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Equity-minded Inclusive Teaching Fall 2023 Workshop Schedule

Equity-minded inclusive teaching strategies intentionally engage all students in learning while understanding their varied experiences, backgrounds, and knowledge. These strategies might also involve critically interrogating your curriculum and teaching practices (for example, how you structure your syllabus, engage students with your content, make class materials accessible, how you grade, etc).

Join us for the Fall 2023 faculty-led workshops that demonstrate specific strategies to support our students inclusively and equitably.

Canon Fire! Critically Interrogating

What We Teach and Why Through an Antiracist Lens

When:

Option 1: Tuesday 10/3 from 3 - 5pm | In-Person | AIRC 3005

RSVP | In Person Event

Option 2: Friday 10/6 from noon to 2pm | Virtually on Zoom

RSVP | Virtual Event on Zoom

For questions about accessibility or to request reasonable accommodations, please contact Som Sayasone at ctl@csus.edu at least five (5) business days in advance or as soon as possible. You can also complete our CTL Event Accommodation Request Form.

Abstract:

Michelangelo, Donatello, Raphael, Leonardo…. Until recently, it was established wisdom that any survey of art history was doing students a grave disservice if it did not include multiple works of art by these venerable Italian Renaissance artists. But if an instructor did not include, for example, the architecture of Mimar Sinan, the prolific architect responsible for more than three hundred buildings in the Ottoman Empire, no one would bat an eye.

This is not unique to art history; teaching in many disciplines, such as music history, literature, humanities, and philosophy among many others, is often structured around a canon. While the idea of a discipline having a common core of authors or texts that are considered pedagogically and culturally valuable is not inherently bad, the trouble with canons is that they were shaped via institutions that were entangled with imperialism, colonialism, racism, and other forms of oppression and exclusion.

This workshop is designed to help instructors in any discipline where their teaching is affected by the existence of some kind of canon.

Biography:

Rachel Miller is an Associate Professor of Art History and the Assistant Chair of the Art Department. At Sacramento State, she teaches courses on ancient, medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque art, using teaching methods that place European art in a broader global context and decolonize European art’s traditional normative position in the canon of art history.

Along with her colleague, Professor Mya Dosch, she has received funding from the College of Arts and Letters to redesign the main art history survey sequence from a European survey to a global survey of art. In 2022, Professor Miller and Professor Dosch received funding from the Office of Undergraduate Studies to address high DFW rates in lower-division art history courses.

Professor Miller has presented papers and workshops on art history pedagogy and organized pedagogy panels at the College Art Association and the Renaissance Society of America annual conferences. She has written on pedagogy for the Sixteenth-Century Society Journal and Art History Teaching Resources.

Professor Miller also serves as a Faculty Mentor at the Wikipedia Education Foundation, guiding instructors who are using Wikipedia editing projects in their courses for the first time.

Inclusive Teaching Practices in a Post-COVID Climate

When:

Option 1: Tuesday 10/17 from 3 - 5pm | In-Person | AIRC 3005

RSVP | In Person Event

Option 2: Friday 10/20 from noon to 2pm | Virtually on Zoom

RSVP | Virtual Event on Zoom

For questions about accessibility or to request reasonable accommodations, please contact Som Sayasone at ctl@csus.edu at least five (5) business days in advance or as soon as possible. You can also complete our CTL Event Accommodation Request Form.

Abstract:

The workshop will review various challenges experienced by a diverse university student body following a post-COVID transition back to in-person instruction. Nationally, students are experiencing increased difficulty with class attendance, engagement, sense of belonging, and overall mental health. These factors, and more, are negatively impacting student retention, progress to degree, and overall student success (Bulman & Fairlie, 2022).

University instructors are experiencing a rapidly changing classroom climate, have increased demands on their time, and are challenged by steep learning curves, as well as new and diverse student needs. Similar to healthcare professionals and K-12 teachers, university instructors are experiencing burnout and compassion fatigue at alarming rates, forcing many to leave fields they are passionate about (Pressley & Ha, 2021; Saladino, Auriemma, & Campinoti, 2022).

The workshop aims to not only recognize student needs and concerns, but also introduces practices that can encourage and promote student voices in the classroom, increase self-advocacy, and encourage students to re-engage in their success.

Using small and large group discussions and sample case studies, participants will identify various opportunities to practice increasing student engagement, inclusion, and success, while better managing their own risks for burnout. Attendees are encouraged to share individual challenges they have experienced in their courses.

Biography of Facilitator:

Aishah Y. Patterson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. She joined the department in 2017 and provides graduate and undergraduate instruction in areas of voice and vocal pathologies, fluency, and medical-based communication disorders.

As a licensed and certified Speech-Language Pathologist, she possesses nearly 20 years of clinical experience across the life-span and supports the clinical training of graduate students in the campus Language, Speech and Hearing Center. Dr. Patterson’s research expertise is in the area of fluency and the use of salivary sampling to assess the physiological stress response in school-age children who stutter.

Having served as a faculty advisor in the Student Success Center and Critical Student Success Faculty Fellow for the College of Health and Human Services, she is staunchly student centered and excited by teaching. Dr. Patterson completed her Ph.D. in Speech and Hearing Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2009 and is a Windy City native.

The Public Exam an Inclusive Approach to Summative Assessment

When:

Option 1: Tuesday 11/14 from 10:30 am – 11:45pm | In-Person | AIRC 3005

RSVP | In Person Event

Option 2: Friday 11/17 from noon to 2pm | Virtually on Zoom

RSVP | Virtual Event on Zoom

For questions about accessibility or to request reasonable accommodations, please contact Som Sayasone at ctl@csus.edu at least five (5) business days in advance or as soon as possible. You can also complete our CTL Event Accommodation Request Form.

Abstract

A public exam takes study guides or sample exams one step further: instructors provide the actual exam ahead of time but redact strategic portions. Students take a non-redacted version in class, like a normal exam. This approach can reduce anxiety, promote deep learning, and eliminate barriers for students who may need more time to read and digest the instructions/question prompts on a test.

In the workshop, we will include examples, tips for effectively using the technique, time to practice writing public exams, and an opportunity for feedback. We encourage you to bring an existing exam or questions you would like to try converting!

Biography:

Cathy Ishikawa (Dept. of Biological Sciences and Interim Co-Director of the Center for Science and Math Success) has been experimenting with inclusive teaching practices since 1996, and started leading TA and faculty professional development workshops in 1998.

She recently has been helping faculty design and implement course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) and project-based learning through National Science Foundation-sponsored projects at Sacramento State (SIRIUS II, Project-ACE), Chico State, and Virginia Union University.

In addition to using active learning to promote deeper student thinking, she has been experimenting with more equitable grading practices in her own classes.

Kimberly Mulligan is an associate professor in the Department of Biological Sciences. In both the classroom and her research program, she has been a practitioner of inclusive teaching and mentoring practices since being hired at Sac State in 2015.

She participated in the National Science Foundation Inclusive Teaching Project, disseminated ideas on fostering inclusion, equity, and social justice in academia at professional STEM societies, and facilitated multiple professional learning communities focused on equity and inclusion in the classroom.

For her efforts aimed at advancing equity and inclusion, she has received the Sac State Multicultural Center’s Educational Advocacy Award, the Sac State Science Educational Equity Mentor of the Year Award, and the yearly College of NSM Outstanding Faculty Award for Teaching.