.

Courses developing an art or a skill:

These courses are designed to promote the lifelong understanding and development of students as integrated physiological and psychological entities, through the acquisition of a recreational, a vocational, or artistic skill. The course proposal must specify how the activities or performances will contribute to understanding the personal development of an integrated individual.

RACE AND ETHNICITY IN AMERICAN SOCIETY (3 units which may overlap with one of the above categories)

At least three (3) units of coursework meeting the criteria specified below must be taken. These courses may also be used to satisfy category requirements. Courses in this category may be lower or upper division.

Courses approved for this category must meet the criteria for this category and of category C, D, or E in the General Education program. Courses in this category shall be designed to examine the culture, contributions and social experience of historically underrepresented ethnic/racial minority groups in the U.S. including, but not limited to, Asian American, African Americans, Mexican Americans and Native Americans. The content of the courses must focus on at least two of these groups or, if one group is the focus, evidence that the experiences of the group were compared and contrasted with those of another group is required. In addition, the courses shall include an analysis of concepts of ethnicity, ethnocentrism and racism and how they shape and explain the ethnic experience in the U.S. How factors such as race, class, gender, age and sexual orientation shape the ethnic experience in the U.S. should be examined.

WRITING INTENSIVE

(3 units of upper division courses in the major or G.E. must be taken in courses designated as Writing Intensive.)

The Writing Intensive requirement is a graduation requirement (see Section II G.)

SECTION II. COURSE/PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION WITH THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE

In addition to satisfying unit and distribution requirements of the General Education Program, students must satisfy specific course/proficiency requirements for graduation with the baccalaureate degree. While some of these graduation requirements may also satisfy General Education Program requirements (e.g., first semester composition), completion of G.E. unit and distribution requirements does not guarantee completion of the specified course/proficiency requirements. All students, including students who have completed the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC), must satisfy each of the course/proficiency requirements specified below for graduation with the baccalaureate degree.

A. American Institutions Requirements (Graduation Requirements in U.S. History, Constitution, and State and Local Government)

Demonstrated competencies in the subjects of U.S. History, Constitution, and State and Local Government are required for graduation. These requirements (often referred to as the "code" requirements) are required under the provisions of Title 5, Section 40404. These requirements may be satisfied by completing approved courses under Area D-3 of the University's G.E. Program (or equivalent courses taken at other institutions that meet criteria specified in Section I D-3) or by examinations administered by the Sac State History or Government Departments. In the University's G.E. Program, courses taken to satisfy these requirements may be used to satisfy Area D requirements. At selected community colleges, courses meeting these requirements may also be used to satisfy Area D requirements of their E.O. 595 G.E. transfer program. Courses meeting these requirements may not be used to satisfy Social and Behavioral Sciences Subject Area requirements of the IGETC. Students completing the IGETC must satisfy the American Institutions requirements by taking additional approved courses prior to or following transfer or by examination at Sac State. Courses meeting these requirements taken at Sac State by G.E.- certified transfer students may be used to satisfy portions of the G.E. residence requirement and, in the case of approved upper division courses, the G.E. upper division unit requirement.

B. Course/Proficiency Requirements in Writing

1.

All students must complete a first semester college composition course (English lA or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher. Courses meeting this requirement also satisfy the Area A-2 requirement of the University's G.E. Program and the IGETC English Communication Subject Area requirement.

2. Second Semester Composition Requirement

a.

Course Requirement

All students, including students who have completed the IGETC shall be required to complete a second semester composition course with a C- grade or better. The requirement is a graduation requirement, not a G.E. requirement. Composition/critical thinking courses taken to satisfy CSU G.E. Breadth Requirements or IGETC requirements do not necessarily satisfy the requirement. Second semester composition courses taken at other institutions may satisfy the requirement if they are determined by the Sac State English Department to be equivalent.

b. Criteria for Courses Satisfying the Requirement

Courses meeting the requirement shall normally be lower division courses and shall focus on composition writing and on reading. Generally, the course shall continue instruction and practice in the kinds of writing tasks introduced in English lA and shall include readings in and writings based on multicultural literature. Course grades shall be assigned primarily on the student's demonstrated writing ability. The curriculum of the course shall emphasize the following:

  • a review of composition principles
  • continued work on the thesis, organization, development
  • continued work on revision
  • close reading of texts
  • summarizing texts in writing
  • reviewing texts in writing
  • evaluating texts in writing
  • integrating texts of others into students' own prose
  • constructing an argument, martialling evidence, persuading
  • research techniques
  • writing longer papers than are required in lA
  • refining style
  • writing precisely and concisely
  • improving use of language

C.

Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (Writing Proficiency Examination)

1.

Under the provisions of E.O. 665 effective Fall 1998, "All students subject to the degree requirements of the 1977-78 or subsequent general catalogs must demonstrate competence in writing skills at the upper division level as a requirement for the baccalaureate degree." While the requirement is a systemwide requirement (identified by the appellation "Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR)", campuses are provided some latitude in determining how the requirement is to be met.

E.O. 665 specifies the following: "Certification of graduation writing proficiency is an all-campus responsibility. Certification may rely on evidence of writing ability in written coursework, essay examinations or other measures of student writing competence. Measures may be developed which best fit individual campus needs. However, certification by examination shall include a common essay written and evaluated under controlled conditions and scored by a least two faculty readers."

2.

Sac State Campus Policy (Writing Proficiency Examination)

Sac State has chosen the examination option for certification of writing proficiency. The University Policy on Writing Proficiency is provided below.

D.

Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement Policy

1. Writing Proficiency Requirement

a.

Candidates for the baccalaureate degree* will be required to demonstrate proficiency in writing.

b. The requirement applies to all students subject to the degree requirements of the 1977-78 or subsequent catalogs.

*The writing proficiency requirement also applies to candidates for a second bachelor's degree and graduate students.

2. Writing Proficiency Examination

a. Students must satisfy the requirement by passing the Writing Proficiency Examination. The examination will be offered at least once each semester.

b. The Writing Proficiency Examination is to be taken before the student completes 74 units, or if a student enters the University at a later stage in his or her career, in the first semester of attendance.

c. Each student taking the examination will have two and a half hours to write a single essay. Essay topics can be dealt with on the basis of common knowledge.

d. Each essay will be evaluated by two readers, and by a third if the first two disagree.

e. The readers will be full- and part-time faculty members chosen by the English Composition Committee.

f. Any student who fails the Writing Proficiency Examination two times must take English 109.

3. Responsibility for administering the writing proficiency requirement shall be assigned to the English Department. Necessary budgetary support for the operation of the program shall be included in the budget of the English Department.

4. The English Department shall recommend to the Faculty Senate further policies to ensure the effectiveness of the University's writing proficiency requirement.

E. Foreign Language Requirements

1.

Foreign Language Graduation Requirement

All students graduating from California State University, Sacramento with a baccalaureate degree must meet a foreign language graduation requirement. Substitutions for students with disabilities that affect performance in foreign languages are prescribed in Section 3. Programs leading to the Bachelor of Science degree may request an exemption from the foreign language proficiency requirement on the basis of high unit requirements in the major.

BEFORE YOU ENROLL AT THE UNIVERSITY

The foreign language requirement may be met by any one of the following:

  • Completion of the third year of a foreign language in high school (grade of C- or better).
  • Graduation from a secondary school where the language of instruction was not English.
  • Advanced Placement Foreign Language Examination scores of 3, 4 or 5.
  • Completion of the second semester level of a foreign language at a community college or university with a grade of "C-" or better.
AFTER YOU ENROLL AT THE UNIVERSITY

If the Sac State foreign language graduation requirement has not been completed before you enroll, you must meet it by completing one of the following:

  • Complete the second semester or equivalent (1B) of a college-level language course (with a grade of "C-" or better). Language courses available at Sac State include: American Sign Language (contact the Department of Special Education [EUR-437, 278-6622] for information), Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Russian and Spanish.
  • Pass intermediate-level tests in two of four skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. One of the tests you pass must be in reading or writing.
  • Pass an advanced-level proficiency test in reading. Contact the department of Foreign Languages (MRP-2051) for further information.

Note: CSU/Sac State International Programs also offer instruction abroad in Danish, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin, Russian, Shona, Spanish and Swedish. For more information contact the Office of International Programs (LSN-2304, 278-6686).

2. Equivalency Options

Students may establish equivalency for the foreign language graduation proficiency requirement by providing evidence through transcripts or other CSU admissions documents that their secondary education was completed in a school where the language of instruction was not English.

3. Policy on Substitution for Foreign Language Graduation Requirements

Students who have acquired brain injury, language disabilities due to a specific learning disability, are deaf, hard of hearing, or speech impaired may, on the recommendation of the director of Services to Students with Disabilities (or designee), satisfy the basic foreign language graduation requirement as follows:

  • complete the usual basic foreign language graduation requirement (three years high school or one year college of one foreign language, or equivalent) with the necessary support services (e.g., readers, interpreters, tutoring, and testing accommodations);
  • pass a Foreign Language Department test that demonstrates second semester competency in reading or writing; or
  • if students who have an acquired brain injury or a language disability due to a specific learning disability are unable to satisfy one of the above options, then they may satisfy the basic foreign language graduation requirement by completing (with a grade of C- or higher) a course approved by the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies that deepens a student's cultural understanding.

F.

Race and Ethnicity in American Society Requirement

All students must complete a three-unit course designated as meeting the Race and Ethnicity in American Society requirement. Courses meeting this requirement may also be used to satisfy the University's G.E. Area requirements. Transfer students, including students with certified completion of the lower division CSU G.E. Breadth Requirement and the IGETC, shall be held to this requirement.

Transfer students may satisfy this requirement at a community college, upon completion of an appropriate course. Courses meeting this requirement taken at Sac State by G.E.-certified students may be used to satisfy portions of the G.E. residence requirement and, in the case of approved upper division courses, the G.E. upper division unit requirement.

G.

Writing Intensive Requirement

1. Course Requirement

Three units of upper division courses in the major or G.E. must be taken in courses designated as Writing Intensive. The Writing Intensive requirement is a graduation requirement that can be satisfied in one of three ways: a) Departments/programs may specify that the Writing Intensive requirement must be met in the major; or, b) In cases where the requirement is not specified as required in the major, the Department may allow students to take a Writing Intensive course in the major. Departments/programs wishing to have courses approved as Writing Intensive must submit the course syllabus to the General Education Course Review Subcommittee which shall review and approve the course for listing as Writing Intensive. c) If a student is not allowed or required to take the Writing Intensive course in the major, the student must take the course from the list of approved G.E. courses.

2. Writing Intensive Course Criteria

Courses designated as Writing Intensive build on the basic skills and knowledge acquired by students in their foundation courses in General Education or the major. These courses are to expand students' knowledge by examining complex issues and they are to advance students' abilities to reason logically and to write clearly in prose. The English Composition (English 1A or equivalent) and Critical Thinking courses (GE Area A-3) as well as the Writing Proficiency Examination are prerequisites to all Writing Intensive courses. Some Writing Intensive courses listed in the General Education program may explore more specialized topics and may thus require prerequisites, but most are to be courses of a broader nature and generally require no formal preparation in the discipline offering the course. Writing Intensive courses not in the General Education Program may also have prerequisites, but they should focus on the broad and general rather than the more technical areas of a discipline.

Students are required to write not less than 5,000 words of clear and logical prose in Writing Intensive courses. An important aspect of the task of instructors is working actively with students to sharpen their analytical abilities and to improve their writing styles. Simple narrative and diary-type writing will not fulfill the requirement.

Writing assignments must be spread out over the entire semester (at least a total of 3,000 words of writing assignments must be due before the last two weeks of instruction). Instructors must provide timely responses and evaluations of each writing assignment, and evaluations and comments must not only be about the subject matter content but address the student's writing skills.

SECTION III. REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO THE G.E. PROGRAM AND COURSE / PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION WITH THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE

A.

G.E. Program Regulations

1. Breadth - Students are allowed to use no more than nine units from their major field to meet General Education requirements. There is no restriction on the overlap of courses between GE and courses taken for a minor.

2.

Upper Division Unit Requirement

Distribution - Systemwide policy (E.O. 595) specifies that at least nine of the total number of semester units required in the General Education Program must be upper division level. At Sac State, all students, including transfer students who have completed the intersegmental transfer curriculum (IGETC), may select coursework from any area of the G.E. Program to satisfy this requirement.

Prerequisites - All upper division courses approved for G.E. listing require at least second semester sophomore standing and completion of all Area A requirements as prerequisites for enrollment.

3.

Area D Regulations

Title 5, Section 40404 requirements: see Section II A.

4.

Grade Point Requirements

a. A 2.00 grade point average must be achieved in all courses included in the General Education Program.
b. Each course taken in Area A (Basic Subjects) must be completed with a grade of C- or higher.
c. Courses taken to satisfy category B-4 (Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative Reasoning) must be completed with a grade of C- or higher.

B.

Sequencing Regulations

1. Course Placement Testing and Enrollment Requirements for Entering Students

Students not otherwise exempt from EPT/EDT and ELM testing requirements cannot enroll in any classes until the tests are taken and scored. Students may not enroll in classes other than English 1A/2B, B-4 quantitative reasoning or appropriate remedial courses, subsequent to the first semester unless they have completed or are enrolled in the English 1A/2B and the required quantitative reasoning course or are enrolled in the courses needed to progress toward completion of those requirements.

2. Prerequisites to Upper Division G.E. Courses - All upper division courses approved for G.E. listing must require at least second semester sophomore standing and completion of all Area A requirements.

C.

Writing Intensive Regulations

For graduation with the baccalaureate degree, at least three units of upper-division courses in the major or G.E. must be taken in courses specially designated as Writing Intensive.

Students (a) must have completed the English Composition (A-2) and the Critical Thinking (A-3) categories and (b) must have a passing score on the Writing Proficiency Examination or have successfully completed English 109 before enrolling in a Writing Intensive course.

D.

Transfer Regulations

1. Transfer students with IGETC or CSU G.E. Breadth Requirement certification are to meet the additional requirements specified by Title 5 and the University's course/proficiency requirements for graduation with the baccalaureate degree (see Section II).

2. Transfer students, including those who have completed the intersegmental transfer program (IGETC), shall be held to satisfying the race and ethnicity requirement. Transfer students who enter under 1992 or subsequent catalog rights shall also be held to the second semester composition and foreign language graduation requirements.

3. At least nine (9) units of G.E. must be taken in residence at Sac State.

4. To ensure that courses taken at other institutions meet the established general education criteria, the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies and the Articulation Officer shall develop a system of regular consultation on General Education with area community colleges.

As part of the pattern of consultation, the Articulation Officer shall request meetings of area community college administrators and faculty with Sac Stateadministrators and faculty regarding the University's Race and Ethnicity in American Society requirement and and other GE issues. Among other goals, these meetings will do the following:

  • inform community colleges of the intent and criteria used to evaluate courses proposed for the Race and Ethnicity requirement at Sac State;
  • offer to work with community colleges in developing or selecting courses;
  • request that area community colleges send course information (catalog description, syllabus, etc.) on any course identified as meeting our requirements to the Articulation Officer; and
  • inform community colleges that Sac State wishes to work in a collegial environment but that it might object to the listing of a course if the University's Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies has serious reservations.
The Articulation Officer shall inform the other California Community Colleges of the Sac State requirements and inform them that their students, upon matriculation at Sac State, will be able to request (with documentation) that an appropriate course be reviewed for acceptance for equivalency to the University's requirement

5. Lower division transfer students who were not eligible for admission as freshmen must satisfy G.E. requirements in oral communication (A-1), written communication (A-2), critical thinking (A-3), and quantitative reasoning (B-4) prior to transfer.

6. All upper division transfer students must satisfy G.E. requirements in oral communication (A-1), written communication (A-2), critical thinking (A-3), and quantitative reasoning (B-4) prior to transfer (EO 665).

SECTION IV. UNIVERSITY COMMITTEE RESPONSIBILITIES RELATED TO THE G.E. PROGRAM AND OTHER UNIVERSITY WIDE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

A. General Education Committee--Membership and Charge

Consistent with CSU regulations, particularly EO 595, the University shall establish the aims, distribution of units, total number of units, and the administrative structure of the General Education Policies/Graduation Requirements Program. The General Education Policies/Graduation Requirements Committee may propose policy for consideration by the Faculty Senate and the President. In addition, the General Education Policies/Graduation Requirements Committee may propose policy on other university-wide degree requirements.

1. Membership

The General Education Graduation Policies Committee is a standing committee of the Faculty Senate. Its membership shall be composed of an appropriate academic administrator designated by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, as a non-voting ex officio member; eight at-large faculty members appointed by the Faculty Senate; one senator elected by the Faculty Senate; one Faculty Senator Executive Committee member who is the chair; one librarian or student services professional, and one staff person; and one student. Appointed faculty members should also be chosen, as often as possible, from departments not otherwise represented on the committee.

The Faculty Senate may select replacement members to serve until the next annual election. The terms of senator will coincide with the senator's term in the Senate. The liaison member will have a one year term.

2. Committee Responsibilities

a. Recommends changes in the G.E. Program as well as changes in other non-major degree requirements to the Faculty Senate.

b. Makes recommendations to the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies on general goals related to resource allocation and administrative procedure in the areas of student orientation and advising, special tutorial and remedial course offerings, student and faculty awareness of the G.E. Program, diagnostic testing, outcome assessment and any other university non-major graduation requirements.

c. Makes recommendations to the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies concerning the desirability of seeking future increases or decreases in section offerings by area, based on program objectives and perceived student needs. Outcome assessment instruments, if appropriate and reliable, should be among the criteria used in making these kinds of recommendations.

d. Hears appeals on course listings or reviews decisions by the Course Review Subcommittee and may recommend revised action to the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies or the Vice President for Academic Affairs as specified in Section IV D-4.

e. Proposes to the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies and reviews with the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies studies, research and research agendas relating to all aspects of G.E.

f. Monitors (through liaison membership and/or annual reports) the procedures and criteria used by other faculty committees (such as the G.E. Course Review Subcommittee and University Reading and Writing Subcommittee) or departments (e.g., Department of Foreign Languages and the English Department) which may take actions which substantially affect course offerings in the G.E. Program or other non-major graduation requirements, to ensure that these conform to existing policies and procedures, the implementation of which are the responsibility of the General Education Policies/Graduation Requirements Committee. Recommendations for changes in the procedures are to be made to that committee or to the appropriate constituting authority for the committee.

g. Overseas G.E. course Assessment.

B. General Education Course Review Subcommittee

1. Charge

A G.E. Course Review Subcommittee shall be established which shall have primary responsibility for determining which courses shall be included in the G.E. Program. Specifically, the charge of the Committee shall be as follows:

  • development of definitions and evaluation standards pertaining to area criteria;
  • evaluation of courses for G.E. listing;
  • approval of courses for G.E. listing;
  • periodic review of area or subarea criteria, definitions and evaluation standards; and
  • periodic review of courses.
2. Membership

The G.E. Course Review Subcommittee shall have the following membership:

One at-large faculty member elected by each College and one faculty member from each College Curriculum committee. 14 total members elected to staggered three-year terms. The Director of General Education is a non voting ex-officio member. The GEP/GRC will appoint a non-voting member from the GEP/GRC. (FS 98-34)

C. Policy on Selection and Review of General Education Courses

1. The statement of G.E. rationale and objectives shall inform the design and instructional goals of G.E. courses and shall inform the course review and approval process for inclusion of courses in the program.

2. The GEP/GRC Committee and other committees, departments, or groups, as appropriate, may propose criteria to the Faculty Senate based on the "Statement of Rationale and Objectives of the G.E. Program" for all categories/requirements of the G.E. Program.

3. The Faculty Senate shall forward approved criteria to the General Education Course Review Subcommittee which shall have responsibility for recommending to the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies courses for listing in the G.E. Program (in accordance with the policy on Procedures for Listing of Courses for G.E. Listing, Section IV D).

4. In accordance with procedures specified in the Policy on Procedures for Review of Courses for G.E. Listing, Section IV D, departments may appeal a decision of the G.E. Course Review Subcommittee or the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies to the General Education Policies/Graduation Requirements Committee.

5. Under procedures developed by the GEP/GRC and approved by the Faculty Senate, G.E. courses and area criteria will be reviewed periodically (see Section IV E on Procedures for Periodic Review of G.E. Courses).

D. Procedures for Listing Courses in the General Education Program

1. Definitions and Evaluation Standards

The G.E. Course Review Subcommittee shall develop, as necessary, definitions and evaluation standards that further explicate and translate area criteria into operational terms. Definitions and evaluation standards shall normally take the form of a "Criteria Check List" which shall be used as the basis for determining whether or not a course shall be listed in the G.E. Program. Departments submitting courses shall be provided copies of criteria check lists and all other information on which course approval shall be based.

Definitions and evaluation standards developed by the G.E. Course Review Subcommittee shall be subject to modification and approval by the University General Education Policies/Graduation Requirements Committee. Disagreement between committees or between a committee and the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies regarding the intent of provisions of the G.E. program shall be brought to the attention of the Faculty Senate.

2. Course Submission Procedures

a) The Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies, in consultation with the G.E. Course Review Subcommittee, shall establish deadlines for submission of courses to be considered for listing in the G.E. Program.

b) The G.E. Course Review Subcommittee shall develop guidelines and necessary forms for departmental requests for course listing in the G.E. Program, which shall include a requirement for departmental justification for listing of the course in a particular area.

c) All courses submitted for G.E. listing must be courses that have been approved through the regular course approval process (i.e., approved by the home department, school committees, school dean, University Curriculum Committee and Vice President for Academic Affairs) for inclusion in the University's catalog of course offerings.

3. Course Review and Approval Procedures

a) Each semester, the G.E. Course Review Subcommittee shall establish subcommittees from its voting membership to conduct initial reviews of courses submitted for G.E. listing in the areas of subcommittee concern. A minimum of five Area subcommittees shall be established (at least one for each of the G.E. Areas A - E). In addition, separate subcommittees may be established for supervenient requirements (e.g., Race and Ethnicity, Writing Intensive). Each subcommittee shall consist of no fewer than three voting members.

b) Area Subcommittees shall evaluate courses using the approved "Criteria Check List" (see Section IV. D1). In its deliberations, the subcommittee may seek the assistance of advisors/consultants with expertise in the area and may invite departments that submit courses to attend a meeting or provide additional written information to assist in understanding the course proposal and/or how the course meets specified criteria and standards. Based on its evaluation, the Area Subcommittee shall make a recommendation to the full Subcommittee on whether or not a course should be listed and shall provide the Subcommittee justification for the recommendation. Members of the department submitting the course, including any subcommittee member who is a member of that department, shall be excused from a meeting or portion of a meeting during which the subcommittee makes it recommendation decision.

c) The G.E. Course Review Subcommittee, considering the recommendation of the appropriate area Subcommittee, shall decide whether or not a course shall be listed in the G.E. Program. The Subcommittee's decision shall be conveyed to the submitting department by the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies. In the case of a negative decision, the Subcommittee shall state its reasons in writing.

d) Ordinarily, G.E. Course Review Subcommittee decisions to list a course in the G.E. Program shall be accepted by the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies who shall convey the decision to the submitting department.

4. Appeal Process

a) Departments may appeal actions of the G.E. Course Review Subcommittee and/or the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies to the University General Education Policies/Graduation Requirements Committee. Appeals may be made by:
  • the department which proposed its course(s) for inclusion in the G.E. Program and was denied by the G.E. Course Review Subcommittee and/or the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies; or
  • departments, other than the department whose course was approved in the review process, on the ground that the approved course does not comply with the criteria.

b) The department making the appeal must submit its reasons in writing to the General Education Policies/Graduation Requirements Committee. The General Education Policies/Graduation Requirements Committee shall also be provided a copy of the G.E. Course Review Subcommittee's and/or Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies's reasons for the original decision.

c) A meeting of the General Education Policies/Graduation Requirements Committee shall be held to which a representative of the appealing department, the G.E. Course Review Subcommittee and the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies shall be invited to discuss the matter. In the case of an appeal initiated by a department other than the department offering the course, the latter shall also be invited. Additional meetings of this type may be called by the General Education Policies/Graduation Requirements Committee if required. The General Education Policies/Graduation Requirements Committee shall not act on appeals in the presence of designated representatives of the appealing department, the G.E. Course Review Subcommittee or the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies. The General Education Policies/Graduation Requirements Committee member who serves as the General Education Policies/Graduation Requirements Committee liaison to the G.E. Course Review Subcommittee and any member of the General Education Policies/Graduation Requirements Committee who is a member of the appealing department shall be excused from a meeting or portion of a meeting during which an appeal is to be decided. In the case of an appeal initiated by a department other than the department offering the course, the latter shall also be excused. The decision of the General Education Policies/Graduation Requirements Committee and its reasons shall be placed in writing and sent to appropriate individuals.

E. Procedures for Periodic Review of General Education Courses

1. Every five years there will be a comprehensive review of courses in G.E. for compliance to area criteria.

2. The Comprehensive Review of General Education Areas

Departments will report to the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies on each of their offerings in the Area being reviewed. The department shall submit course syllabi, sample assignments, and student course assessment data for all sections of G.E. courses offered in the most recent semester preceding the review. If concerns are raised by the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies following review of the above, the department shall be asked to address those concerns.

Departmental reports will be forwarded by the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies to the G. E. Course Review Subcommittee, which in accordance with the policy on Procedures for Review of Courses for G.E. Listing (Section IV D), will review all courses listed in the area for fidelity to approved standards and criteria.

The G.E. Course Review Subcommittee will recommend continuation or termination of listing for each of the courses under review to the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies. Appeals may be filed in accordance with the policy on Procedures for Review of Courses for G.E. Listing (Section IV D). Final authority for the continuation or termination of listings rests with the G.E. Policies/Graduation Requirements Committee. The GEP/GRC shall review the completed list of courses to be continued and terminated. Following the review of courses the G.E. Committee will formally consider the overall condition of the area and, if appropriate, make recommendations for change to the Faculty Senate.